CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 141

_id 6735
authors Gardner, Howard
year 1985
title The Mind's New Science: A History of the Cognitive Revolution
source xv, 423 p. New York: Basic Books, 1985. includes bibliography: p.393-408 and indexes
summary An interdisciplinary effort of cognitive science through conceptual tools to solve the problem of the nature of knowledge and how it is represented in the mind
keywords AI, cognition, research, science, psychology
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:08

_id a864
authors Love, James A.
year 1985
title CAAD: The Interactive Effect in Technical Education
source ACADIA Workshop ‘85 [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Tempe (Arizona / USA) 2-3 November 1985, pp. 1-12
summary The factors that determine the value of CAAD tools in technical education are investigated. Pedagogical theory on problem solving is reviewed, and its relationship to the design process as described by Mitchell is discussed. The goals of design practice and design education are compared. Consideration of the nature of the architectural design process and the impact of CAAD leads to the conclusion that cognitive skills, as defined by Gagne, are of increasing importance. Pre-CAAD approaches to technical instruction are discussed. The opportunities represented by CAAD in terms of more relevant, effective, and rewarding learning experiences are noted. Features that make CAAD tools effective for instruction are considered, and the need for specialized instructional software is pointed out. Additional benefits of CAAD usage, including greater effectiveness of instructional staff and substitution for laboratory hardware are noted.
series ACADIA
email love@ucalgary.ca
last changed 2003/07/28 12:31

_id a6f1
authors Bridges, A.H.
year 1986
title Any Progress in Systematic Design?
source Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [CAAD Futures Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-408-05300-3] Delft (The Netherlands), 18-19 September 1985, pp. 5-15
summary In order to discuss this question it is necessary to reflect awhile on design methods in general. The usual categorization discusses 'generations' of design methods, but Levy (1981) proposes an alternative approach. He identifies five paradigm shifts during the course of the twentieth century which have influenced design methods debate. The first paradigm shift was achieved by 1920, when concern with industrial arts could be seen to have replaced concern with craftsmanship. The second shift, occurring in the early 1930s, resulted in the conception of a design profession. The third happened in the 1950s, when the design methods debate emerged; the fourth took place around 1970 and saw the establishment of 'design research'. Now, in the 1980s, we are going through the fifth paradigm shift, associated with the adoption of a holistic approach to design theory and with the emergence of the concept of design ideology. A major point in Levy's paper was the observation that most of these paradigm shifts were associated with radical social reforms or political upheavals. For instance, we may associate concern about public participation with the 1970s shift and the possible use (or misuse) of knowledge, information and power with the 1980s shift. What has emerged, however, from the work of colleagues engaged since the 1970s in attempting to underpin the practice of design with a coherent body of design theory is increasing evidence of the fundamental nature of a person's engagement with the design activity. This includes evidence of the existence of two distinctive modes of thought, one of which can be described as cognitive modelling and the other which can be described as rational thinking. Cognitive modelling is imagining, seeing in the mind's eye. Rational thinking is linguistic thinking, engaging in a form of internal debate. Cognitive modelling is externalized through action, and through the construction of external representations, especially drawings. Rational thinking is externalized through verbal language and, more formally, through mathematical and scientific notations. Cognitive modelling is analogic, presentational, holistic, integrative and based upon pattern recognition and pattern manipulation. Rational thinking is digital, sequential, analytical, explicatory and based upon categorization and logical inference. There is some relationship between the evidence for two distinctive modes of thought and the evidence of specialization in cerebral hemispheres (Cross, 1984). Design methods have tended to focus upon the rational aspects of design and have, therefore, neglected the cognitive aspects. By recognizing that there are peculiar 'designerly' ways of thinking combining both types of thought process used to perceive, construct and comprehend design representations mentally and then transform them into an external manifestation current work in design theory is promising at last to have some relevance to design practice.
series CAAD Futures
email a.h.bridges@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id avocaad_2001_16
id avocaad_2001_16
authors Yu-Ying Chang, Yu-Tung Liu, Chien-Hui Wong
year 2001
title Some Phenomena of Spatial Characteristics of Cyberspace
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary "Space," which has long been an important concept in architecture (Bloomer & Moore, 1977; Mitchell, 1995, 1999), has attracted interest of researchers from various academic disciplines in recent years (Agnew, 1993; Benko & Strohmayer, 1996; Chang, 1999; Foucault, 1982; Gould, 1998). Researchers from disciplines such as anthropology, geography, sociology, philosophy, and linguistics regard it as the basis of the discussion of various theories in social sciences and humanities (Chen, 1999). On the other hand, since the invention of Internet, Internet users have been experiencing a new and magic "world." According to the definitions in traditional architecture theories, "space" is generated whenever people define a finite void by some physical elements (Zevi, 1985). However, although Internet is a virtual, immense, invisible and intangible world, navigating in it, we can still sense the very presence of ourselves and others in a wonderland. This sense could be testified by our naming of Internet as Cyberspace -- an exotic kind of space. Therefore, as people nowadays rely more and more on the Internet in their daily life, and as more and more architectural scholars and designers begin to invest their efforts in the design of virtual places online (e.g., Maher, 1999; Li & Maher, 2000), we cannot help but ask whether there are indeed sensible spaces in Internet. And if yes, these spaces exist in terms of what forms and created by what ways?To join the current interdisciplinary discussion on the issue of space, and to obtain new definition as well as insightful understanding of "space", this study explores the spatial phenomena in Internet. We hope that our findings would ultimately be also useful for contemporary architectural designers and scholars in their designs in the real world.As a preliminary exploration, the main objective of this study is to discover the elements involved in the creation/construction of Internet spaces and to examine the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces. In addition, this study also attempts to investigate whether participants from different academic disciplines define or experience Internet spaces in different ways, and to find what spatial elements of Internet they emphasize the most.In order to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the spatial phenomena in Internet and to overcome the subjectivity of the members of the research team, the research design of this study was divided into two stages. At the first stage, we conducted literature review to study existing theories of space (which are based on observations and investigations of the physical world). At the second stage of this study, we recruited 8 Internet regular users to approach this topic from different point of views, and to see whether people with different academic training would define and experience Internet spaces differently.The results of this study reveal that the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces is different from that between human participants and physical spaces. In the physical world, physical elements of space must be established first; it then begins to be regarded as a place after interaction between/among human participants or interaction between human participants and the physical environment. In contrast, in Internet, a sense of place is first created through human interactions (or activities), Internet participants then begin to sense the existence of a space. Therefore, it seems that, among the many spatial elements of Internet we found, "interaction/reciprocity" Ñ either between/among human participants or between human participants and the computer interface Ð seems to be the most crucial element.In addition, another interesting result of this study is that verbal (linguistic) elements could provoke a sense of space in a degree higher than 2D visual representation and no less than 3D visual simulations. Nevertheless, verbal and 3D visual elements seem to work in different ways in terms of cognitive behaviors: Verbal elements provoke visual imagery and other sensory perceptions by "imagining" and then excite personal experiences of space; visual elements, on the other hand, provoke and excite visual experiences of space directly by "mapping".Finally, it was found that participants with different academic training did experience and define space differently. For example, when experiencing and analyzing Internet spaces, architecture designers, the creators of the physical world, emphasize the design of circulation and orientation, while participants with linguistics training focus more on subtle language usage. Visual designers tend to analyze the graphical elements of virtual spaces based on traditional painting theories; industrial designers, on the other hand, tend to treat these spaces as industrial products, emphasizing concept of user-center and the control of the computer interface.The findings of this study seem to add new information to our understanding of virtual space. It would be interesting for future studies to investigate how this information influences architectural designers in their real-world practices in this digital age. In addition, to obtain a fuller picture of Internet space, further research is needed to study the same issue by examining more Internet participants who have no formal linguistics and graphical training.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id ed59
authors Hart, Anna
year 1985
title Knowledge Elicitation : Issues and Methods
source Computer Aided Design. November, 1985. vol. 17: pp. 455-462 : ill. includes bibliography
summary The paper, after briefly outlining the stages in the development of an expert system, describes and reviews methods for knowledge elicitation. These methods include: interview techniques; protocol analysis; induction; and the repertory grid technique
keywords knowledge acquisition, expert systems, protocol analysis, psychology
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:08

_id ce52
authors Abram, Greg, Weslover, Lee and Whitted, Turner
year 1985
title Efficient Alias-Free Rendering using Bit-masks and Look-up Tables
source SIGGRAPH '85 Conference Proceedings. July, 1985. vol. 19 ; no. 3: pp. 53-59 : ill. (some col.). includes bibliography
summary The authors demonstrate methods of rendering alias-free synthetic images using a precomputed convolution integral. The method is based on the observation that a visible polygon fragment's contribution to an image is solely a function of its position and shape, and that within a reasonable level of accuracy, a limited number of shapes represent the majority of cases encountered in images commonly rendered. The basic technique has been applied to several different rendering algorithms. A version of the newly non-uniform sampling technique implemented in the same program but with different tables values was introduced
keywords algorithms, computer graphics, anti-aliasing
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 2730
authors Balkovich, Edward, Lerman, Steven and Parmelee, Richard P.
year 1985
title Computing in Higher Education : The ATHENA Experience
source communications of the ACM. November, 1985. vol. 28: pp. 1214- 1224
summary In this article the use of computation in higher education is approached from the broad sense of its actual use in the curriculum. The authors try to identify areas where current educational methods have observable deficiencies that might be alleviated by the use of appropriate software/hardware combinations. Project ATHENA at MIT is the example the article is based on
keywords networks, software, hardware, UNIX, education
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 2928
authors Barsky, Brian A. and De Rose, Tony D.
year 1985
title The Beta2-spline : A Special Case of the Beta-spline Curve and Surface Representation
source IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications September, 1985. vol. 5: pp. 46-58 : ill. includes bibliography.
summary This article develops a special case of the Beta-spline curve and surface technique called the Beta2-spline. While a general Beta-spline has two parameters (B1 and B2) controlling its shape, the special case presented here has only the single parameter B2. Experience has shown this to be a simple but very useful special case that is computationally more efficient than the general case. Optimized algorithms for the evaluation of the Beta2-spline basis functions and rendering of Beta2-spline curves and surfaces via subdivision are presented. This technique is proving to be quite useful in the modeling of complex shapes. The representation is sufficiently general and flexible so as to be capable of modeling irregular curved-surface objects such as automobile bodies, aircraft fuselages, ship hulls, turbine blades, and bottles
keywords B-splines, curved surfaces, computational geometry, representation, algorithms, computer graphics, rendering
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 12:41

_id 2d64
authors Batori, D.S. and Kim, W.
year 1985
title Modeling Concepts for VLSI CAD Objects
source ACM Transactions on Database Systems 10 No. 3 - pp. 322-346
summary VLSI CAD applications deal with design objects that have an interface description and an implementation description. Versions of design objects have a common interface but differ in their implementations. A molecular object is a modeling construct which enables a database entity to be represented by two sets of heterogeneous records, one set describes the object's interface and the other describes its implementation. Thus a reasonable starting point for modeling design objects is to begin with the concept of molecular objects. In this paper, we identify modeling concepts that are fundamental to capturing the semantics of VLSI CAD design objects and versions in terms of molecular objects. A provisional set of user operations on design objects, consistent with these modeling concepts, is also defined. The modeling framework that we present has been found useful for investigating physical storage techniques and change notification problems in version control. REFERENCES
series journal paper
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ddssar0206
id ddssar0206
authors Bax, M.F.Th. and Trum, H.M.G.J.
year 2002
title Faculties of Architecture
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Sixth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings Avegoor, the Netherlands), 2002
summary In order to be inscribed in the European Architect’s register the study program leading to the diploma ‘Architect’ has to meet the criteria of the EC Architect’s Directive (1985). The criteria are enumerated in 11 principles of Article 3 of the Directive. The Advisory Committee, established by the European Council got the task to examine such diplomas in the case some doubts are raised by other Member States. To carry out this task a matrix was designed, as an independent interpreting framework that mediates between the principles of Article 3 and the actual study program of a faculty. Such a tool was needed because of inconsistencies in the list of principles, differences between linguistic versions ofthe Directive, and quantification problems with time, devoted to the principles in the study programs. The core of the matrix, its headings, is a categorisation of the principles on a higher level of abstractionin the form of a taxonomy of domains and corresponding concepts. Filling in the matrix means that each study element of the study programs is analysed according to their content in terms of domains; thesummation of study time devoted to the various domains results in a so-called ‘profile of a faculty’. Judgement of that profile takes place by committee of peers. The domains of the taxonomy are intrinsically the same as the concepts and categories, needed for the description of an architectural design object: the faculties of architecture. This correspondence relates the taxonomy to the field of design theory and philosophy. The taxonomy is an application of Domain theory. This theory,developed by the authors since 1977, takes as a view that the architectural object only can be described fully as an integration of all types of domains. The theory supports the idea of a participatory andinterdisciplinary approach to design, which proved to be awarding both from a scientific and a social point of view. All types of domains have in common that they are measured in three dimensions: form, function and process, connecting the material aspects of the object with its social and proceduralaspects. In the taxonomy the function dimension is emphasised. It will be argued in the paper that the taxonomy is a categorisation following the pragmatistic philosophy of Charles Sanders Peirce. It will bedemonstrated as well that the taxonomy is easy to handle by giving examples of its application in various countries in the last 5 years. The taxonomy proved to be an adequate tool for judgement ofstudy programs and their subsequent improvement, as constituted by the faculties of a Faculty of Architecture. The matrix is described as the result of theoretical reflection and practical application of a matrix, already in use since 1995. The major improvement of the matrix is its direct connection with Peirce’s universal categories and the self-explanatory character of its structure. The connection with Peirce’s categories gave the matrix a more universal character, which enables application in other fieldswhere the term ‘architecture’ is used as a metaphor for artefacts.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 8323
authors Bentley, Jon L.
year 1985
title Selection -- Programming Pearls
source communications of the ACM. November, 1985. vol. 28: pp. 1121- 1127 : ill
summary This column describes selecting the K- smallest member in a set of N elements. A program for the task is derived and its running time is analyzed
keywords search, programming, algorithms, techniques
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id c3b1
authors Berry, R. E. and Meekings, B.A.E.
year 1985
title A Style Analysis of C Programs
source communications of the ACM. January, 1985. vol. 29: pp. 80-88
summary Since programming is considered by many to be learned by experience and example, rather than instruction, the authors analyzed code produced by professional programmers. C programs comprising the UNIX operating system and its utilities were chosen. The authors have arbitrarily selected a large body of professionally produced code and subjected it to 'stylish analysis.' Each program was given a percentage 'score' for style that consists of contributions in varying degrees from various program features like module length, line length, reserved words etc
keywords languages, C, programming, techniques
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id c088
authors Biermann, Alan W., Rodman, Robert D. and Rubin, David C. (et al)
year 1985
title Natural Language with Discrete Speech as a Mode for Human- to-Machine Communication
source Communications of the ACM June, 1985. vol. 28: pp. 628-636 : ill. includes bibliography.
summary A voice interactive natural language system, which allows users to solve problems with spoken English commands, has been constructed. The system utilizes a commercially available discrete speech recognizer which requires that each word be followed by approximately a 300 millisecond pause. In a test of the system, subjects were able to learn its use after about two hours of training. The system correctly processed about 77 percent of the over 6000 input sentences spoken in problem-solving sessions. Subjects spoke at the rate of about three sentences per minute and were able to effectively use the system to complete the given tasks. Subjects found the system relatively easy to learn and use, and gave a generally positive report of their experience
keywords user interface, natural languages, speech recognition, AI
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 66b3
authors Bollinger, Elizabeth
year 1985
title Integrating CADD into the AEC Process - A Case Study
source ACADIA Workshop ‘85 [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Tempe (Arizona / USA) 2-3 November 1985, pp. 13-24
summary A research grant was awarded to the Graduate School of Architecture at the University of Houston by Nash Phillips/Copus, a large homebuilding corporation, to study the integration of computer aided design into the entire building process. A computer aided design system had been utilized by the firm's department of architecture and planning for several months. A team of University faculty and graduate students studied the organization of the firm with respect to functions that could be automated. Its determination was that by utilizing an integrated data base, with information to be extracted from the computer generated drawings, the entire process of bidding and building a structure could be made more efficient and cost effective. The research team developed a system in which cost estimating could be done directly from the drawings. As drawings were modified, new reports could be automatically generated. More design solutions could be studied from the impact of cost as well as aesthetics. Additionally, once plans were drawn, a program written by students would automatically generate elevations of wall panels to be sent to the construction department for its use, and which would also generate material reports. The team also studied techniques of computer modelling for usage by the architectural planning department in client presentations.
series ACADIA
email EBollinger@uh.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id c211
authors Brown, A.G.P.
year 1986
title A Year's Experience with CATIA and CADAM
source Teaching and Research Experience with CAAD [4th eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Rome (Italy) 11-13 September 1986, pp. 7-16
summary In June 1985 Liverpool University obtained the CAD packages CATIA and CADAM to run on its IBM 4341 mainframe. The following is a brief description of the investigations which have taken place in the first year of their implementation to gauge the usefulness of these packages, principalLy as CAAD teaching aids. Neither CATIA nor CADAM were initially developed as architectural design aids so a matter of initial concern was their appropriateness for teaching (and possibly research) in an architectural environment.
series eCAADe
email andygpb@liv.ac.uk
last changed 1998/08/18 07:56

_id 63d0
authors Carrara, Gianfranco and Novembri, Gabriele
year 1986
title Constraint-bounded design search
source Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [CAAD Futures Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-408-05300-3] Delft (The Netherlands), 18-19 September 1985, pp. 146-157
summary The design process requires continual checking of the consistency of design choices against given sets of goals that have been fulfilled. Such a check is generally performed by comparing abstract representations of design goals with these of the sought real building objects (RBO) resulting from complex intellectual activities closely related to the designer's culture and to the environment in which he operates. In this chapter we define a possible formalization of such representations concerning the goals and the RBO that are usually considered in the architectural design process by our culture in our environment. The representation of design goals is performed by expressing their objective aspects (requirements) and by defining their allowable values (performance specifications). The resulting system of requirements defines the set of allowable solutions and infers an abstract representation of the sought building objects (BO) that consists of the set of characteristics (attributes and relations) which are considered relevant to represent the particular kind of RBO with respect to the consistency check with design goals. The values related to such characteristics define the performances of the RBO while their set establishes its behaviour. Generally speaking, there is no single real object corresponding to an abstract representation but the whole class of the RBO that are equivalent with respect to the values assumed by the considered characteristics. The more we increase the number of these, as well as their specifications, the smaller the class becomes until it coincides with a single real object - given that the assessed specifications be fully consistent. On the other hand, the corresponding representation evolves to the total prefiguration of the RBO. It is not therefore possible to completely define a BO representation in advance since this is inferred by the considered goals and is itself a result of the design process. What can only be established in advance is that any set of characteristics assumed to represent any RBO consists of hierarchic, topological, geometrical and functional relations among the parts of the object at any level of aggregation (from components to space units, to building units, to the whole building) that we define representation structure (RS). Consequently the RS may be thought as the elementary structures that, by superposition and interaction, set up the abstract representation that best fit with design goals.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id 298e
authors Dave, Bharat and Woodbury, Robert
year 1990
title Computer Modeling: A First Course in Design Computing
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 61-76
summary Computation in design has long been a focus in our department. In recent years our faculty has paid particular attention to the use of computation in professional architectural education. The result is a shared vision of computers in the curriculum [Woodbury 1985] and a set of courses, some with considerable historyland others just now being initiated. We (Dave and Woodbury) have jointly developed and at various times over the last seven years have taught Computer Modeling, the most introductory of these courses. This is a required course for all the incoming freshmen students in the department. In this paper we describe Computer Modeling: its context, the issues and topics it addresses, the tasks it requires of students, and the questions and opportunities that it raises. Computer Modeling is a course about concepts, about ways of explicitly understanding design and its relation to computation. Procedural skills and algorithmic problem solving techniques are given only secondary emphasis. In essential terms, the course is about models, of design processes, of designed objects, of computation and of computational design. Its lessons are intended to communicate a structure of such models to students and through this structure to demonstrate a relationship between computation and design. It is hoped that this structure can be used as a framework, around which students can continue to develop an understanding of computers in design.
series CAAD Futures
email b.dave@unimelb.edu.au
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id acadia06_068
id acadia06_068
authors Elys, John
year 2006
title Digital Ornament
source Synthetic Landscapes [Proceedings of the 25th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer-Aided Design in Architecture] pp. 68-78
summary Gaming software has a history of fostering development of economical and creative methods to deal with hardware limitations. Traditionally the visual representation of gaming software has been a poor offspring of high-end visualization. In a twist of irony, this paper proposes that game production software leads the way into a new era of physical digital ornament. The toolbox of the rendering engine evolved rapidly between 1974-1985 and it is still today, 20 years later the main component of all visualization programs. The development of the bump map is of particular interest; its evolution into a physical displacement map provides untold opportunities of the appropriation of the 2D image to a physical 3D object.To expose the creative potential of the displacement map, a wide scope of existing displacement usage has been identified: Top2maya is a scientific appropriation, Caruso St John Architects an architectural precedent and Tord Boonje’s use of 2D digital pattern provides us with an artistic production precedent. Current gaming technologies give us an indication of how the resolution of displacement is set to enter an unprecedented level of geometric detail. As modernity was inspired by the machine age, we should be led by current technological advancement and appropriate its usage. It is about a move away from the simplification of structure and form to one that deals with the real possibilities of expanding the dialogue of surface topology. Digital Ornament is a kinetic process rather than static, its intentions lie in returning the choice of bespoke materials back to the Architect, Designer and Artist.
series ACADIA
email elysjohn@hotmail.com
last changed 2006/09/22 06:22

_id 6947
authors Foxley, Eric, McGettrick, A. D. and van Leeuwen, J. (consulting editors)
year 1985
title UNIX for Super Users
source xiv, 213 p. Wokingham, England: Addison-Wesley Pub. Co., 1985. includes index -- (International Computer Science Series)
summary For the person responsible for managing a UNIX system. A description of key management functions like : Bringing up the system and taking it down, creation of new login names, maintenance of file-store security, monitoring user resource usage, and machine performance considerations. Outlines of shell scripts and C programs for various system management function are given. All major versions, at the time, of UNIX and its derivatives are covered
keywords UNIX, operating systems
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

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