CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 11 of 11

_id caadria2012_089
id caadria2012_089
authors Fernando, R.; R. Drogemuller and A. Burden
year 2012
title Parametric and generative methods with building information modelling: Connecting BIM with explorative design modelling
source Proceedings of the 17th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Chennai 25-28 April 2012, pp. 537–546
summary Parametric and generative modelling methods are ways in which computer models are made more flexible, and of formalising domain-specific knowledge. At present, no open standard exists for the interchange of parametric and generative information. The Industry Foundation Classes (IFC) which are an open standard for interoperability in building information models is presented as the base for an open standard in parametric modelling. The advantage of allowing parametric and generative representations are that the early design process can allow for more iteration and changes can be implemented quicker than with traditional models. This paper begins with a formal definition of what constitutes to be parametric and generative modelling methods and then proceeds to describe an open standard in which the interchange of components could be implemented. As an illustrative example of generative design, Frazer’s ‘Reptiles’ project from 1968 is reinterpreted.
keywords Building information model; parametric modelling; generative modelling
series CAADRIA
email ruwan.fernando@gmail.com
last changed 2012/05/29 07:34

_id caadria2006_633
id caadria2006_633
authors WAN-YU LIU
year 2006
title THE EMERGING DIGITAL STYLE: Attention shift in architectural style recognition
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 633-635
summary “Style” has long been an important index to observe the design thinking of designers in architecture. Gombrich (1968) defined style as a particular selection from the alternatives when doing things; Ackerman (1963) considered that a distiguishable ensemble of certain characteristics we call a style; Schapiro (1961) pointed out that style is constant forms, and sometimes the constant elements, qualities and expression; Kirsch (1998), Cha and Gero (1999) thought of style as a form element and shape pattern. As Simon and others referred to, style emerged from the process of problem solving, Chan (1994, 2001) ever devised a serious of experiments to set up the operational definitions of style, further five factors that relate to generating styles. Owing to that the greater part of sketches and drawings in the design process couldn’t be replaced by computer-aided design systems (Eisentraut, 1997), designers must shift between different problem-solving methods while facing different design problems. The purpose in this research is to discuss the influences of computer usage on style generation and style recognition: The employment of certain procedural factors that occurred in the design processes that using conventional media is different from the ones that using computer media? Do personal styles emerge while designers shifting between different media in the design processes? Does any unusual phenomenon emerge while accustomed CAD-systems designers recognizing a style?
series CAADRIA
email Giselle@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id 2475
authors Asimov, Isaac
year 1968
title The Perfect Machine
source Science Journal October, 1968. pp. 115-118 : ill.
summary The author takes a semi-serious look at the world of computers, robots and androids in an attempt to find a recipe for the perfect machine. Described in this article are the possible attributes of the perfect machine and some of the problems it might raise
keywords robotics, science fiction
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:07

_id 5cf4
id 5cf4
authors Barrionuevo, Luis F.
year 2004
title LOS "SPIROSPACES"
source Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference of Mathematics & Design, Special Edition of the Journal of Mathematics & Design, Volume 4, No.1, pp. 179-187.
summary This paper deals with “Spirospaces”. These are a conversion to the third dimension of the two dimensional geometric entities called “Spirolaterals”.

Abelson, Harold, diSessa and Andera (1968) gave the first rules concerning Spirolaterals. To obtain a Spirolateral from a set of straight lines, the first of them must be one unit long and the following must be incremented one unit at each step, at the same time that they turn in a constant direction. Odds (1973) establish the variation of the rotation direction, either to the left or the right. However, he did not give a mathematical relation able to calculate open Spirolaterals. Krawczyk (2001) developed a computer program that generates Spirolaterals following the method suggested by Abelson. These are Spirolaterals obtained by enumeration without a predictive mathematical formula. Krawczyc went farther proposing Spirolaterals based in curved lines. He pointed out that there are a variety of spirolateral forms that have architectural potentiality. Following this, the architectural potentiality of Spirolaterals is the basis of this paper.

To take advantage of that potentiality a computer program was implemented to generate spatial configurations based in Spirolaterals. When a third dimension is given to the Spirolaterals they become Spirospaces. These new entities need spatial and design parameters to be useful for architectural purposes. Barrionuevo and Borsetti (2001) gave results about that work establishing the concept of Spirospaces.

The aim of this paper is to describe a work directed to improve rules and procedures concerning Spirospaces. It is expected that these procedures governed by the proposed rules can be employed as tools during the early steps in the architectural design process.

In this work some aspects concerning Spirospaces are considered. First, Spirolaterals are presented as the predecessors of Spirospaces. Second, Spirospaces are defined, together with their structural parameters. Architectural modeling is studied at the light of two special elements of the Spirospaces: Interstitial spaces and Object spaces. Next, a computer program is presented as the appropriate tool to model configurations having architectural potentiality. Finally, the results obtained running the computer program are analyzed to determine their possible use as architectural forms. Several graphic illustrations are presented showing steps going from the exploration of spatial alternatives to the selection of a specific configuration to be developed.

It is expected that the described computer program could be employed as a design aid tool. As the operation of the program generates a variety of spaces able to dwell architectural objects, it eases the search of configurations suitable to specific functions. The results obtained have the possibility of being exported to computer graphic applications able to add materials, lights and cameras.

keywords Spirolaterals, Spirospaces, architectural spaces, interstitial spaces, objectual spaces
series other
type normal paper
email labsist@hotmail.com
last changed 2005/04/07 13:34

_id 82cd
authors Comba, Paul G.
year 1968
title A Procedure for Detecting Intersections of Three-Dimensional Objects
source Journal of the Association for Computing Machinery. July, 1968. vol. 15: pp. 354-366 ; ill. includes bibliography
summary As a step toward the solution of the placement problem in engineering design, a procedure has been developed for detecting intersections of convex regions in 3-space by means of a pseudocharacteristic function. The mathematical techniques underlying the procedure are discussed, and a system of programs embodying these techniques is described. As a special case a solution is given for the hidden-line problem in graphic display
keywords intersection, interference, engineering, design, modeling, computer graphics, hidden lines, computational geometry, algorithms
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 273f
authors Elcock, E.W.
year 1983
title How Complete are Knowledge Representation Systems?
source IEEE Computer. IEEE computer society, October, 1983. vol. 16: pp. 114-118. includes bibliography
summary Prolog, the most feasible of the first-order logic systems, has intriguing analogies with Absys, short for Aberdeen System, an assertative programming system developed in 1968. In this article, the issue of incompleteness is explored by comparing aspects of the two systems, and the incompleteness resulting from any serious use of Prolog as a vehicle for a knowledge-based system is addressed
keywords PROLOG, algorithms, knowledge, systems, languages
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id ga0202
id ga0202
authors Frazer, Jh., Frazer, J., Liu X., Tang M. and Janssen, P.
year 2002
title Generative and Evolutionary Techniques for Building Envelope Design
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary The authors have been involved in the use of generative techniques for building envelope design since 1968 and the use of genetic algorithms since 1990. Recent work has focused on incorporating optimisation functions into form generating processes in order for new forms responding to varied design environments to be created and determined. This paper will summarise the authors’ previous work in this field and explain the theory behind this approach, and illustrate recent developments. While the initial implementation of a new building envelope design system is reported in more details in a related paper at this conference, this paper outlines its main features and points out the direction at which it is to be fully developed and further improved.
series other
email John.frazer@polyu.edu.hk
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id caadria2009_026
id caadria2009_026
authors Ostwald, Michael J.; Josephine Vaughan
year 2009
title Calculating Visual Complexity In Peter Eisenman’s Architecture
source Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / Yunlin (Taiwan) 22-25 April 2009, pp. 75-84
summary This paper describes the results of the first computational investigation of characteristic visual complexity in the architecture of Peter Eisenman. The research uses a variation of the “box-counting” approach to determining a quantitative value of the formal complexity present in five of Eisenman’s early domestic works (Houses I, II, III, IV and VI all of which were completed between 1968 and 1976). The boxcounting approach produces an approximate fractal dimension calculation for the visual complexity of an architectural elevation. This method has previously been used to analyse a range of historic and modern buildings including the works of Frank Lloyd Wright, Eileen Gray, Le Corbusier and Kazuyo Sejima. Peter Eisenman’s early house designs–important precursors to his later Deconstructivist works–are widely regarded as possessing a high degree of formal consistency and a reasonably high level of visual complexity. Through this analysis it is possible to quantify both the visual complexity and the degree of consistency present in this work for the first time.
keywords Computational analysis; fractal dimension; box-counting; Peter Eisenman
series CAADRIA
email michael.ostwald@newcastle.edu.au
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id 2005_615
id 2005_615
authors Serrato-Combe, Antonio
year 2005
title Lindenmayer Systems – Experimenting with Software String Rewriting as an Assist to the Study and Generation of Architectural Form
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 615-621
summary In 1968 Aristid Lindenmayer proposed a series of mathematical constructs as a foundation for an axiomatic theory of form development. Since that time, Lindenmayer Systems or L-systems have evolved and found many practical applications in the computer visualization area. Generation of fractal imagery, realistic modeling and high quality visualization of organic forms and even music generation are now possible with the assistance of L-systems. But, is it possible to use L-systems in architectural design? Why would anyone use L-systems in architectural design? How would one use them? What could one expect from their use? In addition to providing answers to the above questions this paper presents: 1. Concepts behind L-systems 2. The need to transform L-Systems so they can have creative architectural application possibilities 3. Examples on the architectural use of L-Systems 4. Conclusions
keywords Form Generation, Lindenmayer, String rewriting, Visualization
series eCAADe
email serrato@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id sigradi2005_161
id sigradi2005_161
authors Serrato-Combe, Antonio
year 2005
title Lindenmayer Systems – Experimenting with Software String Rewriting as an Assist to the Study and Generation of Architectural Form
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 161-166
summary In 1968 Aristid Lindenmayer proposed a series of mathematical constructs as a foundation for an axiomatic theory of form development. Since that time, Lindenmayer Systems or L-systems have evolved and found many practical applications in the computer visualization area. Generation of fractal imagery, realistic modeling and high quality visualization of organic forms and even music generation are now possible with the assistance of L-systems. But, is it possible to use L-systems in architectural design? Why would anyone use L-systems in architectural design? How would one use them? What could one expect from their use?
series SIGRADI
type normal paper
email serrato@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 09:00

_id 8245
authors Shaviv, Edna and Greenberg, Donald P.
year 1968
title Funicular Surface Structures: a Computer Graphics Approach
source Bulletin of the International Association for Shell Structures. Madrid, Spain: 1968. pp. 15-26 : ill. includes some bibliographical notes
summary This paper describes the problem of finding the shape of the middle surface of a shell when the loading and the stress resultants distributions are known. Differential equations are set up and solved using the finite difference technique. Several solutions are presented by means of an electronic computer and a plotter
keywords curved surfaces, structures, synthesis, architecture, computer graphics, algorithms
series CADline
email arredna@techunix.technion.ac.il
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

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