CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 172

_id 266d
authors Badler, Norman I., Manoochehri, Kamran H. and Walters, Graham
year 1987
title Articulated Figure Positioning by Multiple Constraints
source IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications. June, 1987. vol. 7: pp. 28-38 : ill. Includes bibliography
summary A problem that arises in positioning an articulated figures is the solution of 3D joint positions (kinematics), when joint angles are given. If more than one such goal is to be achieved, the problem is often solved interactively by positioning or solving one component of the linkage, then adjusting another, then redoing the first, and so on. This iterative process is slow and tedious. The authors present a method that automatically solves multiple simultaneous joint position goals. The user interface offers a six-degree-of freedom input device to specify joint angles and goal positions interactively. Examples are used to demonstrate the power and efficiency of this method for key-position animation
keywords animation, constraints, computer graphics
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 696c
authors Beheshti, M. and Monroy, M.
year 1988
title Requirements for Developing an Information System for Architecture
source CAAD futures ‘87 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-42916-6] Eindhoven (The Netherlands), 20-22 May 1987, pp. 149-170
summary This paper discusses possibilities of developing new tools for architectural design. It argues that architects should meet the challenge of information technology and computer-based design techniques. One such attempt has been the first phase of the development of an architectural design information system (ADIS), also an architectural design decision support system. The system should benefit from the developments of the artificial intelligence to enable the architect to have access to information required to carry out design work. In other words: the system functions as a huge on-line electronic library of architecture, containing up-to-date architectural design information, literature, documents, etc. At the same time, the system offers necessary design aids such as computer programs for design process, drawing programs, evaluation programs, cost calculation programs, etc. The system also provides data communication between the architect and members of the design coalition team. This is found to be of vital importance in the architectural design process, because it can enable the architect to fit in changes, brought about in the project by different parties. Furthermore, they will be able, to oversee promptly the consequences of changes or decisions in a comprehensive manner. The system will offer advantages over the more commonly applied microcomputer based CAAD and IGDM (integrated graphics database management) systems, or even larger systems available to an architect. Computer programs as well as hardware change rapidly and become obsolete. Therefore, unrelenting investment pressure to up-date both software and hardware exists. The financial burden of this is heavy, in particular for smaller architectural practices (for instance an architect working for himself or herself and usually with few or no permanent staff). ADIS, as an on-line architectural design aid, is constantly up-dated by its own organisation. This task will be co-ordinated by the ADIS data- base administrator (DBA). The processing possibilities of the system are faster, therefore more complex processing tasks can be handled. Complicated large graphic data files, can be easily retrieved and manipulated by ADIS, a large system. In addition, the cost of an on-line system will be much less than any other system. The system is based on one model of the architectural design process, but will eventually contain a variety of design models, as it develops. The development of the system will be an evolutionary process, making use of its users' feed-back system. ADIS is seen as a step towards full automation of architectural design practices. Apart from being an architectural design support system, ADIS will assist the architect in his/her administrative and organisational activities.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id b915
authors Carpenter, L., Catmull, E. and Cook, R.L.
year 1987
title The REYES image rendering architecture
source Computer Graphics, 21 4, 95-102
summary In 1987, Robert Cook, Loren Carpenter, and Edwin Catmull released an article about the Reyes (Renders Everything You Ever Saw) image rendering pipeline [1]. This pipeline formed the basis for PRMan (Photo-realistic RenderMan), Pixar's ground-breaking image renderer. The basic Reyes pipeline proceeds in several steps: For each primitive in the scene: 1. Transform to Camera-Space 2. Bound - Eye-space bound of the primitive that will help cull primitives that are outside of the viewing area. 3. Split - A primitive can split itself into one or more smaller primitives. This will help to reduce the total number of polygons when the primitive gets diced. It will also allow parts of a primitive to be culled. 4. Dice - Convert the primitive into a grid of micropolygons. Each micropolygon is about the size of half of a pixel. 5. Shade - Perform lighting and shading calculations on each vertex in the micropolygon grid. 6. Draw - Scan convert and perform z-buffer calculations on the micropolygons of each primitive.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id e9ef
authors Casale, Malcolm S.
year 1987
title Free-Form Solid Modeling with Trimmed Surface Patches
source IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications January, 1987. vol. 7: pp. 33-43 : col. ill. includes bibliography.
summary Solid modelers store a more complete representation than wireframe or surface modelers. This completeness permits the automation of such tasks as interference analysis, mass property calculation, and finite element mesh generation. But the denser information content and complex algorithms needed to perform these tasks complicate the support of free-form geometry, especially Boolean operations. Consequently, the high degree of geometric coverage traditionally found in surface modeling systems has not, for the most part, been equaled in modern solid modelers. This article explores some of the difficulties encountered in Boolean combinations of free-form solids and presents a geometric representation designed to circumvent them
keywords solid modeling, curved surfaces, representation, geometric modeling, curves, boolean operations
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id ascaad2006_paper20
id ascaad2006_paper20
authors Chougui, Ali
year 2006
title The Digital Design Process: reflections on architectural design positions on complexity and CAAD
source Computing in Architecture / Re-Thinking the Discourse: The Second International Conference of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2006), 25-27 April 2006, Sharjah, United Arab Emirates
summary These instructions are intended to guide contributors to the Second Architecture is presently engaged in an impatient search for solutions to critical questions about the nature and the identity of the discipline, and digital technology is a key agent for prevailing innovations in architectural design. The problem of complexity underlies all design problems. With the advent of CAD however, Architect’s ability to truly represent complexity has increased considerably. Another source that provides information about dealing with complexity is architectural theory. As Rowe (1987) states, architectural theory constitutes “a corpus of principles that are agreed upon and therefore worthy of emulation”. Architectural theory often is a mixed reflection on the nature of architectural design, design processes, made in descriptive and prescriptive terms (see Kruft 1985). Complexity is obviously not a new issue in architectural theory. Since it is an inherent characteristic of design problems, it has been dealt with in many different ways throughout history. Contemporary architects incorporate the computer in their design process. They produce architecture that is generated by the use of particle systems, simulation software, animation software, but also the more standard modelling tools. The architects reflect on the impact of the computer in their theories, and display changes in style by using information modelling techniques that have become versatile enough to encompass the complexity of information in the architectural design process. In this way, architectural style and theory can provide directions to further develop CAD. Most notable is the acceptance of complexity as a given fact, not as a phenomenon to oppose in systems of organization, but as a structuring principle to begin with. No matter what information modelling paradigm is used, complex and huge amounts of information need to be processed by designers. A key aspect in the combination of CAD, complexity, and architectural design is the role of the design representation. The way the design is presented and perceived during the design process is instrumental to understanding the design task. More architects are trying to reformulate this working of the representation. The intention of this paper is to present and discuss the current state of the art in architectural design positions on complexity and CAAD, and to reflect in particular on the role of digital design representations in this discussion. We also try to investigate how complexity can be dealt with, by looking at architects, in particular their styles and theories. The way architects use digital media and graphic representations can be informative how units of information can be formed and used in the design process. A case study is a concrete architect’s design processes such as Peter Eisenman Rem Koolhaas, van Berkel, Lynn, and Franke gehry, who embrace complexity and make it a focus point in their design, Rather than viewing it as problematic issue, by using computer as an indispensable instrument in their approaches.
series ASCAAD
email ali_chougui@yahoo.fr
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id d007
authors Day, Christopher
year 1987
title BUILDING AS A HEALING PROCESS
source Proceedings of the 1st European Full-Scale Workshop Conference / ISBN 87-88373-20-7 / Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-16 January 1987, pp. 37-43
summary The work process is predominantly one-sided, involving little more than the intellect for the managerial - and often the architectural-side, and physical strength and manual skills on the building workers' side. Characteristically the buildings that result are sterile. The whole process is one of materialisation of ideas - often too fast and too far. Too fast - because the idea often becomes concrete and inflexible before -it has met, and conversed with the requirements of the surroundings, and people. The buildings that typically result are imposed on and damaging to the environment and social fabric. Too far - because decisions become dominated by monetary considerations. So do relationships - indeed conventional relationships in the, building industry are governed by the principle of gain. There is a tendency therefore to try to get the best bargain out of any situation, to get as much out of it as possible - in other words, relationships are exploitive. Nobody likes being exploited, and it does no one any good. If we wish to develop a healing building process it must start with a recognition that a healthy human being must be meaningful, whole, and nourished.
keywords Full-scale Modeling, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2004/05/04 13:08

_id 8cff
authors Fridqvist, Sverker
year 1989
title Computers as a Creative Tool in Architecture
source CAAD: Education - Research and Practice [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 87-982875-2-4] Aarhus (Denmark) 21-23 September 1989, pp. 9.6.1-9.6.4
summary The School of Architecture at Lund Institute of Technology was augmented by the establishment of the Computer Studio in 1987. As a result the school now has a device for teaching and research in the architects' use of computers. We are now conducting several research projects as well as courses and an education project. The third and fourth years of the education at the school of architecture are arranged as education projects instead of traditional lecturing. The students choose from projects that are organised by different departments at the School of Architecture. The issue is that the students will ask for instruction when felt needed, and that learning will therefore be more efficient. The Computer Studio has conducted such a project during the first half of 1989. We have tried to encourage the students to use our different computers and programs in new and creative ways. One of the issues of the computer project is to teach the students how computers are used at the architects offices today as well as expected future developments. The students shall be acquainted well enough with present and future possibilities to make good choices when deciding upon buying computers for architectural use. Another issue is to develop new ways of making and presenting architecture by using computers. As a group the teachers at the school of architecture have a very restrictive attitude towards the use of computers. We hope that our project will open their minds for the possibilities of computers, and to engage them in the development of new ways to use computers creatively in architecture. An interesting question is if the use of computers will yield different outcomes of he students' work than traditional methods. An object for research is whether the added possibilities of considering different aspects of he design by using a computer will make for higher quality of the results.

series eCAADe
email Sverker.Fridqvist@caad.lth.se
more http://www.caad.lth.se/
last changed 1998/08/24 10:13

_id af13
authors Kennedy, Michael
year 1987
title The Initial Start: Beginning CAADD for the Brand New Student
source Integrating Computers into the Architectural Curriculum [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Raleigh (North Carolina / USA) 1987, pp. 65-76
summary Described is a teaching system presently being used during the first five weeks of a first course in Computer Aided Architectural Design and Drafting (After these five weeks students spend eleven weeks actively using a 2-D drafting package and a 3-D surface modeling package).

It is the view of the author that a student can obtain much more from her or his first course in CAADD if some fundamental concepts are covered specifically and dramatically, rather than assumed or conveyed by osmosis. On the other hand, one does not want to significantly delay the teaching of he principal objective: how to use a computer as a partner in design and production. The answer to meeting these two divergent objectives is two-fold: (1) careful organization with computer based tutorials, and (2) integration of architectonic lessons during the introduction.

The objectives of he initial five weeks are (1) to demystify computers, (2) teach the fundamental concepts of computer systems relating to hardware (disks, cpu, memory, display), and software (programs, data, files), (3) illustrate programming and program design, and (4) convey the concept of discrete symbol manipulation and its relation to graphics and text.

series ACADIA
last changed 1999/01/01 18:08

_id 889f
authors Krantz, Birgit
year 1987
title THE FULL-SCALE LABORATORY IN LUND
source Proceedings of the 1st European Full-Scale Workshop Conference / ISBN 87-88373-20-7 / Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-16 January 1987, pp. 7-17
summary An often repeated statement of the nature of the result of our general construction activities in general says that any building and environmental arrangement could be seen as a pure experimental product. The building, in this sense, is nothing but one single full-scale experiment started afresh each time, unfortunately, we could add, without the consistent follow-up measures. In view of this way of understanding the building process you might deduce the interest in a more anticipating attitude.and behaviour, namely the mock-up method or the full-scale design process, based on the philosophy that in a situation of uncertainty you had better try before than after. An underlying presumption is, however, that generally there is a lack of knowledge about the consequences by transferring spatial and design ideas from. drawings to one to one realization. A lack of knowledge not only-among lay, people but also among professionals. The mock-up practice can also to the same extent be derived from a pure investigative interest with the aim to virtually analyze general or specific problems in the* relationship man and the built environment, particularly buildings and spatial settings on the micro level. That means the use of the full-scale method for the search for basic design knowledge. In this sense the mock-up activities started in Sweden.
keywords Full-scale Modeling, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2004/05/04 13:09

_id 0e62
authors Lansdown, John
year 1987
title Some Notes on the Impact of Computing on Design
source Architectural Education and the Information Explosion [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Zurich (Switzerland) 5-7 September 1987.
summary Computers have been potentially able to assist designers in their work for almost thirty years. A few pioneers have been using them for this purpose for more than twenty years but it is only in the last seven or so that use has become really widespread. Undoubtedly, the most widespread use of computers in architectural practice is for making production drawings - which they can do with an accuracy, speed and reliability difficult to achieve by manual means. But this use does not even begin to exploit the full possibilities that computer aided design opens up. What I want to do here is to introduce these possibilities and discuss what impact they might have on the way we design in the immediate future.
series eCAADe
last changed 1998/09/18 06:57

_id 4904
authors Lapre, L. and Hudson, P.
year 1988
title Talking about Design: Supporting the Design Process with Different Goals
source CAAD futures ‘87 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-42916-6] Eindhoven (The Netherlands), 20-22 May 1987, pp. 127-136
summary The architectural design process has more than one participant. Each participant has his own way of approaching the information embedded in a design. In the future the CAAD systems of these participants must be able to communicate and exchange information. For a communication of this kind there must be a common ground, a frame of reference, in which these different points of view can be expressed. This frame of reference or model must support participants accessing the same information with different objectives and for different purposes. We shall propose such a model based on research results obtained by the analysis of architectural knowledge and designs. The model incorporates certain aspects drawn from AI.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id bbeb
authors Pena, W., Parshall, S. and Kelly, K.
year 1987
title Problem Seeking: An architectural programming primer
source 3d ed. Washinton, D. C. AIA Press
summary Architectural programming is a team effort that requires close cooperation between architects and their clients. Problem Seeking, Fourth Edition lays out a five-step procedure that teams can follow when programming any building or series of buildings, from a small house to a hospital complex. This simple yet comprehensive process encompasses the entire range of factors that influence the design of buildings. This new edition of the only programming guide appropriate for both architect and client features new ways of thinking about programming, new strategies for effective group action, and new settings in which to explore programming concepts. Supplemented with more than 120 helpful illustrations and diagrams, this indispensable resource provides updated technical information and faster, easier access to explanations, examples, and tools.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id e304
authors Porada, M.
year 1988
title Digital Image: A Bridge Towards Mental Images?
source CAAD futures ‘87 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-42916-6] Eindhoven (The Netherlands), 20-22 May 1987, pp. 209-216
summary How we see things depends on our education and our cultural pre-suppositions. This does not allow to convey some logical form, but nevertheless makes possible a more global and less formalized understanding of the objects, their environment and their physical proprieties. In architecture, the digital image acts according to two directions: (-) representation: the fine images are a means of communication between the different parties implementing building projects. (-) modelization: in addition to its iconic qualities the layers of different models simulate the most different aspects of the ,image and the environment characteristics. // At this level our vision is directly concerned with the design of the studied object; it acts both in the design process and in the expression of our conceptual images. How does modelization work? Infographical representation deals with a more or less schematic and conceptualized world the reading of which is more typified than particularized. It deals with a schematization nearly "ideographical" of the mental image thus is produced "synthetism", a neologism similar to such expressions as realism or abstractionism.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id 8a38
authors Rasdorf, William J. and Parks, Linda M.
year 1987
title Natural Language Prototypes for Analyzing Design Standards
source Southampton, U.K: Computational Mechanics Publications, 1987. pp. 147-160
summary CADLINE has abstract only. This paper addresses the use of natural language processing for acquiring, processing, and representing knowledge from design standards. A standard is a set of provisions providing principles, models, rules, limits, and particulars that are established by some authority for some purpose. In their textual form as written documents, design standards cannot directly be used in computer-aided design (CAD) systems. This paper demonstrates how standards can be transformed, using natural language processing techniques, from their textual form to alternative representations that more readily lend themselves to use in computer-aided design systems, supporting a variety of design applications. The language being transformed is the Building Officials and Code Administrators Building Code, one set of requirements that govern the design of buildings. Prototype computer subsystems have been developed that transform natural language sentences to case-grammar format and finally to subject-relationship- object triplets. The three prototypes that achieve these transformations are described: a parser, a semantic analyzer, and a query system. During one processing cycle, the system identifies that data items in a provision and the relationships between the data items. It also interacts with the user to add new data items to its knowledge bases, to verify data items found, and to add to its vocabulary. Alternatively, it responds to natural-language questions about the contents of the standard by identifying the relevant provisions within the standards. Processing formal documents requires knowledge about vocabulary, word-order, time, semantics, reference, and discourse. Despite the relative clarity of formal writing as it occurs in standards, the difficulties of implied responsibility, multiple meanings, and implied data items remain. A long-term research program at North Carolina State University has been defined that builds on these prototypes to further investigate knowledge acquisition and representation for standards
keywords design, standards, analysis, AI, natural languages
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 831d
authors Seebohm, Thomas
year 1992
title Discoursing on Urban History Through Structured Typologies
source Mission - Method - Madness [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-01-2] 1992, pp. 157-175
summary How can urban history be studied with the aid of three-dimensional computer modeling? One way is to model known cities at various times in history, using historical records as sources of data. While such studies greatly enhance the understanding of the form and structure of specific cities at specific points in time, it is questionable whether such studies actually provide a true understanding of history. It can be argued that they do not because such studies only show a record of one of many possible courses of action at various moments in time. To gain a true understanding of urban history one has to place oneself back in historical time to consider all of the possible courses of action which were open in the light of the then current situation of the city, to act upon a possible course of action and to view the consequences in the physical form of the city. Only such an understanding of urban history can transcend the memory of the actual and hence the behavior of the possible. Moreover, only such an understanding can overcome the limitations of historical relativism, which contends that historical fact is of value only in historical context, with the realization, due to Benedetto Croce and echoed by Rudolf Bultmann, that the horizon of "'deeper understanding" lies in "'the actuality of decision"' (Seebohm and van Pelt 1990).

One cannot conduct such studies on real cities except, perhaps, as a point of departure at some specific point in time to provide an initial layout for a city knowing that future forms derived by the studies will diverge from that recorded in history. An entirely imaginary city is therefore chosen. Although the components of this city at the level of individual buildings are taken from known cities in history, this choice does not preclude alternative forms of the city. To some degree, building types are invariants and, as argued in the Appendix, so are the urban typologies into which they may be grouped. In this imaginary city students of urban history play the role of citizens or groups of citizens. As they defend their interests and make concessions, while interacting with each other in their respective roles, they determine the nature of the city as it evolves through the major periods of Western urban history in the form of threedimensional computer models.

My colleague R.J. van Pelt and I presented this approach to the study of urban history previously at ACADIA (Seebohm and van Pelt 1990). Yet we did not pay sufficient attention to the manner in which such urban models should be structured and how the efforts of the participants should be coordinated. In the following sections I therefore review what the requirements are for three-dimensional modeling to support studies in urban history as outlined both from the viewpoint of file structure of the models and other viewpoints which have bearing on this structure. Three alternative software schemes of progressively increasing complexity are then discussed with regard to their ability to satisfy these requirements. This comparative study of software alternatives and their corresponding file structures justifies the present choice of structure in relation to the simpler and better known generic alternatives which do not have the necessary flexibility for structuring the urban model. Such flexibility means, of course, that in the first instance the modeling software is more timeconsuming to learn than a simple point and click package in accord with the now established axiom that ease of learning software tools is inversely related to the functional power of the tools. (Smith 1987).

series ACADIA
email tseebohm@fes.uwaterloo.ca
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id 2d0b
authors Wagter, H.
year 1988
title CAD-Techniques in Architecture and Building Design, a Realistic Overview
source CAAD futures ‘87 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-42916-6] Eindhoven (The Netherlands), 20-22 May 1987, pp. 7-14
summary Giving an overview on CAD-techniques in architecture and building design might seem a bit superfluous. Every mentioned subject will be worked out in this conference in much more detail than is possible in the context of this very first paper. Nevertheless it will be useful to sketch a framework. It gives an opportunity to participants to compare, and will help to judge the different influences of the conclusions in the right context. For the authors it might mean that they can fill in their own place, and that their introductions can be short so there will be more time available for in depth explanations. It must be stated that CAAD-Futures theme is at the design part of the building process as mentioned in its announcement "it takes stock of current developments in CAAD and attempts to anticipate the direction of future developments and their relevance to and impact on architectural practice and education, the building industry and the quality of the built environment".
series CAAD Futures
email Harry.Wagter@brighthouse.nl
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id eb5f
authors Al-Sallal, Khaled A. and Degelman, Larry 0.
year 1994
title A Hypermedia Model for Supporting Energy Design in Buildings
source Reconnecting [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-03-9] Washington University (Saint Louis / USA) 1994, pp. 39-49
summary Several studies have discussed the limitations of the available CAAD tools and have proposed solutions [Brown and Novitski 1987, Brown 1990, Degelman and Kim 1988, Schuman et al 1988]. The lack of integration between the different tasks that these programs address and the design process is a major problem. Schuman et al [1988] argued that in architectural design many issues must be considered simultaneously before the synthesis of a final product can take place. Studies by Brown and Novitski [1987] and Brown [1990] discussed the difficulties involved with integrating technical considerations in the creative architectural process. One aspect of the problem is the neglect of technical factors during the initial phase of the design that, as the authors argued, results from changing the work environment and the laborious nature of the design process. Many of the current programs require the user to input a great deal of numerical values that are needed for the energy analysis. Although there are some programs that attempt to assist the user by setting default values, these programs distract the user with their extensive arrays of data. The appropriate design tool is the one that helps the user to easily view the principal components of the building design and specify their behaviors and interactions. Data abstraction and information parsimony are the key concepts in developing a successful design tool. Three different approaches for developing an appropriate CAAD tool were found in the literature. Although there are several similarities among them, each is unique in solving certain aspects of the problem. Brown and Novitski [1987] emphasize the learning factor of the tool as well as its highly graphical user interface. Degelman and Kim [1988] emphasize knowledge acquisition and the provision of simulation modules. The Windows and Daylighting Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) emphasizes the dynamic structuring of information, the intelligent linking of data, the integrity of the different issues of design and the design process, and the extensive use of images [Schuman et al 19881, these attributes incidentally define the word hypermedia. The LBL model, which uses hypermedia, seems to be the more promising direction for this type of research. However, there is still a need to establish a new model that integrates all aspects of the problem. The areas in which the present research departs from the LBL model can be listed as follows: it acknowledges the necessity of regarding the user as the center of the CAAD tool design, it develops a model that is based on one of the high level theories of human-computer interaction, and it develops a prototype tool that conforms to the model.

series ACADIA
email l-degelman@neo.tamu.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id sigradi2013_234
id sigradi2013_234
authors Alencar, Viviane; Gabriela Celani
year 2013
title The Art of Computer Graphics Programming: Translating Pioneer Programs
source SIGraDi 2013 [Proceedings of the 17th Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISBN: 978-956-7051-86-1] Chile - Valparaíso 20 - 22 November 2013, pp. 500 - 504
summary Considering the importance of the use of programming languages for teaching computational design to architects, this paper proposes the translation of computer programs from a pioneer work in this field into a more contemporary programming language. The book The Art of Computer Graphics Programming: A Structured Introduction for Architects and Designers was published in 1987 by William J. Mitchell, Robin Ligget and Thomas Kvan, and remains an important reference for architects. The original Pascal codes in the book were translated into Processing, and made available through an Internet website, along with images and comments, in order to give late Prof. Mitchell’s work the consideration it deserves.
keywords Processing; Pascal; Computer graphics
series SIGRADI
email vivisalencar@gmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id e2b3
authors Bollinger, Elizabeth
year 1987
title The New Studio: CAD and the Workstation: Implications for Architecture Education
source Architectural Education and the Information Explosion [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Zurich (Switzerland) 5-7 September 1987.
summary Exploring the potential of the computer in the design process; Use of the computer through the conceptual, schematic, and design development processes, as well as the more conventional presentation techniques; and successes and failures regarding the integration of the computer into the thesis projects.
series eCAADe
email EBollinger@uh.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id e861
authors Burnham, G.T.
year 1987
title Microcomputer-Based Expert System for the Design of Operational Military Airfields
source Department of Architectural Science, University of Sydney
summary This thesis develops a number of prototypical expert systems on a microcomputer to assist the military designer or engineer with facets of military operational airfield design. An existing expert system shell BUILD written in PROLOG-1 was altered to provide a more permanent record of the results of the system execution. The individual knowledge base includes production rules which conform to the BUILD syntax requirements. A number of additional clauses related to the knowledge base are written in PROLOG-1. The expert system consists of some 200 rules and an additional 36 clauses. The rules contain knowledge on soil characteristics pertinent to airfields, factors involved in calculating lengths of runways and factors for determining the effort involved in construction. The knowledge for the expert systems was gathered from a combination of civilian and military literature sources, the author's own experience, and discussions with military and air force personnel currently engaged in the design, planning and construction of these facilities. Development of these prototypical expert systems demonstrates the feasibility of implementing expert systems on microcomputers in this domain. Furthermore, it demonstrates their possible application to military engineering design particularly where the design process relies on a large amount of tabulated data and heuristic knowledge. It is this type of knowledge that is often used by the military engineer to find a timely problem solution when provided with a range of options. [Unpublished. -- CADLINE has abstract only.]
keywords Applications, Military Engineering, Expert Systems, Design, Planning
series thesis:MSc
last changed 2002/12/14 18:15

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