CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 21 to 40 of 96

_id ea4c
authors Chang, Hsi and Iyengar, S. Sitharama
year 1984
title Efficient Algorithms to Globally Balance a Binary Search Tree
source Communications of the ACM. July, 1984. vol. 27: pp. 695-702. includes bibliography
summary A binary search tree can be globally balanced by readjustment of pointers or with a sorting process in O(n) time, n being the total number of nodes. This paper presents three global balancing algorithms, one of which uses folding with the other two adopting parallel procedures. These algorithms show improvement in time efficiency over some sequential algorithms when applied to large binary search trees. A comparison of various algorithms is presented
keywords techniques, parallel processing, algorithms, search, sorting
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 8860
authors Choi, B.K., Barash, M.M. and Anderson, D.C.
year 1984
title Automatic Recognition of Machined Surfaces from a 3D Solid Model
source computer Aided Design. March, 1984. vol. 16: pp. 81-86 : ill. includes bibliography
summary It has been proposed that a direct link between CAD and CAM be provided through a computer-automated process planning system. Described in this paper are algorithmic procedures to identify machined surfaces (i.e., machining requirements) for a workpiece directly from its 3D geometric description. A machined surface is a portion of workpiece that can be generated by a certain mode of metal removal operation. Machined surfaces are algorithmically recognized from a 3D boundary file, and then their 2 1/2D descriptions are obtained in a data structure (format) suitable for an automated process planning system. A simplified boundary file data structure is introduced in order to explain the machined surface recognition procedures
keywords A machined surface type is defined as a pattern of faces, and a syntactic pattern recognition method is used to find the machined surface from the boundary file
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id f9f4
authors Cook, R.L., Porter, Th. and Carpenter, L.
year 1984
title Distributed Ray Tracing
source Computer Graphics, vol. 18, no. 3, pp. 137145, July 1984. SIGGRAPH '84 Proceedings
summary Ray tracing is one of the most elegant techniques in computer graphics. Many phenomena that are difficult or impossible with other techniques are simple with ray tracing, including shadows, reflections, and refracted light. Ray directions, however, have been determined precisely, and this has limited the capabilities of ray tracing. By distributing the directions of the rays according to the analytic function they sample, ray tracing can incorporate fuzzy phenomena. This provides correct and easy solutions to some previously unsolved or partially solved problems, including motion blur, depth of field, penumbras, translucency, and fuzzy reflections. Motion blur and depth of field calculations can be integrated with the visible surface calculations, avoiding the problems found in previous methods.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 6054
authors Cook, R.L.
year 1984
title Shade Trees
source Computer Graphics, Vol. 18, No.3, pp.223-23 1
summary Shading is an important part of computer imagery, but shaders have been based on fixed models to which all surfaces must conform. As computer imagery becomes more sophisticated, surfaces have more complex shading characteristics and thus require a less rigid shading model. This paper presents a flexible tree-structured shading model that can represent a wide range of shading characteristics. The model provides an easy means for specifying complex shading characteristics. It is also efficient because it can tailor the shading calculations to each type of surface.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 20ff
id 20ff
authors Derix, Christian
year 2004
title Building a Synthetic Cognizer
source Design Computation Cognition conference 2004, MIT
summary Understanding ‘space’ as a structured and dynamic system can provide us with insight into the central concept in the architectural discourse that so far has proven to withstand theoretical framing (McLuhan 1964). The basis for this theoretical assumption is that space is not a void left by solid matter but instead an emergent quality of action and interaction between individuals and groups with a physical environment (Hillier 1996). In this way it can be described as a parallel distributed system, a self-organising entity. Extrapolating from Luhmann’s theory of social systems (Luhmann 1984), a spatial system is autonomous from its progenitors, people, but remains intangible to a human observer due to its abstract nature and therefore has to be analysed by computed entities, synthetic cognisers, with the capacity to perceive. This poster shows an attempt to use another complex system, a distributed connected algorithm based on Kohonen’s self-organising feature maps – SOM (Kohonen 1997), as a “perceptual aid” for creating geometric mappings of these spatial systems that will shed light on our understanding of space by not representing space through our usual mechanics but by constructing artificial spatial cognisers with abilities to make spatial representations of their own. This allows us to be shown novel representations that can help us to see new differences and similarities in spatial configurations.
keywords architectural design, neural networks, cognition, representation
series other
type poster
email christian.derix@aedas.com
more http://www.springer.com/computer/ai/book/978-1-4020-2392-7
last changed 2012/09/17 19:13

_id e7cf
authors Eastman, Charles M. and Preiss, K.
year 1984
title A Review of Solid Shape Modelling Based on Integrity
source Computer Aided Design March, 1984. vol. 16: pp. 66-80 : ill. includes bibliography.
summary The potential benefits of using a canonical model for representing the shapes of solid objects has led to the design and implementation of a number of geometric modelers with varying capabilities. This paper reviews the approaches taken in solid modeling by defining the well-formedness conditions which must be implemented in any modeling system. The methods for satisfying the well-formedness constraints in the various solid modeling methods are reviewed, using the concept of integrity constraints. The incorporation of integrity constraints, both explicitly and implicitly, into solid modelers are considered, with particular focus on boundary modelers. The use of integrity constraints for defining shape families and assembly families are also presented. The result is a unified view of solid shape modeling systems that enables their classification and extension into particular application areas
keywords solid modeling, constraints, B-rep
series CADline
email chuck.eastman@arch.gatech.edu
last changed 2003/05/17 08:15

_id 26de
authors Enderle, G., K. Kansy and Pfaff, G.
year 1984
title Computer Graphics Programming : GKS - the graphics standard
source 542 p. : ill. (some col.) Berlin: Springer-Verlag, 1984. includes bibliography: p. 527-532 and index. -- (Symbolic Computation Series)
summary Covers computer graphics programming on the basis of the Graphical Kernel System. It gives an overview over the GKS concepts, the history of the GKS design and the various system interfaces. A detailed description of the application of GKS functions both in PASCAL and FORTRAN is a significant part
keywords standards, computer graphics, GKS, programming
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

_id a461
authors Gerzso, Miguel J. and Buchmann, Alejandro P.
year 1984
title TM : An Object- Oriented Language for CAD and Required Database Capabilities
source Silver Spring: IEEE Computer Society, 1984. pp. 115-123 : ill. includes bibliography
summary The object-oriented language TM is presented and its main features are discussed, such as attribute inheritance, extensibility, encapsulation, definition of public and private responses, and addition of responses. These features make TM attractive for expansion into a programming environment providing extensive DBMS capabilities. Since TM is conceived as a programming language for CAD, the extensions that are proposed are intended to convert TM into a programming environment and DBMS for CAD applications, providing the ability to handle molecular objects, heterogeneously formatted data and constraint management. The language has been implemented while the expansions are the subject of current research
keywords programming, languages, OOPS, CAD, applications,
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id b8b9
authors Gibson, W.
year 1984
title Neuromancer
source Victor Gollancz
summary Here is the novel that started it all, launching the cyberpunk generation, and the first novel to win the holy trinity of science fiction: the Hugo Award, the Nebula Award and the Philip K. Dick Award. With Neuromancer, William Gibson introduced the world to cyberspace--and science fiction has never been the same. Case was the hottest computer cowboy cruising the information superhighway--jacking his consciousness into cyberspace, soaring through tactile lattices of data and logic, rustling encoded secrets for anyone with the money to buy his skills. Then he double-crossed the wrong people, who caught up with him in a big way--and burned the talent out of his brain, micron by micron. Banished from cyberspace, trapped in the meat of his physical body, Case courted death in the high-tech underworld. Until a shadowy conspiracy offered him a second chance--and a cure--for a price....
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 61be
authors Goldberg, A.J.
year 1984
title Smalltalk-80: The Interactive Programming Environment
source Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley
summary This book describes the process by which Smalltalk was introduced to people outside Xerox PARC, where it was developed. This book first describes the incredibly exciting history of how Smalltalk was built from scratch. It then goes on to show the way in which Smalltalk was made public. At first, this was an engineering process. Large companies were contacted and offered to participate by porting the Smalltalk VM to their machines, and then running an image provided on tape. Each of these teams then wrote a paper on their experience, and these original papers are included in this book. Xerox PARC also wrote its own paper. These papers are an invaluable source of information for any Smalltalker. They range from overall design issues down to statistics on the work of the VM and image contents.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 2667
authors Gonzalez, C.J., Williams, M.H. and Atichison, I.E.
year 1984
title Evaluation of the Effectiveness of PROLOG for a CAD Application
source IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications March, 1984. vol. 4: pp. 67-75 : ill. includes bibliography.
summary A comparison between PROLOG and PASCAL by implementing them on a PDP-11/34 in order to study whether PROLOG could be used as a language for programming CAD applications and if so how could it be used. To obtain a fair perspective Pascal was chosen as a model for programming languages because it is well structured, embodying all the control structures required for structured programming and providing a wide range of data structure like PROLOG
keywords PROLOG, PASCAL, CAD, applications, programming, languages
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 12:41

_id 36
authors González, Carlos Guillermo
year 1998
title Una TecnologÌa Digital Para el Diseño: El Tde-Ac (A Digital Technology for Design: The Tde-Ac)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 274-279
summary TDE is a graphic language capable of notation of pure design operations, which offers an alternative to Monge and Perspective drawing. This language which was perfected and developed by Claudio Guerri in the late 80's, is originated in the Theory of Spatial Delimitation of CÈsar Janello (1974-1984). From 1995 onwards, and within the framework of the UBACyT AR025 Project (1995-1997), a software in order to apply the TDE through computer technology started to be developed. This work is carried out within the framework of the research program SPATIAL SEMIOTICS-DESIGN THEORY of the FADU-UBA directed by Claudio Guerri, and is continued in the UBACyT AR01 4 Project (1998-2000) "TDE-AC. Graphic language. TDE computer assisted". The computer tool TDE-AC, adds to this graphic language the power of the processing speed and a certain autonomy of interpretation and execution of design operations, which enables to visualize results with a remarkable speed in relation with manual or intellectual work in front of the drawing table. Trough the amplified projection on the screens of the program the stage of development and effectivity of TDE-AC will be demonstrated.
series SIGRADI
email gnzlz@satlink.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id ddss2008-02
id ddss2008-02
authors Gonçalves Barros, Ana Paula Borba; Valério Augusto Soares de Medeiros, Paulo Cesar Marques da Silva and Frederico de Holanda
year 2008
title Road hierarchy and speed limits in Brasília/Brazil
source H.J.P. Timmermans, B. de Vries (eds.) 2008, Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, ISBN 978-90-6814-173-3, University of Technology Eindhoven, published on CD
summary This paper aims at exploring the theory of the Social Logic of Space or Space Syntax as a strategy to define parameters of road hierarchy and, if this use is found possible, to establish maximum speeds allowed in the transportation system of Brasília, the capital city of Brazil. Space Syntax – a theory developed by Hillier and Hanson (1984) – incorporates the space topological relationships, considering the city shape and its influence in the distribution of movements within the space. The theory’s axiality method – used in this study – analyses the accessibility to the street network relationships, by means of the system’s integration, one of its explicative variables in terms of copresence, or potential co-existence between the through-passing movements of people and vehicles (Hillier, 1996). One of the most used concepts of Space Syntax in the integration, which represents the potential flow generation in the road axes and is the focus of this paper. It is believed there is a strong correlation between urban space-form configuration and the way flows and movements are distributed in the city, considering nodes articulations and the topological location of segments and streets in the grid (Holanda, 2002; Medeiros, 2006). For urban transportation studies, traffic-related problems are often investigated and simulated by assignment models – well-established in traffic studies. Space Syntax, on the other hand, is a tool with few applications in transport (Barros, 2006; Barros et al, 2007), an area where configurational models are considered to present inconsistencies when used in transportation (cf. Cybis et al, 1996). Although this is true in some cases, it should not be generalized. Therefore, in order to simulate and evaluate Space Syntax for the traffic approach, the city of Brasília was used as a case study. The reason for the choice was the fact the capital of Brazil is a masterpiece of modern urban design and presents a unique urban layout based on an axial grid system considering several express and arterial long roads, each one with 3 to 6 lanes,
keywords Space syntax, road hierarchy
series DDSS
last changed 2008/09/01 15:06

_id ga9928
id ga9928
authors Goulthorpe
year 1999
title Hyposurface: from Autoplastic to Alloplastic Space
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary By way of immediate qualification to an essay which attempts to orient current technical developments in relation to a series of dECOi projects, I would suggest that the greatest liberation offered by new technology in architecture is not its formal potential as much as the patterns of creativity and practice it engenders. For increasingly in the projects presented here dECOi operates as an extended network of technical expertise: Mark Burry and his research team at Deakin University in Australia as architects and parametric/ programmatic designers; Peter Wood in New Zealand as programmer; Alex Scott in London as mathematician; Chris Glasow in London as systems engineer; and the engineers (structural/services) of David Glover’s team at Ove Arup in London. This reflects how we’re working in a new technical environment - a new form of practice, in a sense - a loose and light network which deploys highly specialist technical skill to suit a particular project. By way of a second disclaimer, I would suggest that the rapid technological development we're witnessing, which we struggle to comprehend given the sheer pace of change that overwhelms us, is somehow of a different order than previous technological revolutions. For the shift from an industrial society to a society of mass communication, which is the essential transformation taking place in the present, seems to be a subliminal and almost inexpressive technological transition - is formless, in a sense - which begs the question of how it may be expressed in form. If one holds that architecture is somehow the crystallization of cultural change in concrete form, one suspects that in the present there is no simple physical equivalent for the burst of communication technologies that colour contemporary life. But I think that one might effectively raise a series of questions apropos technology by briefly looking at 3 or 4 of our current projects, and which suggest a range of possibilities fostered by new technology. By way of a third doubt, we might qualify in advance the apparent optimism of architects for CAD technology by thinking back to Thomas More and his island ‘Utopia’, which marks in some way the advent of Modern rationalism. This was, if not quite a technological utopia, certainly a metaphysical one, More’s vision typically deductive, prognostic, causal. But which by the time of Francis Bacon’s New Atlantis is a technological utopia availing itself of all the possibilities put at humanity’s disposal by the known machines of the time. There’s a sort of implicit sanction within these two accounts which lies in their nature as reality optimized by rational DESIGN as if the very ethos of design were sponsored by Modern rationalist thought and its utopian leanings. The faintly euphoric ‘technological’ discourse of architecture at present - a sort of Neue Bauhaus - then seems curiously misplaced historically given the 20th century’s general anti-, dis-, or counter-utopian discourse. But even this seems to have finally run its course, dissolving into the electronic heterotopia of the present with its diverse opportunities of irony and distortion (as it’s been said) as a liberating potential.1 This would seem to mark the dissolution of design ethos into non-causal process(ing), which begs the question of ‘design’ itself: who 'designs' anymore? Or rather, has 'design' not become uncoupled from its rational, deterministic, tradition? The utopianism that attatches to technological discourse in the present seems blind to the counter-finality of technology's own accomplishments - that transparency has, as it were, by its own more and more perfect fulfillment, failed by its own success. For what we seem to have inherited is not the warped utopia depicted in countless visions of a singular and tyrranical technology (such as that in Orwell's 1984), but a rich and diverse heterotopia which has opened the possibility of countless channels of local dialect competing directly with the channels of power. Undoubtedly such multiplicitous and global connectivity has sent creative thought in multiple directions…
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 4551
authors Griffiths, J.G.
year 1984
title A Depth-Coherence Scanline Algorithm for Displaying Curved Surfaces
source Computer Aided Design. March, 1984. vol. 16: pp. 91-101 : ill. includes bibliography
summary A scanline algorithm is presented which generates a realistic picture of a solid object bounded by curved surfaces. Externally, a surface is described by parametric equations. The internal representation is comprised of meshes of cubic splines which may be subdivided. Memory is saved by delaying subdivision, and by using a novel garbage collection technique. Time is saved by exploiting depth coherence. A viewpoint and scanline fix a cross-section represented as a set of curves. There are usually only a few of these to compare, and the curve nearest the viewer often remains nearest over much of its length
keywords algorithms, curves, curved surfaces, splines, computer graphics, hidden surfaces
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id c1ae
authors Gulliehsen, Eric and Chang, Ernest
year 1984
title An Expert System for Generative Architectural Design
source December, 1984. pp. 253-267. includes bibliography
summary The mathematician-architect Christopher Alexander has devised a scientific theory of architectural design. He believes that all existing architectural entities can be described as interacting patterns, all possible relationships of which are governed by generative rules. These form a pattern language capable of generating design forms appropriate to a given environmental context. The complexity of interaction among these rules leads to difficulties in their representation by conventional methods. This paper presents a computer-based expert system which implements Alexander's design methodology
keywords synthesis, expert systems, CAD, patterns, design, methods, architecture, theory
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

_id 2391
authors Hammond, Brian G. and Leifer, Dave
year 1984
title A Graphics Interface to Complement Traditional Techniques
source 1984? pp. 321-329 : ill. includes bibliography
summary Noting the reluctance of architects in small private practices to adopt CAAD aids, the crudity of existing graphic interfaces is identified as an inhibiting factor. A suite of computer programs currently under development are described which are designed to permit the input of geometric plan forms by traditional pencil and paper techniques, whilst utilizing the computers processing power to edit and manipulate the data so `captured'
keywords CAD, architecture, user interface, computer graphics
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 7789
authors Heckbert, P.S.
year 1984
title Survey of Texture Mapping
source IEEE Computer Graphics & Applications, Vol.6, No. 11, Nov. 1984, pp. 56-67
summary Texture mapping is one of the most successful new techniques in high quality image synthesis. Its use can enhance the visual richness of raster scan images immensely while entailing only a relatively small increase in computation. The technique has been applied to a number of surface attributes: surface color, surface normal, specularity, transparency, illumination, and surface displacement, to name a few. Although the list is potentially endless, the techniques of texture mapping are essentially the same in all cases. We will survey the fundamentals of texture mapping, which can be split into two topics: the geometric mapping that warps a texture onto a surface, and the filtering that is necessary in order to avoid aliasing. An extensive bibliography is included.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 653f
authors Hedelman, Harold
year 1984
title A Data Flow Approach to Procedural Modeling
source IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications January, 1984. vol. 4: pp. 16-26 : ill. (some col.). includes bibliography.
summary Computer graphics tasks generally involve either modeling or viewing. Modeling combines primitive building blocks (polygons, patches, etc.) into data structures that represent entire objects and scenes. To visualize a modeled object, its data structure is input to appropriate viewing routines. While a great deal has been done on modeling and viewing with geometric primitives, little has been published on the use of procedural primitives. A procedural model is a step-by-step guide for constructing a representation of an object or process, i.e., a program. It is also a function, a 'black box' with a set of inputs and outputs. Two questions are especially pertinent to the work presented in this article
keywords First, what are the advantages of both data flow methods and procedural modeling? Second, how can such models be used in composition? computer graphics, modeling, information, management
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:08

_id 63a9
authors Hellgardt, Michael
year 1993
title Architectural Theory and Design Grammars
source [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Eindhoven (The Netherlands) 11-13 November 1993
summary The idea of artificial brains and artificial intelligence (AI) has been subject to criticism. The objection of J. Searle, for instance, which has been published in 1984 and which was partially directly addressed to one of the centres of AI, the Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, is mainly based on two points: (1) interactions between physiological and mental functions, and (2) the intentionality and context-relatedness of meaning. - With an emphasis on architectural design, this paper is about the second point, because the problem of meaning is a neuralgic point in the discussion of "artificial intelligence in design" (AID). Technical parameters are incompatible with mechanisms of meaning in any field of artistic, cultural or non-technical expression. This point, that is the relation between acts of meaning and acts of technical problem-solving and, connectedly, the relation between technological and architectural design, has been widely ignored in the discussion on AID. The development seems to be dominated by the tacit assumption that architecture can be articulated and generated purely in technical and formal terms of information processing beyond the field of architecture itself. Design and shape grammars have become a well established field in the discussion of AID, also with respect to architecture. But questions of architectural history and theory are touched on only incidentally and not sufficiently in this discussion. The problem is not, in other words, simply to include more or less unrelated cases of architecture, or architectural concepts -even if these are famous ones, such as Laugier's original hut for instance but to establish structural relations between arguments of architectural theory and arguments of AID.

series eCAADe
email michael@hellgar.iaf.nl
last changed 2003/05/10 08:03

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