CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 8 of 8

_id 8c66
authors Brooks, Frederick P. Jr., Ouh-Young,Ming and Batter, James J. (et al)
year 1990
title Project GROPE - Haptic Displays for Scientific Visualization
source SIGGRAPH '90 Conference Proceedings August, 1990. vol. 24 ; no. 4: pp. 177-185 : ill. (some col.). includes bibliography.
summary A project to develop a haptic and display for 6-D force fields of interacting protein molecules was began in 1967. The authors approached it in four stages: a 2-D system, a 3-D system tested with a simple task, a 6-D system tested with a simple task, and a full 6-D molecular docking system, which was the initial goal. This paper summarize the entire project, the four systems, the evaluation experiments, the results, and the authors observations
keywords user interface, computer graphics, visualization, virtual reality
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

_id ascaad2010_279
id ascaad2010_279
authors Celani, G.; L. Medrano; J. Spinelli
year 2010
title Unicamp 2030
source CAAD - Cities - Sustainability [5th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2010 / ISBN 978-1-907349-02-7], Fez (Morocco), 19-21 October 2010, pp. 279-286
summary The state university of Campinas, Unicamp, is a public university in upstate São Paulo, Brazil, ranked the second best in the country. It was founded in 1966, and its main campus started to be built in 1967, in the suburbs of Campinas, nowadays a two-million people city. The area of the campus is almost 3 million square meters (300 hectares), with a total built area of 522.000 m2 and a population of 40 thousand people - 30 thousand students, 2 thousand faculty members and almost 8 thousand staff members. The campus’ gross population density is 133 people per hectare. Less than 6% of the total campus area is presently occupied. The design of Unicamp's campus is based on concepts that were typical of the modern movement, with reminiscences of corbusian urbanism, in which preference is given to cars and buildings are spread apart on the territory, with little concern to the circulation of pedestrians. The standard building type that has been built on campus since the 1970's is based on non-recyclable materials, and has a poor thermal performance. Unicamp is expected to double its number of students by the year 2030. The campus density is thus expected to grow from 600 people per hectare to almost 1,000 people per hectare. The need to construct new buildings is seen as an opportunity to correct certain characteristics of the campus that are now seen as mistakes, according to sustainability principles. This paper describes a set of proposals targeting the increase of the campus' density in a sustainable way. The plan also aims at increasing the quality of life on campus and diminishing its impact on the environment. The main targets are: - Reducing the average temperature by 2oC; - Reducing the average displacement time by 15 minutes; - Increasing the campus' density by 100%; - Reducing the CO2 emissions by 50%. // In order to achieve these goals, the following actions have been proposed: Developing a new standard building for the university, incorporating sustainability issues, such as the use of renewable and/or recyclable materials, the installation of rainwater storage tanks, the use of natural ventilation for cooling, sitting the buildings in such a way to decrease thermal gain, and other issues that are required for sustainable buildings' international certifications. To assess the performance of the new standard building, different simulation software were used, such as CFD for checking ventilation, light simulation software to assess energy consumption, and so on. 1. Filling up under-utilized urban areas in the campus with new buildings, to make better use of unused infrastructure and decrease the distance between buildings. 2. Proposing new bicycle paths in and outside campus, and proposing changes in the existing bicycle path to improve its safety. 3. Developing a landscape design plan that aims at creating shaded pedestrian and bicycle passageways.
series ASCAAD
email medrano@fec.unicamp.br
last changed 2011/03/01 06:36

_id e3d1
authors Dodge, Richard
year 1998
title What a Difference a Tool Makes:The Evolution of a Computer Design Studio
source Computerised Craftsmanship [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Paris (France) 24-26 September 1998
summary What a Difference a Tool Makes : discoveries made during the evolution of the Advanced Design Studio (a.k.a. 'working drawings') at the University of Texas at Austin since the time this core course was switched to computers, when student design teams were provided with computers and required to use them for design and presentation. Covers the period from the course?s inception in 1991 to the present, during which the course has been under the continuing aegis of Professor Richard Dodge, who has taught design since 1967. Contrapuntal presentation by Professor Dodge and co-instructor and former student Marla Smith: what was done, what worked, and what went wrong. Discusses students, faculty, hardware, software, design problems assigned, and the most educational computer-related catastrophes.
series eCAADe
more http://www.paris-valdemarne.archi.fr/archive/ecaade98/html/04dodge/index.htm
last changed 1998/09/26 08:44

_id ca47
authors Lee, Shu Wan
year 1996
title A Cognitive Approach to Architectural Style Several Characteristics of Design Thinking in Architecture
source CAADRIA ‘96 [Proceedings of The First Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 9627-75-703-9] Hong Kong (Hong Kong) 25-27 April 1996, pp. 223-226
summary Designing is a complicated human behaviour and method, and is often treated as a mysterious "black box” operation in human mind. In the early period as for theory-studying of design thinking, the way of thinking that the researchers took were mostly descriptive discussions. Therefore, they lacked direct and empirical evidence although those studies provided significant exploration of design thinking (Wang, 1995). In recent years as for the study of cognitive science, they have tried to make design "glass box”. That is to try to make the thinking processes embedded in designers publicized. That is also to externalize the design procedure which provided the design studies another theoretical basis of more accurate and deeply researched procedure (Jones, 1992). Hence the studying of design thinking has become more important and the method of designing has also progressed a lot. For example, the classification of the nature of design problem such as ill-defined and well-defined (Newell, Shaw, and Simon, 1967), and different theoretical procedure modes for different disciplines, such as viewing architectural models as conjecture-analysis models and viewing engineering models as analysis-synthesis (Cross, 1991).
series CAADRIA
last changed 1999/01/31 14:14

_id ecaade2013_013
id ecaade2013_013
authors Lorenz, Wolfgang E.
year 2013
title Combining Complexity and Harmony by the Box-Counting Method
source Stouffs, Rudi and Sariyildiz, Sevil (eds.), Computation and Performance – Proceedings of the 31st eCAADe Conference – Volume 2, Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology, Delft, The Netherlands, 18-20 September 2013, pp. 667-676
wos WOS:000340643600069
summary When Benoît Mandelbrot raised the question about the length of Britain’s coastline in 1967, this was a major step towards formulating the theory of fractals, which also led to a new understanding of irregularity in nature. Since then it has become obvious that fractal geometry is more appropriate for describing complex forms than traditional Euclidean geometry (not only with regard to natural systems but also in architecture). This paper provides another view on architectural composition, following the utilization of fractal analysis. The procedure concerning the exploration of a façade design is demonstrated step by step on the Roman temple front of the Pantheon by Appolodorus and its re-interpretation – in the particular case the entrance front of Il Redentore, a Renaissance church by Palladio. Their level of complexity and range of scales that offer coherence are visualized by the specific measurement method of box-counting.
keywords Fractal analysis; box-counting method; Pantheon; Il Redentore; Palladio.
series eCAADe
email lorenz@iemar.tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id d7d2
id d7d2
authors Verdy Kwee, Anthony Radford, Dean Bruton, Ian Roberts
year 2006
title Architecture | Media | Representations Survey- (Exigencies at a Media Crossroad)
source Challenges for Architectural Science in Changing Climates: Proceedings of the 40th Annual Conference of the Architectural Science Association ANZAScA Adelaide, Australia | 22- 25 November 2006
summary Architectural information has been presented in a myriad of ways through various media for the purpose of public education. Rapid technological change tremendously affects the modes and techniques of communication media necessitating a reassessment of these vehicles. This paper suggests that if the medium should continue to be the ‘massage’ (McLuhan, 1967), it is imperative that we should understand the implications our choice and use of various media for communication of specific data, especially in relation to a targeted audience.

The paper presents the results and analyses of an online user survey (please refer to http://cumincad.scix.net/data/works/att/8d88.content.09055.pdf) which considers the use of currently available media, their roles and performance in the delivery of information of architectural works. It proposes suggestions for the manner and reasons these factors fashion users’ preferences. It also highlights several aspects of architectural data (e.g. forms, lighting, materials, etc) as well as those of the respective media used to represent them while indicating how significant end-users perceive these aspects in the process of understanding architecture. The interpretations of the results outlined in this paper may suggest some answers to the questions relating to current media use, but they may also pose more questions about the types of and the manner in which information should be delivered to architecture enthusiasts/readers. This reassessment is intended to help anticipate future directions in the application of these media in presenting architectural information. Special attention is particularly paid to the opportunities afforded by the digital platform.

keywords architecture, media, representation, survey, architectural information
series other
type normal paper
email verdy.kwee@adelaide.edu.au
more contact conference committee at http://www.adelaide.edu.au/anzasca2006/
last changed 2006/12/07 04:43

_id 3ac5
id 3ac5
authors Verdy Kwee, Antony Radford, Dean Bruton and Ian Roberts
year 2006
title Architecture | Media | Representations Survey- (Exigencies at a Media Crossroad)
source Adeliade, Australia
summary Architectural information has been presented in a myriad of ways through various media for the purpose of public education. Rapid technological change tremendously affects the modes and techniques of communication media necessitating a reassessment of these vehicles. This paper suggests that if the medium should continue to be the ‘massage’ (McLuhan, 1967), it is imperative that we should understand the implications our choice and use of various media for communication of specific data, especially in relation to a targeted audience. The paper presents the results and analyses of an online user survey which considers the use of currently available media, their roles and performance in the delivery of information of architectural works. It proposes suggestions for the manner and reasons these factors fashion users’ preferences. It also highlights several aspects of architectural data (e.g. forms, lighting, materials, etc) as well as those of the respective media used to represent them while indicating how significant end-users perceive these aspects in the process of understanding architecture. The interpretations of the results outlined in this paper may suggest some answers to the questions relating to current media use, but they may also pose more questions about the types of and the manner in which information should be delivered to architecture enthusiasts/readers. This reassessment is intended to help anticipate future directions in the application of these media in presenting architectural information. Special attention is particularly paid to the opportunities afforded by the digital platform.
keywords publications, user survey, perception, online, print content, education, understanding, information delivery, presentation
series other
type normal paper
email verdy_kwee@uaeu.ac.ae
last changed 2009/02/05 03:36

_id 20ab
authors Yakeley, Megan
year 2000
title Digitally Mediated Design: Using Computer Programming to Develop a Personal Design Process
source Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Architecture
summary This thesis is based on the proposal that the current system of architectural design education confuses product and process. Students are assessed through, and therefore concentrate on, the former whilst the latter is left in many cases to chance. This thesis describes a new course taught by the author at MIT for the last three years whose aim is to teach the design process away from the complexities inherent in the studio system. This course draws a parallel between the design process and the Constructionist view of learning, and asserts that the design process is a constant learning activity. Therefore, learning about the design process necessarily involves learning the cognitive skills of this theoretical approach to education. These include concrete thinking and the creation of external artifacts to develop of ideas through iterative, experimental, incremental exploration. The course mimics the Constructionist model of using the computer programming environment LOGO to teach mathematics. It uses computer programming in a CAD environment, and specifically the development of a generative system, to teach the design process. The efficacy of such an approach to architectural design education has been studied using methodologies from educational research. The research design used an emergent qualitative model, employing Maykut and Morehouses interpretive descriptive approach (Maykut & Morehouse, 1994) and Glaser and Strausss Constant Comparative Method of data analysis (Glaser & Strauss, 1967). Six students joined the course in the Spring 1999 semester. The experience of these students, what and how they learned, and whether this understanding was transferred to other areas of their educational process, were studied. The findings demonstrated that computer programming in a particular pedagogical framework, can help transform the way in which students understand the process of designing. The following changes were observed in the students during the course of the year: Development of understanding of a personalized design process; move from using computer programming to solve quantifiable problems to using it to support qualitative design decisions; change in understanding of the paradigm for computers in the design process; awareness of the importance of intrapersonal and interpersonal communication skills; change in expectations of, their sense of control over, and appropriation of, the computer in the design process; evidence of transference of cognitive skills; change from a Behaviourist to a Constructionist model of learning Thesis Supervisor: William J. Mitchell Title: Professor of Architecture and Media Arts and Sciences, School of Architecture and Planning
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

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