CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 163

_id avocaad_2001_09
id avocaad_2001_09
authors Yu-Tung Liu, Yung-Ching Yeh, Sheng-Cheng Shih
year 2001
title Digital Architecture in CAD studio and Internet-based competition
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary Architectural design has been changing because of the vast and creative use of computer in different ways. From the viewpoint of designing itself, computer has been used as drawing tools in the latter phase of design (Mitchell 1977; Coyne et al. 1990), presentation and simulation tools in the middle phase (Liu and Bai 2000), and even critical media which triggers creative thinking in the very early phase (Maher et al. 2000; Liu 1999; Won 1999). All the various roles that computer can play have been adopted in a number of professional design corporations and so-called computer-aided design (CAD) studio in schools worldwide (Kvan 1997, 2000; Cheng 1998). The processes and outcomes of design have been continuously developing to capture the movement of the computer age. However, from the viewpoint of social-cultural theories of architecture, the evolvement of design cannot be achieved solely by designers or design processes. Any new idea of design can be accepted socially, culturally and historically only under one condition: The design outcomes could be reviewed and appreciated by critics in the field at the time of its production (Csikszentmihalyi 1986, 1988; Schon and Wiggins 1992; Liu 2000). In other words, aspects of design production (by designers in different design processes) are as critical as those of design appreciation (by critics in different review processes) in the observation of the future trends of architecture.Nevertheless, in the field of architectural design with computer and Internet, that is, so-called computer-aided design computer-mediated design, or internet-based design, most existing studies pay more attentions to producing design in design processes as mentioned above. Relatively few studies focus on how critics act and how they interact with designers in the review processes. Therefore, this study intends to investigate some evolving phenomena of the interaction between design production and appreciation in the environment of computer and Internet.This paper takes a CAD studio and an Internet-based competition as examples. The CAD studio includes 7 master's students and 2 critics, all from the same countries. The Internet-based competition, held in year 2000, includes 206 designers from 43 counties and 26 critics from 11 countries. 3 students and the 2 critics in the CAD studio are the competition participating designers and critics respectively. The methodological steps are as follows: 1. A qualitative analysis: observation and interview of the 3 participants and 2 reviewers who join both the CAD studio and the competition. The 4 analytical criteria are the kinds of presenting media, the kinds of supportive media (such as verbal and gesture/facial data), stages of the review processes, and interaction between the designer and critics. The behavioral data are acquired by recording the design presentation and dialogue within 3 months. 2. A quantitative analysis: statistical analysis of the detailed reviewing data in the CAD studio and the competition. The four 4 analytical factors are the reviewing time, the number of reviewing of the same project, the comparison between different projects, and grades/comments. 3. Both the qualitative and quantitative data are cross analyzed and discussed, based on the theories of design thinking, design production/appreciation, and the appreciative system (Goodman 1978, 1984).The result of this study indicates that the interaction between design production and appreciation during the review processes could differ significantly. The review processes could be either linear or cyclic due to the influences from the kinds of media, the environmental discrepancies between studio and Internet, as well as cognitive thinking/memory capacity. The design production and appreciation seem to be more linear in CAD studio whereas more cyclic in the Internet environment. This distinction coincides with the complementary observations of designing as a linear process (Jones 1970; Simon 1981) or a cyclic movement (Schon and Wiggins 1992). Some phenomena during the two processes are also illustrated in detail in this paper.This study is merely a starting point of the research in design production and appreciation in the computer and network age. The future direction of investigation is to establish a theoretical model for the interaction between design production and appreciation based on current findings. The model is expected to conduct using revised protocol analysis and interviews. The other future research is to explore how design computing creativity emerge from the process of producing and appreciating.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id eb5f
authors Al-Sallal, Khaled A. and Degelman, Larry 0.
year 1994
title A Hypermedia Model for Supporting Energy Design in Buildings
source Reconnecting [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-03-9] Washington University (Saint Louis / USA) 1994, pp. 39-49
summary Several studies have discussed the limitations of the available CAAD tools and have proposed solutions [Brown and Novitski 1987, Brown 1990, Degelman and Kim 1988, Schuman et al 1988]. The lack of integration between the different tasks that these programs address and the design process is a major problem. Schuman et al [1988] argued that in architectural design many issues must be considered simultaneously before the synthesis of a final product can take place. Studies by Brown and Novitski [1987] and Brown [1990] discussed the difficulties involved with integrating technical considerations in the creative architectural process. One aspect of the problem is the neglect of technical factors during the initial phase of the design that, as the authors argued, results from changing the work environment and the laborious nature of the design process. Many of the current programs require the user to input a great deal of numerical values that are needed for the energy analysis. Although there are some programs that attempt to assist the user by setting default values, these programs distract the user with their extensive arrays of data. The appropriate design tool is the one that helps the user to easily view the principal components of the building design and specify their behaviors and interactions. Data abstraction and information parsimony are the key concepts in developing a successful design tool. Three different approaches for developing an appropriate CAAD tool were found in the literature. Although there are several similarities among them, each is unique in solving certain aspects of the problem. Brown and Novitski [1987] emphasize the learning factor of the tool as well as its highly graphical user interface. Degelman and Kim [1988] emphasize knowledge acquisition and the provision of simulation modules. The Windows and Daylighting Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) emphasizes the dynamic structuring of information, the intelligent linking of data, the integrity of the different issues of design and the design process, and the extensive use of images [Schuman et al 19881, these attributes incidentally define the word hypermedia. The LBL model, which uses hypermedia, seems to be the more promising direction for this type of research. However, there is still a need to establish a new model that integrates all aspects of the problem. The areas in which the present research departs from the LBL model can be listed as follows: it acknowledges the necessity of regarding the user as the center of the CAAD tool design, it develops a model that is based on one of the high level theories of human-computer interaction, and it develops a prototype tool that conforms to the model.

series ACADIA
email l-degelman@neo.tamu.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id avocaad_2001_19
id avocaad_2001_19
authors Shen-Kai Tang, Yu-Tung Liu, Yu-Sheng Chung, Chi-Seng Chung
year 2001
title The visual harmony between new and old materials in the restoration of historical architecture: A study of computer simulation
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In the research of historical architecture restoration, scholars respectively focus on the field of architectural context and architectural archeology (Shi, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995; Fu, 1995, 1997; Chiu, 2000) or on architecture construction and the procedure of restoration (Shi, 1988, 1989; Chiu, 1990). How to choose materials and cope with their durability becomes an important issue in the restoration of historical architecture (Dasser, 1990; Wang, 1998).In the related research of the usage and durability of materials, some scholars deem that, instead of continuing the traditional ways that last for hundreds of years (that is to replace new materials with old ones), it might be better to keep the original materials (Dasser, 1990). However, unavoidably, some of the originals are much worn. Thus we have to first establish the standard of eliminating components, and secondly to replace identical or similar materials with the old components (Lee, 1990). After accomplishing the restoration, we often unexpectedly find out that the renewed historical building is too new that the sense of history is eliminated (Dasser, 1990; Fu, 1997). Actually this is the important factor that determines the accomplishment of restoration. In the past, some scholars find out that the contrast and conflict between new and old materials are contributed to the different time of manufacture and different coating, such as antiseptic, pattern, etc., which result in the discrepancy of the sense of visual perception (Lee, 1990; Fu, 1997; Dasser, 1990).In recent years, a number of researches and practice of computer technology have been done in the field of architectural design. We are able to proceed design communication more exactly by the application of some systematic softwares, such as image processing, computer graphic, computer modeling/rendering, animation, multimedia, virtual reality and so on (Lawson, 1995; Liu, 1996). The application of computer technology to the research of the preservation of historical architecture is comparatively late. Continually some researchers explore the procedure of restoration by computer simulation technology (Potier, 2000), or establish digital database of the investigation of historical architecture (Sasada, 2000; Wang, 1998). How to choose materials by the technology of computer simulation influences the sense of visual perception. Liu (2000) has a more complete result on visual impact analysis and assessment (VIAA) about the research of urban design projection. The main subjects of this research paper focuses on whether the technology of computer simulation can extenuate the conflict between new and old materials that imposed on visual perception.The objective of this paper is to propose a standard method of visual harmony effects for materials in historical architecture (taking the Gigi Train Station destroyed by the earthquake in last September as the operating example).There are five steps in this research: 1.Categorize the materials of historical architecture and establish the information in digital database. 2.Get new materials of historical architecture and establish the information in digital database. 3.According to the mixing amount of new and old materials, determinate their proportion of the building; mixing new and old materials in a certain way. 4.Assign the mixed materials to the computer model and proceed the simulation of lighting. 5.Make experts and the citizens to evaluate the accomplished computer model in order to propose the expected standard method.According to the experiment mentioned above, we first address a procedure of material simulation of the historical architecture restoration and then offer some suggestions of how to mix new and old materials.By this procedure of simulation, we offer a better view to control the restoration of historical architecture. And, the discrepancy and discordance by new and old materials can be released. Moreover, we thus avoid to reconstructing ˇ§too newˇ¨ historical architecture.
series AVOCAAD
email tsk.aa88g@nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id c7f4
authors Bancroft, Pamela J. (ed.)
year 1988
title Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings]
source ACADIA ‘88 Conference Proceedings /Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, 311 p.
summary Progress is being made towards integrating computing into architectural design. This progress is not being made in a coordinated and systematic manner, which is actually a positive factor. Architects will never be scientists or engineers, who hold the distinguishing characteristic of being masters of the scientific method. We have never been so incumbered, although we certainly have given it our best effort.

Architects are creative problem solvers, primarily driven by intuition, while coming from a sense of the past and the logic of the present. Our initial attempts at integrating computing into the studio, as evidenced by this collection of papers, is very diverse, based on differing pedagogical assumptions, and the achieving of significantly different results. This would appear to be evidence of a revolutionary approach to the problem rather than a scientific evolutionary approach. Terrific! This is when we as architects are at our best. Although we reach a great number of emphatically dead ends, the successes and discoveries achieved along the way are significant.

The diversity and quality of papers submitted suggest that we are indeed pursuing the task of integration in our typical, individual, intuitive, logical manner. I commend all of the authors who submitted proposals and thank them for expanding the envelope of integration into their personal exploration.

series ACADIA
last changed 1999/01/01 18:21

_id 8c6d
authors Brooks, H. Gordon
year 1988
title A New Communication Model for Architecture Using Video and 3D Computer Animated Graphics
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 263-274
summary The University of Arkansas School of Architecture has produced a half-hour television program describing Richard Meier's Atheneum in New Harmony, Indiana. The program uses an analysis technique developed by Dr. Geoffrey Baker, RIBA. The treatment for the material is a combination of on- site video and computer generated 3D animated graphics. An instrument was developed to evaluate the video and its 3D graphics. Based on analysis of the test data several conclusions are apparent. Students believe the video to be very helpful in understanding this building. This video appears to be paced too quickly for understanding in one viewing. Repetitive viewings of the video are helpful in understanding the content. Some students are able to understand principles presented visually better than those presented verbally, but best learning happens when information is reinforced visually and verbally.

series ACADIA
last changed 1999/01/01 18:35

_id 0dc3
authors Chambers, Tom and Wood, John B.
year 1999
title Decoding to 2000 CAD as Mediator
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 210-216
summary This paper will present examples of current practice in the Design Studio course of the BDE, University of Strathclyde. The paper will demonstrate an integrated approach to teaching design, which includes CAD among other visual communication techniques as a means to exploring design concepts and the presentation of complex information as part of the design process. It will indicate how the theoretical dimension is used to direct the student in their areas of independent study. Projects illustrated will include design precedents that have involved students in the review and assessment of landmarks in the history of design. There will be evidence of how students integrate DTP in the presentation of site analysis, research of appropriate design precedents and presentation of their design solutions. CADET underlines the importance of considering design solutions within the context of both our European cultural context and of assessing the environmental impact of design options, for which CAD is eminently suited. As much as a critical method is essential to the development of the design process, a historical perspective and an appreciation of the sophistication of communicative media will inform the analysis of structural form and meaning in a modem urban context. Conscious of the dynamic of social and historical influences in design practice, the student is enabled "to take a critical stand against the dogmatism of the school "(Gadamer, 1988) that inevitably insinuates itself in learning institutions and professional practice.
keywords Design Studio, Communication, Integrated Teaching
series eCAADe
email j.b.wood@strath.ac.uk
last changed 1999/10/10 12:53

_id 56be
authors Dillon, Andrew and Marian, Sweeney
year 1988
title The Application of Cognitive Psychology to CAD Input/Output
source Proceedings of the HCI'88 Conference on People and Computers IV 1988 p.477-488
summary The design of usable human-computer interfaces is one of the primary goals of the HCI specialist. To date however interest has focussed mainly on office or text based systems such as word processors or databases. Computer aided design (CAD) represents a major challenge to the human factors community to provide suitable input and expertise in an area where the users goals and requirements are cognitively distinct from more typical HCI. The present paper is based on psychological investigations of the engineering domain, involving an experimental comparison of designers using CAD and the more traditional drawing board. By employing protocol analytic techniques it is possible to shed light on the complex problem-solving nature of design and to demonstrate the crucial role of human factors in the development of interfaces which facilitate the designers in their task. A model of the cognition of design is proposed which indicates that available knowledge and guidelines alone are not sufficient to aid CAD developers and the distinct nature of the engineering designer's task merits specific attention.
keywords Cognitive Psychology; Interface Design; Protocol Analysis
series other
last changed 2002/07/07 14:01

_id 4743
authors Dvorak, Robert W.
year 1988
title Designing in the CAD Studio
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 123-134
summary The "CAD Studio" is one of many design options that fourth year students may select in the College of Architecture. In this electronic environment, the students analyze and present their designs totally on the computer. The vehicle used is a fifteen week architectural problem called the "Calor Redesign Project".

The "Calor" problem requires the move of a famous residence to a hot arid climate. The residence must then be redesigned in the original architect's style so the building becomes as energy efficient as possible in its new arid environment. The students are required to use as design criteria a new building program, the design philosophy of the original architect, and appropriate passive energy techniques that will reduce the thermal stress on the building. The building's energy response is measured by using an envelope energy analysis program called "Calor".

Much of the learning comes from imposing a new set of restraints on a famous piece of architecture and asking the student to redesign it. The students not only need to learn and use a different design philosophy, but also develop new skills to communicate their ideas on the computer. Both Macintosh and IBM computers are used with software ranging from Microsoft Works, Superpaint, AutoCAD, MegaCAD, Dr Halo, to Calor.

series ACADIA
last changed 1999/01/01 18:28

_id 476d
authors Gero, J. and Maher, M.
year 1988
title Future Roles of Knowledge-based Systems in the Design Process
source CAAD futures ‘87 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-42916-6] Eindhoven (The Netherlands), 20-22 May 1987, pp. 81-90
summary This paper examines the future roles of knowledge-based systems in the design process. It commences with a brief review of computer-aided design and knowledge-based systems prior to examining the present and future roles of knowledge-based systems in design under the headings of: design analysis/formulation; design synthesis; and design evaluation. The paper concludes with a discussion on design integration, novel design, and detail design.
series CAAD Futures
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id 8385
authors Holtz, Neal M. and Rasdorf, William J.
year 1988
title An Evaluation of Programming Languages and Language Features for Engineering Software Development
source International Journal of Engineering with Computers. Springer-Verlag, 1988. vol. 3: pp. 183-199
summary Also published as 'Procedural Programming Languages for the Development of CAD and CAE Systems Software,' in the proceedings of ASME International Conference on Computers in Engineering (1987 : New York, NY). The scope of engineering software has increased dramatically in the past decade. In its early years, most engineering applications were concerned solely with solving difficult numerical problems, and little attention was paid to man- machine interaction, to data management, or to integrated software systems. Now computers solve a much wider variety of problems, including those in which numerical computations are less predominant. In addition, completely new areas of engineering applications such as artificial intelligence have recently emerged. It is well recognized that the particular programming language used to develop an engineering application can dramatically affect the development cost, operating cost. reliability, and usability of the resulting software. With the increase in the variety, functionality, and complexity of engineering software, with its more widespread use, and with its increasing importance, more attention must be paid to programming language suitability so that rational decisions regarding language selection may be made. It is important that professional engineers be aware of the issues addressed in this paper, for it is they who must design, acquire, and use applications software, as well as occasionally develop or manage its development. This paper addresses the need for engineers to possess a working knowledge of the fundamentals of computer programming languages. In pursuit of this, the paper briefly reviews the history of four well known programming languages. It then attempts to identify and to look critically at the attributes of programming languages that significantly affect the production of engineering software. The four procedural programming languages chosen for review are those intended for scientific and general purpose programming, FORTRAN 77, C, Pascal, and Modula-2. These languages are compared and some general observations are made. As it is felt important that professional engineers should be able to make informed decisions about programming language selection, the emphasis throughout this paper is on a methodology of evaluation of programming languages. Choosing an appropriate language can be a complex task and many factors must be considered. Consequently, fundamentals are stressed
keywords programming, engineering, languages, software, management, evaluation, FORTRAN, C, PASCAL, MODULA-2, CAD, CAE
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 0711
authors Kunnath, S.K., Reinhorn, A.M. and Abel, J.F.
year 1990
title A Computational Tool for Evaluation of Seismic Performance of RC Buildings
source February, 1990. [1] 15 p. : ill. graphs, tables. includes bibliography: p. 10-11
summary Recent events have demonstrated the damaging power of earthquakes on structural assemblages resulting in immense loss of life and property (Mexico City, 1985; Armenia, 1988; San Francisco, 1989). While the present state-of-the-art in inelastic seismic response analysis of structures is capable of estimating response quantities in terms of deformations, stresses, etc., it has not established a physical qualification of these end-results into measures of damage sustained by the structure wherein system vulnerability is ascertained in terms of serviceability, repairability, and/or collapse. An enhanced computational tool is presented in this paper for evaluation of reinforced concrete structures (such as buildings and bridges) subjected to seismic loading. The program performs a series of tasks to enable a complete evaluation of the structural system: (a) elastic collapse- mode analysis to determine the base shear capacity of the system; (b) step-by-step time history analysis using a macromodel approach in which the inelastic behavior of RC structural components is incorporated; (c) reduction of the response quantities to damage indices so that a physical interpretation of the response is possible. The program is built around two graphical interfaces: one for preprocessing of structural and loading data; and the other for visualization of structural damage following the seismic analysis. This program can serve as an invaluable tool in estimating the seismic performance of existing RC buildings and for designing new structures within acceptable levels of damage
keywords seismic, structures, applications, evaluation, civil engineering, CAD
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 12:41

_id 4904
authors Lapre, L. and Hudson, P.
year 1988
title Talking about Design: Supporting the Design Process with Different Goals
source CAAD futures ‘87 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-42916-6] Eindhoven (The Netherlands), 20-22 May 1987, pp. 127-136
summary The architectural design process has more than one participant. Each participant has his own way of approaching the information embedded in a design. In the future the CAAD systems of these participants must be able to communicate and exchange information. For a communication of this kind there must be a common ground, a frame of reference, in which these different points of view can be expressed. This frame of reference or model must support participants accessing the same information with different objectives and for different purposes. We shall propose such a model based on research results obtained by the analysis of architectural knowledge and designs. The model incorporates certain aspects drawn from AI.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id 11cb
id 11cb
authors Oguzhan Özcan
year 2004
title MATHEMATICS AND DESIGN EDUCATION
source Proceedings of the Fourth International Conference of Mathematics & Design, Special Edition of the Journal of Mathematics & Design, Volume 4, No.1, pp. 199-203.
summary Many people believe that mathematical thought is an essential element of creativity. The origin of this idea in art dates back to Plato. Asserting that aesthetics is based on logical and mathematical rules, Plato had noticed that geometrical forms were “forms of beauty” in his late years. Unlike his contemporaries, he had stressed that the use of geometrical forms such as lines, circles, planes, cubes in a composition would aid to form an aesthetics. The rational forms of Plato and the rules of geometry have formed the basis of antique Greek art, sculpture and architecture and have influenced art and design throughout history in varying degrees. This emphasis on geometry has continued in modern design, reflected prominently by Kandinsky’s geometric classifications .

Mathematics and especially geometry have found increasing application in the computer-based design environment of our day. The computer has become the central tool in the modern design environment, replacing the brush, the paints, the pens and pencils of the artist. However, if the artist does not master the internal working of this new tool thoroughly, he can neither develop nor express his creativity. If the designer merely learns how to use a computer-based tool, he risks producing designs that appear to be created by a computer. From this perspective, many design schools have included computer courses, which teach not only the use of application programs but also programming to modify and create computer-based tools.

In the current academic educational structure, different techniques are used to show the interrelationship of design and programming to students. One of the best examples in this area is an application program that attempts to teach the programming logic to design students in a simple way. One of the earliest examples of such programs is the Topdown Programming Shell developed by Mitchell, Liggett and Tan in 1988 . The Topdown system is an educational CAD tool for architectural applications, where students program in Pascal to create architectural objects. Different examples of such educational programs have appeared since then. A recent fine example of these is the book and program called “Design by Number” by John Maeda . In that book, students are led to learn programming by coding in a simple programming language to create various graphical primitives.

However, visual programming is based largely on geometry and one cannot master the use of computer-based tools without a through understanding of the mathematical principles involved. Therefore, in a model for design education, computer-based application and creativity classes should be supported by "mathematics for design" courses. The definition of such a course and its application in the multimedia design program is the subject of this article.

series other
type normal paper
email oozcan@yildiz.edu.tr
last changed 2005/04/07 13:36

_id cdc5
id cdc5
authors Richens, P.
year 1988
title Automation of Drafting and Building Modelling – Historical Review of Commercial Development since the Seventies
source CIB-W78 Conference, Lund
summary The present day GDS system has its roots in BDS, started in 1970, BDS was a 3D data-centered system for design, analysis and documentation of system-built buildings. GDS started as a 2D drafting system, and proved more effective and marketable. Specialized applications and 3D capabilities were added gradually. Current interest is in simplifying the software, especially its user interface.
series other
email paul.richens@arct.cam.ac.uk
more http://www.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/pubs/
last changed 2003/12/03 07:33

_id 4034
authors Rosenman, Michael A., Balachandran, M.B. and Gero, John S.
year 1988
title The Place of Expert Systems in Civil Engineering
source Symposium on Knowledge Based Systems in Civil Engineering. 1988. pp. 19-36 CADLINE has abstract only.
summary --- Also printed in 1989 Civil Engineering Systems 6(1&2):11-20. Engineering is concerned with much more than calculation and numeric analysis. It is concerned with ideas, concepts, judgement and deploying experience which cannot be represented numerically. All of these appear to be outside the realm of traditional engineering computing. Engineers make use of knowledge about objects, events and processes and make declarative statements about them which are often written down symbolically. These limitations of traditional computing in civil engineering can be overcome by expert systems. In this paper a number of expert systems dealing with analysis, design and knowledge acquisition in the field of civil engineering are presented
keywords analysis, design, civil engineering, expert systems, knowledge acquisition
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id c5ec
authors Smith Shaw, Doris
year 1988
title The Conceptual Approach to CAD Education
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 35-45
summary Recent research at the Corps of Engineers Construction Engineering Research Laboratory (CERL) investigated embedded computer-based instruction for AutoCAD. The results of this study, which are the focus of this paper, indicated that the only factor which correlated with success in completing the final test was previous experience with another CAD system. Those who knew another CAD system had higher scores and required less than half the time to complete the lessons. Presumably their conceptual knowledge about CAD transferred to the new software environment, even though the Corps' study showed that they were initially biased against learning the new system. Such biased attitudes have been observed when users are asked to learn a second similar software of any kind.

Architects who are deeply involved in computer-aided design have stated that one must learn to program the computer to build the conceptual framework for the creative process. We at CERL agree that an understanding of underlying graphics concepts is essential to the designer. Our research shows that giving students the freedom to explore an existing software program can result in the development of conceptual knowledge. Interviews also reveal that students can invent ways to meet individual objectives when "guided discovery" learning is encouraged.

series ACADIA
last changed 1999/01/01 18:23

_id 866f
authors Zelissen, C.
year 1988
title From Drafting to Design: New Programming Tools are Needed
source CAAD futures ‘87 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-42916-6] Eindhoven (The Netherlands), 20-22 May 1987, pp. 253-261
summary The software needed by engineers and architects shows two new aspects. First, these programs get more and more graphic elements, secondly there is a trend from general purpose packages to more problem oriented programs. Comparing several of these application depending programs, a strong similarity appears; a user builds up a representation of a (technical) model by placing, replacing, deleting and so on, representations of objects, belonging to this model. From the programmer's point of view, it must be possible to abstract the several models and the actions on the components of a model, and therefore to build one-program with a model description as parameter. Assuming the existence of such a program, the only remaining part needed to build a complete dedicated package has reference to the specific technical calculations. In this contribution we touch on a number of the problems in developing and implementing such a program.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id 0697
authors Balachandran, M.B. and Gero, John S.
year 1988
title Development of a Knowledge-Based System for Structural Optimization
source Dordrecht: Kluwer, 1988. pp. 17-24
summary Optimization is a useful and challenging activity in structural design. It provides designers with tools for better designs while saving time in the design process. The features of conventional optimization tools are presented and their limitations are outlined. The impact and role of knowledge-based methodologies in structural optimization processes is discussed. Structural optimization involves a number of tasks which require human expertise, and are traditionally assisted by human designers. These include design optimization formulation, problem recognition and the selection of appropriate algorithm(s). In this representation and processing of constraints are crucial tasks. This paper presents a framework for developing a knowledge-based system to accomplish these tasks. Based on the needs and the nature of the optimization process, a conceptual architecture of an integrated knowledge-based system is presented. The structure and functions of various components of the system are described
keywords knowledge base, systems, integration, optimization, structures, engineering
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 887e
authors Belajcic, N. D.
year 1988
title Computer Implementation of Shape Grammars
source Department of Architectural Science, University of Sydney
summary An approach is taken that shape grammars can be used as a possible vehicle for automated design generation. Historical background of shape grammars is discussed with emphasis on vocabulary/syntax aspect of the design process and significance of class solutions to problems. Similarities with expert system mechanics and structure is highlighted and advantages and disadvantages of rule-based and frame-based systems are considered. These concepts are implemented in a computer program written in LISP employing icon driven graphic interface with tools for creating shapes and rules. Finally, problems associated with adopted reasoning strategies are reported and areas of further development and improvement suggested. [UNPUBLISHED. CADLINE has abstract only]
keywords Shape Grammars, Design Process
series thesis:MSc
last changed 2002/12/14 18:10

_id c57b
authors Bier, Eric A.
year 1988
title Snap-Dragging. Interactive Geometric design in Two and Three Dimensions
source University of California, Berkeley
summary Graphic artists, mechanical designers, architects, animators, authors of technical papers and others create geometric designs (illustrations and solid models) as a major part of their daily efforts. Some part of this shape construction must be done with precision. For instance, certain line segments should be horizontal, parallel or congruent. In recent years, interactive computer programs have been used to speed up the production of precise geometric designs. These programs take advantage of high-speed graphics, equation solving, and computer input peripherals to reduce the time needed to describe point positions to the machine. Previous techniques include rounding the cursor to points on a rectangular grid, solving networks of constraints, and supporting step-by-step drafting-style constructions. Snap-dragging is a modification of the drafting approach that takes advantage of powerful workstations to reduce the time needed to make precise illustrations. Using a single gravity mapping, a cursor can be snapped to either points, lines or surface. The gravity algorithm achieves good performance by computing intersection points on the fly. To aid precise construction, a set of lines, circles, planes, and spheres, called alignment objects, are constructed by the system at a set of slopes, angles, and distances specified by the user. These alignments objects are constructed at each vertex or edge that the user has declared to be hot (of interest). Vertices and edges can also be made hot by the system through the action of an automatic hotness rule. When snap-dragging is used, shapes can often be constructed using a few more keystrokes than would be needed to sketch them freehand. Objects can be edited at arbitrary orientations and sizes. The number of primitive operations is small, making it possible to provide keyboard combinations for quickly activating most of these operations. The user interface works nearly identically in two or three dimensions. In three dimensions, snap-dragging works with a two-dimensional pointing device in a single perspective view.  
series thesis:PhD
email bier@parc.com
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

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