CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 96

_id 63a9
authors Hellgardt, Michael
year 1993
title Architectural Theory and Design Grammars
source [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Eindhoven (The Netherlands) 11-13 November 1993
summary The idea of artificial brains and artificial intelligence (AI) has been subject to criticism. The objection of J. Searle, for instance, which has been published in 1984 and which was partially directly addressed to one of the centres of AI, the Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, is mainly based on two points: (1) interactions between physiological and mental functions, and (2) the intentionality and context-relatedness of meaning. - With an emphasis on architectural design, this paper is about the second point, because the problem of meaning is a neuralgic point in the discussion of "artificial intelligence in design" (AID). Technical parameters are incompatible with mechanisms of meaning in any field of artistic, cultural or non-technical expression. This point, that is the relation between acts of meaning and acts of technical problem-solving and, connectedly, the relation between technological and architectural design, has been widely ignored in the discussion on AID. The development seems to be dominated by the tacit assumption that architecture can be articulated and generated purely in technical and formal terms of information processing beyond the field of architecture itself. Design and shape grammars have become a well established field in the discussion of AID, also with respect to architecture. But questions of architectural history and theory are touched on only incidentally and not sufficiently in this discussion. The problem is not, in other words, simply to include more or less unrelated cases of architecture, or architectural concepts -even if these are famous ones, such as Laugier's original hut for instance but to establish structural relations between arguments of architectural theory and arguments of AID.

series eCAADe
email michael@hellgar.iaf.nl
last changed 2003/05/10 08:03

_id 409c
authors Akin, Omer, Flemming, Ulrich and Woodbury, Robert F.
year 1984
title Development of Computer Systems for Use in Architectural Education
source 1984. ii, 47 p. includes bibliography
summary Computers have not been used in education in a way that fosters intellectual development of alternate approaches to design. Sufficient theory exists to use computing devices to support other potentially fruitful approaches to design. A proposal is made for the development of a computer system for architectural education which is built upon a particular model for design, that of rational decision making. Within the framework provided by the model, a series of courseware development projects are proposed which together with hardware acquisitions constitute a comprehensive computer system for architectural education
keywords architecture, education, design, decision making
series CADline
email ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id ecaadesigradi2019_449
id ecaadesigradi2019_449
authors Becerra Santacruz, Axel
year 2019
title The Architecture of ScarCity Game - The craft and the digital as an alternative design process
source Sousa, JP, Xavier, JP and Castro Henriques, G (eds.), Architecture in the Age of the 4th Industrial Revolution - Proceedings of the 37th eCAADe and 23rd SIGraDi Conference - Volume 3, University of Porto, Porto, Portugal, 11-13 September 2019, pp. 45-52
summary The Architecture of ScarCity Game is a board game used as a pedagogical tool that challenges architecture students by involving them in a series of experimental design sessions to understand the design process of scarcity and the actual relation between the craft and the digital. This means "pragmatic delivery processes and material constraints, where the exchange between the artisan of handmade, representing local skills and technology of the digitally conceived is explored" (Huang 2013). The game focuses on understanding the different variables of the crafted design process of traditional communities under conditions of scarcity (Michel and Bevan 1992). This requires first analyzing the spatial environmental model of interaction, available human and natural resources, and the dynamic relationship of these variables in a digital era. In the first stage (Pre-Agency), the game set the concept of the craft by limiting students design exploration from a minimum possible perspective developing locally available resources and techniques. The key elements of the design process of traditional knowledge communities have to be identified (Preez 1984). In other words, this stage is driven by limited resources + chance + contingency. In the second stage (Post-Agency) students taking the architects´ role within this communities, have to speculate and explore the interface between the craft (local knowledge and low technological tools), and the digital represented by computation data, new technologies available and construction. This means the introduction of strategy + opportunity + chance as part of the design process. In this sense, the game has a life beyond its mechanics. This other life challenges the participants to exploit the possibilities of breaking the actual boundaries of design. The result is a tool to challenge conventional methods of teaching and leaning controlling a prescribed design process. It confronts the rules that professionals in this field take for granted. The game simulates a 'fake' reality by exploring in different ways with surveyed information. As a result, participants do not have anything 'real' to lose. Instead, they have all the freedom to innovate and be creative.
keywords Global south, scarcity, low tech, digital-craft, design process and innovation by challenge.
series eCAADeSIGraDi
email axbesa03@gmail.com
last changed 2019/08/26 20:28

_id 8087
authors Boehm, Barry W., Penedo, Maria H. and Stuckle, Don E. (et al)
year 1984
title A Software Development Environment for Improving Productivity
source IEEE Computer. June, 1984. pp. 30-44 : ill. includes bibliography
summary The software productivity system (SPS) was developed to support project activities. It involves a set of strategies, including the work environment; the evaluation and procurement of hardware equipment; the provision for immediate access to computing resources through local area networks; the building of an integrated set of tools to support the software development life cycle and all project personnel; and a user support function to transfer new technology. All of these strategies are being accomplished incrementally. The current architecture is VAX-based and uses the Unix operating system, a wideband local network, and a set of software tools. The article describes the steps that led to the creation of the software productivity project and its components and summarized the requirements analyses on which the SPS was based
keywords productivity, software, hardware, programming
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

_id 8fd4
authors Christiansson, Per
year 1984
title Integrated Computer Aided Design: Present and Future Data Structure
source CIB W78, Colloquium June, 1984. 6 p. : ill. includes bibliography.
summary The article presents some viewpoints on data structures which may mirror the building process and development of integrated computer aided design systems. The emphasis is upon the necessity to find a sufficiently valid general approach to system development in order to meet the fast evolution within the field and the demand for development strategies
keywords data structures, integration, CAD, systems, building process, architecture, standards, construction
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:07

_id 26de
authors Enderle, G., K. Kansy and Pfaff, G.
year 1984
title Computer Graphics Programming : GKS - the graphics standard
source 542 p. : ill. (some col.) Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1984. includes bibliography: p. 527-532 and index. -- (Symbolic Computation Series)
summary Covers computer graphics programming on the basis of the Graphical Kernel System. It gives an overview over the GKS concepts, the history of the GKS design and the various system interfaces. A detailed description of the application of GKS functions both in PASCAL and FORTRAN is a significant part
keywords standards, computer graphics, GKS, programming
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

_id 3386
authors Gavin, L., Keuppers, S., Mottram, C. and Penn, A.
year 2001
title Awareness Space in Distributed Social Networks
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 615-628
summary In the real work environment we are constantly aware of the presence and activity of others. We know when people are away from their desks, whether they are doing concentrated work, or whether they are available for interaction. We use this peripheral awareness of others to guide our interactions and social behaviour. However, when teams of workers are spatially separated we lose 'awareness' information and this severely inhibits interaction and information flow. The Theatre of Work (TOWER) aims to develop a virtual space to help create a sense of social awareness and presence to support distributed working. Presence, status and activity of other people are made visible in the theatre of work and allow one to build peripheral awareness of the current activity patterns of those who we do not share space with in reality. TOWER is developing a construction set to augment the workplace with synchronous as well as asynchronous awareness. Current, synchronous activity patterns and statuses are played out in a 3D virtual space through the use of symbolic acting. The environment itself however is automatically constructed on the basis of the organisation's information resources and is in effect an information space. Location of the symbolic actor in the environment can therefore represent the focus of that person's current activity. The environment itself evolves to reflect historic patterns of information use and exchange, and becomes an asynchronous representation of the past history of the organisation. A module that records specific episodes from the synchronous event cycle as a Docudrama forms an asynchronous information resource to give a history of team work and decision taking. The TOWER environment is displayed using a number of screen based and ambient display devices. Current status and activity events are supplied to the system using a range of sensors both in the real environment and in the information systems. The methodology has been established as a two-stage process. The 3D spatial environment will be automatically constructed or generated from some aspect of the pre-existing organisational structure or its information resources or usage patterns. The methodology must be extended to provide means for that structure to grow and evolve in the light of patterns of actual user behaviour in the TOWER space. We have developed a generative algorithm that uses a cell aggregation process to transcribe the information space into a 3d space. In stage 2 that space was analysed using space syntax methods (Hillier & Hanson, 1984; Hillier 1996) to allow the properties of permeability and intelligibility to be measured, and then these fed back into the generative algorithm. Finally, these same measures have been used to evaluate the spatialised behaviour that users of the TOWER space show, and will used to feed this back into the evolution of the space. The stage of transcription from information structure to 3d space through a generative algorithm is critical since it is this stage that allows neighbourhood relations to be created that are not present in the original information structure. It is these relations that could be expected to help increase social density.
keywords Algorithmic Form Generation, Distributed Workgroups, Space Syntax
series CAAD Futures
email l.gavin@ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id 61be
authors Goldberg, A.J.
year 1984
title Smalltalk-80: The Interactive Programming Environment
source Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley
summary This book describes the process by which Smalltalk was introduced to people outside Xerox PARC, where it was developed. This book first describes the incredibly exciting history of how Smalltalk was built from scratch. It then goes on to show the way in which Smalltalk was made public. At first, this was an engineering process. Large companies were contacted and offered to participate by porting the Smalltalk VM to their machines, and then running an image provided on tape. Each of these teams then wrote a paper on their experience, and these original papers are included in this book. Xerox PARC also wrote its own paper. These papers are an invaluable source of information for any Smalltalker. They range from overall design issues down to statistics on the work of the VM and image contents.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ddss2008-02
id ddss2008-02
authors Gonçalves Barros, Ana Paula Borba; Valério Augusto Soares de Medeiros, Paulo Cesar Marques da Silva and Frederico de Holanda
year 2008
title Road hierarchy and speed limits in Brasília/Brazil
source H.J.P. Timmermans, B. de Vries (eds.) 2008, Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, ISBN 978-90-6814-173-3, University of Technology Eindhoven, published on CD
summary This paper aims at exploring the theory of the Social Logic of Space or Space Syntax as a strategy to define parameters of road hierarchy and, if this use is found possible, to establish maximum speeds allowed in the transportation system of Brasília, the capital city of Brazil. Space Syntax – a theory developed by Hillier and Hanson (1984) – incorporates the space topological relationships, considering the city shape and its influence in the distribution of movements within the space. The theory’s axiality method – used in this study – analyses the accessibility to the street network relationships, by means of the system’s integration, one of its explicative variables in terms of copresence, or potential co-existence between the through-passing movements of people and vehicles (Hillier, 1996). One of the most used concepts of Space Syntax in the integration, which represents the potential flow generation in the road axes and is the focus of this paper. It is believed there is a strong correlation between urban space-form configuration and the way flows and movements are distributed in the city, considering nodes articulations and the topological location of segments and streets in the grid (Holanda, 2002; Medeiros, 2006). For urban transportation studies, traffic-related problems are often investigated and simulated by assignment models – well-established in traffic studies. Space Syntax, on the other hand, is a tool with few applications in transport (Barros, 2006; Barros et al, 2007), an area where configurational models are considered to present inconsistencies when used in transportation (cf. Cybis et al, 1996). Although this is true in some cases, it should not be generalized. Therefore, in order to simulate and evaluate Space Syntax for the traffic approach, the city of Brasília was used as a case study. The reason for the choice was the fact the capital of Brazil is a masterpiece of modern urban design and presents a unique urban layout based on an axial grid system considering several express and arterial long roads, each one with 3 to 6 lanes,
keywords Space syntax, road hierarchy
series DDSS
last changed 2008/09/01 15:06

_id ga9928
id ga9928
authors Goulthorpe
year 1999
title Hyposurface: from Autoplastic to Alloplastic Space
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary By way of immediate qualification to an essay which attempts to orient current technical developments in relation to a series of dECOi projects, I would suggest that the greatest liberation offered by new technology in architecture is not its formal potential as much as the patterns of creativity and practice it engenders. For increasingly in the projects presented here dECOi operates as an extended network of technical expertise: Mark Burry and his research team at Deakin University in Australia as architects and parametric/ programmatic designers; Peter Wood in New Zealand as programmer; Alex Scott in London as mathematician; Chris Glasow in London as systems engineer; and the engineers (structural/services) of David Glover’s team at Ove Arup in London. This reflects how we’re working in a new technical environment - a new form of practice, in a sense - a loose and light network which deploys highly specialist technical skill to suit a particular project. By way of a second disclaimer, I would suggest that the rapid technological development we're witnessing, which we struggle to comprehend given the sheer pace of change that overwhelms us, is somehow of a different order than previous technological revolutions. For the shift from an industrial society to a society of mass communication, which is the essential transformation taking place in the present, seems to be a subliminal and almost inexpressive technological transition - is formless, in a sense - which begs the question of how it may be expressed in form. If one holds that architecture is somehow the crystallization of cultural change in concrete form, one suspects that in the present there is no simple physical equivalent for the burst of communication technologies that colour contemporary life. But I think that one might effectively raise a series of questions apropos technology by briefly looking at 3 or 4 of our current projects, and which suggest a range of possibilities fostered by new technology. By way of a third doubt, we might qualify in advance the apparent optimism of architects for CAD technology by thinking back to Thomas More and his island ‘Utopia’, which marks in some way the advent of Modern rationalism. This was, if not quite a technological utopia, certainly a metaphysical one, More’s vision typically deductive, prognostic, causal. But which by the time of Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis is a technological utopia availing itself of all the possibilities put at humanity’s disposal by the known machines of the time. There’s a sort of implicit sanction within these two accounts which lies in their nature as reality optimized by rational DESIGN as if the very ethos of design were sponsored by Modern rationalist thought and its utopian leanings. The faintly euphoric ‘technological’ discourse of architecture at present - a sort of Neue Bauhaus - then seems curiously misplaced historically given the 20th century’s general anti-, dis-, or counter-utopian discourse. But even this seems to have finally run its course, dissolving into the electronic heterotopia of the present with its diverse opportunities of irony and distortion (as it’s been said) as a liberating potential.1 This would seem to mark the dissolution of design ethos into non-causal process(ing), which begs the question of ‘design’ itself: who 'designs' anymore? Or rather, has 'design' not become uncoupled from its rational, deterministic, tradition? The utopianism that attatches to technological discourse in the present seems blind to the counter-finality of technology's own accomplishments - that transparency has, as it were, by its own more and more perfect fulfillment, failed by its own success. For what we seem to have inherited is not the warped utopia depicted in countless visions of a singular and tyrranical technology (such as that in Orwell's 1984), but a rich and diverse heterotopia which has opened the possibility of countless channels of local dialect competing directly with the channels of power. Undoubtedly such multiplicitous and global connectivity has sent creative thought in multiple directions…
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id c1ae
authors Gulliehsen, Eric and Chang, Ernest
year 1984
title An Expert System for Generative Architectural Design
source December, 1984. pp. 253-267. includes bibliography
summary The mathematician-architect Christopher Alexander has devised a scientific theory of architectural design. He believes that all existing architectural entities can be described as interacting patterns, all possible relationships of which are governed by generative rules. These form a pattern language capable of generating design forms appropriate to a given environmental context. The complexity of interaction among these rules leads to difficulties in their representation by conventional methods. This paper presents a computer-based expert system which implements Alexander's design methodology
keywords synthesis, expert systems, CAD, patterns, design, methods, architecture, theory
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

_id 2391
authors Hammond, Brian G. and Leifer, Dave
year 1984
title A Graphics Interface to Complement Traditional Techniques
source 1984? pp. 321-329 : ill. includes bibliography
summary Noting the reluctance of architects in small private practices to adopt CAAD aids, the crudity of existing graphic interfaces is identified as an inhibiting factor. A suite of computer programs currently under development are described which are designed to permit the input of geometric plan forms by traditional pencil and paper techniques, whilst utilizing the computers processing power to edit and manipulate the data so `captured'
keywords CAD, architecture, user interface, computer graphics
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id e799
authors Howes, Jaki
year 1986
title Computer Education in Schools of Architecture and the Needs of Practice
source Teaching and Research Experience with CAAD [4th eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Rome (Italy) 11-13 September 1986, pp. 45-48
summary In April 1985 there was a meeting (at Huddersfield Polytechnic) or representatives from 26 Schools of Architecture. At this, concern was expressed about the lack of direction from the RIBA with regard to the appropriate level of computer teaching on architectural courses. In addition, it was felt that it was essential that at least one member of a Visiting Board panel should be computer literate and in a position to give advice. These points were raised at the RIBA Computer Committee later in 1985, and the committee's attention was also drawn to comments contained in the report by HM Inspector on Public Sector Education in Architecture (1985) based on investigations made during 1984.
series eCAADe
email j.howes@lmu.ac.uk
last changed 1998/08/23 08:30

_id e0a3
authors Johnson, Robert E.
year 1984
title Computer-Aided Energy Economics for Early Concept Design Analysis
source Building Economics, International Symposium Proceedings (3rd : Canada). 1984? vol. 3: pp.46-57 : ill. includes bibliography
summary Decisions that have the greatest impact on energy cost performance are made very early in the design process. The problem is that these early design decisions are rarely tested thoroughly until very late in design. Usually this is due to the difficulties inherent in the use of the more sophisticated analysis procedures. Hourly energy computer simulations are costly to use, often require detailed input preparation, and use large ''main-frame' computers. Easier to use energy evaluation tools such as manual calculations and simplified computer programs do not yield reliable results. This is particularly true when passive solar design solutions are being tested. However, even the sophisticated approaches often have a limited ability to comprehensively model the economic implications of the more accurate energy simulations. This paper is intended to describe efforts at the University of Michigan to develop a more integrated approach to the assessment of energy economics - one that may be used at the earliest stages of concept design. The approach taken has been to concentrate on developing interactive, easy to use computer programs to describe building design proposals. This computer-generated building model is then used to automatically generate the information required to run a large, sophisticated energy analysis program developed by the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers (BLAST). Total life cycle cost analysis is performed either using procedures within BLAST or an 'electronic spreadsheet' system. Perceived deficiencies in the current state of this energy/cost evaluation system are described, and future research directions are presented
keywords architecture, energy, analysis, CAD, economics, design, methods
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

_id 40d6
authors Johnson, Robert E.
year 1984
title The Integration of Economic Analysis and Computer-based Building Models
source CIB W-65 Symposium. July, 1984. [19] p. : ill. includes bibliography
summary Most current methods used to evaluate the economics of building designs are inadequate in that they focus on the evaluation of completed designs and do not assist in the development and creation of designs. They are used after most major design decisions have been made. This paper describes the first year of a two year research project (funded by the National Science Foundation, the U.S. Government) which seeks to integrate economic analysis techniques into design decision-making within the context of an interactive computer-aided architectural and engineering design system. Issues reviewed include the current state of computer software, existing economic analysis models and existing economic analysis software. A conclusion is reached that most economic analysis systems fall into the category of single purpose software and are not adaptable to the wide range of idiosyncratic evaluation models used in real estate, architecture, engineering, construction and building management. Objectives are proposed for a general purpose, interactive cost modeling system that is integrated with a geometric computer-based building model. Initial experiments with a prototype of this system at various stages of the design-construction-use process are discussed. Further development of this system as a research tool for exploring alternative economic modeling procedures is presented
keywords analysis, evaluation, CAD, architecture, design, methods, economics, integration
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 4eaf
authors Kalay, Yehuda E.
year 1984
title A Database Management Approach to CAD/CAM Systems Integration
source December, 1984. 13 p. : ill. includes bibliography
summary Facilitating the communication between different CAD/CAM systems is rapidly becoming an important issue, as more systems reach the market. A solution to the communication problem can be found if it is considered part of the more general problem of managing the complex information associated with the representation of physical artifacts and environments in the memory of computers, thereby accounting for the operators that are used for accessing the data as well as the data itself. Database management systems have provided powerful solutions to information management problems in a variety of disciplines and enjoy a broad and rigorous research foundation. If the techniques, methods and systems that were developed for database management could be utilized for CAD/CAM integration, they would save a considerable duplication of effort, enhance the integrity of the data, and bring to bear the results and advances that have been achieved over a long period of hard work
keywords CAD, CAM, relational database, integration, architecture
series CADline
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

_id caadria2004_k-1
id caadria2004_k-1
authors Kalay, Yehuda E.
year 2004
title CONTEXTUALIZATION AND EMBODIMENT IN CYBERSPACE
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 5-14
summary The introduction of VRML (Virtual Reality Markup Language) in 1994, and other similar web-enabled dynamic modeling software (such as SGI’s Open Inventor and WebSpace), have created a rush to develop on-line 3D virtual environments, with purposes ranging from art, to entertainment, to shopping, to culture and education. Some developers took their cues from the science fiction literature of Gibson (1984), Stephenson (1992), and others. Many were web-extensions to single-player video games. But most were created as a direct extension to our new-found ability to digitally model 3D spaces and to endow them with interactive control and pseudo-inhabitation. Surprisingly, this technologically-driven stampede paid little attention to the core principles of place-making and presence, derived from architecture and cognitive science, respectively: two principles that could and should inform the essence of the virtual place experience and help steer its development. Why are the principles of place-making and presence important for the development of virtual environments? Why not simply be content with our ability to create realistically-looking 3D worlds that we can visit remotely? What could we possibly learn about making these worlds better, had we understood the essence of place and presence? To answer these questions we cannot look at place-making (both physical and virtual) from a 3D space-making point of view alone, because places are not an end unto themselves. Rather, places must be considered a locus of contextualization and embodiment that ground human activities and give them meaning. In doing so, places acquire a meaning of their own, which facilitates, improves, and enriches many aspects of our lives. They provide us with a means to interpret the activities of others and to direct our own actions. Such meaning is comprised of the social and cultural conceptions and behaviors imprinted on the environment by the presence and activities of its inhabitants, who in turn, ‘read’ by them through their own corporeal embodiment of the same environment. This transactional relationship between the physical aspects of an environment, its social/cultural context, and our own embodiment of it, combine to create what is known as a sense of place: the psychological, physical, social, and cultural framework that helps us interpret the world around us, and directs our own behavior in it. In turn, it is our own (as well as others’) presence in that environment that gives it meaning, and shapes its social/cultural character. By understanding the essence of place-ness in general, and in cyberspace in particular, we can create virtual places that can better support Internet-based activities, and make them equal to, in some cases even better than their physical counterparts. One of the activities that stands to benefit most from understanding the concept of cyber-places is learning—an interpersonal activity that requires the co-presence of others (a teacher and/or fellow learners), who can point out the difference between what matters and what does not, and produce an emotional involvement that helps students learn. Thus, while many administrators and educators rush to develop webbased remote learning sites, to leverage the economic advantages of one-tomany learning modalities, these sites deprive learners of the contextualization and embodiment inherent in brick-and-mortar learning institutions, and which are needed to support the activity of learning. Can these qualities be achieved in virtual learning environments? If so, how? These are some of the questions this talk will try to answer by presenting a virtual place-making methodology and its experimental implementation, intended to create a sense of place through contextualization and embodiment in virtual learning environments.
series CAADRIA
type normal paper
last changed 2004/05/20 16:37

_id eacf
authors Lantz, Keith A. and Nowicki, William I.
year 1984
title Structured Graphics for Distributed Systems
source ACM Transactions on Graphics January, 1984. vol. 3: pp. 23-51 : ill.
summary includes bibliography: pp. 48-51. One of the most important functions of an intelligent workstation is to provide a state-of-the-art user interface to distributed resources. One aspect of such an interface is virtual terminal support for both local and remote applications with a range of requirements, including graphics. To ensure good response for remote applications in particular, the bulk of user interaction must be handled local to the workstation. Therefore, the terminal management software on the workstation must provide object modeling as well as viewing facilities, in contrast to most contemporary graphics systems. One way of doing this is to support structured display files. It is equally important to support simultaneous access to multiple applications ; thus the terminal management software must provide window system facilities. Lastly, since the terminal management software should present a common interface to both local and remote applications, the workstation itself should be regarded as a multifunction component of the distributed system and not strictly as a terminal or a personal computer. This paper presents the system architecture and protocols necessary to achieve these goals and evaluates an existing implementation
keywords user interface, windowing, computer graphics, programming
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

_id 5c07
authors Lee, H.-L., Liu, Y.-T., Chen, S.-C., Tang, S.-K. and Huang, C.-P., Huang, C.-H., Chang, Y.-L., Chang, K.-W. and Chen, K.-Y.
year 2002
title A Comparative study of protocol analysis for - Spatiality of a Text-based Cyberspace
source Connecting the Real and the Virtual - design e-ducation [20th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-0-8] Warsaw (Poland) 18-20 September 2002, pp. 262-266
summary Graduate Institute of Architecture, National Chiao Tung University, Hsinchu, 30050, TAIWAN The adaptation of the word cyberspace (Gibson, 1984) following the emergence of the World Wide Web Internet not only succinctly revolutionized the correlation of time and space but also poised to challenge how we view the existing spatial concept. This research tries to use protocol analysis to examine text-based cyberspace, such as bulletin board, chart rooms and so forth, and the objective of this research is to realize the spatiality of cyberspace through the cognitive point of view, and to compare the differences of the definitions and perception ways of spatiality between people with general domain and in design fields. Finally, we validate the existence of cyberspace, where the process not only allows further categorization of spatial elements concluded from the earlier study, but discover that varied backgrounds can affect how a user defines and perceives cyberspace (Strate, 1999).
series eCAADe
email aleppo@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2002/09/09 17:19

_id 4af9
authors Levy, Henry
year 1984
title VAXstation : A General-Purpose Raster Graphics Architecture
source ACM Transactions on Graphics. January, 1984. vol. 3: pp. 70-83 : ill. includes bibliography
summary A raster graphics architecture and a raster graphics device are described. The graphics architecture is an extension of the RasterOp model and supports operations for rectangle movement, text writing, curve drawing, flood, and fill. The architecture is intended for implementation by both closely and loosely coupled display subsystems. The first implementation of the architecture is a remote raster display connected by fiber optics to a VAX minicomputer. The device contains a separate microprocessor, frame buffer, and additional local memory: it is capable of executing raster commands on operands in local memory or VAX host memory
keywords hardware, computer graphics, technology
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:09

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