CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id 273f
authors Elcock, E.W.
year 1983
title How Complete are Knowledge Representation Systems?
source IEEE Computer. IEEE computer society, October, 1983. vol. 16: pp. 114-118. includes bibliography
summary Prolog, the most feasible of the first-order logic systems, has intriguing analogies with Absys, short for Aberdeen System, an assertative programming system developed in 1968. In this article, the issue of incompleteness is explored by comparing aspects of the two systems, and the incompleteness resulting from any serious use of Prolog as a vehicle for a knowledge-based system is addressed
keywords PROLOG, algorithms, knowledge, systems, languages
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id sigradi2005_161
id sigradi2005_161
authors Serrato-Combe, Antonio
year 2005
title Lindenmayer Systems – Experimenting with Software String Rewriting as an Assist to the Study and Generation of Architectural Form
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 1, pp. 161-166
summary In 1968 Aristid Lindenmayer proposed a series of mathematical constructs as a foundation for an axiomatic theory of form development. Since that time, Lindenmayer Systems or L-systems have evolved and found many practical applications in the computer visualization area. Generation of fractal imagery, realistic modeling and high quality visualization of organic forms and even music generation are now possible with the assistance of L-systems. But, is it possible to use L-systems in architectural design? Why would anyone use L-systems in architectural design? How would one use them? What could one expect from their use?
series SIGRADI
type normal paper
email serrato@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 09:00

_id 2005_615
id 2005_615
authors Serrato-Combe, Antonio
year 2005
title Lindenmayer Systems – Experimenting with Software String Rewriting as an Assist to the Study and Generation of Architectural Form
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 615-621
summary In 1968 Aristid Lindenmayer proposed a series of mathematical constructs as a foundation for an axiomatic theory of form development. Since that time, Lindenmayer Systems or L-systems have evolved and found many practical applications in the computer visualization area. Generation of fractal imagery, realistic modeling and high quality visualization of organic forms and even music generation are now possible with the assistance of L-systems. But, is it possible to use L-systems in architectural design? Why would anyone use L-systems in architectural design? How would one use them? What could one expect from their use? In addition to providing answers to the above questions this paper presents: 1. Concepts behind L-systems 2. The need to transform L-Systems so they can have creative architectural application possibilities 3. Examples on the architectural use of L-Systems 4. Conclusions
keywords Form Generation, Lindenmayer, String rewriting, Visualization
series eCAADe
email serrato@arch.utah.edu
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id caadria2006_633
id caadria2006_633
authors WAN-YU LIU
year 2006
title THE EMERGING DIGITAL STYLE: Attention shift in architectural style recognition
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 633-635
summary “Style” has long been an important index to observe the design thinking of designers in architecture. Gombrich (1968) defined style as a particular selection from the alternatives when doing things; Ackerman (1963) considered that a distiguishable ensemble of certain characteristics we call a style; Schapiro (1961) pointed out that style is constant forms, and sometimes the constant elements, qualities and expression; Kirsch (1998), Cha and Gero (1999) thought of style as a form element and shape pattern. As Simon and others referred to, style emerged from the process of problem solving, Chan (1994, 2001) ever devised a serious of experiments to set up the operational definitions of style, further five factors that relate to generating styles. Owing to that the greater part of sketches and drawings in the design process couldn’t be replaced by computer-aided design systems (Eisentraut, 1997), designers must shift between different problem-solving methods while facing different design problems. The purpose in this research is to discuss the influences of computer usage on style generation and style recognition: The employment of certain procedural factors that occurred in the design processes that using conventional media is different from the ones that using computer media? Do personal styles emerge while designers shifting between different media in the design processes? Does any unusual phenomenon emerge while accustomed CAD-systems designers recognizing a style?
series CAADRIA
email Giselle@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

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