CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 111

_id 88b6
authors Campello, Ruy Eduardo and Maculan, Nelson
year 1983
title A Lower Bound to the Set Partitioning Problem with Side Constraints
source 24 p. : ill. Pittsburgh: Design Research Center, CMU, December, 1983 DRC-70-20-83. includes bibliography.
summary A Lagrangean relaxation approach is proposed to provide a lower bound on the optimal solution of the set partitioning problem with side constraints, which is a general methodology to solve a combinatorial optimization problem. This Lagrangean relaxation approach is accomplished by a subgradient optimization procedure which solves at each iteration a special 0-1 knapsack problem. The approach seems to be promising since it produces feasible integer solutions to the side constraints that can hopefully be the optimal solution to most of the instances of the set partitioning problem with side constraints
keywords mathematics, operations research, relaxation, algorithms, combinatorics, optimization, constraints
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id sigradi2007_af13
id sigradi2007_af13
authors Granero, Adriana Edith; Alicia Barrón; María Teresa Urruti
year 2007
title Transformations in the educational system, Influence of the Digital Graph [Transformaciones en el sistema educacional, influencia de la Gráfica Digital]
source SIGraDi 2007 - [Proceedings of the 11th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] México D.F. - México 23-25 October 2007, pp. 182-186
summary The educative proposal was based on the summary attained through experiences piled up during the 2 last semester courses, 2/2006-1/2007. This proposal corresponds to a mix of methodology (by personal attendance / by internet). Founding on the Theory of the Game (Eric Berne 1960) and on different theories such as: Multiple intelligences (Haward Gardner 1983), Emotional Intelligence (Peter Salowey and John Mayer 1990, Goleman 1998), Social Intelligence (Goleman 2006), the Triarchy of Intelligence (Stemberg, R.J. 1985, 1997), “the hand of the human power”, it´s established that the power of the voice, that of the imagination, the reward, the commitment and association produce a significant increase of the productivity (Rosabeth Moss Kanter 2000), aside from the constructive processes of the knowledge (new pedagogical concepts constructivista of Ormrod J.E. 2003 and Tim O´Reilly 2004).
series SIGRADI
email ag@ub.edu.ar adriana.granero@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id acadia03_014
id acadia03_014
authors Woo, J.-H., Clayton, M., Johnson, R. and Flores, B.
year 2003
title Case Study of Tacit Knowledge Sharing in a Distributed Design Studio
source Connecting >> Crossroads of Digital Discourse [Proceedings of the 2003 Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design In Architecture / ISBN 1-880250-12-8] Indianapolis (Indiana) 24-27 October 2003, pp. 107-116
summary This paper demonstrates the effects of experts’ tacit knowledge on improving architectural students’ design artifacts in a distributed design studio. In geographically distributed design environments, the Internet is an important medium by which architects can share tacit knowledge in the form of dialogue via online communication technologies, such as online chat and Instant Messaging (IM). In spring 2003, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) and 8 schools conducted a collaborative design studio to develop a crew restraint system for space flights. Online chat software was used as a primary communication channel. Throughout the entire design studio, NASA professionals served as knowledge holders while undergraduate students participated as knowledge seekers. An interpretive content analysis and case study methodology were used in this study. We qualitatively observed the interactions between NASA and the students based upon two aspects: knowledge reflection and design improvement. Data were collected using document analysis of all knowledge sources and students’ design artifacts. The findings of this study indicate that the online chat system is useful in sharing tacit knowledge for the early part of design processes in a distributed design environment. Experts’ tacit knowledge appears to not only influence how students understand problems, but how they initiate conceptual design. This study provides empirical evidence regarding tacit knowledge sharing, and strengthens Schon’s (1983) claim about knowledge reflection in design studio. Furthermore, this study introduces architectural practitioners to the practical necessity of tacit knowledge sharing. This study is significant because its findings indicate the appropriate knowledge management strategy for architectural practitioners.
series ACADIA
email jwoo@tamu.edu
last changed 2003/10/30 15:20

_id bacd
authors Abadí Abbo, Isaac
year 1999
title APPLICATION OF SPATIAL DESIGN ABILITY IN A POSTGRADUATE COURSE
source Full-scale Modeling and the Simulation of Light [Proceedings of the 7th European Full-scale Modeling Association Conference / ISBN 3-85437-167-5] Florence (Italy) 18-20 February 1999, pp. 75-82
summary Spatial Design Ability (SDA) has been defined by the author (1983) as the capacity to anticipate the effects (psychological impressions) that architectural spaces or its components produce in observers or users. This concept, which requires the evaluation of spaces by the people that uses it, was proposed as a guideline to a Masters Degree Course in Architectural Design at the Universidad Autonoma de Aguascalientes in Mexico. The theory and the exercises required for the experience needed a model that could simulate spaces in terms of all the variables involved. Full-scale modeling as has been tested in previous research, offered the most effective mean to experiment with space. A simple, primitive model was designed and built: an articulated ceiling that allows variation in height and shape, and a series of wooden panels for the walls and structure. Several exercises were carried out, mainly to experience cause -effect relationships between space and the psychological impressions they produce. Students researched into spatial taxonomy, intentional sequences of space and spatial character. Results showed that students achieved the expected anticipation of space and that full-scale modeling, even with a simple model, proved to be an effective tool for this purpose. The low cost of the model and the short time it took to be built, opens an important possibility for Institutions involved in architectural studies, both as a research and as a learning tool.
keywords Spatial Design Ability, Architectural Space, User Evaluation, Learning, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
email iabadi@ceea.arq.ucv.ve
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2004/05/04 09:27

_id 21d8
authors Balas, Egon and Toth, Paolo
year 1983
title Branch and Bound Methods for the Traveling Salesman Problem
source December, 1983, 65 p. : ill., tables. Includes bibliography
summary This paper reviews the state of the art in enumerative solution methods for the traveling salesman problem (TSP). The introduction (Section 1) discusses the main ingredients of branch and bound methods for the TSP. Sections 2,3 and 4 discuss classes of methods based on three different relaxation of the TSP: the assignment problem with the TSP cost function, the 1-tree problem with a Lagrangean objective function, and the assignment problem with a lagrangean objective function. Section 5 briefly reviews some other relaxations of the TSP, while section 6 discusses the performance of some state of the art computer codes. Besides material from the literature, the paper also includes the results and statistical analysis of some computational experiments designed for the purposes of this review
keywords relaxation, branch-and-bound, algorithms, applications
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 41af
authors Barnhill, Robert E.
year 1983
title A Survey of the Representation and Design of Surfaces
source IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications. October, 1983. vol. 3: pp. 9-16 : ill. includes bibliography
summary The approach of devising robust surface methods applicable to arbitrarily located data was taken by the CAGD Group at the University of Utah. Adopting two broad classes of methods suitable for solving the problems (i.e., problems for which simplifying geometric assumptions cannot be made): (1) surface interpolants defined over triangles or tetrahedra and (2) distance-weighted interpolants. Interactive computer graphics was used to display surfaces for adequate visualization. Although some figures were given, it must be kept in mind that some 3-D medium, or at least motion, is necessary to understand surfaces
keywords computational geometry, computer graphics, representation, curved surfaces, mathematics
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

_id 0000
authors Bijl, Aart
year 1983
title Know Your Technology - Or: Can Computers Understand Designers?
source Proceedings of the International Conference eCAADe [European Computer Aided Architectural Design Education] Brussels (Belgium) 1983, pp. V.1-V.11
summary Any great expansion of the population of computer users, embracing architects and other ordinary people, will happen only if we change from current computing technology to radically new software technology. Criteria for new technology are discussed, with reference to inadequacies of current technology; we should strive for computers that can understand people. Logic programming is described as one development towards this goal, illustrated by the example of Prolog serving as interpreter of user demands and supporting partial and changing logical models of user activity. Architects can choose computing options now that will put them on a path leading to future new technology. Choice is explained, favouring a software environment that is used by researchers and also supports immediate and practical computer applications. Lessons are drawn for architectural education, to prepare for change that will take place during a student's 40-year working life.
keywords Software Technology, Logic Programming
series eCAADe
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 0105
authors Bossan, Mario and Ronchi, Alfredo M.
year 1989
title Presentazione Esperienza Didattica del Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Sistemi Edilizi e Territoriali - Politecnico di Milano
source CAAD: Education - Research and Practice [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 87-982875-2-4] Aarhus (Denmark) 21-23 September 1989, pp. 9.8.1-9.8.19
summary Didactic and research experience developed at the "Dipartimento di Ingegneria dei Sistemi Edilizi e Territoriali del Politecnico di Milano" in the environment of Computer Aided Architectural Design (CAAD). From the early part of the 1980's, using initially at an experimental level the resources available at the departmental centre of calculation various applications of CAD techniques in the building sector have been effected at DISET (Dipartimento di Ingegneria del Politecnico di Milano). During 1983, after a three year period of experimenting with these systems, it was decided to organise and activate a small computer aided design centre, within the department, the use of which was reserved for dissertation and research students.

series eCAADe
email ronchi@cdc8g5.cdc.polimi.it
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 4491
authors Bouyat, M., H. Botta and Vignat, J. C.
year 1983
title VERDI : A Computer Aided Design System for Development and City Planning
source ACM IEEE Design Automation Conference Proceedings (20th : 1983 : Miami Beach, Florida). pp. 382-385 : ill. includes bibliography
summary The system presented is a CAD system for use in planning road and other facility networks. Taking a draft master plan as its point of departure the system makes it possible: (1) To plan in a dynamic fashion since it permits the back-and-forth study of the interconnections between the design of the master plan and network design; (2) to preserve, from one work session to another, data that has already been acquired and calculated; (3) to make relevant technical evaluations in the following three fields: earthworks, roads, and sewage networks
keywords CAD, urban planning, applications
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 8e02
authors Brown, A.G.P. and Coenen, F.P.
year 2000
title Spatial reasoning: improving computational efficiency
source Automation in Construction 9 (4) (2000) pp. 361-367
summary When spatial data is analysed the result is often very computer intensive: even by the standards of contemporary technologies, the machine power needed is great and the processing times significant. This is particularly so in 3-D and 4-D scenarios. What we describe here is a technique, which tackles this and associated problems. The technique is founded in the idea of quad-tesseral addressing; a technique, which was originally applied to the analysis of atomic structures. It is based on ideas concerning Hierarchical clustering developed in the 1960s and 1970s to improve data access time [G.M. Morton, A computer oriented geodetic database and a new technique on file sequencing, IBM Canada, 1996.], and on atomic isohedral (same shape) tiling strategies developed in the 1970s and 1980s concerned with group theory [B. Grunbaum, G.C. Shephard, Tilings and Patterns, Freeman, New York, 1987.]. The technique was first suggested as a suitable representation for GIS in the early 1980s when the two strands were brought together and a tesseral arithmetic applied [F.C. Holdroyd, The Geometry of Tiling Hierarchies, Ars Combanitoria 16B (1983) 211–244.; S.B.M. Bell, B.M. Diaz, F.C. Holroyd, M.J.J. Jackson, Spatially referenced methods of processing raster and vector data, Image and Vision Computing 1 (4) (1983) 211–220.; Diaz, S.B.M. Bell, Spatial Data Processing Using Tesseral Methods, Natural Environment Research Council, Swindon, 1986.]. Here, we describe how that technique can equally be applied to the analysis of environmental interaction with built forms. The way in which the technique deals with the problems described is first to linearise the three-dimensional (3-D) space being investigated. Then, the reasoning applied to that space is applied within the same environment as the definition of the problem data. We show, with an illustrative example, how the technique can be applied. The problem then remains of how to visualise the results of the analysis so undertaken. We show how this has been accomplished so that the 3-D space and the results are represented in a way which facilitates rapid interpretation of the analysis, which has been carried out.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 8b75
authors Cullen, Ian
year 1983
title Expert Systems in Architectural and Planning Education
source Proceedings of the International Conference eCAADe [European Computer Aided Architectural Design Education] Brussels (Belgium) 1983, pp. IV.1-IV.15
summary The paper discusses the problems and possibilities of a project initiated recently within the Bartlett in the general area of knowledge engineering. The aim is to assemble a set of knowledge bases which may be explored interactively by students. The system will differ from traditional CAL packages in that it will be both problem oriented - designed to extract from the students the information required to reach a specific decision - and capable of providing an explanation of its approach at any point.
keywords Knowledge Engineering
series eCAADe
last changed 1998/08/18 05:56

_id 2328
authors David, B. and Décoppet, A.
year 1983
title Architectural Programming with CAD
source Proceedings of the International Conference eCAADe [European Computer Aided Architectural Design Education] Brussels (Belgium) 1983, pp. II.23-II.35
summary We would like to explain to you the programme for a ten-week workshop spending ten hours per week on the architectural programming of a particular project. We have developed a special methodology which is a synthesis between Architectural Programming Methodology and Integrated CAD Methodology and have used it on two occasions. We would like to describe our experience with this workshop.
series eCAADe
email info@grenoble.archi.fr
more http://www.grenoble.archi.fr
last changed 1998/08/18 05:50

_id 0faa
authors Duelund Mortensen, Peder
year 1991
title THE FULL-SCALE MODEL WORKSHOP
source Proceedings of the 3rd European Full-Scale Modelling Conference / ISBN 91-7740044-5 / Lund (Sweden) 13-16 September 1990, pp. 10-11
summary The workshop is an institution, available for use by the public and established at the Laboratory of Housing in the Art Academy's school of Architecture for a 3 year trial period beginning April 1985. This resumé contains brief descriptions of a variety of representative model projects and an overview of all projects carried out so far, including the pilot projects from 1983 and planned projects to and including January 1987. The Full Scale Model Workshop builds full size models of buildings, rooms and parts of buildings. The purpose of the Full Scale Model Workshop is to promote communication among building's users. The workshop is a tool in an attempt to build bridges between theory and practice in research, experimentation and communication of research results. New ideas and experiments of various sorts can be tried out cheaply, quickly and efficiently through the building of full scale models. Changes can be done on the spot as a planned part of the project and on the basis of ideas and experiments achieved through the model work itself. Buildings and their space can thus be communicated directly to all involved persons, regardless of technical background or training in evaluation of building projects.
keywords Full-scale Modeling, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2004/05/04 13:23

_id e8c7
authors Feigenbaum, Edward A. and McCorduck, Pamela
year 1983
title The Fifth Generation : Artificial Intelligence and Japan's Computer Challenge to the World
source ix, 275 p. Reading, Mass.: Addison- Wesley Pub. Co., 1983. includes bibliography: p. 268
summary Knowledge is the future power and Japan wants to be the first in developing and marketing the Fifth Generation of computers
keywords What is The Fifth Generation? Why Japan ? and how would it affect the Western world? expert systems, hardware, AI
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

_id 8e9b
authors Foque, R. and Hashimshony, R.
year 1983
title Experience of a Design Exercise, Making Use of the Programs: Goal, Bible & Gloss (Developed by Abacus)
source Proceedings of the International Conference eCAADe [European Computer Aided Architectural Design Education] Brussels (Belgium) 1983, pp. II.1-II.9
summary A 6 weeks (2 days a week) design exercise, making use of the above programs, was held the last bimester in the Faculty of Architecture in TH Delft. This exercise was an experimental one for the students, as well as for the teachers. As the exercise had an experimental character, it is clear that a lot should be learned from that experience, both from its positive and negative outcomes. The paper will try to evaluate on this point for the benefit of those intending to set up similar projects.

keywords Experimental Exercise
series eCAADe
last changed 1998/08/18 05:48

_id b190
authors Goldberg, Adele and Robson, David
year 1983
title Smalltalk-80: The language and its implementation
source New York, NY: Addison Wesley Co
summary Smalltalk-80 is the classic standard Smalltalk language as described in Smalltalk-80: The Language and Its Implementation by Goldberg and Robson. This book is commonly called "the Blue Book". Squeak implements the dialect of Smalltalk described in this book, but has a different implementation. Overview of the Smalltalk Language Smalltalk is a general purpose, high level programming language. It was the first original "pure" object oriented language, but not the first to use the object oriented concept, which is credited to Simula 67. The explosive growth of Object Oriented Programming (OOP) technologies began in the early 1980's, with Smalltalk's introduction. Behind it was the idea that the individual human user should be the most important component of any computing system, and that programming should be a natural extension of thinking, and also a dynamic and evolutionary process consistent with the model of human learning activity. In Smalltalk, these ideas are embodied in a framework for human-computer communication. In a sense, Smalltalk is yet another language like C and Pascal, and programs can be written in Smalltalk that have the look and feel of such conventional languages. The difference lies * in the amount of code that can be reduced, * less cryptic syntax, * and code that is easier to handle for application maintenance and enhancement. But Smalltalk's most powerful feature is easy code reuse. Smalltalk makes reuse of programs, routines, and subroutines (methods) far easier. Though procedural languages allow reuse too, it is harder to do, and much easier to cheat. It is no surprise that Smalltalk is relatively easy to learn, mainly due to its simple syntax and semantics, as well as few concepts. Objects, classes, messages, and methods form the basis of programming in Smalltalk. The general methodology to use Smalltalk The notion of human-computer interface also results in Smalltalk promoting the development of safer systems. Errors in Smalltalk may be viewed as objects telling users that confusion exists as to how to perform a desired function.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id sigradi2006_e028c
id sigradi2006_e028c
authors Griffith, Kenfield; Sass, Larry and Michaud, Dennis
year 2006
title A strategy for complex-curved building design:Design structure with Bi-lateral contouring as integrally connected ribs
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 465-469
summary Shapes in designs created by architects such as Gehry Partners (Shelden, 2002), Foster and Partners, and Kohn Peterson and Fox rely on computational processes for rationalizing complex geometry for building construction. Rationalization is the reduction of a complete geometric shape into discrete components. Unfortunately, for many architects the rationalization is limited reducing solid models to surfaces or data on spread sheets for contractors to follow. Rationalized models produced by the firms listed above do not offer strategies for construction or digital fabrication. For the physical production of CAD description an alternative to the rationalized description is needed. This paper examines the coupling of digital rationalization and digital fabrication with physical mockups (Rich, 1989). Our aim is to explore complex relationships found in early and mid stage design phases when digital fabrication is used to produce design outcomes. Results of our investigation will aid architects and engineers in addressing the complications found in the translation of design models embedded with precision to constructible geometries. We present an algorithmically based approach to design rationalization that supports physical production as well as surface production of desktop models. Our approach is an alternative to conventional rapid prototyping that builds objects by assembly of laterally sliced contours from a solid model. We explored an improved product description for rapid manufacture as bilateral contouring for structure and panelling for strength (Kolarevic, 2003). Infrastructure typically found within aerospace, automotive, and shipbuilding industries, bilateral contouring is an organized matrix of horizontal and vertical interlocking ribs evenly distributed along a surface. These structures are monocoque and semi-monocoque assemblies composed of structural ribs and skinning attached by rivets and adhesives. Alternative, bi-lateral contouring discussed is an interlocking matrix of plywood strips having integral joinery for assembly. Unlike traditional methods of building representations through malleable materials for creating tangible objects (Friedman, 2002), this approach constructs with the implication for building life-size solutions. Three algorithms are presented as examples of rationalized design production with physical results. The first algorithm [Figure 1] deconstructs an initial 2D curved form into ribbed slices to be assembled through integral connections constructed as part of the rib solution. The second algorithm [Figure 2] deconstructs curved forms of greater complexity. The algorithm walks along the surface extracting surface information along horizontal and vertical axes saving surface information resulting in a ribbed structure of slight double curvature. The final algorithm [Figure 3] is expressed as plug-in software for Rhino that deconstructs a design to components for assembly as rib structures. The plug-in also translates geometries to a flatten position for 2D fabrication. The software demonstrates the full scope of the research exploration. Studies published by Dodgson argued that innovation technology (IvT) (Dodgson, Gann, Salter, 2004) helped in solving projects like the Guggenheim in Bilbao, the leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy, and the Millennium Bridge in London. Similarly, the method discussed in this paper will aid in solving physical production problems with complex building forms. References Bentley, P.J. (Ed.). Evolutionary Design by Computers. Morgan Kaufman Publishers Inc. San Francisco, CA, 1-73 Celani, G, (2004) “From simple to complex: using AutoCAD to build generative design systems” in: L. Caldas and J. Duarte (org.) Implementations issues in generative design systems. First Intl. Conference on Design Computing and Cognition, July 2004 Dodgson M, Gann D.M., Salter A, (2004), “Impact of Innovation Technology on Engineering Problem Solving: Lessons from High Profile Public Projects,” Industrial Dynamics, Innovation and Development, 2004 Dristas, (2004) “Design Operators.” Thesis. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2004 Friedman, M, (2002), Gehry Talks: Architecture + Practice, Universe Publishing, New York, NY, 2002 Kolarevic, B, (2003), Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing, Spon Press, London, UK, 2003 Opas J, Bochnick H, Tuomi J, (1994), “Manufacturability Analysis as a Part of CAD/CAM Integration”, Intelligent Systems in Design and Manufacturing, 261-292 Rudolph S, Alber R, (2002), “An Evolutionary Approach to the Inverse Problem in Rule-Based Design Representations”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 329-350 Rich M, (1989), Digital Mockup, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Reston, VA, 1989 Schön, D., The Reflective Practitioner: How Professional Think in Action. Basic Books. 1983 Shelden, D, (2003), “Digital Surface Representation and the Constructability of Gehry’s Architecture.” Diss. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2003 Smithers T, Conkie A, Doheny J, Logan B, Millington K, (1989), “Design as Intelligent Behaviour: An AI in Design Thesis Programme”, Artificial Intelligence in Design, 293-334 Smithers T, (2002), “Synthesis in Designing”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 3-24 Stiny, G, (1977), “Ice-ray: a note on the generation of Chinese lattice designs” Environmental and Planning B, volume 4, pp. 89-98
keywords Digital fabrication; bilateral contouring; integral connection; complex-curve
series SIGRADI
email kenfield@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id 610b
authors Hall, R.N.
year 1983
title The Use of Gable OMS (Object Modelling System) in the Building Design ProcessThe Use of Gable OMS (Object Modelling System) in the Building Design Process
source Proceedings of the International Conference eCAADe [European Computer Aided Architectural Design Education] Brussels (Belgium) 1983, pp. III.1-III.18
summary GABLE CAD SYSTEMS comprise a suite of integrated sub-systems, one of which is OMS. The use of OMS in the development of a building design enables three dimensional graphical modelling of objects associated with buildings. Thus furniture, fittings and fixtures may be located within any room in a building or outside a building or in relation to other groups of objects unrelated to a building. Once located, objects and building may be seen in 2D plan and elevation/section projection or 3D projection (perspectives, axonometrics, isometrics, etc.). In this way furniture, people, cars, trees,landscape objects may all be modelled and graphically represented in addition to the modelling capabilities enabled using GABLE BMS (Building Modelling System). These graphically represented 2D and 3D views of objects can then be passed into GABLE IDS for further embellishment, annotation or dimensioning to produce detailed working drawings.
keywords Three Dimensional Graphical Modelling
series eCAADe
last changed 1998/08/18 05:52

_id 8d5e
authors Hayes-Roth, Frederick, Waterman, Donald A. and Lenat, Douglas B. (editors)
year 1983
title Building Expert System
source vii, 444 p. : ill
summary Reading,Mass.: Addison-Wesley Pub., 1983. 1: include bibliography: p. 405-420 -- (Teknowledge Series in Knowledge Engineering. Hayes-Roth, Frederick, series editor). This book is a collaboration of 38 expert system researchers and developers. It provides a broad introduction to the concepts and methods necessary for an understanding of how these systems work
keywords AI, expert systems
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

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