CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 155

_id eb5f
authors Al-Sallal, Khaled A. and Degelman, Larry 0.
year 1994
title A Hypermedia Model for Supporting Energy Design in Buildings
source Reconnecting [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-03-9] Washington University (Saint Louis / USA) 1994, pp. 39-49
summary Several studies have discussed the limitations of the available CAAD tools and have proposed solutions [Brown and Novitski 1987, Brown 1990, Degelman and Kim 1988, Schuman et al 1988]. The lack of integration between the different tasks that these programs address and the design process is a major problem. Schuman et al [1988] argued that in architectural design many issues must be considered simultaneously before the synthesis of a final product can take place. Studies by Brown and Novitski [1987] and Brown [1990] discussed the difficulties involved with integrating technical considerations in the creative architectural process. One aspect of the problem is the neglect of technical factors during the initial phase of the design that, as the authors argued, results from changing the work environment and the laborious nature of the design process. Many of the current programs require the user to input a great deal of numerical values that are needed for the energy analysis. Although there are some programs that attempt to assist the user by setting default values, these programs distract the user with their extensive arrays of data. The appropriate design tool is the one that helps the user to easily view the principal components of the building design and specify their behaviors and interactions. Data abstraction and information parsimony are the key concepts in developing a successful design tool. Three different approaches for developing an appropriate CAAD tool were found in the literature. Although there are several similarities among them, each is unique in solving certain aspects of the problem. Brown and Novitski [1987] emphasize the learning factor of the tool as well as its highly graphical user interface. Degelman and Kim [1988] emphasize knowledge acquisition and the provision of simulation modules. The Windows and Daylighting Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) emphasizes the dynamic structuring of information, the intelligent linking of data, the integrity of the different issues of design and the design process, and the extensive use of images [Schuman et al 19881, these attributes incidentally define the word hypermedia. The LBL model, which uses hypermedia, seems to be the more promising direction for this type of research. However, there is still a need to establish a new model that integrates all aspects of the problem. The areas in which the present research departs from the LBL model can be listed as follows: it acknowledges the necessity of regarding the user as the center of the CAAD tool design, it develops a model that is based on one of the high level theories of human-computer interaction, and it develops a prototype tool that conforms to the model.

series ACADIA
email l-degelman@neo.tamu.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id cf2011_p127
id cf2011_p127
authors Benros, Deborah; Granadeiro Vasco, Duarte Jose, Knight Terry
year 2011
title Integrated Design and Building System for the Provision of Customized Housing: the Case of Post-Earthquake Haiti
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 247-264.
summary The paper proposes integrated design and building systems for the provision of sustainable customized housing. It advances previous work by applying a methodology to generate these systems from vernacular precedents. The methodology is based on the use of shape grammars to derive and encode a contemporary system from the precedents. The combined set of rules can be applied to generate housing solutions tailored to specific user and site contexts. The provision of housing to shelter the population affected by the 2010 Haiti earthquake illustrates the application of the methodology. A computer implementation is currently under development in C# using the BIM platform provided by Revit. The world experiences a sharp increase in population and a strong urbanization process. These phenomena call for the development of effective means to solve the resulting housing deficit. The response of the informal sector to the problem, which relies mainly on handcrafted processes, has resulted in an increase of urban slums in many of the big cities, which lack sanitary and spatial conditions. The formal sector has produced monotonous environments based on the idea of mass production that one size fits all, which fails to meet individual and cultural needs. We propose an alternative approach in which mass customization is used to produce planed environments that possess qualities found in historical settlements. Mass customization, a new paradigm emerging due to the technological developments of the last decades, combines the economy of scale of mass production and the aesthetics and functional qualities of customization. Mass customization of housing is defined as the provision of houses that respond to the context in which they are built. The conceptual model for the mass customization of housing used departs from the idea of a housing type, which is the combined result of three systems (Habraken, 1988) -- spatial, building system, and stylistic -- and it includes a design system, a production system, and a computer system (Duarte, 2001). In previous work, this conceptual model was tested by developing a computer system for existing design and building systems (Benr__s and Duarte, 2009). The current work advances it by developing new and original design, building, and computer systems for a particular context. The urgent need to build fast in the aftermath of catastrophes quite often overrides any cultural concerns. As a result, the shelters provided in such circumstances are indistinct and impersonal. However, taking individual and cultural aspects into account might lead to a better identification of the population with their new environment, thereby minimizing the rupture caused in their lives. As the methodology to develop new housing systems is based on the idea of architectural precedents, choosing existing vernacular housing as a precedent permits the incorporation of cultural aspects and facilitates an identification of people with the new housing. In the Haiti case study, we chose as a precedent a housetype called “gingerbread houses”, which includes a wide range of houses from wealthy to very humble ones. Although the proposed design system was inspired by these houses, it was decided to adopt a contemporary take. The methodology to devise the new type was based on two ideas: precedents and transformations in design. In architecture, the use of precedents provides designers with typical solutions for particular problems and it constitutes a departing point for a new design. In our case, the precedent is an existing housetype. It has been shown (Duarte, 2001) that a particular housetype can be encoded by a shape grammar (Stiny, 1980) forming a design system. Studies in shape grammars have shown that the evolution of one style into another can be described as the transformation of one shape grammar into another (Knight, 1994). The used methodology departs takes off from these ideas and it comprises the following steps (Duarte, 2008): (1) Selection of precedents, (2) Derivation of an archetype; (3) Listing of rules; (4) Derivation of designs; (5) Cataloguing of solutions; (6) Derivation of tailored solution.
keywords Mass customization, Housing, Building system, Sustainable construction, Life cycle energy consumption, Shape grammar
series CAAD Futures
email deborahbenros@gmail.com
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id ea6a
authors Bentley, Jon L.
year 1988
title More Programming Pearls : Confessions of a Coder
source 207 p. : ill. Reading, Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co., 1988. includes index
summary A collection of essays demonstrating the various aspects of programming. Some cover programming techniques using the C and AWK languages, other essays discuss making I/O fit for humans and several sub routines
keywords programming, algorithms, techniques
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 68c8
authors Flemming, U., Coyne, R. and Fenves, S. (et al.)
year 1994
title SEED: A Software Environment to Support the Early Phases in Building Design
source Proceeding of IKM '94, Weimar, Germany, pp. 5-10
summary The SEED project intends to develop a software environment that supports the early phases in building design (Flemming et al., 1993). The goal is to provide support, in principle, for the preliminary design of buildings in all aspects that can gain from computer support. This includes using the computer not only for analysis and evaluation, but also more actively for the generation of designs, or more accurately, for the rapid generation of design representations. A major motivation for the development of SEED is to bring the results of two multi-generational research efforts focusing on `generative' design systems closer to practice: 1. LOOS/ABLOOS, a generative system for the synthesis of layouts of rectangles (Flemming et al., 1988; Flemming, 1989; Coyne and Flemming, 1990; Coyne, 1991); 2. GENESIS, a rule-based system that supports the generation of assemblies of 3-dimensional solids (Heisserman, 1991; Heisserman and Woodbury, 1993). The rapid generation of design representations can take advantage of special opportunities when it deals with a recurring building type, that is, a building type dealt with frequently by the users of the system. Design firms - from housing manufacturers to government agencies - accumulate considerable experience with recurring building types. But current CAD systems capture this experience and support its reuse only marginally. SEED intends to provide systematic support for the storing and retrieval of past solutions and their adaptation to similar problem situations. This motivation aligns aspects of SEED closely with current work in Artificial Intelligence that focuses on case-based design (see, for example, Kolodner, 1991; Domeshek and Kolodner, 1992; Hua et al., 1992).
series other
email ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 436b
authors Gero, John S. (editor)
year 1988
title Artificial Intelligence in Engineering : Robotics and Processes
source 403 p. Amsterdam: Elsevier/CMP, 1988. CADLINE has abstract only
summary This volume contains the papers in the robotics and processes areas from the Third International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Engineering. Robotics has the potential to change the physical face of engineering and has no counterpart in traditional engineering. It requires the integration of numerous disparate aspects of engineering. There is a fundamental requirement for geometric and spatial reasoning of a qualitative kind. A variety of other processes in engineering are being examined through the artificial intelligence lens. The material collected under the process rubric demonstrates both the benefits and potential of utilizing this approach. The papers are presented under the following headings: Robotics; Geometric and Spatial Reasoning; Interpretation Processes; Reasoning Processes; Planning and Scheduling Processes; Interfaces
keywords AI, robotics, reasoning, planning, user interface, engineering, construction
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id c085
authors Goldman, Glenn and Zdepski, M. Stephen
year 1988
title Abstraction and Representation: Computer Graphics and Architectural Design
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 205-215
summary While there is evidence to support that many important aspects of architectural design are not graphically based, but analytical in nature, there remains a long history of design exploration dependent on representation. Furthermore, methods of imager 3While there is evidence to support that many important aspects of architectural design are not graphically based, but analytical in nature, there remains a long history of design exploration dependent on representation. Furthermore, methods of imager 3While there is evidence to support that many important aspects of architectural design are not graphically based, but analytical in nature, there remains a long history of design exploration dependent on representation. Furthermore, methods of imager 3While there is evidence to support that many important aspects of architectural design are not graphically based, but analytical in nature, there remains a long history of design exploration dependent on representation. Furthermore, methods of imager 3While there is evidence to support that many important aspects of architectural design are not graphically based, but analytical in nature, there remains a long history of design exploration dependent on representation. Furthermore, methods of imager 3While there is evidence to support that many important aspects of architectural design are not graphically based, but analytical in nature, there remains a long history of design exploration dependent on representation. Furthermore, methods of imager 3While there is evidence to support that many important aspects of architectural design are not graphically based, but analytical in nature, there remains a long history of design exploration dependent on representation. Furthermore, methods of imager 3While there is evidence to support that many important aspects of architectural design are not graphically based, but analytical in nature, there remains a long history of design exploration dependent on representation. Furthermore, methods of imager 3While there is evidence to support that many important aspects of architectural design are not graphically based, but analytical in nature, there remains a long history of design exploration dependent on representation. Furthermore, methods of imager 3While there is evidence to support that many important aspects of architectural design are not graphically based, but analytical in nat
series ACADIA
email goldman@njit.edu
last changed 2003/04/17 13:32

_id 176f
authors Habraken, N.J. and Gross, M.D.
year 1988
title Concept Design Games
source Design Studies, Volume 9, Number 3, 1988, pp. 12-23
summary This paper describes our work on using games as a tool for research in design theory and methods. Games offer a means of isolating certain aspects, or concepts, of designing for purposes of scrutiny. A game provides an environment for a group of players, acting with individual goals and a shared program, to make and transform complex configurations, free of functional requirements. Adjusting game parameters emphasizes different concepts. We have developed nine games that explore a variety of concepts of general interest to those concerned with organizing physical configurations. Beyond these particular concepts, we argue that games are a useful way to couch studies in design theory and methods.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 21b9
authors Landsdown, J.
year 1988
title Computers and Visualisation of Design Ideas: Possibilities and Promises
source CAAD futures ‘87 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-42916-6] Eindhoven (The Netherlands), 20-22 May 1987, pp. 71-80
summary Drawing in all its various forms, from freehand sketching to detailed technical layout, is a type of modelling that designers find indispensable. In many cases, indeed, drawing is the only form of external modelling a designer uses. It has two basic functions: to assist in the externalisation and development of mental concepts and to help in the presentation of these concepts to others. The current thrust of work in computer graphics - although valuable - tends to concentrate almost exclusively on the presentation aspects and it is now possible to create images almost resembling photographs of real objects as well as production drawings of great accuracy and consistency. This paper summarises some of this presentation work as well as developments which might go further in assisting the activities and processes of design.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id 4904
authors Lapre, L. and Hudson, P.
year 1988
title Talking about Design: Supporting the Design Process with Different Goals
source CAAD futures ‘87 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-42916-6] Eindhoven (The Netherlands), 20-22 May 1987, pp. 127-136
summary The architectural design process has more than one participant. Each participant has his own way of approaching the information embedded in a design. In the future the CAAD systems of these participants must be able to communicate and exchange information. For a communication of this kind there must be a common ground, a frame of reference, in which these different points of view can be expressed. This frame of reference or model must support participants accessing the same information with different objectives and for different purposes. We shall propose such a model based on research results obtained by the analysis of architectural knowledge and designs. The model incorporates certain aspects drawn from AI.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id c70a
authors Lindgren, Christina Axelsson
year 1988
title Forest Visual Variation as a Recreative Force
source Knowledge-Based Design in Architecture, Tips-88 (pre-proceedings) (1988 : Otaniemi). editors. John S Gero and T. Oksala. Espoo, Finland: Research Institute for Built Environment, Helsinki University of Technology, Department of Architecture, pp. 149-157. includes bibliography.
summary --- A revised version of this paper has been published in the Acta Polytechnica Scandinavica series. The article presents some findings concerning the importance of forest visual variation and the possibilities to create a Forest Visual Opportunity Spectrum. In the light of suggestions on theory of recreation and of the actual multiple use planning situation of forests, the possibilities and limits of empirical studies as a tool to receive knowledge of visual aspects of forests are discussed
keywords planning, knowledge, applications, landscape
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:09

_id 4744
authors Livingstone, Margaret and Hubel, David
year 1988
title Segregation of Form, Color, Movement, and Depth : Anatomy, Physiology, and Perception
source Science. May, 1988. vol. 240: pp. 740-750 : ill. some col. includes bibliography
summary Anatomical and physiological observations in monkeys indicate that the primate visual system consists of several separate and independent subdivisions that analyze different aspects of the same retinal image: cells in cortical visual areas 1 and 2 and higher visual areas are segregated into three interdigitating subdivisions that differ in their selectivity for color, stereopsis, movement, and orientation. The pathways selective for form and color seem to be derived mainly from the parvocellular geniculate subdivisions, the depth- and movement-selective components from the magnocellular. At lower levels, in the retina and in the geniculate, cells in these two subdivisions differ in their color selectivity, contrast sensitivity, temporal properties, and spatial resolution. These major differences in the properties of cells at lower levels in each of the subdivisions led to the prediction that different visual functions, such as color, depth, movement, and form perception, should exhibit corresponding differences. Human perceptual experiments are remarkably consistent with these predictions. Moreover, perceptual experiments can be designed to ask which subdivisions of the system are responsible for particular visual abilities, such as figure/ground discrimination or perception of depth from perspective or relative movement-functions that might be difficult to deduce from single-cell response properties
keywords color, theory, perception
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

_id 2a6e
authors McCullough, Malcolm
year 1988
title Representation in the Computer Aided Design Studio
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 163-174
summary Application of commercial computer aided design systems to schematic design in a studio setting in a professionally oriented university provides the opportunity for observation of extensive use of CAD by designers with little or no orientation toward computing. Within a framework of studios intended to contrast media and highlight the issue of design representation, the most encouraging applications of computing have involved dynamic visual design representation. This paper presents a case study of three studios at the University of Texas at Austin together with commentary on the place of computing in this essentially artistic environment. It presents, in slide form, a body of aesthetically oriented CAD work which signals the spread of computer aided design out of the hands of researchers and into mainstream architectural design, where development of the visual and dynamic aspects of the medium may prove to be primary routes to improvement of itS power and acceptance. Much like a first design project, this paper then presents a lot of observations without yet much rigorous development of any one. It asks implicitly whether application of software constitutes research.

series ACADIA
email mmmc@umich.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id 1447
authors Meyer, B.
year 1988
title Object Oriented Software Construction
source Prentice-Hall, Englewood-Cliff NJ
summary Object-Oriented Software Construction, second edition is the comprehensive reference on all aspects of object technology, from design principles to O-O techniques, Design by Contract, O-O analysis, concurrency, persistence, abstract data types and many more. Written by a pioneer in the field, contains an in-depth analysis of both methodological and technical issues.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 21b5
authors Müller, Volker
year 1993
title Introducing CAD to a Big Corporation
source CAAD Futures ‘93 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-89922-7] (Pittsburgh / USA), 1993, pp. 497-512
summary The report presents the ongoing activity of introducing CAD to the entire range of facilities planning and management of the Frankfurt Airport Corporation. It addresses issues of organizing the shift from conventional to computer supported planning and facilities management,- the problems of training professionals with various background in the use of new tools; aspects of data validity; regulation of data exchange; and customization of software to the needs of special tasks within the corporation. The report is based on about four years of project runtime. The preparation of the project started in fall 1988. The project proper started in June 1989. It is entering its last year. Up to now about 120 persons have been trained to use CAD.
keywords CAD Introduction, Corporation Setting, Adult Education, Data Integrity, Data Security, Data Exchange, Linkage Between Geometric and Alphanumeric Data, Customized Systems
series CAAD Futures
email vmueller@nbbj.com
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id e304
authors Porada, M.
year 1988
title Digital Image: A Bridge Towards Mental Images?
source CAAD futures ‘87 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-42916-6] Eindhoven (The Netherlands), 20-22 May 1987, pp. 209-216
summary How we see things depends on our education and our cultural pre-suppositions. This does not allow to convey some logical form, but nevertheless makes possible a more global and less formalized understanding of the objects, their environment and their physical proprieties. In architecture, the digital image acts according to two directions: (-) representation: the fine images are a means of communication between the different parties implementing building projects. (-) modelization: in addition to its iconic qualities the layers of different models simulate the most different aspects of the ,image and the environment characteristics. // At this level our vision is directly concerned with the design of the studied object; it acts both in the design process and in the expression of our conceptual images. How does modelization work? Infographical representation deals with a more or less schematic and conceptualized world the reading of which is more typified than particularized. It deals with a schematization nearly "ideographical" of the mental image thus is produced "synthetism", a neologism similar to such expressions as realism or abstractionism.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id a81e
authors Van Andel, Joost
year 1988
title Expert Systems in Environmental Psychology
source JAPS10 conference. 1988. includes bibliography
summary The knowledge gathered through research in environmental psychology is not optimally used by designers and other people working in applied settings such as politicians and civil servants. In this paper a number of causes and possible improvements of this situation are discussed. Two aspects are highlighted in particular: the structure and the presentation of information. A recent development to present knowledge from environmental psychology is the use of computerized information systems or expert systems. Limitations and possibilities of expert systems in general and for environmental psychology in particular are discussed. The issue is illustrated with parts of an expert system on the design of children's play environments using the pattern language as a structure to present information efficiently and attractively to designers
keywords expert systems, design process, psychology, patterns, languages
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:09

_id avocaad_2001_09
id avocaad_2001_09
authors Yu-Tung Liu, Yung-Ching Yeh, Sheng-Cheng Shih
year 2001
title Digital Architecture in CAD studio and Internet-based competition
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary Architectural design has been changing because of the vast and creative use of computer in different ways. From the viewpoint of designing itself, computer has been used as drawing tools in the latter phase of design (Mitchell 1977; Coyne et al. 1990), presentation and simulation tools in the middle phase (Liu and Bai 2000), and even critical media which triggers creative thinking in the very early phase (Maher et al. 2000; Liu 1999; Won 1999). All the various roles that computer can play have been adopted in a number of professional design corporations and so-called computer-aided design (CAD) studio in schools worldwide (Kvan 1997, 2000; Cheng 1998). The processes and outcomes of design have been continuously developing to capture the movement of the computer age. However, from the viewpoint of social-cultural theories of architecture, the evolvement of design cannot be achieved solely by designers or design processes. Any new idea of design can be accepted socially, culturally and historically only under one condition: The design outcomes could be reviewed and appreciated by critics in the field at the time of its production (Csikszentmihalyi 1986, 1988; Schon and Wiggins 1992; Liu 2000). In other words, aspects of design production (by designers in different design processes) are as critical as those of design appreciation (by critics in different review processes) in the observation of the future trends of architecture.Nevertheless, in the field of architectural design with computer and Internet, that is, so-called computer-aided design computer-mediated design, or internet-based design, most existing studies pay more attentions to producing design in design processes as mentioned above. Relatively few studies focus on how critics act and how they interact with designers in the review processes. Therefore, this study intends to investigate some evolving phenomena of the interaction between design production and appreciation in the environment of computer and Internet.This paper takes a CAD studio and an Internet-based competition as examples. The CAD studio includes 7 master's students and 2 critics, all from the same countries. The Internet-based competition, held in year 2000, includes 206 designers from 43 counties and 26 critics from 11 countries. 3 students and the 2 critics in the CAD studio are the competition participating designers and critics respectively. The methodological steps are as follows: 1. A qualitative analysis: observation and interview of the 3 participants and 2 reviewers who join both the CAD studio and the competition. The 4 analytical criteria are the kinds of presenting media, the kinds of supportive media (such as verbal and gesture/facial data), stages of the review processes, and interaction between the designer and critics. The behavioral data are acquired by recording the design presentation and dialogue within 3 months. 2. A quantitative analysis: statistical analysis of the detailed reviewing data in the CAD studio and the competition. The four 4 analytical factors are the reviewing time, the number of reviewing of the same project, the comparison between different projects, and grades/comments. 3. Both the qualitative and quantitative data are cross analyzed and discussed, based on the theories of design thinking, design production/appreciation, and the appreciative system (Goodman 1978, 1984).The result of this study indicates that the interaction between design production and appreciation during the review processes could differ significantly. The review processes could be either linear or cyclic due to the influences from the kinds of media, the environmental discrepancies between studio and Internet, as well as cognitive thinking/memory capacity. The design production and appreciation seem to be more linear in CAD studio whereas more cyclic in the Internet environment. This distinction coincides with the complementary observations of designing as a linear process (Jones 1970; Simon 1981) or a cyclic movement (Schon and Wiggins 1992). Some phenomena during the two processes are also illustrated in detail in this paper.This study is merely a starting point of the research in design production and appreciation in the computer and network age. The future direction of investigation is to establish a theoretical model for the interaction between design production and appreciation based on current findings. The model is expected to conduct using revised protocol analysis and interviews. The other future research is to explore how design computing creativity emerge from the process of producing and appreciating.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 866f
authors Zelissen, C.
year 1988
title From Drafting to Design: New Programming Tools are Needed
source CAAD futures ‘87 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-42916-6] Eindhoven (The Netherlands), 20-22 May 1987, pp. 253-261
summary The software needed by engineers and architects shows two new aspects. First, these programs get more and more graphic elements, secondly there is a trend from general purpose packages to more problem oriented programs. Comparing several of these application depending programs, a strong similarity appears; a user builds up a representation of a (technical) model by placing, replacing, deleting and so on, representations of objects, belonging to this model. From the programmer's point of view, it must be possible to abstract the several models and the actions on the components of a model, and therefore to build one-program with a model description as parameter. Assuming the existence of such a program, the only remaining part needed to build a complete dedicated package has reference to the specific technical calculations. In this contribution we touch on a number of the problems in developing and implementing such a program.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id cf2005_2_22_193
id cf2005_2_22_193
authors HSIEH Chun-Yu
year 2005
title A Preliminary Model of Creativity in Digital Development of Architecture
source Learning from the Past a Foundation for the Future [Special publication of papers presented at the CAAD futures 2005 conference held at the Vienna University of Technology / ISBN 3-85437-276-0], Vienna (Austria) 20-22 June 2005, pp. 63-74
summary Research into the various forms and processes of creativity has been a topic of great interest in the design field for many years. Part of the view is personality, and part of the answer is behavioural. Creativity is also explained through the identity of social values and the whole creative process. This paper proposes to use the interacting creativity model of Csikszentmihalyi as the basic structure, to establish the major criteria of testing creativity in the digital era. This paper demonstrates two facts: first, it confirms that creativity in architecture is truly valuable in the digital age; second, it proves that in the digital era, individuals, cultures and societies are all under the impact of digital technologies, a fact which transforms the model of interacting creativity proposed by Csikszentmihalyi in 1988 into a new model of digital interacting creativity.
keywords creativity, digital media, society, culture
series CAAD Futures
email ch0315@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/05/05 05:06

_id 4901
authors McIntosh, John F.
year 1988
title The ASU Strategic Plan For Computing Support
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 301-310
summary Our College has spent approximately one hundred thousand dollars per year on computing over the last five years. This paper, which developed out of a University-wide strategic planning exercise, speaks to the question: What are we getting for all that money?

The background to this large planning exercise is sketched, the goals of our computing support plan are stated, the strategies aimed at achieving these goals are explained, and the observed outcomes from implementing these strategies are listed.

In evaluating the plan, this paper argues the position that a computer culture must take hold within the College before computer-aided design will have a truly profound effect upon pedagogy. Operationally, this means that every faculty member must have a personal computer and that every student must have free access to a microcomputer facility. Only then does the whole College adopt the new culture.

The fiscal commitment is high, but there are payoffs in of fice automation that justify the investment even in the short-term. Trivial as it seems, wordprocessing is the first step in seeding this culture. These short term payoffs help make the case for investing in the promise of long-term payoffs in superior design through computer aids.

series ACADIA
email john.mcintosh@asu.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

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