CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 81 to 89 of 89

_id 452c
authors Vanier, D. J. and Worling, Jamie
year 1986
title Three-dimensional Visualization: A Case Study
source Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [CAAD Futures Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-408-05300-3] Delft (The Netherlands), 18-19 September 1985, pp. 92-102
summary Three-dimensional computer visualization has intrigued both building designers and computer scientists for decades. Research and conference papers present an extensive list of existing and potential uses for threedimensional geometric data for the building industry (Baer et al., 1979). Early studies on visualization include urban planning (Rogers, 1980), treeshading simulation (Schiler and Greenberg, 1980), sun studies (Anon, 1984), finite element analysis (Proulx, 1983), and facade texture rendering (Nizzolese, 1980). With the advent of better interfaces, faster computer processing speeds and better application packages, there had been interest on the part of both researchers and practitioners in three-dimensional -models for energy analysis (Pittman and Greenberg, 1980), modelling with transparencies (Hebert, 1982), super-realistic rendering (Greenberg, 1984), visual impact (Bridges, 1983), interference clash checking (Trickett, 1980), and complex object visualization (Haward, 1984). The Division of Building Research is currently investigating the application of geometric modelling in the building delivery process using sophisticated software (Evans, 1985). The first stage of the project (Vanier, 1985), a feasibility study, deals with the aesthetics of the mode. It identifies two significant requirements for geometric modelling systems: the need for a comprehensive data structure and the requirement for realistic accuracies and tolerances. This chapter presents the results of the second phase of this geometric modelling project, which is the construction of 'working' and 'presentation' models for a building.
series CAAD Futures
email Dana.Vanier@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id 02c6
authors Wheeler, B.J.Q
year 1986
title A Unified Model for Building
source Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [CAAD Futures Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-408-05300-3] Delft (The Netherlands), 18-19 September 1985, pp. 200-231
summary It is commonly recognized that the time-honoured procedure for preparing an architectural design for building on site is inefficient. Each member of a team of consultant professionals makes an independently documented contribution. For a typical project involving an architect and structural, electrical, mechanical and public services engineers there will be at least five separate sets of general- arrangement drawings, each forming a model of the building, primarily illustrating one discipline but often having to include elements of others in order to make the drawing readable. For example, an air-conditioning duct-work layout is more easily understood when superimposed on the room layout it serves which the engineer is not responsible for but has to understand. Both during their parallel evolution and later, when changes have to be made during the detailed design and production drawing stages, it is difficult and time consuming to keep all versions coordinated. Complete coordination is rarely achieved in time, and conflicts between one discipline and another have to be rectified when encountered on site with resulting contractual implications. Add the interior designer, the landscape architect and other specialized consultants at one end of the list and contractors' shop drawings relating to the work of all the consultants at the other, and the number of different versions of the same thing grows, escalating the concomitant task of coordination. The potential for disputes over what is the current status of the design is enormous, first, amongst the consultants and second, between the consultants and the contractor. When amendments are made by one party, delay and confusion tend to follow during the period it takes the other parties to update their versions to include them. The idea of solving this problem by using a common computer-based model which all members of the project team can directly contribute to is surely a universally assumed goal amongst all those involved in computer-aided building production. The architect produces a root drawing or model, the 'Architect's base plan', to which the other consultants have read-only access and on top of which they can add their own write-protected files. Every time they access the model to write in the outcome of their work on the project they see the current version of the 'Architect's base plan' and can thus respond immediately to recent changes and avoid wasting time on redundant work. The architect meanwhile adds uniquely architectural material in his own overlaid files and maintains the root model as everybody's work requires. The traditional working pattern is maintained while all the participants have the ability to see their colleagues, work but only make changes to those parts for which they are responsible.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id 8f9d
authors Wolchko, Matthew J.
year 1985
title Strategies Toward Architectural Knowledge Engineering
source ACADIA Workshop 85 [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Tempe (Arizona / USA) 2-3 November 1985, pp. 69-82
summary Conventional CAD-drafting systems become more powerful modeling tools with the addition of a linked attribute spreadsheet module. This affords the designer the ability to make design decisions not only in the graphic environment, but also as a consequence of quantitative design constraints made apparent in the spreadsheet. While the spreadsheet interface is easily understood by the user, it suffers from two limitations: it lacks a variety of functional capabilities that would enable it to solve more complex design tasks; also, it can only report on existing conditions in the graphic environment. A proposal is made for the enhancement of the spreadsheet's programming power, creating an interface for the selection of program modules that can solve various architectural design tasks. Due to the complexity and graphic nature of architectural design, it is suggested that both procedural and propositional programming methods be used in concert within such a system. In the following, a suitable design task (artificial illumination-reflected ceiling layout) is selected, and then decomposed into two parts: the quantitative analysis (via the application of a procedural programming algorithm), and a logical model generation using shape grammar rules in a propositional framework.
series ACADIA
last changed 1999/01/01 17:51

_id c328
authors Woo, Tony C. and Shin, S. Y.
year 1985
title A Linear Time Algorithm for Triangulating a Point-Visible Polygon
source ACM Transactions on Graphics. January, 1985. Vol. 4: pp. 60-70 : ill. includes bibliography
summary The triangulation of a point-visible (star-shaped) polygon cannot be performed trivially if its kernel does not share a vertex with the polygon. The paper presents a triangulation algorithm that exploits point-and strong edge-visibility. It is through these two properties that the authors are able to triangulate in linear time. After classifying simple polygons by visibility, the authors show that strongly edge-visible polygons can be triangulated in linear time. A point-visible polygon is transformed into a strongly edge-visible polygon by the following steps: partitioning with a ray, partially triangulating both partitions, merging the two remaining polygons, and showing that the merged polygon is a strongly edge-visible polygon
keywords algorithms, polygons, triangulation, computational geometry
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id avocaad_2001_16
id avocaad_2001_16
authors Yu-Ying Chang, Yu-Tung Liu, Chien-Hui Wong
year 2001
title Some Phenomena of Spatial Characteristics of Cyberspace
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary "Space," which has long been an important concept in architecture (Bloomer & Moore, 1977; Mitchell, 1995, 1999), has attracted interest of researchers from various academic disciplines in recent years (Agnew, 1993; Benko & Strohmayer, 1996; Chang, 1999; Foucault, 1982; Gould, 1998). Researchers from disciplines such as anthropology, geography, sociology, philosophy, and linguistics regard it as the basis of the discussion of various theories in social sciences and humanities (Chen, 1999). On the other hand, since the invention of Internet, Internet users have been experiencing a new and magic "world." According to the definitions in traditional architecture theories, "space" is generated whenever people define a finite void by some physical elements (Zevi, 1985). However, although Internet is a virtual, immense, invisible and intangible world, navigating in it, we can still sense the very presence of ourselves and others in a wonderland. This sense could be testified by our naming of Internet as Cyberspace -- an exotic kind of space. Therefore, as people nowadays rely more and more on the Internet in their daily life, and as more and more architectural scholars and designers begin to invest their efforts in the design of virtual places online (e.g., Maher, 1999; Li & Maher, 2000), we cannot help but ask whether there are indeed sensible spaces in Internet. And if yes, these spaces exist in terms of what forms and created by what ways?To join the current interdisciplinary discussion on the issue of space, and to obtain new definition as well as insightful understanding of "space", this study explores the spatial phenomena in Internet. We hope that our findings would ultimately be also useful for contemporary architectural designers and scholars in their designs in the real world.As a preliminary exploration, the main objective of this study is to discover the elements involved in the creation/construction of Internet spaces and to examine the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces. In addition, this study also attempts to investigate whether participants from different academic disciplines define or experience Internet spaces in different ways, and to find what spatial elements of Internet they emphasize the most.In order to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the spatial phenomena in Internet and to overcome the subjectivity of the members of the research team, the research design of this study was divided into two stages. At the first stage, we conducted literature review to study existing theories of space (which are based on observations and investigations of the physical world). At the second stage of this study, we recruited 8 Internet regular users to approach this topic from different point of views, and to see whether people with different academic training would define and experience Internet spaces differently.The results of this study reveal that the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces is different from that between human participants and physical spaces. In the physical world, physical elements of space must be established first; it then begins to be regarded as a place after interaction between/among human participants or interaction between human participants and the physical environment. In contrast, in Internet, a sense of place is first created through human interactions (or activities), Internet participants then begin to sense the existence of a space. Therefore, it seems that, among the many spatial elements of Internet we found, "interaction/reciprocity" either between/among human participants or between human participants and the computer interface seems to be the most crucial element.In addition, another interesting result of this study is that verbal (linguistic) elements could provoke a sense of space in a degree higher than 2D visual representation and no less than 3D visual simulations. Nevertheless, verbal and 3D visual elements seem to work in different ways in terms of cognitive behaviors: Verbal elements provoke visual imagery and other sensory perceptions by "imagining" and then excite personal experiences of space; visual elements, on the other hand, provoke and excite visual experiences of space directly by "mapping".Finally, it was found that participants with different academic training did experience and define space differently. For example, when experiencing and analyzing Internet spaces, architecture designers, the creators of the physical world, emphasize the design of circulation and orientation, while participants with linguistics training focus more on subtle language usage. Visual designers tend to analyze the graphical elements of virtual spaces based on traditional painting theories; industrial designers, on the other hand, tend to treat these spaces as industrial products, emphasizing concept of user-center and the control of the computer interface.The findings of this study seem to add new information to our understanding of virtual space. It would be interesting for future studies to investigate how this information influences architectural designers in their real-world practices in this digital age. In addition, to obtain a fuller picture of Internet space, further research is needed to study the same issue by examining more Internet participants who have no formal linguistics and graphical training.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id a237
authors Zelissen, C.
year 1986
title Report of a CAAD-Course: Curriculum, Results and Revision
source Teaching and Research Experience with CAAD [4th eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Rome (Italy) 11-13 September 1986, pp. 146-153
summary In 1985 the college of Technology Heerlen started in cooperation with the Academy of Architecture Maastricht a course CAAD on behalf of graduates of both institutes. In this contribution attention is paid to the preparation and frame. The course in 1985 was a great success. After a profound revision the course has started again this year. A report of the experiences by the course developer/co-ordinator.

series eCAADe
last changed 1998/08/18 08:10

_id 4f6f
authors Kalay, Yehuda E.
year 1985
title Knowledge-Based Computer-Aided Design to Assist Designers of Physical Artifacts
source 1985. [15] p. : ill. includes bibliography
summary The objectives of this project are to increase the productivity of physical designers, and to improve the quality of designed artifacts and environments. The means for achieving these objectives include the development, implementation and verification of a broad-based methodology to be used for building context-sensitive computer-aided design systems to facilitate the design and fabrication of physical artifacts. Such systems will extend computer aides for design over the earliest phases of the design process and thus facilitate design-capture in addition to the common design-communication utilities they currently provide. They will thus constitute intelligent design assistants that will relieve the designer from the necessity to deal with some design details, as well as the need to explicitly manage the consistency of the design database. The project employs principles developed by Artificial Intelligence methods that are used in non-deterministic problem solving processes that represent data and knowledge in distributed networks. Principles such as object-centered data factorization and message-based change propagation techniques are implemented in an existing architectural computer-aided design system and field-tested in a practicing Architectural/Engineering office
keywords CAD, knowledge base, design methods, design process, architecture
series CADline
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 4839
authors Kripac, Jiri
year 1985
title Classification of Edges and its Application in Determining Visibility
source Computer Aided Design. January/ February 1985. vol. 17: pp.30-36 : ill. includes bibliography
summary A new hidden-line algorithm is proposed for illustrating objects consisting of plane faces. The algorithm determines the degree of edge and classifies edges and faces into contoural and non-contoural. To reduce memory requirements, sequential files and sorting are used. The algorithm is particularly intended for illustrating complex objects, such as curved surfaces approximated by plane faces
keywords algorithms, hidden lines, curved surfaces, geometric modeling, computer graphics
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:08

_id 6c66
authors Perlin, Ken
year 1985
title An Image Synthesizer
source SIGGRAPH '85 Conference Proceedings. July, 1985. vol. 19 ; no. 3: pp. 287- 296 : ill. includes bibliography
summary The authors introduce the concept of a Pixel Stream Editor. This forms the basis for an interactive synthesizer for designing highly realistic Computer Generated Imagery. The designer works in an interactive Very High Level programming environment which provides a very fast concept/implement/view iteration cycle. Naturalistic visual complexity is built up by composition of non-linear functions, as opposed to the more conventional texture mapping or growth model algorithms. Powerful primitives are included for creating controlled stochastic effects. The concept of 'solid texture' to the field of CGI is introduced. The authors have used this system to create very convincing representations of clouds, fire, water, stars, marble, wood, rock, soap films and crystals. The algorithms created with this paradigm are generally extremely fast, highly realistic, and asynchronously parallelizable at the pixel level
keywords computer graphics, programming, algorithms, synthesis, realism
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:09

For more results click below:

show page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3this is page 4HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_787001 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002