CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 81 to 100 of 163

_id 035e
authors Gero, John S.
year 1988
title Prototypes : A Basis for Knowledge-based Design
source Symposium on Knowledge Based Design in Architecture. 1988. pp. 3-8. Also published in Knowledge Based Systems in Architecture, Acta Polytechnica Scandinavica, Helsinki, edited by J. S. Gero and T. Oksala, 1989
summary A new conceptual schema called a prototype for the representation of generalized design knowledge is proposed. It contains knowledge necessary for the commencement and the continuation of a design. This paper briefly presents the schema and describes its use in designing. Its use in categorizing design processes is presented
keywords prototypes, representation, knowledge base, design
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 0833
authors Gero, John S.
year 1988
title Expert systems in Engineering Design : the Concept of Prototypes and their Application
source Symposium on Knowledge Based Systems in Civil Engineering. 1988. pp. 37-45
summary CADLINE has abstract only. This paper addresses the question of what sort of schemata do experts in engineering design use to allow the commencement and continuation of a design. It is suggested that a conceptual schema labelled prototype can be used to capture this expertise. Prototypes are generalizations at different levels of design experience and provide the bases of an approach to designing with computers. They structure design experience to make it applicable in similar situations. The paper elaborates the concept and briefly describes an application
keywords structures, engineering, expert systems, prototypes, design, knowledge
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 6745
authors Giraud, Christian and Hanrot, Stephane
year 1988
title Elements for Spatial Reasoning in Construction
source Robotics in Construction, International Symposium (5th : 1988 : Tokyo, Japan). pp. 105- 113 : ill. includes bibliography
summary According to AI techniques, spatial reasoning is seen in construction as generation and solving of goals involving a spatial representation model of buildings defining a rich taxonomy of parts and elements, and spatial relationships between these parts and elements. The authors define spatial representation model and spatial relationship from previous experiments in architect knowledge representation and automated surveying. The aim is to enable very abstract and short descriptions of building component assemblies, from designers at drawing-boards or from workers on sites, which can be processed and transformed in basic geometrical properties
keywords reasoning, representation, construction, automation
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id a4ce
authors Goldberg, D.
year 1988
title Genetic Algorithms in Search, Optimization and Machine Learning
source Addison-Wesley, Reading, Massachusetts
summary David Goldberg's Genetic Algorithms in Search, Optimization and Machine Learning is by far the bestselling introduction to genetic algorithms. Goldberg is one of the preeminent researchers in the field--he has published over 100 research articles on genetic algorithms and is a student of John Holland, the father of genetic algorithms--and his deep understanding of the material shines through. The book contains a complete listing of a simple genetic algorithm in Pascal, which C programmers can easily understand. The book covers all of the important topics in the field, including crossover, mutation, classifier systems, and fitness scaling, giving a novice with a computer science background enough information to implement a genetic algorithm and describe genetic algorithms to a friend.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 85b9
authors Haglund, Bruce and Sumption, Brian
year 1988
title Toward a Computer Integrated Design Studio
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 291-299
summary The formation of our vision for a computer-integrated design studio is outlined. The ways in which our experience in teaching with computers in a variety of settings and in developing our own computer tools has contributed to this is explained. The next step in actualization of our vision is the creation of a design curriculum and a computerized studio which support the integration of this new technology into the traditions of architectural education.
series ACADIA
last changed 1999/01/01 18:37

_id 20a1
authors Hall, R.
year 1989
title Illumination and Color in Computer Generated Imagery
source New York: Springer Verlag
summary This is a discussion of the physics of illumination and the associated techniques for modeling global and local illumination in computer generated imagery. It was state-of-the-art in 1988, but is now rather outdated. It does include discussions of physics and color theory basics that have not changed, and a discussion of illumination models through ray tracing models using various specular reflectance functions and including Fresnel effects. This text is currently out of print. However, we still receive numerous requests for an electronic version of the source code in the book.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id diss_howe
id diss_howe
authors Howe, Alan Scott
year 1988
title A new paradigm for life-cycle management of kit-of-parts building systems
source UNIVERSITY OF MICHIGAN , PhD
summary The research described in this dissertation brings together various technologies in manufacturing and information management and suggests a new paradigm for the design, manufacture, and lifetime use of artifacts using kit-of-parts systems and rule-based assembly. The questions are asked: If architects, designers, and users were given direct online connection to real-time design information sources and fabrication processes, and have the ability to monitor and control the current state of designed objects throughout the objects' lifetime, how would the entire life-cycle of a product be affected, and how would design processes change? During the course of the research described in this dissertation, a series of simulations and experiments were conducted which produced a computer-based simulated design, manufacture, and use environment wherein these questions could begin to be answered. A kit-of-parts model building system was devised which could be used to design model buildings in virtual form by downloading virtual representations of the components from the Internet and assembling them into a desired form. The virtual model building could then be used to order the manufacture of real components online, and remotely controlled robots used to assemble the actual building on the site. Through the use of special hardware manufactured into the components, real-time remote monitoring and control of the current state of the finished model building was affected during the building's lifetime. The research establishes the feasibility of an online life-cycle environment where a virtual representation of an artifact is created and used to both manufacture a real-world counterpart and also monitor and control the current state of the real-world object. The state-of-the-art of pertinent technologies were explored through literature searches and experiments. Data representation, rule-based design techniques, robotics, and digital control were studied, and a series of design principles established which lend themselves toward a life-cycle management paradigm. Several case studies are cited which show how the design principles and life-cycle management environment can be applied to real buildings and other artifacts such as vehicles and marine structures. Ideas for expanded research on the life-cycle management paradigm are cited.  

series thesis:PhD
email ash@plugin-creations.com
more http://wwwlib.umi.com/dissertations/fullcit/9909905
last changed 2003/11/20 18:57

_id cf2005_2_22_193
id cf2005_2_22_193
authors HSIEH Chun-Yu
year 2005
title A Preliminary Model of Creativity in Digital Development of Architecture
source Learning from the Past a Foundation for the Future [Special publication of papers presented at the CAAD futures 2005 conference held at the Vienna University of Technology / ISBN 3-85437-276-0], Vienna (Austria) 20-22 June 2005, pp. 63-74
summary Research into the various forms and processes of creativity has been a topic of great interest in the design field for many years. Part of the view is personality, and part of the answer is behavioural. Creativity is also explained through the identity of social values and the whole creative process. This paper proposes to use the interacting creativity model of Csikszentmihalyi as the basic structure, to establish the major criteria of testing creativity in the digital era. This paper demonstrates two facts: first, it confirms that creativity in architecture is truly valuable in the digital age; second, it proves that in the digital era, individuals, cultures and societies are all under the impact of digital technologies, a fact which transforms the model of interacting creativity proposed by Csikszentmihalyi in 1988 into a new model of digital interacting creativity.
keywords creativity, digital media, society, culture
series CAAD Futures
email ch0315@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/05/05 05:06

_id f65d
authors Kalisperis, L.N.
year 1988
title A Conceptual Framework for Computing in Architectural Design
source Pennsylvania State University
summary A brief historical overview of architectural design reveals that there has been a slow development in the conceptualization of the scope of architectural design. Advancing our understanding of the architectural design process reveals new directions for computing in architectural design. This study proposes a conceptual framework for an integrated computing environment. Design disciplines have embarked on a rigorous search for theoretical perspectives and methods that encompass a comprehensive view of architecture. Architectural design has been seen as a sequential process similar to that of industrial design. Attempts to formalize this process based on industrial design methods solved only a fraction of the overall integration problem. The resultant models are inadequate to deal with the complexity of architectural design. Emerging social problem-solving paradigms seek to construct a cognitive psychology of problem solving and have a direct relevance to architectural design. These problem-solving activities include structured, semi-structured, and ill-defined problems, which are included to varying degrees in each problem situation across a continuum of difficulty. Problem solving in architectural design involves the determination of certain objectives and also whether or not it is possible to accomplish them. Developments in computing in architecture have paralleled developments in architectural methodologies. The application of computing in architectural design has predominantly focused only on sequential process, optimum solutions, and quantifiable tasks of the design process. Qualitative, generative, tasks of architectural design were dealt with through the introduction of paradigms from linguistics and knowledge-based systems borrowed from engineering applications. Although the application of such paradigms resulted in some success, this reductionist approach to computing in architecture fragmented its integration into the design process. What is required, therefore, is a unified approach to computing in architecture based on a holistic view of the architectural design process. The model proposed in this study provides such a conceptual framework. This model shifts the focus from product to process and views the design problem as a goal-oriented problem-solving activity that allows a design team to identify strategies and methodologies in the quest for design solutions.  
series thesis:PhD
email lnk@psu.edu
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 67ac
authors Koivunen, Marja-Riitta and Mantyla, Martti
year 1988
title Hut Windows : An Improved Architecture for a User Interface Management System
source IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications. January, 1988. vol. 8: pp. 43-52 : ill. includes bibliography
summary The design of Hut Windows, a user interface management system intended for applications in mechanical CAD, is the subject of this article. Hut Windows features a three-layered internal architecture, where the presentation, dialogue- control, and application processing layers are clearly separated from each other. This leads to increased simplicity and flexibility in user interface design over the more traditional situation where all of these layers are closely coupled
keywords user interface, CAD, windowing, mechanical engineering
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 7e15
authors Kvan, Thomas
year 1997
title Chips, chunks and sauces
source International Journal of Design Computing, 1, 1997 (Editorial)
summary I am sure there is an art in balancing the chunks to use with your chips. Then there is the sauce that envelops them both. I like my chips chunky and not too saucy. Not that I am obsessed with food but I don't think you can consider design computing without chunks. It's the sauce I'm not sure about. The chunks of which I write are not of course those in your salsa picante but those postulated by Chase and Simon (1973) reflecting on good chess players; the chunks of knowledge with which an expert tackles a problem in their domain of expertise. The more knowledge an expert has of complex and large configurations of typical problem situations (configurations of chess pieces), the greater range of solutions the expert can bring a wider to a particular problem. Those with more chunks have more options and arrive at better solutions. In other words, good designs come from having plenty of big chunks available. There has been a wealth of research in the field of computer-supported collaborative work in the contexts of writing, office management, software design and policy bodies. It is typically divided between systems which support decision making (GDSS: group decision support systems) and those which facilitate joint work (CSCW: computer-based systems for co-operative work) (see Dennis et al. (1988) for a discussion of the distinctions and their likely convergence). Most implementations in the world of design have been on CSCW systems, few have looked at trying to make a group design decision support system (GDDSS?). Most of the work in CSCD has been grounded in the heritage of situated cognition - the assumption that collaborative design is an act that is intrinsically grounded in the context within which it is carried out, that is, the sauce in which we find ourselves swimming daily. By sauce, therefore, I am referring to anything that is not knowledge in the domain of expertise, such as modes of interaction, gestures, social behaviours.
series journal paper
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2003/05/15 08:29

_id ijac20053406
id ijac20053406
authors Kvan, Thomas
year 2005
title Professor Tsuyoshi Sasada 1941-2005
source International Journal of Architectural Computing vol. 3 - no. 4, 519-526
summary Tsuyoshi Sasada, known as Tee to so many of us, died on 30 September 2005 at the age of 64 after a long illness.Tee retired from Osaka University in 2004 upon reaching the mandatory retirement age but retained his association as Emeritus Professor.At the time of his death he held appointments as Honorary Professor, National Chiao Tung University (Taiwan) and Expert Researcher, National Institute of Information and Communications Technology. He had been with Osaka University since 1970, having earned his bachelor, master and doctoral degrees at Kyoto University. In 1988 he was appointed Professor in Osaka and established his laboratory, known as the Sasada Lab, from which over 200 students have graduated.
series journal
email t.kvan@arch.usyd.edu.au
more http://www.ingentaconnect.com/content/mscp/ijac/2006/00000004/00000001/art00002
last changed 2007/03/04 06:08

_id 21b9
authors Landsdown, J.
year 1988
title Computers and Visualisation of Design Ideas: Possibilities and Promises
source CAAD futures ‘87 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-42916-6] Eindhoven (The Netherlands), 20-22 May 1987, pp. 71-80
summary Drawing in all its various forms, from freehand sketching to detailed technical layout, is a type of modelling that designers find indispensable. In many cases, indeed, drawing is the only form of external modelling a designer uses. It has two basic functions: to assist in the externalisation and development of mental concepts and to help in the presentation of these concepts to others. The current thrust of work in computer graphics - although valuable - tends to concentrate almost exclusively on the presentation aspects and it is now possible to create images almost resembling photographs of real objects as well as production drawings of great accuracy and consistency. This paper summarises some of this presentation work as well as developments which might go further in assisting the activities and processes of design.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id e8bb
authors Lehto, M.
year 1988
title Optical Discs - Their Application in Mass Data Storage
source CAAD futures ‘87 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-42916-6] Eindhoven (The Netherlands), 20-22 May 1987, pp. 189-198
summary Much of the building designer's time is taken up correlating the various sources of information so as to incorporate it in the design within a limited time span. The building information service should be able to provide him or her by the up-to-date information in a user friendly format. Optical disc technology makes it possible to combine different forms of building data into images which can be mass stored and randomly accessed on a single disc, with the minimal response time by personal computer or CAD- workstation. In this paper the use of various forms of optical disc technology in construction industry and the prototype video disc produced by VTT are described.
keywords Construction, Optical Discs, Interactive Video Disc, Mass Storage
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id c70a
authors Lindgren, Christina Axelsson
year 1988
title Forest Visual Variation as a Recreative Force
source Knowledge-Based Design in Architecture, Tips-88 (pre-proceedings) (1988 : Otaniemi). editors. John S Gero and T. Oksala. Espoo, Finland: Research Institute for Built Environment, Helsinki University of Technology, Department of Architecture, pp. 149-157. includes bibliography.
summary --- A revised version of this paper has been published in the Acta Polytechnica Scandinavica series. The article presents some findings concerning the importance of forest visual variation and the possibilities to create a Forest Visual Opportunity Spectrum. In the light of suggestions on theory of recreation and of the actual multiple use planning situation of forests, the possibilities and limits of empirical studies as a tool to receive knowledge of visual aspects of forests are discussed
keywords planning, knowledge, applications, landscape
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:09

_id 8a1b
authors Mackenzie, C.A.
year 1987
title Inducing Relational Grammars From Design Interpretations
source AI'87 : Proceeding of the Australian Joint Artificial Intelligence Conference. 1987. pp. 207-220 CADLINE has abstract only.
summary --- Also published in Artificial Intelligence Developments and Applications edited by J. S. Gero and R. Stanton, North-Holland Pub. 1988. The combination of a heuristic driven search and a tree systems inference technique to induce context-free design grammars is presented. This is achieved by searching for the most useful interpretations of each design in a sample set and discovering regularities in their tree systems representation. The knowledge induced is represented as an accepting tree systems automation and generative grammar. Examples from the domain of architectural design are given
keywords heuristics, inference, search, shape grammars, knowledge, representation, architecture
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 0149
authors Mackenzie, C.A.
year 1988
title Heuristic Search and Tree Systems Inference for Structural Pattern Recognition
source Knowledge based systems. 1988. vol. 1: pp. 78-89
summary An experiment is reported that combines the use of a heuristic search and a tree systems inference technique to induce context-free relational grammars that generate patterns in the style embodied in a sample set. This is achieved by searching for concise structural representations of each pattern in a sample set and discovering regularities in their tree systems representation. The knowledge induced is represented as an accepting tree systems automation and generative grammar, and is used to classify extant patterns and generate novel ones. Examples are given to illustrate the methodology, and to lend support to the hypothesis that the style of a pattern can be partially characterized by a unique generative process
keywords algorithms, heuristics, search, pattern recognition, inference, shape grammars
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 2fd0
authors Maher, Mary Lou, Zhao, F. and Gero, John S.
year 1989
title Creativity in Humans and Computers
source Helsinki: Acta Polytechnica Scandinavica, 1989. pp. 129-141. Also Published as : Creativity in Humans and Computers: A Discussion of Creativity in Computer-Aided Architectural Design, in J.S. Gero and T. Oksala (eds.) Symposium on Knowledge-based Design in Architecture, Helsinki University of Technology, pp. 31-44. 1988
summary This paper explores creativity from a process viewpoint. It examines various strategies employed by humans during their creative acts and posits analogous computational processes. The discussion provides a framework for the current work by the authors on knowledge-based creative design
keywords creativity, design process, architecture, knowledge base
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id b0f7
authors Martens, Bob
year 1992
title A FINISHING TOUCH TO THE FULL-SCALE LABORATORY AT THE UNIVERSITY OF TECHNOLOGY IN VIENNA
source Proceedings of the 4rd European Full-Scale Modelling Conference / Lausanne (Switzerland) 9-12 September 1992, Part A, pp. 7-14
summary The development planning of the full-scale laboratory at the Vienna University of Technology was already presented to the third E.F.A. Conference in Lund (1990). Exchange of experience has greatly encouraged us to take all measures necessary for an immediate provisional operation. Working experience was of considerable significance regarding reconstruction work having repeatedly been postponed ever since 1988. This paper deals with the Vienna full-scale laboratory in its ultimate form and all the equipment designed therefore. Summarizingly, the further measures for operation are being considered.
keywords Full-scale Modeling, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2004/05/04 13:30

_id c7e9
authors Maver, T.W.
year 2002
title Predicting the Past, Remembering the Future
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 2-3
summary Charlas Magistrales 2There never has been such an exciting moment in time in the extraordinary 30 year history of our subject area, as NOW,when the philosophical theoretical and practical issues of virtuality are taking centre stage.The PastThere have, of course, been other defining moments during these exciting 30 years:• the first algorithms for generating building layouts (circa 1965).• the first use of Computer graphics for building appraisal (circa 1966).• the first integrated package for building performance appraisal (circa 1972).• the first computer generated perspective drawings (circa 1973).• the first robust drafting systems (circa 1975).• the first dynamic energy models (circa 1982).• the first photorealistic colour imaging (circa 1986).• the first animations (circa 1988)• the first multimedia systems (circa 1995), and• the first convincing demonstrations of virtual reality (circa 1996).Whereas the CAAD community has been hugely inventive in the development of ICT applications to building design, it hasbeen woefully remiss in its attempts to evaluate the contribution of those developments to the quality of the built environmentor to the efficiency of the design process. In the absence of any real evidence, one can only conjecture regarding the realbenefits which fall, it is suggested, under the following headings:• Verisimilitude: The extraordinary quality of still and animated images of the formal qualities of the interiors and exteriorsof individual buildings and of whole neighborhoods must surely give great comfort to practitioners and their clients thatwhat is intended, formally, is what will be delivered, i.e. WYSIWYG - what you see is what you get.• Sustainability: The power of «first-principle» models of the dynamic energetic behaviour of buildings in response tochanging diurnal and seasonal conditions has the potential to save millions of dollars and dramatically to reduce thedamaging environmental pollution created by badly designed and managed buildings.• Productivity: CAD is now a multi-billion dollar business which offers design decision support systems which operate,effectively, across continents, time-zones, professions and companies.• Communication: Multi-media technology - cheap to deliver but high in value - is changing the way in which we canexplain and understand the past and, envisage and anticipate the future; virtual past and virtual future!MacromyopiaThe late John Lansdown offered the view, in his wonderfully prophetic way, that ...”the future will be just like the past, onlymore so...”So what can we expect the extraordinary trajectory of our subject area to be?To have any chance of being accurate we have to have an understanding of the phenomenon of macromyopia: thephenomenon exhibitted by society of greatly exaggerating the immediate short-term impact of new technologies (particularlythe information technologies) but, more importantly, seriously underestimating their sustained long-term impacts - socially,economically and intellectually . Examples of flawed predictions regarding the the future application of information technologiesinclude:• The British Government in 1880 declined to support the idea of a national telephonic system, backed by the argumentthat there were sufficient small boys in the countryside to run with messages.• Alexander Bell was modest enough to say that: «I am not boasting or exaggerating but I believe, one day, there will bea telephone in every American city».• Tom Watson, in 1943 said: «I think there is a world market for about 5 computers».• In 1977, Ken Olssop of Digital said: «There is no reason for any individuals to have a computer in their home».The FutureJust as the ascent of woman/man-kind can be attributed to her/his capacity to discover amplifiers of the modest humancapability, so we shall discover how best to exploit our most important amplifier - that of the intellect. The more we know themore we can figure; the more we can figure the more we understand; the more we understand the more we can appraise;the more we can appraise the more we can decide; the more we can decide the more we can act; the more we can act themore we can shape; and the more we can shape, the better the chance that we can leave for future generations a trulysustainable built environment which is fit-for-purpose, cost-beneficial, environmentally friendly and culturally significactCentral to this aspiration will be our understanding of the relationship between real and virtual worlds and how to moveeffortlessly between them. We need to be able to design, from within the virtual world, environments which may be real ormay remain virtual or, perhaps, be part real and part virtual.What is certain is that the next 30 years will be every bit as exciting and challenging as the first 30 years.
series SIGRADI
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

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