CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 162

_id 7e15
authors Kvan, Thomas
year 1997
title Chips, chunks and sauces
source International Journal of Design Computing, 1, 1997 (Editorial)
summary I am sure there is an art in balancing the chunks to use with your chips. Then there is the sauce that envelops them both. I like my chips chunky and not too saucy. Not that I am obsessed with food but I don't think you can consider design computing without chunks. It's the sauce I'm not sure about. The chunks of which I write are not of course those in your salsa picante but those postulated by Chase and Simon (1973) reflecting on good chess players; the chunks of knowledge with which an expert tackles a problem in their domain of expertise. The more knowledge an expert has of complex and large configurations of typical problem situations (configurations of chess pieces), the greater range of solutions the expert can bring a wider to a particular problem. Those with more chunks have more options and arrive at better solutions. In other words, good designs come from having plenty of big chunks available. There has been a wealth of research in the field of computer-supported collaborative work in the contexts of writing, office management, software design and policy bodies. It is typically divided between systems which support decision making (GDSS: group decision support systems) and those which facilitate joint work (CSCW: computer-based systems for co-operative work) (see Dennis et al. (1988) for a discussion of the distinctions and their likely convergence). Most implementations in the world of design have been on CSCW systems, few have looked at trying to make a group design decision support system (GDDSS?). Most of the work in CSCD has been grounded in the heritage of situated cognition - the assumption that collaborative design is an act that is intrinsically grounded in the context within which it is carried out, that is, the sauce in which we find ourselves swimming daily. By sauce, therefore, I am referring to anything that is not knowledge in the domain of expertise, such as modes of interaction, gestures, social behaviours.
series journal paper
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2003/05/15 08:29

_id 404e
authors Oksala , T.
year 1988
title Logical Models for Rule-based CAAD
source CAAD futures ‘87 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-42916-6] Eindhoven (The Netherlands), 20-22 May 1987, pp. 107-116
summary The aim of this paper is to present the basic results of a theoretic approach to represent architectural individual forms in CAD systems. From the point of view of design methodology and problem solving these descriptions might be conceived' as parts of possible environments satisfying the laws of some design theory in logical sense. This paper describes results in a series of logical studies towards rule and knowledge based systems for design automation. The effective use of programming languages and computers as design aids in architecture presupposes certain capabilities to articulate built environment logically. The use of graphic languages in the description of environmental items e.g. buildings might be theoretically mastered by formal production systems including linguistic, geometric, and spatio-material generation. The combination of the power of formal mechanisms and logical individual calculus offers suitable framework to generate arbitrary e.g. free spatial compositions as types or unique solutions. In this frame it is natural to represent in a coherent way very complex hierarchical parsing of buildings in explicit form as needed in computer implementations. In order to simulate real design work the individual configurations of possible built forms should be designed to satisfy known rules. In the preliminary stage partial solutions to design problems may be discussed in mathematical terms using frameworks like lattices, graphs, or group theoretical considerations of structural, functional, and visual organization of buildings. The capability to produce mathematically sophisticated geometric structures allows us to generalize the approach further. The theoretical design knowhow in architecture can be partly translated in to some logic and represented in a knowledge base. These rules are used as selection criteria for geometric design candidates in the sense of logical model theory and mathematical optimization. The economy of the system can be developed by using suitable conduct mechanisms familiar e.g. from logic programming. The semantics of logic offers a frame to consider computer assisted and formal generation in design. A number of semantic and pragmatic problems, however, remain to be solved. In any case conceptual analyses based on logic are applicable in order to rationally reconstruct architectural goals contributing to the quality of environmental design, which should be the main goal in the development of design systems in near future.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id 45b7
authors Oxman, R.E.
year 1988
title Expert System for Generation and Evaluation in Architectural Design
source Technion, Faculty of Architecture and Town Planing, Haifa
summary The research field, focuses on a new research area of Knowledge Based Systems for Architectural Design. The research deals with concepts and tools emerging from Artificial Intelligence, Knowledge Based Systems and Expert Systems. The research is involved with the construction of a theoretical basis for the development of approaches and methods for the representation and control of design knowledge as a reasoning process. Key questions which attempt to reconsider representation and control in design are formulated. The following questions serve as a research framework out of which new approaches, methods and tools were developed. (1.)What are the existing ideas, methods and tools in Expert Systems? (2.) What are the performance characteristics of Expert Systems in Architectural Design ? (3.) What are the desired operative characteristics and interactions for Expert Systems in design ? (4.) How is it possible to formulate and apply the diverse forms of Architectural Knowledge in Expert Systems for design? (5.) What are the problems of implementation in the development of Expert Systems for design ? The state of the art in knowledge based systems is surveyed, while emphasizing the differences between conventional systems and knowledge based systems. Representation and control methods and the components of expert systems are reviewed. Expert systems for diagnosis, interpretation, planning and design are analysed with respect to their performance characteristics. Techniques and technologies of existing tools are defined. An expert system for the generation and evaluation of ill defined architectural design problems is develped. A formalization of the concept of 'design interpretation' is proposed and developed. It is applied in the process of defining and classifying the performance characteristics of expert systems for design. This concept is based upon two sets of reasoning processes: those which enable a mapping between design requirements and solution descriptions in the generation stage of design and those between solution descriptions and performance evaluation in the evaluation stage of design. On the basis of the formalization of this concept, an expert system capable of integrating various modes of performance is proposed and developed. The system functions as a 'design generator', a 'design critic', or a' design critic-generator'. These modes, which integrate generation and evaluation in the same system, operate by employing both forward chaining and backward chaining inference mechanisms. As a result of the examination of desired forms of interactions, a new approach for dual direction interpretation between graphic and verbal modes is developed. This approach reflects the importance of both graphical and verbal expression in design. The approach is based upon a simultaneous mapping between symbolic-verbal interpretation and graphic interpretation. The work presents the mapping process through the concept of design interpretation, employing geometrical knowledge, typological knowledge and evaluation knowledge. A tool which provides communication between an expert system and a graphic system was developed and is presented. The importance of such a tool in expert systems for design resides in the provision of free choice to the user for interacting with the system either graphically or verbally during the design process. An additional component in the development of knowledge-based systems for design is related to the important question of knowledge definition and the representational schemata of design knowledge. A new representational scheme for complex architectural knowledge, termed 'The generation and refinement scheme of a design prototype' is proposed and developed. Its operation as part of a total integrated design system is demonstrated. The scheme is based upon the structures of knowledge of design precedents which constitute typical situations and solutions in architectural design. This scheme provides an appropriate representation for the two types of knowledge which operate in a refinement process of a design prototype. Generative knowledge describes the solution space by predefined refinement stages; interpretive knowledge enables their selection. The examination of representational methods for the proposed scheme indicated that employing a single representational method lacked enough generalization and expressive power for the needs of the design knowledge structures. It was found that a way to represent complex structures is through the integration of multiple methods of representation, each one according to the knowledge characteristics. In order to represent the proposed scheme of design knowledge, a unique method was developed which integrates both rules and frames. The method consists of a rules-frames-rules structure for the representation of a design prototype. An approach is developed for the implementation of these concepts in an expert system for design. PRODS: A prototype based expert system shell for design is developed and demonstrated. The system consists of three basic components: a rule-based expert system shell, a frame system, and a knowledge base interface. All system interactions are controlled by the inference engine. It passes control between the rule-base and the frame-base inference engines, and provides communications between the rule-based and frame-based representations. It is suggested that expert system can interface with external CAD systems including graphics, communicating through a central representation. These concepts and developments are demonstrated in two implementations. The PREDIKT system for the preliminary design of the residential kitchen; the PROUST system for the selection and refinement of dwelling types. PREDIKT demonstrates the integration of rules and a graphical-verbal interpreter; in addition, PROUST demonstrates the significance of hybrid representation in the generation and refinement processes. The results and conlusions are summarized. Future research agenda within the field of knowledge-based systems for design is discussed, and potential research areas are defined.
series thesis:PhD
email arrro01@techunix.technion.ac.il
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 20a1
authors Hall, R.
year 1989
title Illumination and Color in Computer Generated Imagery
source New York: Springer Verlag
summary This is a discussion of the physics of illumination and the associated techniques for modeling global and local illumination in computer generated imagery. It was state-of-the-art in 1988, but is now rather outdated. It does include discussions of physics and color theory basics that have not changed, and a discussion of illumination models through ray tracing models using various specular reflectance functions and including Fresnel effects. This text is currently out of print. However, we still receive numerous requests for an electronic version of the source code in the book.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 2e5a
authors Matsumoto, N. and Seta, S.
year 1997
title A history and application of visual simulation in which perceptual behaviour movement is measured.
source Architectural and Urban Simulation Techniques in Research and Education [3rd EAEA-Conference Proceedings]
summary For our research on perception and judgment, we have developed a new visual simulation system based on the previous system. Here, we report on the development history of our system and on the current research employing it. In 1975, the first visual simulation system was introduced, witch comprised a fiberscope and small-scale models. By manipulating the fiberscope's handles, the subject was able to view the models at eye level. When the pen-size CCD TV camera came out, we immediately embraced it, incorporating it into a computer controlled visual simulation system in 1988. It comprises four elements: operation input, drive control, model shooting, and presentation. This system was easy to operate, and the subject gained an omnidirectional, eye-level image as though walking through the model. In 1995, we began developing a new visual system. We wanted to relate the scale model image directly to perceptual behavior, to make natural background images, and to record human feelings in a non-verbal method. Restructuring the above four elements to meet our equirements and adding two more (background shooting and emotion spectrum analysis), we inally completed the new simulation system in 1996. We are employing this system in streetscape research. Using the emotion spectrum system, we are able to record brain waves. Quantifying the visual effects through these waves, we are analyzing the relation between visual effects and physical elements. Thus, we are presented with a new aspect to study: the relationship between brain waves and changes in the physical environment. We will be studying the relation of brain waves in our sequential analysis of the streetscape.
keywords Architectural Endoscopy, Endoscopy, Simulation, Visualisation, Visualization, Real Environments
series EAEA
email matumoto@archi.ace.nitech.ac.jp
more http://www.bk.tudelft.nl/media/eaea/eaea97.html
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id ec36
authors Meurant, Robert C.
year 1988
title Some Metaphysical Considerations Raised by the Computer-Generated Electronic Environment
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 59-70
summary The effects of the computer on the designer are profound, and affect design methodology and habitation. The computer-aided designer experiences within the electronic environment a freedom from certain important constraints of real-world modelling of physical reality. Electronic configurations are not bound by the constructional, material, or structural constraints operating in the physical world. This freedom is liberating, in that the imagination is given a powerful tool with which to develop external representations of ideal environments. But there is also the potential of destructive tendencies. Is the increasing sophistication of external tools of the imagination at the expense of the ability of the individual to master the internal imagination - are we externalizing at the price of inner vision? There is also the possibility of greater alienation from the physical world. We loose the tactile sensitivity, and the spatial and structural intuition with which we draw and make physical models. These are essential parts of the design of the physical environment.

We are left on the horns of a dilemma. The rapid response and exciting images of the computergenerated video environment suggest we are entering an era when architecture itself becomes electronic. The physical built-form recedes in importance, and may even become redundant. But we must also ask: Are we entering a post-computer age? Will we realize the potential profundity of our innate human biocomputers - to the point where we renounce the hard technology of the material for the soft technology of consciousness?

series ACADIA
last changed 1999/01/01 18:24

_id 47e7
authors Segal, Mark and Sequin, Carlo H.
year 1988
title PARTITIONING POLYHEDRAL OBJECTS INTO NONINTERSECTING PARTS
source IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications. January, 1988. vol. 8: pp. 53-67 : ill. some col. includes bibliography
summary The article describes an algorithm for partitioning intersecting polyhedrons into disjoint pieces and, more generally, removing intersections from sets of planar polygons embedded in three space. Polygons, or faces, need not be convex and may contain multiple holes. Intersections are removed by considering pairs of faces and slicing the faces apart along their regions of intersection. To reduce the number of face pairs examined, bounding boxes around groups of faces are checked for overlap. The intersection algorithm also computes set theoretic operations on polyhedrons. Information gathered during face cutting is used to determine which portions of the original boundaries may be present in the result of an intersection, a union, or a difference of solids. The method includes provisions to detect, and in some cases overcome, the effects of numerical inaccuracy on the topological decisions that the algorithm must make. The regions in which ambiguous results are possible are flagged so that the user can take appropriate action.
keywords geometric modeling, computer graphics, objects, programming, hidden surfaces, hidden lines, business, practice, systems, user interface, UNIX
series CADline
type normal paper
last changed 2005/10/05 05:39

_id avocaad_2001_19
id avocaad_2001_19
authors Shen-Kai Tang, Yu-Tung Liu, Yu-Sheng Chung, Chi-Seng Chung
year 2001
title The visual harmony between new and old materials in the restoration of historical architecture: A study of computer simulation
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In the research of historical architecture restoration, scholars respectively focus on the field of architectural context and architectural archeology (Shi, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995; Fu, 1995, 1997; Chiu, 2000) or on architecture construction and the procedure of restoration (Shi, 1988, 1989; Chiu, 1990). How to choose materials and cope with their durability becomes an important issue in the restoration of historical architecture (Dasser, 1990; Wang, 1998).In the related research of the usage and durability of materials, some scholars deem that, instead of continuing the traditional ways that last for hundreds of years (that is to replace new materials with old ones), it might be better to keep the original materials (Dasser, 1990). However, unavoidably, some of the originals are much worn. Thus we have to first establish the standard of eliminating components, and secondly to replace identical or similar materials with the old components (Lee, 1990). After accomplishing the restoration, we often unexpectedly find out that the renewed historical building is too new that the sense of history is eliminated (Dasser, 1990; Fu, 1997). Actually this is the important factor that determines the accomplishment of restoration. In the past, some scholars find out that the contrast and conflict between new and old materials are contributed to the different time of manufacture and different coating, such as antiseptic, pattern, etc., which result in the discrepancy of the sense of visual perception (Lee, 1990; Fu, 1997; Dasser, 1990).In recent years, a number of researches and practice of computer technology have been done in the field of architectural design. We are able to proceed design communication more exactly by the application of some systematic softwares, such as image processing, computer graphic, computer modeling/rendering, animation, multimedia, virtual reality and so on (Lawson, 1995; Liu, 1996). The application of computer technology to the research of the preservation of historical architecture is comparatively late. Continually some researchers explore the procedure of restoration by computer simulation technology (Potier, 2000), or establish digital database of the investigation of historical architecture (Sasada, 2000; Wang, 1998). How to choose materials by the technology of computer simulation influences the sense of visual perception. Liu (2000) has a more complete result on visual impact analysis and assessment (VIAA) about the research of urban design projection. The main subjects of this research paper focuses on whether the technology of computer simulation can extenuate the conflict between new and old materials that imposed on visual perception.The objective of this paper is to propose a standard method of visual harmony effects for materials in historical architecture (taking the Gigi Train Station destroyed by the earthquake in last September as the operating example).There are five steps in this research: 1.Categorize the materials of historical architecture and establish the information in digital database. 2.Get new materials of historical architecture and establish the information in digital database. 3.According to the mixing amount of new and old materials, determinate their proportion of the building; mixing new and old materials in a certain way. 4.Assign the mixed materials to the computer model and proceed the simulation of lighting. 5.Make experts and the citizens to evaluate the accomplished computer model in order to propose the expected standard method.According to the experiment mentioned above, we first address a procedure of material simulation of the historical architecture restoration and then offer some suggestions of how to mix new and old materials.By this procedure of simulation, we offer a better view to control the restoration of historical architecture. And, the discrepancy and discordance by new and old materials can be released. Moreover, we thus avoid to reconstructing ¡§too new¡¨ historical architecture.
series AVOCAAD
email tsk.aa88g@nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 0697
authors Balachandran, M.B. and Gero, John S.
year 1988
title Development of a Knowledge-Based System for Structural Optimization
source Dordrecht: Kluwer, 1988. pp. 17-24
summary Optimization is a useful and challenging activity in structural design. It provides designers with tools for better designs while saving time in the design process. The features of conventional optimization tools are presented and their limitations are outlined. The impact and role of knowledge-based methodologies in structural optimization processes is discussed. Structural optimization involves a number of tasks which require human expertise, and are traditionally assisted by human designers. These include design optimization formulation, problem recognition and the selection of appropriate algorithm(s). In this representation and processing of constraints are crucial tasks. This paper presents a framework for developing a knowledge-based system to accomplish these tasks. Based on the needs and the nature of the optimization process, a conceptual architecture of an integrated knowledge-based system is presented. The structure and functions of various components of the system are described
keywords knowledge base, systems, integration, optimization, structures, engineering
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id c568
authors Balachandran, M.B. and John S. Gero
year 1987
title A Model for Knowledge Based Graphical Interfaces
source AI '87: Proceedings of the Australian Joint Artificial Intelligence Conference. 1987. pp. 505-521. Also published in Artificial Intelligence Developments and Applications edited by J. S. Gero and R Stanton, North-Holland Pub. 1988. -- CADLINE has abstract only.
summary This paper describes a model for knowledge-based graphical interface which incorporates a variety of knowledge of the domain of application. The key issues considered include graphics interpretation, extraction of features of graphics objects and identification of prototype objects. The role of such knowledge-based interfaces in computer-aided design is discussed. A prototype system developed in Prolog and C is described and its application in the domain of structural engineering is demonstrated
keywords user interface, computer graphics, knowledge base, systems, civil engineering, structures
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 696c
authors Beheshti, M. and Monroy, M.
year 1988
title Requirements for Developing an Information System for Architecture
source CAAD futures ‘87 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-42916-6] Eindhoven (The Netherlands), 20-22 May 1987, pp. 149-170
summary This paper discusses possibilities of developing new tools for architectural design. It argues that architects should meet the challenge of information technology and computer-based design techniques. One such attempt has been the first phase of the development of an architectural design information system (ADIS), also an architectural design decision support system. The system should benefit from the developments of the artificial intelligence to enable the architect to have access to information required to carry out design work. In other words: the system functions as a huge on-line electronic library of architecture, containing up-to-date architectural design information, literature, documents, etc. At the same time, the system offers necessary design aids such as computer programs for design process, drawing programs, evaluation programs, cost calculation programs, etc. The system also provides data communication between the architect and members of the design coalition team. This is found to be of vital importance in the architectural design process, because it can enable the architect to fit in changes, brought about in the project by different parties. Furthermore, they will be able, to oversee promptly the consequences of changes or decisions in a comprehensive manner. The system will offer advantages over the more commonly applied microcomputer based CAAD and IGDM (integrated graphics database management) systems, or even larger systems available to an architect. Computer programs as well as hardware change rapidly and become obsolete. Therefore, unrelenting investment pressure to up-date both software and hardware exists. The financial burden of this is heavy, in particular for smaller architectural practices (for instance an architect working for himself or herself and usually with few or no permanent staff). ADIS, as an on-line architectural design aid, is constantly up-dated by its own organisation. This task will be co-ordinated by the ADIS data- base administrator (DBA). The processing possibilities of the system are faster, therefore more complex processing tasks can be handled. Complicated large graphic data files, can be easily retrieved and manipulated by ADIS, a large system. In addition, the cost of an on-line system will be much less than any other system. The system is based on one model of the architectural design process, but will eventually contain a variety of design models, as it develops. The development of the system will be an evolutionary process, making use of its users' feed-back system. ADIS is seen as a step towards full automation of architectural design practices. Apart from being an architectural design support system, ADIS will assist the architect in his/her administrative and organisational activities.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ea6a
authors Bentley, Jon L.
year 1988
title More Programming Pearls : Confessions of a Coder
source 207 p. : ill. Reading, Massachusetts: Addison-Wesley Publishing Co., 1988. includes index
summary A collection of essays demonstrating the various aspects of programming. Some cover programming techniques using the C and AWK languages, other essays discuss making I/O fit for humans and several sub routines
keywords programming, algorithms, techniques
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id c9e4
authors Birmingham, William P. and Siewiorek, Daniel P.
year 1988
title Automated knowledge Acquisition for a Computer Hardware Synthesis System
source 19 p. : ill. Engineering Design Research Center, CMU, June, 1988. EDRC 18-06-88. includes bibliography
summary The MICON Synthesizer Version 1 (M1) is a rule-based system which produces a complete small computer design from a set of abstract specifications. The ability of M1 to produce designs depends on the encoding of large amounts of domain knowledge. An automated knowledge acquisition tool, CGEN, works symbiotically with M1 by gathering the knowledge required by M1. CGEN acquires knowledge about how to build and when to use various computer structures. This paper overviews the operation of CGEN by providing an example of the types of knowledge acquired and the mechanisms employed. A novel knowledge-intensive generalization scheme is presented. Generalization is a pragmatic necessity for knowledge acquisition in this domain. A series of experiments to test CGEN's capabilities are explained. A description of the architecture and knowledge-base of M1 is also provided
keywords electrical engineering, automation, knowledge acquisition, knowledge base, systems
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 8d41
authors Bourque, Paul N.
year 1988
title Computer-Aided Learning of Structural Behavior
source Computing in Design Education [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Ann Arbor (Michigan / USA) 28-30 October 1988, pp. 135-146
summary Computer-aided learning of structural behavior can be very effective and motivating. Students are able to analyse structures in far less time than by traditional methods and address problems of much greater complexity. They do so without the burden of manual computation.

Computer programs exist that are well suited for this purpose, two of which are described. They offer a broad range of design capabilities, and are easy to master because of their intuitive and graphically oriented approach.

A number of examples are given to illustrate the potential of computer-aided learning as a complement to traditional methods either in the classroom or in coursework.

series ACADIA
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id caadria2011_061
id caadria2011_061
authors Celani, Gabriela; José P. Duarte and Carlos V. Vaz
year 2011
title The gardens revisited: The link between technology, meaning and logic?
source Proceedings of the 16th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / The University of Newcastle, Australia 27-29 April 2011, pp. 643-652
summary The objective of this paper is to compare the computational concepts present in three books published by Mitchell between 1987 and 1990: The art of computer-graphics programming (1987), which has Robin Liggett and Thomas Kvan as co-authors, The logic of architecture (1990), probably his most influential work, and The poetics of gardens (1988), which has Charles Moore and William Turnbull as coauthors. By looking at the concepts that are presented in the three books and establishing a comparison between them, we expect to show that The poetics of Gardens should not be seen as a detour from Mitchell´s line of research, but rather as a key piece for understanding the relationship between technology, meaning and logic in his very coherent body of work.
keywords Computational design concepts; technology; meaning; logic
series CAADRIA
email celani@fec.unicamp.br
last changed 2012/05/30 19:29

_id 6f1b
authors De Floriani, Leila and Falcidieno, Bianca
year 1988
title A Hierarchical Boundary Model for Solid Object Representation
source ACM Transactions on Graphics. January, 1988. vol. 7: pp. 42-60 : ill. includes bibliography
summary A new hierarchical model for solid object representation is described. This model, called a Hierarchical Face Adjacency Hypergraph (HFAH), is based on a relational description of the object boundary, called a Face Adjacency Hypergraph (FAH), which considers faces as the primary topological entities defining the object boundary. The HFAH consists of a hierarchy of FAHs describing the decomposition of the boundary of an object into form features. In this paper the HFAH is described together with its internal encoding structure. Two basic transformations, called refinement and abstraction, are defined on the hierarchical model; these allow effective and efficient modifications of the hierarchical boundary model
keywords representation, computational geometry, solid modeling, algorithms, design, data structures, graphs, features, B-rep
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id sigradi2009_1055
id sigradi2009_1055
authors Ferreira, Jane Victal
year 2009
title Pensando o tempo e o espaço [Thinking time and space]
source SIGraDi 2009 - Proceedings of the 13th Congress of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics, Sao Paulo, Brazil, November 16-18, 2009
summary This paper compares the musical and architectural languages exploring the similarities between works related to Twelve-tone music and Descontruction. To do this, first looks at Opus 27 by Anton Webern whose goal was to explore the spatiality in the context of sound perception by using a topology based on a square matrix of twelve rows and columns. Next, compares these procedures to those adopted by Peter Eisenman to design the conceptual model Guardiola House (1988), demonstrating the affinity between spatial and temporal constructions in the works of these two authors.
keywords Peter Eisenman; Anton Webern; Dodecafonismo; Deconstrutivismo
series SIGRADI
email janevictal@hotmail.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:51

_id 68c8
authors Flemming, U., Coyne, R. and Fenves, S. (et al.)
year 1994
title SEED: A Software Environment to Support the Early Phases in Building Design
source Proceeding of IKM '94, Weimar, Germany, pp. 5-10
summary The SEED project intends to develop a software environment that supports the early phases in building design (Flemming et al., 1993). The goal is to provide support, in principle, for the preliminary design of buildings in all aspects that can gain from computer support. This includes using the computer not only for analysis and evaluation, but also more actively for the generation of designs, or more accurately, for the rapid generation of design representations. A major motivation for the development of SEED is to bring the results of two multi-generational research efforts focusing on `generative' design systems closer to practice: 1. LOOS/ABLOOS, a generative system for the synthesis of layouts of rectangles (Flemming et al., 1988; Flemming, 1989; Coyne and Flemming, 1990; Coyne, 1991); 2. GENESIS, a rule-based system that supports the generation of assemblies of 3-dimensional solids (Heisserman, 1991; Heisserman and Woodbury, 1993). The rapid generation of design representations can take advantage of special opportunities when it deals with a recurring building type, that is, a building type dealt with frequently by the users of the system. Design firms - from housing manufacturers to government agencies - accumulate considerable experience with recurring building types. But current CAD systems capture this experience and support its reuse only marginally. SEED intends to provide systematic support for the storing and retrieval of past solutions and their adaptation to similar problem situations. This motivation aligns aspects of SEED closely with current work in Artificial Intelligence that focuses on case-based design (see, for example, Kolodner, 1991; Domeshek and Kolodner, 1992; Hua et al., 1992).
series other
email ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 4cbb
authors Gero, John S. (editor)
year 1988
title Artificial Intelligence in Engineering : Design
source 465 p. Amsterdam: Elsevier/CMP, 1988. CADLINE has abstract only
summary This volume contains the papers in the design area from the Third International Conference on Artificial Intelligence in Engineering. Design is that most fundamental but least understood of engineering activities. Most current computer- aided design systems are primarily concerned with graphical representations of objects as they are being designed. The introduction of artificial intelligence into engineering has fostered the burgeoning interest in formal methods of engineering design. These methods treat design as being modelable using reasoning processes. The papers related to design can be grouped into two categories: those primarily concerned with design knowledge in its various forms and those primarily concerned with applications in specific domains. The papers in this volume are presented under the following headings: Design Knowledge and Representation; Integrated Circuit Design; Mechanical Engineering Design; Structural Engineering Design; Simultaneous Engineering Design; Architectural Design
keywords AI, design, engineering, knowledge, applications, architecture, CAD, CAE, integrated circuits, representation, structures, civil engineering
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 82a7
authors Gero, John S., Maher, Mary Lou and Zhang, W.
year 1988
title Chunking Structural Design Knowledge as Prototypes
source Amsterdam: CMP, 1988. pp. 3-21. includes a short bibliography
summary The concept of a prototype as a conceptual schema for the representation of generalized design knowledge is proposed. A formal definition of prototypes is presented independent of their implementation. The paper elaborates this concept and demonstrates its applicability through an example in the domain of structural design. The example of prototype knowledge is presented for the design of rigid frames and the process of designing using prototypes is described. The advantages of this approach are presented
keywords design, prototypes, knowledge, representation, structures
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

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