CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 106

_id bacd
authors Abadí Abbo, Isaac
year 1999
title APPLICATION OF SPATIAL DESIGN ABILITY IN A POSTGRADUATE COURSE
source Full-scale Modeling and the Simulation of Light [Proceedings of the 7th European Full-scale Modeling Association Conference / ISBN 3-85437-167-5] Florence (Italy) 18-20 February 1999, pp. 75-82
summary Spatial Design Ability (SDA) has been defined by the author (1983) as the capacity to anticipate the effects (psychological impressions) that architectural spaces or its components produce in observers or users. This concept, which requires the evaluation of spaces by the people that uses it, was proposed as a guideline to a Masters Degree Course in Architectural Design at the Universidad Autonoma de Aguascalientes in Mexico. The theory and the exercises required for the experience needed a model that could simulate spaces in terms of all the variables involved. Full-scale modeling as has been tested in previous research, offered the most effective mean to experiment with space. A simple, primitive model was designed and built: an articulated ceiling that allows variation in height and shape, and a series of wooden panels for the walls and structure. Several exercises were carried out, mainly to experience cause -effect relationships between space and the psychological impressions they produce. Students researched into spatial taxonomy, intentional sequences of space and spatial character. Results showed that students achieved the expected anticipation of space and that full-scale modeling, even with a simple model, proved to be an effective tool for this purpose. The low cost of the model and the short time it took to be built, opens an important possibility for Institutions involved in architectural studies, both as a research and as a learning tool.
keywords Spatial Design Ability, Architectural Space, User Evaluation, Learning, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
email iabadi@ceea.arq.ucv.ve
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2004/05/04 09:27

_id c201
authors Elfes, Alberto and Talukdar, Sarosh N.
year 1983
title A Distributed Control System for a Mobile Robot
source 7 p. : ill. Pittsburgh: Design Research Center, CMU, December, 1983. includes bibliography
summary This paper describes a distributed software control structure developed for the CMU Rover, an advanced mobile robot equipped with a variety of sensors. Expert modules control the operation of the sensors and actuators, interpret sensory and feedback information, build an internal model of the robot's working environment, devise strategies to accomplish proposed tasks and execute these strategies. Each expert module is composed of a pair of (master, slave) processes, where the master process controls the scheduling and working of the slave process. Communication among expert modules occurs asynchronously over a blackboard structure. Information specific to the execution of a given task is provided through a control plan. The system is distributed over a network of processors. Real-time operating system kernels local to each processor and an interprocess message communication mechanism ensure transparency of the underlying network structure. The various parts of the system are presented in this paper and future work to be performed is mentioned
keywords robotics, control
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id sigradi2006_e028c
id sigradi2006_e028c
authors Griffith, Kenfield; Sass, Larry and Michaud, Dennis
year 2006
title A strategy for complex-curved building design:Design structure with Bi-lateral contouring as integrally connected ribs
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 465-469
summary Shapes in designs created by architects such as Gehry Partners (Shelden, 2002), Foster and Partners, and Kohn Peterson and Fox rely on computational processes for rationalizing complex geometry for building construction. Rationalization is the reduction of a complete geometric shape into discrete components. Unfortunately, for many architects the rationalization is limited reducing solid models to surfaces or data on spread sheets for contractors to follow. Rationalized models produced by the firms listed above do not offer strategies for construction or digital fabrication. For the physical production of CAD description an alternative to the rationalized description is needed. This paper examines the coupling of digital rationalization and digital fabrication with physical mockups (Rich, 1989). Our aim is to explore complex relationships found in early and mid stage design phases when digital fabrication is used to produce design outcomes. Results of our investigation will aid architects and engineers in addressing the complications found in the translation of design models embedded with precision to constructible geometries. We present an algorithmically based approach to design rationalization that supports physical production as well as surface production of desktop models. Our approach is an alternative to conventional rapid prototyping that builds objects by assembly of laterally sliced contours from a solid model. We explored an improved product description for rapid manufacture as bilateral contouring for structure and panelling for strength (Kolarevic, 2003). Infrastructure typically found within aerospace, automotive, and shipbuilding industries, bilateral contouring is an organized matrix of horizontal and vertical interlocking ribs evenly distributed along a surface. These structures are monocoque and semi-monocoque assemblies composed of structural ribs and skinning attached by rivets and adhesives. Alternative, bi-lateral contouring discussed is an interlocking matrix of plywood strips having integral joinery for assembly. Unlike traditional methods of building representations through malleable materials for creating tangible objects (Friedman, 2002), this approach constructs with the implication for building life-size solutions. Three algorithms are presented as examples of rationalized design production with physical results. The first algorithm [Figure 1] deconstructs an initial 2D curved form into ribbed slices to be assembled through integral connections constructed as part of the rib solution. The second algorithm [Figure 2] deconstructs curved forms of greater complexity. The algorithm walks along the surface extracting surface information along horizontal and vertical axes saving surface information resulting in a ribbed structure of slight double curvature. The final algorithm [Figure 3] is expressed as plug-in software for Rhino that deconstructs a design to components for assembly as rib structures. The plug-in also translates geometries to a flatten position for 2D fabrication. The software demonstrates the full scope of the research exploration. Studies published by Dodgson argued that innovation technology (IvT) (Dodgson, Gann, Salter, 2004) helped in solving projects like the Guggenheim in Bilbao, the leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy, and the Millennium Bridge in London. Similarly, the method discussed in this paper will aid in solving physical production problems with complex building forms. References Bentley, P.J. (Ed.). Evolutionary Design by Computers. Morgan Kaufman Publishers Inc. San Francisco, CA, 1-73 Celani, G, (2004) “From simple to complex: using AutoCAD to build generative design systems” in: L. Caldas and J. Duarte (org.) Implementations issues in generative design systems. First Intl. Conference on Design Computing and Cognition, July 2004 Dodgson M, Gann D.M., Salter A, (2004), “Impact of Innovation Technology on Engineering Problem Solving: Lessons from High Profile Public Projects,” Industrial Dynamics, Innovation and Development, 2004 Dristas, (2004) “Design Operators.” Thesis. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2004 Friedman, M, (2002), Gehry Talks: Architecture + Practice, Universe Publishing, New York, NY, 2002 Kolarevic, B, (2003), Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing, Spon Press, London, UK, 2003 Opas J, Bochnick H, Tuomi J, (1994), “Manufacturability Analysis as a Part of CAD/CAM Integration”, Intelligent Systems in Design and Manufacturing, 261-292 Rudolph S, Alber R, (2002), “An Evolutionary Approach to the Inverse Problem in Rule-Based Design Representations”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 329-350 Rich M, (1989), Digital Mockup, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Reston, VA, 1989 Schön, D., The Reflective Practitioner: How Professional Think in Action. Basic Books. 1983 Shelden, D, (2003), “Digital Surface Representation and the Constructability of Gehry’s Architecture.” Diss. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2003 Smithers T, Conkie A, Doheny J, Logan B, Millington K, (1989), “Design as Intelligent Behaviour: An AI in Design Thesis Programme”, Artificial Intelligence in Design, 293-334 Smithers T, (2002), “Synthesis in Designing”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 3-24 Stiny, G, (1977), “Ice-ray: a note on the generation of Chinese lattice designs” Environmental and Planning B, volume 4, pp. 89-98
keywords Digital fabrication; bilateral contouring; integral connection; complex-curve
series SIGRADI
email kenfield@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id cbe9
authors Jacob, Robert J.K.
year 1983
title Using Formal Specifications in the Design of a Human-Computer Interface
source Communications of the ACM April, 1983. vol. 26: pp. 259-264 : diagrams. includes bibliography.
summary Formal specification techniques are valuable in software development because they permit a designer to describe the external behavior of a system precisely without specifying its internal implementation. Although formal specifications have been applied to many areas of software systems, they have not been widely used for specifying user interfaces. In the Military Message System project at the Naval Research Laboratory, the user interfaces as well as the other components of a family of message systems are specified formally, and prototypes are then implemented from the specifications. This paper illustrates the specification of the user interface module for the family of message systems. It then surveys specification techniques that can be applied to human-computer interfaces and divides the techniques into two categories: those based on state transition diagrams and those based on BNF. Examples of both types of specifications are given. Specification notations based on state transition diagrams are preferable to those based on BNF because the former capture the surface structure of the user interface more perspicuously. In either notation, high-level abstraction for describing the semantics of the user interface is needed, and an application-specific one is used here
keywords user interface, design, theory
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 4d66
authors Kalay, Yehuda E.
year 1983
title A Relational Database for Non-Manipulative Representation of Solid Objects
source Computer Aided Design September, 1983. vol. 15: pp. 271-276 : ill. includes bibliography.
summary Being the heart of any solid modeling system, much effort has been spent on formulating the data models which represent the shape of a polyhedral solid object within the computer in an accurate, unique and complete manner. This paper presents an example relational model as a complementary logical schema for viewing the shape database. It facilitates compact storage and supports non-manipulative query operations through the projection, selection and join operators defined for the relational model, without requiring expert knowledge of the manipulative structure. The flexibility of the relational model, compared with that of the hierarchical, manipulative one, allows easy extensibility and the association of non- geometric attributes with each data item
keywords solid modeling, polyhedra, relational database, representation
series CADline
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 07c4
authors McGilton, Henry and Morgan, Rachel
year 1983
title Introducing the UNIX system
source 556 p. New York: McGraw-Hill, 1983. includes bibliography: p. 541-544 and index. --- ( McGraw-Hill software series for computer professionals)
summary A reference guide for version 7 of the UNIX system including: Key concepts behind the system, from how to log on, the directory structure and a file system to the ideas of standard files and processes. Popular UNIX packages, software development tools, management and maintenance and more
keywords UNIX, software, tools, education
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 46b2
authors Rasdorf, William J. and Fenves, Stephen J.
year 1983
title Organization of a Structural Design Database
source Electronic Computation Conference Proceedings (8th : 1983 : Houston, TX). American Society of Civil Engineers, pp. 559-571. CADLINE has abstract only
summary This paper proposes a database schema that supports structural engineering design of buildings. An evaluation and comparison of hierarchical, network, and relational databases shows that relational databases are especially suited to a structural engineering design database. The proposed database schema represents the complex relationships between the components of a building-design database. The schema consists of a structural system hierarchy that relates abstract database components to basic building elements. In addition, it combines topology with attributes to achieve an integration that allows the representation of a broad range of common building configurations and structural systems. The user can combine a basic set of constructs to generate either a general or a very detailed description of a structure. The high degree of integration of topology and attributes yields a database that possesses desirable relational characteristics. The database provides efficient access to components based both on their location and on their attribute values. It also allows the user to add, delete, retrieve, and modify database components and values. The versatility and flexibility of the relational model make it a useful tool for managing building engineering data
keywords building, details, database, civil engineering, integration
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 9e1a
authors Schoen, D.
year 1983
title The Reflective Practitioner
source Basic Books. New York
summary The reflection that accompanies the evidence a candidate presents in the performance-based product is a critical part of the candidate's development. Through reflection the candidate begins the ongoing process of blending the art and science of good teaching practice. Reflection requires thoughtful and careful reporting and analysis of teaching practice, philosophy, and experience. Understanding why an activity or practice was productive or nonproductive in the classroom is a key element in the progression from novice to master teacher. The reflection cycle and the guiding questions included in this packet are designed to assist licensure candidates in the reflection process. They will enable candidates to better understand the reflection process and address the question; "How does this piece of evidence demonstrate my knowledge and skill level in this activity?". The following reflection cycle offers a prescriptive structure while allowing the flexibility necessary for candidates to demonstrate their knowledge, skill, and ability in the unique context of their area and environment. The reflections of the novice teacher are also vital to the assessors charged with the responsibility for judging whether the teacher has met the required level of performance for each standard based activity. Through their responses to the guiding questions, candidates will better be able to put evidence into perspective for the review team members by explaining how the evidence or artifact addresses the standard through the activity.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 452c
authors Vanier, D. J. and Worling, Jamie
year 1986
title Three-dimensional Visualization: A Case Study
source Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [CAAD Futures Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-408-05300-3] Delft (The Netherlands), 18-19 September 1985, pp. 92-102
summary Three-dimensional computer visualization has intrigued both building designers and computer scientists for decades. Research and conference papers present an extensive list of existing and potential uses for threedimensional geometric data for the building industry (Baer et al., 1979). Early studies on visualization include urban planning (Rogers, 1980), treeshading simulation (Schiler and Greenberg, 1980), sun studies (Anon, 1984), finite element analysis (Proulx, 1983), and facade texture rendering (Nizzolese, 1980). With the advent of better interfaces, faster computer processing speeds and better application packages, there had been interest on the part of both researchers and practitioners in three-dimensional -models for energy analysis (Pittman and Greenberg, 1980), modelling with transparencies (Hebert, 1982), super-realistic rendering (Greenberg, 1984), visual impact (Bridges, 1983), interference clash checking (Trickett, 1980), and complex object visualization (Haward, 1984). The Division of Building Research is currently investigating the application of geometric modelling in the building delivery process using sophisticated software (Evans, 1985). The first stage of the project (Vanier, 1985), a feasibility study, deals with the aesthetics of the mode. It identifies two significant requirements for geometric modelling systems: the need for a comprehensive data structure and the requirement for realistic accuracies and tolerances. This chapter presents the results of the second phase of this geometric modelling project, which is the construction of 'working' and 'presentation' models for a building.
series CAAD Futures
email Dana.Vanier@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id 6d3e
authors Yau, Mann-may and Srihari, Sargur N.
year 1983
title A Hierarchical Data Structure for Multidimensional Digital Images
source Communications of the ACM. July, 1983. vol. 26: pp. 504-515 : ill. includes bibliography
summary A tree data structure for representing multidimensional digital binary images is described. The method is based on recursive subdivision of the d-dimensional space into 2d hyperoctants. An algorithm for constructing the tree of a d- dimensional binary image from the tree of its (d-1)- dimensional cross sections is given. The computational advantages of the data structure and the algorithm are demonstrated both theoretically and in application to a three-dimensional reconstruction of a human brain
keywords algorithms, computational geometry, representation, data structures, solid modeling
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 0cfd
authors Zawack, Daniel J. and Thompson, Gerald L.
year 1983
title A Dynamic Space-Time Network Flow Model for City Traffic Congestion
source 43 p. : ill. graphs Pittsburgh, PA: Design Research Center CMU, December, 1983. DRC-70-18-83. includes bibliography
summary A space-time network is used to model traffic flows over time for a capacitated road transportation system having one-way and two-way streets. Also traffic signal lights, which change the network structure, are explicitly incorporated into the model. A linear (time) cost per unit flow is associated with each arc, and it is shown that under the model structure, travel time on a street is piecewise linear convex function of the number of units travelling on that street. Hence congestion effects are explicitly considered while maintaining the linear nature of the model. Two efficient solutions methods are proposed. A network flow solution for multiple source single destination network and a shortest path solution for a single source single destination network
keywords dynamic programming, simulation, planning, graphs, networks, transportation
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

_id e118
authors Balas, Egon
year 1983
title Disjunctive Programming and a Hierarchy of Relaxations for Discrete Optimization Problems
source December, 1983. 38 p. : ill. includes bibliography
summary The author discuss a new conceptual framework for the convexification of discrete optimization problems, and a general technique for obtaining approximations to the convex hull of the feasible set. The concepts come from disjunctive programming and the key tool is a description of the convex hull of a union of polyhedra in terms of a higher dimensional polyhedron. Although this description was known for several years, only recently was it shown by Jeroslow and Lowe to yield improved representations of discrete optimization problems. The author expresses the feasible set of a discrete optimization problem as the intersection (conjunction) of unions of polyhedra, and define an operation that takes one such expression into another, equivalent one, with fewer conjuncts. He then introduces a class of relaxations based on replacing each conjunct (union of polyhedra) by its convex hull. The strength of the relaxations increases as the number of conjuncts decreases, and the class of relaxations forms a hierarchy that spans the spectrum between the common linear programming relaxation, and the convex hull of the feasible set itself. Instances where this approach presents advantages include critical path problems in disjunctive graphs, network synthesis problems, certain fixed charge network flow problems, etc. The approach on the first of these problems is illustrated, which is a model for machine sequencing
keywords polyhedra, computational geometry, optimization, programming, convex hull, graphs
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:07

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id e7b8
authors Dahl, Veronica
year 1983
title Logic Programming as a Representation of Knowledge
source IEEE Computer. IEEE Computer Society, October, 1983. vol. 16: pp. 106-110 : ill. includes bibliography
summary Logic has traditionally provided a firm conceptual framework for representing knowledge. As it can formally deal with the notion of logical consequence, the introduction of Prolog has made it possible to represent knowledge in terms of logic and also to expect appropriate inferences to be drawn from it automatically. This article illustrates and explores these ideas with respect to two central representational issues: problem solving knowledge and database knowledge. The technical aspects of both subjects have been covered elsewhere (Kowalski, R. Logic for problem solving, North- Holland pub. 1979 ; Dahl, V. on database system development through logic ACM Trans.vol.7/no.3/Mar.1982 pp.102). This explanation uses simple, nontechnical terms
keywords PROLOG, knowledge, representation, logic, programming, problem solving, database
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:08

_id b190
authors Goldberg, Adele and Robson, David
year 1983
title Smalltalk-80: The language and its implementation
source New York, NY: Addison Wesley Co
summary Smalltalk-80 is the classic standard Smalltalk language as described in Smalltalk-80: The Language and Its Implementation by Goldberg and Robson. This book is commonly called "the Blue Book". Squeak implements the dialect of Smalltalk described in this book, but has a different implementation. Overview of the Smalltalk Language Smalltalk is a general purpose, high level programming language. It was the first original "pure" object oriented language, but not the first to use the object oriented concept, which is credited to Simula 67. The explosive growth of Object Oriented Programming (OOP) technologies began in the early 1980's, with Smalltalk's introduction. Behind it was the idea that the individual human user should be the most important component of any computing system, and that programming should be a natural extension of thinking, and also a dynamic and evolutionary process consistent with the model of human learning activity. In Smalltalk, these ideas are embodied in a framework for human-computer communication. In a sense, Smalltalk is yet another language like C and Pascal, and programs can be written in Smalltalk that have the look and feel of such conventional languages. The difference lies * in the amount of code that can be reduced, * less cryptic syntax, * and code that is easier to handle for application maintenance and enhancement. But Smalltalk's most powerful feature is easy code reuse. Smalltalk makes reuse of programs, routines, and subroutines (methods) far easier. Though procedural languages allow reuse too, it is harder to do, and much easier to cheat. It is no surprise that Smalltalk is relatively easy to learn, mainly due to its simple syntax and semantics, as well as few concepts. Objects, classes, messages, and methods form the basis of programming in Smalltalk. The general methodology to use Smalltalk The notion of human-computer interface also results in Smalltalk promoting the development of safer systems. Errors in Smalltalk may be viewed as objects telling users that confusion exists as to how to perform a desired function.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 4b8e
authors Kalay, Yehuda E. and Eastman, Charles M.
year 1983
title Shape Operation : An Algorithm For Binary Combining Boundary Model Solids
source November, 1983. 30 p. : ill. includes bibliography
summary The attractiveness of shape operators to end-users of geometric modeling systems stems from their intuitive clarity. Their implementation, however, is one of the most difficult algorithms in computational geometry. This complexity is further increased by the special properties of surfaces, such as orientation, that places the algorithm in the domain of manifold theory more than of set theory. A theoretical base for applying the set-theoretic operators of union, intersection and difference to spatial domains is presented, along with an algorithm that is successful in negotiating these complexities and all their special cases (in particular the presence of coincidental surfaces). The general principles of representing solids through their bounding surfaces and topics in manifold theory and boolean algebra relevant to understanding the algorithm are also discussed. The algorithm has been successfully implemented in three different geometric modeling systems over a period of four years. Some example of its application are included
keywords algorithms, boolean operations, solid modeling, B-rep, geometric modeling, topology
series CADline
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/05/17 08:18

_id cf2009_771
id cf2009_771
authors LaBelle, Guillaume; Nembrini, Julien and Huang, Jeffrey
year 2009
title Programming framework for architectural design ANAR+: Object oriented geometry
source T. Tidafi and T. Dorta (eds) Joining Languages, Cultures and Visions: CAADFutures 2009, PUM, 2009, pp. 771- 785
summary From the recent advent of scripting tools integrated into commercial CAAD software and everyday design practice, the use of programming applied to an architectural design process becomes a necessary field of study. The presented research explores the use of programming as explorative and reflexive medium (Schön, 1983) through the development of a programming framework for architectural design. Based on Java, the ANAR+ library is a parametric geometry environment meant to be used as programming interface by designers. Form exploration strategies based on parametric variations depend on the internal logic description, a key role for form generation. In most commercial CAD software, geometric data structures are often predefined objects, thus constraining the form exploration, whereas digital architectural research and teaching are in need for an encompassing tool able to step beyond new software products limitations.
keywords Parametric design, programming language, architectural Geometry, pro-cessing
series CAAD Futures
email guillaume.labelle@epfl.ch
last changed 2009/06/08 18:53

_id cf2009_poster_25
id cf2009_poster_25
authors Nembrini, Julien; Guillaume Labelle, Nathaniel Zuelzke, Mark Meagher and Jeffrey Huang
year 2009
title Source Studio: Teaching Programming For Architectural Design
source T. Tidafi and T. Dorta (eds) Joining Languages Cultures and Visions: CAADFutures 2009 CD-Rom
summary The architectural studio framework presented here is based on the use of programming as central form generation reflexive medium (Schon, 1983). Its aim is to teach architectural design while introducing a different approach toward computer tools by enabling students to fully explore variations in their designs through the use of coding for form definition. It proposes the students to reflect on their design process through its confrontation to algorithmic formalization (Mitchell 1990). This results in exercising the synthetic re-thinking of their initial sketch intents to comply with the difficult task of fitting the language syntax. With the proliferation and constant replacement of computer tools among the architectural practice, a shift appears in the attitude towards introducing students to different tools: studio teaching is branded by specific software platforms advocated by the teaching team. A lack of generalized view, independent of commercial CAD software, is problematic for the definition of new teaching tools suited for this constantly evolving situation (Terzidis, 2006).
keywords Programming, studio teaching, scripting, parametric design
series CAAD Futures
type poster
last changed 2009/07/08 20:12

_id 2387
authors Akin, Omer, Baykan, Can D. and Rao, Radha D.
year 1983
title Searching in the UNIX Directory
source December, 1983. 19 p. : ill., tables. includes bibliography
summary The structure of the directory space and subjects search behaviors in the UNIX operating system environment are examined. Protocol analysis with two subjects and survey of the contents of the directory space of all users of E-VAX and X-VAX systems in the Architecture and Computer Science Systems at Carnegie Mellon University were conducted. Depth first search characterized both the organization of the directories and the behavior of the subjects. Single step as opposed to multiple step traversal of the directory tree was also prevalent in the subject`s behaviors. Recommendations for system friendliness, in term of reusability, orientation, robustness, and consistency are developed
keywords UNIX, user interface, protocol analysis
series CADline
email oa04@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 6da7
authors Bridges, Alan
year 1983
title Course Description - University of Strathclyde - Msc In Building Science (Computer Aided Building Design)
source Proceedings of the International Conference eCAADe [European Computer Aided Architectural Design Education] Brussels (Belgium) 1983, pp. I.40-I.51
summary This paper describes a one-year postgraduate course in computer-aided building design. The course structure is outlined, together with the resources required to run such a course. Details of the course modules are given in an appendix.

keywords Postgraduate Course, Computer-aided Building Design
series eCAADe
email a.h.bridges@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

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