CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 41 to 60 of 163

_id 6c93
authors Rehg, J., Elfes, A. and Talukdar, S.N. (et al)
year 1988
title CASE : Computer-Aided Simultaneous Engineering
source 13 p. : ill
summary Pittsburgh, PA: Engineering Design Research Center, CMU, 1988. EDRC 05-22-88. This paper presents a new system for computer-aided mechanical design known as CASE, which stands for Computer- Aided Simultaneous Engineering. CASE was developed to support mechanical design at the project level, and serve as a means of integrating into the design process concerns from other parts of the lifecycle of a product. CASE is composed of an integrated framework of synthesis, analysis, and translation programs, and is designed to serve as a testbed for research in representation, problem-solving, and systems integration for computer-aided mechanical design. A prototype version of CASE has been applied to the domain of window regulator design, and is capable of automatically synthesizing regulators to meet a set of specifications and performing tolerance and stress analysis on developing designs
keywords representation, problem solving, constraints, reasoning, mechanical engineering
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 12:42

_id 2622
authors Schmitt, G.
year 1988
title Expert Systems and Interactive Fractal Generators in Design and Evaluation
source CAAD futures ‘87 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-42916-6] Eindhoven (The Netherlands), 20-22 May 1987, pp. 91-106
summary Microcomputer based interactive programmable drafting programs and analysis packages are setting new standards for design support, systems in architectural offices. These programs allow the representation and performance simulation of design proposals with one tool, but they lack the ability to represent knowledge concerning relations between design and artifact. While they can expediate the traditional design and analysis process, they do not fundamentally improve it. We shall describe three computationally related approaches which could be a step towards a necessary paradigm change in developing design software. These approaches deal with expert design generators and evaluators, function oriented programming, and fractal design machines.
series CAAD Futures
email gerhard.schmitt@sl.ethz.ch
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id e05e
authors Schon, Donald A. and Wigging, Glenn
year 1988
title Kinds of Seeing and Their Functions in Designing
source November, 1988. 31 p. : ill
summary Architectural designing is described as a kind of experimentation that consists in reflective 'conversation' with the materials of a design situation. A designer sees, moves and sees again. Working in some visual medium -- drawing, in the article examples -- the designer sees what is 'there' in some representation of a site, draws in relation to it, and sees what has been drawn, thereby informing further designing. In all this 'seeing' the designer not only visually registers information but also constructs its meaning -- identifies patterns and gives them meaningsÔ h) 0*0*0*°° ÔŒ beyond themselves. Words like 'recognize,' 'detect,' 'discover' and 'appreciate' denote variants of seeing, as do such terms as 'seeing that,' 'seeing as' and 'seeing in.' The purpose here is to explore the kinds of seeing involved in designing and to describe their various functions. At local and global levels, and in many different ways, designing is an interaction of making and seeing, doing and discovering. On the basis of a few minuscule examples, the authors suggest some of the ways in which this sort of interaction works. Some conditions that enable it to work are described. And some of its consequences for design education and for the development of computer environments useful to designers are drawn
keywords design methods, education, architecture, cognition, perception, design process, semantics, protocol analysis
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 861a
authors Sedas, Sergio W. and Talukdar, Sarosh N.
year 1987
title A Disassembly Planner for Redesign
source The Winter Annual Meeting of the American Society of Mechanical Engineers. Symposium of Intelligent and Integrated Manufacturing Analysis and Synthesis. December, 1987. Pittsburgh, PA: Engineering Design Research Center, CMU, 1988. [6] p. : ill. includes bibliography
summary This paper describes an algorithm for generating plans for disassembling given objects. The plans are produced by a set of knowledge sources acting on a set of representations for the object. Both sets are arbitrarily expandable, so programs using the approach can grow continually in capability. Our present complement of knowledge sources and representations can tackle relatively difficult problems. Three examples are included. The first requires a good bit of geometric reasoning before appropriate subassemblies can be selected. The second and third require certain movable parts to be repositioned before disassembly can be achieved
keywords algorithms, representation, synthesis, assemblies, knowledge, reasoning, mechanical engineering
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 47e7
authors Segal, Mark and Sequin, Carlo H.
year 1988
title PARTITIONING POLYHEDRAL OBJECTS INTO NONINTERSECTING PARTS
source IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications. January, 1988. vol. 8: pp. 53-67 : ill. some col. includes bibliography
summary The article describes an algorithm for partitioning intersecting polyhedrons into disjoint pieces and, more generally, removing intersections from sets of planar polygons embedded in three space. Polygons, or faces, need not be convex and may contain multiple holes. Intersections are removed by considering pairs of faces and slicing the faces apart along their regions of intersection. To reduce the number of face pairs examined, bounding boxes around groups of faces are checked for overlap. The intersection algorithm also computes set theoretic operations on polyhedrons. Information gathered during face cutting is used to determine which portions of the original boundaries may be present in the result of an intersection, a union, or a difference of solids. The method includes provisions to detect, and in some cases overcome, the effects of numerical inaccuracy on the topological decisions that the algorithm must make. The regions in which ambiguous results are possible are flagged so that the user can take appropriate action.
keywords geometric modeling, computer graphics, objects, programming, hidden surfaces, hidden lines, business, practice, systems, user interface, UNIX
series CADline
type normal paper
last changed 2005/10/05 05:39

_id 037b
authors Shapiro, Stuart C. and Rapaport, William J.
year 1988
title Models and Minds : A Reply to Barnden
source NAIC-Northeast Artificial Intelligence Consortium, March, 1988. 13 p. : ill. includes bibliography
summary Cognitive agents, whether human or computer, that engage in natural language discourse and that have beliefs about the beliefs of other cognitive agents must be able to represent objects the way they believe them to be and the way they believe others believe them to be. They must be able to represent other cognitive agents both as objects of beliefs and as agents of beliefs. They must be able to represent their own beliefs, and they must be able to represent beliefs as objects of beliefs. These requirements raise questions about the number of tokens of the belief representation language needed to represent believers and propositions in their normal roles and in their roles as objects of beliefs. This paper explicate the relations among nodes, mental tokens, concepts, actual objects, concepts in the belief spaces of an agent and the agent's model of other agents, concepts of other cognitive agents, and propositions. The discussion is structured as a response to objections raised by another researcher to the authors' earlier papers, and as a demonstration of how they handle an example he claimed the authors could no do
keywords cognition, AI, natural languages, knowledge, representation, semantic networks
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

_id avocaad_2001_20
id avocaad_2001_20
authors Shen-Kai Tang
year 2001
title Toward a procedure of computer simulation in the restoration of historical architecture
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In the field of architectural design, “visualization¨ generally refers to some media, communicating and representing the idea of designers, such as ordinary drafts, maps, perspectives, photos and physical models, etc. (Rahman, 1992; Susan, 2000). The main reason why we adopt visualization is that it enables us to understand clearly and to control complicated procedures (Gombrich, 1990). Secondly, the way we get design knowledge is more from the published visualized images and less from personal experiences (Evans, 1989). Thus the importance of the representation of visualization is manifested.Due to the developments of computer technology in recent years, various computer aided design system are invented and used in a great amount, such as image processing, computer graphic, computer modeling/rendering, animation, multimedia, virtual reality and collaboration, etc. (Lawson, 1995; Liu, 1996). The conventional media are greatly replaced by computer media, and the visualization is further brought into the computerized stage. The procedure of visual impact analysis and assessment (VIAA), addressed by Rahman (1992), is renewed and amended for the intervention of computer (Liu, 2000). Based on the procedures above, a great amount of applied researches are proceeded. Therefore it is evident that the computer visualization is helpful to the discussion and evaluation during the design process (Hall, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998; Liu, 1997; Sasada, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1993, 1997, 1998). In addition to the process of architectural design, the computer visualization is also applied to the subject of construction, which is repeatedly amended and corrected by the images of computer simulation (Liu, 2000). Potier (2000) probes into the contextual research and restoration of historical architecture by the technology of computer simulation before the practical restoration is constructed. In this way he established a communicative mode among archeologists, architects via computer media.In the research of restoration and preservation of historical architecture in Taiwan, many scholars have been devoted into the studies of historical contextual criticism (Shi, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995; Fu, 1995, 1997; Chiu, 2000). Clues that accompany the historical contextual criticism (such as oral information, writings, photographs, pictures, etc.) help to explore the construction and the procedure of restoration (Hung, 1995), and serve as an aid to the studies of the usage and durability of the materials in the restoration of historical architecture (Dasser, 1990; Wang, 1998). Many clues are lost, because historical architecture is often age-old (Hung, 1995). Under the circumstance, restoration of historical architecture can only be proceeded by restricted pictures, written data and oral information (Shi, 1989). Therefore, computer simulation is employed by scholars to simulate the condition of historical architecture with restricted information after restoration (Potier, 2000). Yet this is only the early stage of computer-aid restoration. The focus of the paper aims at exploring that whether visual simulation of computer can help to investigate the practice of restoration and the estimation and evaluation after restoration.By exploring the restoration of historical architecture (taking the Gigi Train Station destroyed by the earthquake in last September as the operating example), this study aims to establish a complete work on computer visualization, including the concept of restoration, the practice of restoration, and the estimation and evaluation of restoration.This research is to simulate the process of restoration by computer simulation based on visualized media (restricted pictures, restricted written data and restricted oral information) and the specialized experience of historical architects (Potier, 2000). During the process of practicing, communicates with craftsmen repeatedly with some simulated alternatives, and makes the result as the foundation of evaluating and adjusting the simulating process and outcome. In this way we address a suitable and complete process of computer visualization for historical architecture.The significance of this paper is that we are able to control every detail more exactly, and then prevent possible problems during the process of restoration of historical architecture.
series AVOCAAD
email tsk.aa88g@nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 08c3
authors Steinfeld, Edward
year 1988
title Using CAD to Teach Architectural Design
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 75-86
summary A CAD program with solid modeling capabilities was used as the primary instructional media for a graduate level architectural design studio. The objective of the studio was to enhance design education by use of the CAD tool. A series of projects were designed to utilize CAD most effectively without sacrificing complexity and depth of educational content. The experiment identified several pedagogical advantages of CAD for design education and also some problems that have to be resolved to take maximum advantage of these tools.

series ACADIA
last changed 1999/01/01 18:25

_id fc80
authors Ubbelohde, S. and Humann, C.
year 1998
title Comparative Evaluation of Four Daylighting Software Programs
source 1998 ACEEE Summer Study on Energy Efficiency in Buildings Proceedings. American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy
summary By the mid-1980's, a number of software packages were under development to predict daylighting performance in buildings, in particular illumination levels in daylighted spaces. An evaluation in 1988 by Ubbelohde et al. demonstrated that none of the software then available was capable of predicting the simplest of real daylighting designs. In the last ten years computer capabilities have evolved rapidly and we have four major packages widely available in the United States. This paper presents a comparative evaluation from the perspective of building and daylighting design practice. A contemporary building completed in 1993 was used as a base case for evaluation. We present the results from field measurements, software predictions and physical modeling as a basis for discussing the capabilities of the software packages in architectural design practice. We found the current software packages far more powerful and nuanced in their ability to predict daylight than previously. Some can accurately predict quantitative daylight performance under varying sky conditions and produce handsome and accurate visualizations of the space. The programs differ significantly, however, in their ease of use, modeling basis and the emphasis between quantitative predictions and visualization in the output.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id a81e
authors Van Andel, Joost
year 1988
title Expert Systems in Environmental Psychology
source JAPS10 conference. 1988. includes bibliography
summary The knowledge gathered through research in environmental psychology is not optimally used by designers and other people working in applied settings such as politicians and civil servants. In this paper a number of causes and possible improvements of this situation are discussed. Two aspects are highlighted in particular: the structure and the presentation of information. A recent development to present knowledge from environmental psychology is the use of computerized information systems or expert systems. Limitations and possibilities of expert systems in general and for environmental psychology in particular are discussed. The issue is illustrated with parts of an expert system on the design of children's play environments using the pattern language as a structure to present information efficiently and attractively to designers
keywords expert systems, design process, psychology, patterns, languages
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:09

_id 44de
authors Woodwark, J.R.
year 1988
title Shape Models in Computer-Integrated Manufacture : A Review
source 18 p. Winchester: IBM UK Scientific Center, IBM United Kingdom Laboratories Limited, January, 1988. IBM UKSC Report 183. includes bibliography
summary Existing computer-aided manufacturing systems are based on models of shape tailored to a particular process. Computer- integrated manufacture involves many different processes, and hence requires more complete models of components or assemblies. This can be provided by solid modelling techniques extended to include extra data related to manufacture such as form features and tolerances. These developments are being applied to many manufacturing processes, from casting to assembly, but profound questions remain concerning both the structure and the use of shape models in manufacture
keywords CAM, geometric modeling, systems
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 176f
authors Habraken, N.J. and Gross, M.D.
year 1988
title Concept Design Games
source Design Studies, Volume 9, Number 3, 1988, pp. 12-23
summary This paper describes our work on using games as a tool for research in design theory and methods. Games offer a means of isolating certain aspects, or concepts, of designing for purposes of scrutiny. A game provides an environment for a group of players, acting with individual goals and a shared program, to make and transform complex configurations, free of functional requirements. Adjusting game parameters emphasizes different concepts. We have developed nine games that explore a variety of concepts of general interest to those concerned with organizing physical configurations. Beyond these particular concepts, we argue that games are a useful way to couch studies in design theory and methods.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id e9e7
authors Schoen, D.
year 1988
title Designing: Rules, types and worlds
source Design Studies, Volume 9, Number 3, 1988, pp. 24-38
summary Protocols of seven practised designers, all undertaking a common design exercise, have been analysed for patterns of reasoning and use of design rules. Patterns of reasoning were found to be shared among designers and not significantly different from reasoning in everyday life. Rules were largely implicit, overlapping, diverse, variously applied, contextually dependent, subject to exceptions and to critical modification. It is argued that rules are derived from underlying types - functional building types, references, spatial gestalts and experiential archetypes - that serve as `holding environments' for design knowledge.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 450c
authors Akin, Ömer
year 1990
title Computational Design Instruction: Toward a Pedagogy
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 302-316
summary The computer offers enormous potential both in and out of the classroom that is realized only in limited ways through the applications available to us today. In the early days of the computer it was generally argued that it would replace the architect. When this idea became obsolete, the prevailing opinion of proponents and opponents alike shifted to the notion of the computer as merely adding to present design capabilities. This idea is so ingrained in our thinking that we still speak of "aiding" design with computers. It is clear to those who grasp the real potential of this still new technology - as in the case of many other major technological innovations - that it continues to change the way we design, rather than to merely augment or replace human designers. In the classroom the computer has the potential to radically change three fundamental ingredients: student, instruction, and instructor. It is obvious that changes of this kind spell out a commensurate change in design pedagogy. If the computer is going to be more than a passive instrument in the design studio, then design pedagogy will have to be changed, fundamentally. While the practice of computing in the studio continues to be a significant I aspect of architectural education, articulation of viable pedagogy for use in the design studio is truly rare. In this paper the question of pedagogy in the CAD studio will be considered first. Then one particular design studio taught during Fall 1988 at Carnegie Mellon University will be presented. Finally, we shall return to issues of change in the student, instruction, and instructor, as highlighted by this particular experience.
series CAAD Futures
email oa04@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id c568
authors Balachandran, M.B. and John S. Gero
year 1987
title A Model for Knowledge Based Graphical Interfaces
source AI '87: Proceedings of the Australian Joint Artificial Intelligence Conference. 1987. pp. 505-521. Also published in Artificial Intelligence Developments and Applications edited by J. S. Gero and R Stanton, North-Holland Pub. 1988. -- CADLINE has abstract only.
summary This paper describes a model for knowledge-based graphical interface which incorporates a variety of knowledge of the domain of application. The key issues considered include graphics interpretation, extraction of features of graphics objects and identification of prototype objects. The role of such knowledge-based interfaces in computer-aided design is discussed. A prototype system developed in Prolog and C is described and its application in the domain of structural engineering is demonstrated
keywords user interface, computer graphics, knowledge base, systems, civil engineering, structures
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id c6d5
authors Balachandran, M.B.
year 1988
title A Model for Knowledge-Based Design Optimization [PhD dissertation]
source Dept. of Architectural Science, University of Sydney
summary Unpublished. CADLINE has abstract only. This dissertation is concerned with developments in design decision methodologies applied to computer-aided design. The major aim of this research was to design and develop a knowledge-based computer-aided optimization system that has the ability to emulate some of the human performances in design decision processes. The issues and problems involved in developing a knowledge-based system for design optimization are addressed. A knowledge-based methodology to aid design optimization formulation is investigated. The major issues considered include representation of design description, the variety of knowledge required for the formulation process, recognizing optimization formulations, and selection of appropriate algorithms. It is demonstrated that the knowledge-based control of numerical processes leads to efficient and improved decisions in design. In developing knowledge-based systems for computer-aided decision applications an effective human-machine interface is essential. A model for knowledge-based graphical interfaces is proposed. This model incorporates knowledge for graphics interpretation, extraction of features of graphics objects and identification of prototypical objects. An experimental system developed in Prolog and C is demonstrated in the domain of structural design. The system shows one way of combining knowledge-based systems technology with computer graphics and indicates how knowledge-based interfaces improve the system's interactive capabilities. Finally, the system, OPTIMA, is presented. The system is designed as an integrated knowledge-based decision system using frames, rule bases, menu inputs, algebraic computation and optimization algorithms. The system has been written in LISP, Prolog and C and implemented on SUN Microsystems workstations. The performance of the system is demonstrated using two example problems from the domains of structural and architectural design respectively. The knowledge-based approach to design optimization is shown to be considerably easier and more efficient than those using conventional programs.
keywords Knowledge Base, Systems, CAD, Representation, Design, Frames, Computer Graphics, User Interface, Decision Making
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 696c
authors Beheshti, M. and Monroy, M.
year 1988
title Requirements for Developing an Information System for Architecture
source CAAD futures ‘87 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-42916-6] Eindhoven (The Netherlands), 20-22 May 1987, pp. 149-170
summary This paper discusses possibilities of developing new tools for architectural design. It argues that architects should meet the challenge of information technology and computer-based design techniques. One such attempt has been the first phase of the development of an architectural design information system (ADIS), also an architectural design decision support system. The system should benefit from the developments of the artificial intelligence to enable the architect to have access to information required to carry out design work. In other words: the system functions as a huge on-line electronic library of architecture, containing up-to-date architectural design information, literature, documents, etc. At the same time, the system offers necessary design aids such as computer programs for design process, drawing programs, evaluation programs, cost calculation programs, etc. The system also provides data communication between the architect and members of the design coalition team. This is found to be of vital importance in the architectural design process, because it can enable the architect to fit in changes, brought about in the project by different parties. Furthermore, they will be able, to oversee promptly the consequences of changes or decisions in a comprehensive manner. The system will offer advantages over the more commonly applied microcomputer based CAAD and IGDM (integrated graphics database management) systems, or even larger systems available to an architect. Computer programs as well as hardware change rapidly and become obsolete. Therefore, unrelenting investment pressure to up-date both software and hardware exists. The financial burden of this is heavy, in particular for smaller architectural practices (for instance an architect working for himself or herself and usually with few or no permanent staff). ADIS, as an on-line architectural design aid, is constantly up-dated by its own organisation. This task will be co-ordinated by the ADIS data- base administrator (DBA). The processing possibilities of the system are faster, therefore more complex processing tasks can be handled. Complicated large graphic data files, can be easily retrieved and manipulated by ADIS, a large system. In addition, the cost of an on-line system will be much less than any other system. The system is based on one model of the architectural design process, but will eventually contain a variety of design models, as it develops. The development of the system will be an evolutionary process, making use of its users' feed-back system. ADIS is seen as a step towards full automation of architectural design practices. Apart from being an architectural design support system, ADIS will assist the architect in his/her administrative and organisational activities.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id cf2011_p127
id cf2011_p127
authors Benros, Deborah; Granadeiro Vasco, Duarte Jose, Knight Terry
year 2011
title Integrated Design and Building System for the Provision of Customized Housing: the Case of Post-Earthquake Haiti
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 247-264.
summary The paper proposes integrated design and building systems for the provision of sustainable customized housing. It advances previous work by applying a methodology to generate these systems from vernacular precedents. The methodology is based on the use of shape grammars to derive and encode a contemporary system from the precedents. The combined set of rules can be applied to generate housing solutions tailored to specific user and site contexts. The provision of housing to shelter the population affected by the 2010 Haiti earthquake illustrates the application of the methodology. A computer implementation is currently under development in C# using the BIM platform provided by Revit. The world experiences a sharp increase in population and a strong urbanization process. These phenomena call for the development of effective means to solve the resulting housing deficit. The response of the informal sector to the problem, which relies mainly on handcrafted processes, has resulted in an increase of urban slums in many of the big cities, which lack sanitary and spatial conditions. The formal sector has produced monotonous environments based on the idea of mass production that one size fits all, which fails to meet individual and cultural needs. We propose an alternative approach in which mass customization is used to produce planed environments that possess qualities found in historical settlements. Mass customization, a new paradigm emerging due to the technological developments of the last decades, combines the economy of scale of mass production and the aesthetics and functional qualities of customization. Mass customization of housing is defined as the provision of houses that respond to the context in which they are built. The conceptual model for the mass customization of housing used departs from the idea of a housing type, which is the combined result of three systems (Habraken, 1988) -- spatial, building system, and stylistic -- and it includes a design system, a production system, and a computer system (Duarte, 2001). In previous work, this conceptual model was tested by developing a computer system for existing design and building systems (Benr__s and Duarte, 2009). The current work advances it by developing new and original design, building, and computer systems for a particular context. The urgent need to build fast in the aftermath of catastrophes quite often overrides any cultural concerns. As a result, the shelters provided in such circumstances are indistinct and impersonal. However, taking individual and cultural aspects into account might lead to a better identification of the population with their new environment, thereby minimizing the rupture caused in their lives. As the methodology to develop new housing systems is based on the idea of architectural precedents, choosing existing vernacular housing as a precedent permits the incorporation of cultural aspects and facilitates an identification of people with the new housing. In the Haiti case study, we chose as a precedent a housetype called “gingerbread houses”, which includes a wide range of houses from wealthy to very humble ones. Although the proposed design system was inspired by these houses, it was decided to adopt a contemporary take. The methodology to devise the new type was based on two ideas: precedents and transformations in design. In architecture, the use of precedents provides designers with typical solutions for particular problems and it constitutes a departing point for a new design. In our case, the precedent is an existing housetype. It has been shown (Duarte, 2001) that a particular housetype can be encoded by a shape grammar (Stiny, 1980) forming a design system. Studies in shape grammars have shown that the evolution of one style into another can be described as the transformation of one shape grammar into another (Knight, 1994). The used methodology departs takes off from these ideas and it comprises the following steps (Duarte, 2008): (1) Selection of precedents, (2) Derivation of an archetype; (3) Listing of rules; (4) Derivation of designs; (5) Cataloguing of solutions; (6) Derivation of tailored solution.
keywords Mass customization, Housing, Building system, Sustainable construction, Life cycle energy consumption, Shape grammar
series CAAD Futures
email deborahbenros@gmail.com
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id c9e4
authors Birmingham, William P. and Siewiorek, Daniel P.
year 1988
title Automated knowledge Acquisition for a Computer Hardware Synthesis System
source 19 p. : ill. Engineering Design Research Center, CMU, June, 1988. EDRC 18-06-88. includes bibliography
summary The MICON Synthesizer Version 1 (M1) is a rule-based system which produces a complete small computer design from a set of abstract specifications. The ability of M1 to produce designs depends on the encoding of large amounts of domain knowledge. An automated knowledge acquisition tool, CGEN, works symbiotically with M1 by gathering the knowledge required by M1. CGEN acquires knowledge about how to build and when to use various computer structures. This paper overviews the operation of CGEN by providing an example of the types of knowledge acquired and the mechanisms employed. A novel knowledge-intensive generalization scheme is presented. Generalization is a pragmatic necessity for knowledge acquisition in this domain. A series of experiments to test CGEN's capabilities are explained. A description of the architecture and knowledge-base of M1 is also provided
keywords electrical engineering, automation, knowledge acquisition, knowledge base, systems
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 8ac0
authors Birmingham, William P., Gupta, Anurag P. and Siewiorek, Daniel P.
year 1988
title The MICON System for Computer Design
source 11 p. : ill. Pittsburgh, PA: Engineering Design Research Center, CMU, November, 1988. EDRC 18-10-89. includes bibliography
summary The MICON system is an integrated collection of programs which automatically synthesizes small computer systems from high level specifications. The system address multiple levels of design, from logical through physical, providing a rapid prototyping capability. Two programs form MICON's nucleus: a knowledge-based synthesis tool called M1; and, an automated knowledge acquisition tool named CGEN which is used to teach M1 how to design. Other tools in the MICON system are an integrated database and associated data management tools. The system is fully functional, having been used to generate working designs. This paper describes the architecture and operation of the MICON system
keywords integrated circuits, electrical engineering, design, systems, automation, integration
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

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