CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 101 to 120 of 172

_id 448b
authors Gerzso, Miguel J.
year 1987
title On the Reasons for Designing an Object Based Language Called TM
source 1987. 7 p. : ill. includes bibliography
summary One of the most basic problems in attempting to use computers for architectural applications has been the generation of design alternatives. In order to approach this problem, it is claimed in the paper that in reality it is two basic problems: a methodological problem and a data and procedural representation problem. Diagrammatic Production Rules (DPR's), developed previously by the author, have been proposed for dealing with methodological problem and TM, an object based language, is proposed in the paper for dealing with the data and procedural representation problem. An example of a DPR and a 'program' in TM are included to illustrate the relationship between the two
keywords languages, representation, OOPS, CAD, applications, programming, architecture, synthesis, design
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id e3a4
authors Girard, Michael
year 1987
title Interactive Design of 3D Computer-Animated Legged Animal Motion
source IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications. June, 1987. vol. 7: pp. 39-51 : ill. includes bibliography
summary A visually interactive approach to the design of 3D computer- animated legged animal motion in the context of the PODA computer animation system is presented. The design process entails the interactive specification of parameters that drive a computational model for animal movement. The animator incrementally modifies a framework for establishing desired limb and body motion as well as the constraints imposed by physical dynamics (Newtonian mechanical properties) and temporal restrictions. PODA uses the desired motion and constraints specified by the animator to produce motion through an idealized model of the animal's adaptive dynamic control strategies
keywords computer graphics, animation
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:08

_id e60d
authors Gross, Mark D., Ervin, Stephen M. and Anderson, James (et al)
year 1987
title Designing with Constraints
source John Wiley & Sons, 1987. pp. 53-83. includes bibliography
summary The constraint model of designing provides a means of demonstrating and exploring the computability of design. Designing is understood as a process of incrementally defining an initially ill-defined question, and concurrently proposing and testing possible answers. That is, not finding THE solution to A problem, but finding A solution to THE problem. Articulating (including inventing and modifying) the question, and exploring possible alternative answers (or designs), are two fundamental activities which can be supported by computers and the constraint model. The authors discuss the use of constraints to explicate design questions, circumscribe feasible regions and specify proposed solutions, and examine the processes of search and scrutiny within a region. Naming, solving history-keeping, block-structuring, identifying and resolving conflicts are among tasks identified that can be rendered to a computer. Questions of knowledge representation and inference making with ambiguity and imprecision are discussed. Examples of the application of the constraint model to design problems in architecture and site planning are illustrated by brief scenarios
keywords constraints, design process, search, knowledge
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

_id 630c
authors Harel, David
year 1987
title Algorithmics: the Spirit of Computing
source x, 425 p. : ill. Reading, Mass.: Addison Wesley Pub. Co., 1987. include bibliography: p. 357-403 and index
summary The preliminary chapters discuss the concept of an algorithmic problem and the algorithm that solves it. Discussions of the structure of algorithms, the data they manipulate and the languages in which they are programmed. Part two of the book turns to some general methods and paradigms for algorithmic design. Part three of the book is devoted to the inherent limitations of effectively executable algorithms and hence of the computers that implement them
keywords algorithms, programming
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:08

_id cd8d
authors Herbert, Daniel M.
year 1987
title Study Drawings in Architectural Design: Applications for CAD Systems
source Integrating Computers into the Architectural Curriculum [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Raleigh (North Carolina / USA) 1987, pp. 157-168
summary To guide their future development, research and teaching in computer-aided design must look beyond the technical capabilities of computer systems to establish a theoretical foundation based on known processes in design. This paper suggests that such a theoretical foundation can be derived by analyzing architectural study drawings -- defined as the rough drawings that architects make in the exploratory stages of design -- to determine their epistemelogical properties. The analysis brings forward concepts from a number of disciplines related to the structure of human knowledge to identify five properties of study drawings. Based on these properties, the paper proposes strategies for application to the next generation of research and teaching in CAD systems.
series ACADIA
last changed 1999/01/01 18:13

_id 6b87
authors Hess, Georg
year 1987
title Electronic Messaging - Message-Handling: The Key to Worldwide Electronic Communication
source Architectural Education and the Information Explosion [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Zurich (Switzerland) 5-7 September 1987.
summary The working performance of computers and of numerous online-services today are being decentralized and used in networks. The interpersonal exchange of messages and hence electronic mailflow from one computer to another is gaining an increasing significance with the growth of the numbers of PCs being used. At the same time, new low-cost forms of organization and communications are being created. Message Handling as the term for the exchange of locally independent messages and news goes, is being introduced to the individual working place on a worldwide scale with the powerful PTT-Data Packet Switching Networks and the new communications protocols like the X.400 as well as the public electronic mail servers, which are available via telephone.

series eCAADe
last changed 1998/09/18 07:01

_id cd7b
authors Hopgood, F. and Duce, D.
year 1988
title Future Developments in Graphics and Workstations
source CAAD futures 87 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-42916-6] Eindhoven (The Netherlands), 20-22 May 1987, pp. 217-252
summary The application of Computer Aided Design has been fragmented so far due to the lack of standards at the hardware and basic software level. The most impressive products have been turn-key systems using custom-built hardware with large software suites developed over a number of years. Such systems have often been difficult to modify and maintain. The very nature of such systems is that they are expensive to produce, have a limited market and, consequently, are expensive. Hardware and software advances over the last few years point to a change in this environment. The trend is towards hardware and software compatibility from the computer suppliers allowing software suppliers to target their offerings at a wider range of products. This produces a competitive market and the downward trend in hardware costs gives the possibility for systems of much lower cost and, consequently, opens up the market to a larger customer base. This paper will concentrate on the developments in single user workstations and graphics standards which should provide a firm base for this new environment.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id c890
authors Hutchinson, Peter J., Rosenman, Michael A. and Gero, John S.
year 1987
title RETWALL : An Expert System for the Selection and Preliminary Design of Earth Retaining Structures
source Knowledge Based Systems. 1987. vol. 1: pp. 11-23
summary This paper describes an expert system for the selection and preliminary design of engineering earth retaining structures. It describes the domain and how the knowledge was acquired from textbooks, questionnaires and interviews. Details of the implementation of RETWALL using the expert system shell BUILD are provided as is a full script of a session
keywords expert systems, knowledge, representation, engineering, applications,knowledge acquisition, software
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id afd5
authors Jog, Bharati
year 1987
title An Interface Between CAD and Energy Analysis System
source Integrating Computers into the Architectural Curriculum [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Raleigh (North Carolina / USA) 1987, pp. 87-94
summary During the architectural design process it is helpful to get the energy analysis at various steps. Using the knowledge obtained from energy analysis programs, a design can be improved during the next step. Today Computer-Aided Drafting packages are popular as drafting tools in the architecture profession and schools. Many software packages for energy analysis are also available. To promote such analytical design process, there is a need to develop interfaces between energy analysis systems and Computer- Aided Drafting packages to get the energy analysis using the drawing files. This paper describes the use of the interface between Computer-Aided Drafting system and energy analysis program as an analytical tool in the Computer-Aided Design process. Then it presents an interface developed between AutoCAD, a popular Computer-Aided Drafting tool, and CALPAS3, an energy analysis program.

series ACADIA
last changed 1999/01/01 18:09

_id 34be
authors Johnson, M.
year 1987
title The Body in the Mind: The Bodily Basis of Meaning, Imagination, and Reason
source University of Chicago Press, Chicago, Illinois
summary This is the first work which systematically put together a sensible story about the intermodal structures (image schemata) linking high-level cognition, like langauge, with the body-rich information of perceptual processing. Johnson's image schemata was the first proposal for this project which was both neurally plausible, given the organization of the cortex into topology preserving maps (contradicting Fodor and Pylshyn's mistaken view), and supported by the evidence from development, in language and conceptual structure. This book spawned debates on schematization in fields ranging from developmental psychology, cognitive psychology, linguistics, philosophy, neurocomputational modeling, and neuroscience. When the st century cognitive neuroscience writes its chapter on the way semantic processing works at a neural level, it will need to refute those 20th century philosophers of language who thought that language was primarily referential, truth-conditional, and operated on symbols formed independently of bodily perception. This book will be the touchstone for that project.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 0b76
authors Kalay, Yehuda E. (editor)
year 1987
title Computability of Design
source xvii, 363 p. : ill New York: Wiley & Sons, 1987. includes bibliographies and index --- (Principle of Computer-aided Design)
summary Computer-aided design has promised to transform the art and science of architectural design. Yet despite some significant achievements, it has so far failed to do so. The book explores reasons why design is so difficult to support by computational means and what can be done to alleviate this difficulty. Written by an interdisciplinary panel of experts the book presents a varied and comprehensive view of the ways creative design processes can be modeled mathematically
keywords CAD, design process, architecture, design methods, knowledge, representation, practice, evaluation, analysis
series CADline
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id ae4f
authors Kalay, Yehuda E., Swerdloff, Lucien M. and Majkowski, Bruce R.
year 1987
title Computer-Aided Architectural Design Research : Summary of Proposed Research Plan
source March, 1987. [8] p. includes bibliography
summary The potentials of recent advancements in computer-driven, information-rich technologies have begun to effect the disciplines of architecture, planning, and design. The roles of computer-aided design tools are, however, still not completely specified, and it is the responsibility of research institutes, and in particular schools of architecture and design, to explore, define, and develop the uses of computers in architecture, planning, and design. The CAD program at the School of Architecture and Planning is based on the premise that research and education are both essential and interdependent components which provide students with necessary technical skills, improve methods of teaching fundamental design knowledge, and foster the exploration and development of new technologies and methodologies for computers in design. The program has been implemented in what the authors have termed the 'Triad Methodology' of computer-aided architectural design: the teaching of CAD principles to students, the development of a strong research program, and the use of computer tools to enhance the school's general curriculum. The CAD Lab functions as a conduit for basic and advanced research intended to enhance architecture and planning through the use of computers. The faculty and graduate students have already demonstrated their interest and ability to undertake state of the art research in CAD. It is expected that these interests will continue and proliferate in the future. This paper briefly outlines the direction, scope, and required resources for computer related research at the School of Architecture and Planning in Buffalo
keywords CAD, education, architecture, research
series CADline
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

_id eeda
authors Kalay, Yehuda E.
year 1987
title Graphic Introduction to Programming
source xvii, 231 p. : ill. New York: Wiley-Interscience, 1987. includes bibliography p.: 215-216 and Index -- (Principles of Computer- Aided Design)
summary Teaching PASCAL programming for graphic applications by using graphics from the very beginning. The book is an introduction to computer-aided design and require no prior computer experience
keywords computer graphics, programming, PASCAL, education
series CADline
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id e290
authors Kalay, Yehuda E.
year 1987
title Worldview : An Integrated Geometric Modeling/Drafting System
source IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications. February, 1987. vol. 7: pp. 36-46 : ill. (some col.). includes bibliography
summary Worldview is a computer-aided architectural and engineering design system that combines the power of geometric modeling utilities with the intuitive design and communication capabilities of drafting utilities. This article describes the basic design concepts and implementation of the system, achieved by representing the designed artifact nonredundantly in a three-dimensional 'world' and manipulating it through multiple two-dimensional 'views.' The world consists of a collection of shapes that store all the formative information pertinent to the designed artifact, while the views consist of images of selected shapes, generated through particular two-way mapping transforms. Several views that depict the same set of shapes through different transforms can be displayed simultaneously, using multiple, dynamic, user- defined windows, thereby enabling addressability of points in the 3D world. Views also include such design and communication aids as dimension lines, construction lines, annotations, and graphic symbols to enhance the visual content of the images without encumbering the representation of the shapes themselves. Modifications applied to the shapes through any view are immediately apparent in all other views in which the shapes are imaged. The shapes are represented by a data structure based on the Hybrid Edge data model, which facilitates the integration of points, lines, surfaces, and volumetric bodies into one formative hierarchy. The integration of drafting and modeling simplifies the use of powerful modeling utilities by designers, facilitates the communication of the designed artifact, and enhances the integrity of the design as a whole
keywords drafting, systems, geometric modeling, representation, user interface, computer graphics, CAD, architecture, engineering
series CADline
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

_id 4ca5
authors Kramel, Herbert E.
year 1987
title The Consequence of Telecommunication for Architecture and Architecture Education
source Architectural Education and the Information Explosion [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Zurich (Switzerland) 5-7 September 1987.
summary Most of us will raise the question whether or not there will be any consequences at all beyond the increasing amount of communication systems which have to be taken into consideration in the design of a building. As an introduction into the subject, recent changes in the academic community as well as observations on the field of architecture will be introduced. Technological developments in Switzerland, Swissnet i.e. will be used to reinforce the assumption that telecommunication in its various forms may have or will have consequences for the work of the architects as well as for architecture education.
series eCAADe
last changed 1998/09/18 07:07

_id diss_kuo
id diss_kuo
authors Kuo, C.J.
year 1999
title Unsupervised Dynamic Concurrent Computer-Aided Design Assistant
source Los Angeles: UCLA
summary The increasing capability of computer-aided architectural design systems has strengthened the role that the computer plays in the workplace. Due to the complexity of developing new techniques and research, these systems are undertaken mostly by scientists and engineers without significant architectural input (Willey, 1991). The design concept of these systems may be based on a well-defined and well-understood process, which is not yet realized in architectural design (Galle, 1994). The output of such research may not be easily adapted into the design process. Most of the techniques assume a complete understanding of the design space (Gero and Maher, 1987) (Willey, 1991). The description or construction of the design space is always time and space consuming, and the result can never be complete due to the ever-changing nature of architectural design. This research intends to initiate a solution for the above problems. The proposed system is an unsupervised-dynamic-concurrent-computer-aided-design assistant. The “unsupervised” means the learning process is not supervised by the user because it is against the designer's nature to “think-aloud” in the design studio and it also increases the work load. It is dynamic because the size of the knowledge base is constantly changing. Concurrent means that there are multiple procedures active simultaneously. This research focuses on learning the operational knowledge from an individual designer and reapplying it in future designs. A computer system for this experiment is constructed. It is capable of The preliminary result shows a positive feedback from test subjects. The purpose of this research is to suggest a potent computational frame within which future developments may flourish.
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/11/28 06:37

_id 21b9
authors Landsdown, J.
year 1988
title Computers and Visualisation of Design Ideas: Possibilities and Promises
source CAAD futures 87 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-42916-6] Eindhoven (The Netherlands), 20-22 May 1987, pp. 71-80
summary Drawing in all its various forms, from freehand sketching to detailed technical layout, is a type of modelling that designers find indispensable. In many cases, indeed, drawing is the only form of external modelling a designer uses. It has two basic functions: to assist in the externalisation and development of mental concepts and to help in the presentation of these concepts to others. The current thrust of work in computer graphics - although valuable - tends to concentrate almost exclusively on the presentation aspects and it is now possible to create images almost resembling photographs of real objects as well as production drawings of great accuracy and consistency. This paper summarises some of this presentation work as well as developments which might go further in assisting the activities and processes of design.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id 59de
authors Lansdown, J.
year 1987
title The Creative Aspects of CAD: A Possible Approach
source Design Studies, (8) 2, pp. 76-81
summary Whilst it is common ground that CAD systems can help designers in many areas, what is not clear is the extent of assistance that can be provided in the creative aspects. A possible approach to creative designing with computers is that of `prototype modification'. It is possible to see all designing in terms of this approach. The distinction between innovative design and design by modification results only from the quality and nature of the prototypes and modifications involved.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id e8bb
authors Lehto, M.
year 1988
title Optical Discs - Their Application in Mass Data Storage
source CAAD futures 87 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-42916-6] Eindhoven (The Netherlands), 20-22 May 1987, pp. 189-198
summary Much of the building designer's time is taken up correlating the various sources of information so as to incorporate it in the design within a limited time span. The building information service should be able to provide him or her by the up-to-date information in a user friendly format. Optical disc technology makes it possible to combine different forms of building data into images which can be mass stored and randomly accessed on a single disc, with the minimal response time by personal computer or CAD- workstation. In this paper the use of various forms of optical disc technology in construction industry and the prototype video disc produced by VTT are described.
keywords Construction, Optical Discs, Interactive Video Disc, Mass Storage
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id ceb3
authors Lehtonen, Hilkka
year 1987
title Visualization Needs and Tool Kits
source Architectural Education and the Information Explosion [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Zurich (Switzerland) 5-7 September 1987.
summary A well-known Finnish novel characterizes the agrarian way of life by the following words: In the beginning there was a marsh, a hoe and John. John turned the marsh into a fertile corn field by means of the Finnish "sisu" or perseverance. We may draw a parallel to architectural design and say that in the beginning there was the idea of the architect only after that came various tools. Nevertheless, the method of visualization - image in its many forms - is something quintessential in architectural planning and design: it plays a central role as a tool for the designer's own thinking and evaluation, in general communication of planning, and in the communication between the designer and other parties of the planning process. Different sketches give directly visual interpretations to different consequences. The needs for the communication of planning in itself have grown along with the manifold development of public communication. Accordingly, the communication of planning has to compete with the highly-developed commercial communication.
series eCAADe
last changed 1998/09/18 07:04

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