CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id 252a
authors Reich, Yoram
year 1988
title Machine Learning for Expert Systems : Motivation and Techniques
source i-iii, 51 p. : some ill Pittsburgh, PA: Engineering Design Research Center, CMU, June, 1988. EDRC 12-27-88. includes bibliography. First generation expert systems suffer from two major problems: they are brittle and their development is a long, effortful process. Few successful expert systems for real world problems have been demonstrated. In this paper, learning, the key to intelligent behavior and expertise, is described as the answer to both expert systems deficiencies. Machine learning techniques are described, with their applicability to expert systems. A framework to organize machine learning techniques is provided. The description is followed by examples taken from the structural design domain. AI / learning / expert systems / structures / techniques. 37. Requicha, Aristides A. G. 'Mathematical Models of Rigid Solid Objects -- Production Automation Project.' Rochester, NY: College of Engineering & Applied Science, University of Rochester, November, 1977. [3], 37 p. : ill.
summary Computational models of solid objects are potentially useful in a variety of scientific and engineering fields, and in particular in the field of design and manufacturing automation for the mechanical industries. In recent years a multitude of modelling systems have been implemented both by research laboratories and commercial vendors, but little attention has been paid to the fundamental theoretical issues in geometric modelling. This has led to severe difficulties in assessing current and proposed systems, and in distinguishing essential capabilities and limitations from user conveniences and efficiency considerations. This paper seeks a sharp mathematical characterization of 'rigid solids' in a manner that is suitable for studies in design and production automation. It draws heavily on established results in modern geometry and topology. Relevant results scattered throughout the mathematical literature are placed in a coherent framework and presented in a form accessible to engineers and computer scientists. A companion paper is devoted to a discussion of representational issues in the context set forth by this paper
keywords solid modeling, geometric modeling
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:09

_id 0697
authors Balachandran, M.B. and Gero, John S.
year 1988
title Development of a Knowledge-Based System for Structural Optimization
source Dordrecht: Kluwer, 1988. pp. 17-24
summary Optimization is a useful and challenging activity in structural design. It provides designers with tools for better designs while saving time in the design process. The features of conventional optimization tools are presented and their limitations are outlined. The impact and role of knowledge-based methodologies in structural optimization processes is discussed. Structural optimization involves a number of tasks which require human expertise, and are traditionally assisted by human designers. These include design optimization formulation, problem recognition and the selection of appropriate algorithm(s). In this representation and processing of constraints are crucial tasks. This paper presents a framework for developing a knowledge-based system to accomplish these tasks. Based on the needs and the nature of the optimization process, a conceptual architecture of an integrated knowledge-based system is presented. The structure and functions of various components of the system are described
keywords knowledge base, systems, integration, optimization, structures, engineering
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 0833
authors Gero, John S.
year 1988
title Expert systems in Engineering Design : the Concept of Prototypes and their Application
source Symposium on Knowledge Based Systems in Civil Engineering. 1988. pp. 37-45
summary CADLINE has abstract only. This paper addresses the question of what sort of schemata do experts in engineering design use to allow the commencement and continuation of a design. It is suggested that a conceptual schema labelled prototype can be used to capture this expertise. Prototypes are generalizations at different levels of design experience and provide the bases of an approach to designing with computers. They structure design experience to make it applicable in similar situations. The paper elaborates the concept and briefly describes an application
keywords structures, engineering, expert systems, prototypes, design, knowledge
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 7e15
authors Kvan, Thomas
year 1997
title Chips, chunks and sauces
source International Journal of Design Computing, 1, 1997 (Editorial)
summary I am sure there is an art in balancing the chunks to use with your chips. Then there is the sauce that envelops them both. I like my chips chunky and not too saucy. Not that I am obsessed with food but I don't think you can consider design computing without chunks. It's the sauce I'm not sure about. The chunks of which I write are not of course those in your salsa picante but those postulated by Chase and Simon (1973) reflecting on good chess players; the chunks of knowledge with which an expert tackles a problem in their domain of expertise. The more knowledge an expert has of complex and large configurations of typical problem situations (configurations of chess pieces), the greater range of solutions the expert can bring a wider to a particular problem. Those with more chunks have more options and arrive at better solutions. In other words, good designs come from having plenty of big chunks available. There has been a wealth of research in the field of computer-supported collaborative work in the contexts of writing, office management, software design and policy bodies. It is typically divided between systems which support decision making (GDSS: group decision support systems) and those which facilitate joint work (CSCW: computer-based systems for co-operative work) (see Dennis et al. (1988) for a discussion of the distinctions and their likely convergence). Most implementations in the world of design have been on CSCW systems, few have looked at trying to make a group design decision support system (GDDSS?). Most of the work in CSCD has been grounded in the heritage of situated cognition - the assumption that collaborative design is an act that is intrinsically grounded in the context within which it is carried out, that is, the sauce in which we find ourselves swimming daily. By sauce, therefore, I am referring to anything that is not knowledge in the domain of expertise, such as modes of interaction, gestures, social behaviours.
series journal paper
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2003/05/15 08:29

_id a62c
authors Flemming, Ulrich, Coyne, Robert F. and Glavin, Timothy J. (et al)
year 1988
title A Generative Expert System for the Design of Building Layouts -- Version 2
source Artificial Intelligence in Engineering: Design. editor. John J. Gero. Elsevier (Computational Mechanics Publications), 1988. PP. 445-464 : ill. includes bibliography
summary The paper describes an attempt to increase the intelligence of a CAD system by adding capabilities (1) to systematically enumerate alternative solutions to a design problem, and (2) to take, at the same time, a broad spectrum of criteria or concerns into account. These capabilities are intended to complement the designer's abilities and performance. In connection with such attempts, fundamental problems arise when the objects to be designed have shape and are located in space. These problems are identified, and an approach to solve them is outlined. This approach is currently being tested over a range of domains all of which deal with the design of layouts of rectangles subject to constraints and criteria. The search for alternatives takes place in a state space with properties that make it possible to systematically explore and evaluate the power of various search strategies or planning paradigms. The state space is established through a domain-independent generator, while the evaluation of points in that space is carried out by a domain-dependent tester built up through a process of knowledge acquisition familiar from work with expert systems
keywords design, expert systems, CAD, enumeration, shape grammars,architecture, intelligence, synthesis, space allocation, layout, floor plans
series CADline
email ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 8385
authors Holtz, Neal M. and Rasdorf, William J.
year 1988
title An Evaluation of Programming Languages and Language Features for Engineering Software Development
source International Journal of Engineering with Computers. Springer-Verlag, 1988. vol. 3: pp. 183-199
summary Also published as 'Procedural Programming Languages for the Development of CAD and CAE Systems Software,' in the proceedings of ASME International Conference on Computers in Engineering (1987 : New York, NY). The scope of engineering software has increased dramatically in the past decade. In its early years, most engineering applications were concerned solely with solving difficult numerical problems, and little attention was paid to man- machine interaction, to data management, or to integrated software systems. Now computers solve a much wider variety of problems, including those in which numerical computations are less predominant. In addition, completely new areas of engineering applications such as artificial intelligence have recently emerged. It is well recognized that the particular programming language used to develop an engineering application can dramatically affect the development cost, operating cost. reliability, and usability of the resulting software. With the increase in the variety, functionality, and complexity of engineering software, with its more widespread use, and with its increasing importance, more attention must be paid to programming language suitability so that rational decisions regarding language selection may be made. It is important that professional engineers be aware of the issues addressed in this paper, for it is they who must design, acquire, and use applications software, as well as occasionally develop or manage its development. This paper addresses the need for engineers to possess a working knowledge of the fundamentals of computer programming languages. In pursuit of this, the paper briefly reviews the history of four well known programming languages. It then attempts to identify and to look critically at the attributes of programming languages that significantly affect the production of engineering software. The four procedural programming languages chosen for review are those intended for scientific and general purpose programming, FORTRAN 77, C, Pascal, and Modula-2. These languages are compared and some general observations are made. As it is felt important that professional engineers should be able to make informed decisions about programming language selection, the emphasis throughout this paper is on a methodology of evaluation of programming languages. Choosing an appropriate language can be a complex task and many factors must be considered. Consequently, fundamentals are stressed
keywords programming, engineering, languages, software, management, evaluation, FORTRAN, C, PASCAL, MODULA-2, CAD, CAE
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 0ee1
authors Veness, R. E.
year 1988
title Bridge Builder: An Expert System for the Design of Non-Equipment Military Bridging
source Department of Architectural Science, University of Sydney
summary This thesis describes an expert system for the selection, design and documentation of non-equipment military bridges. The expert system uses the expert system shell BUILD. Extensive use has been made of interfacing between BUILD and Prolog and then by using Prolog's foreign language interface with Pascal procedures and the graphics interface. The expert system, which consists of rules, Pascal procedures and a graphics package, aims at: (a) the determination of the suitable bridging structure; (b) designing a bridge using material constraints; (c) producing a consistent and sound structural design for the bridge and the necessary support structures; (d) producing the necessary working drawings and a bill of materials for the solution. The graphics interface is used to display and manipulate a three dimensional model of the solution and the hardcopy output. [Unpublished. -- CADLINE has abstract only.]
keywords Military Engineering, Expert Systems, Structures, User Interface, Applications
series thesis:MSc
last changed 2002/12/14 18:13

_id 56be
authors Dillon, Andrew and Marian, Sweeney
year 1988
title The Application of Cognitive Psychology to CAD Input/Output
source Proceedings of the HCI'88 Conference on People and Computers IV 1988 p.477-488
summary The design of usable human-computer interfaces is one of the primary goals of the HCI specialist. To date however interest has focussed mainly on office or text based systems such as word processors or databases. Computer aided design (CAD) represents a major challenge to the human factors community to provide suitable input and expertise in an area where the users goals and requirements are cognitively distinct from more typical HCI. The present paper is based on psychological investigations of the engineering domain, involving an experimental comparison of designers using CAD and the more traditional drawing board. By employing protocol analytic techniques it is possible to shed light on the complex problem-solving nature of design and to demonstrate the crucial role of human factors in the development of interfaces which facilitate the designers in their task. A model of the cognition of design is proposed which indicates that available knowledge and guidelines alone are not sufficient to aid CAD developers and the distinct nature of the engineering designer's task merits specific attention.
keywords Cognitive Psychology; Interface Design; Protocol Analysis
series other
last changed 2002/07/07 14:01

_id c568
authors Balachandran, M.B. and John S. Gero
year 1987
title A Model for Knowledge Based Graphical Interfaces
source AI '87: Proceedings of the Australian Joint Artificial Intelligence Conference. 1987. pp. 505-521. Also published in Artificial Intelligence Developments and Applications edited by J. S. Gero and R Stanton, North-Holland Pub. 1988. -- CADLINE has abstract only.
summary This paper describes a model for knowledge-based graphical interface which incorporates a variety of knowledge of the domain of application. The key issues considered include graphics interpretation, extraction of features of graphics objects and identification of prototype objects. The role of such knowledge-based interfaces in computer-aided design is discussed. A prototype system developed in Prolog and C is described and its application in the domain of structural engineering is demonstrated
keywords user interface, computer graphics, knowledge base, systems, civil engineering, structures
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id c6d5
authors Balachandran, M.B.
year 1988
title A Model for Knowledge-Based Design Optimization [PhD dissertation]
source Dept. of Architectural Science, University of Sydney
summary Unpublished. CADLINE has abstract only. This dissertation is concerned with developments in design decision methodologies applied to computer-aided design. The major aim of this research was to design and develop a knowledge-based computer-aided optimization system that has the ability to emulate some of the human performances in design decision processes. The issues and problems involved in developing a knowledge-based system for design optimization are addressed. A knowledge-based methodology to aid design optimization formulation is investigated. The major issues considered include representation of design description, the variety of knowledge required for the formulation process, recognizing optimization formulations, and selection of appropriate algorithms. It is demonstrated that the knowledge-based control of numerical processes leads to efficient and improved decisions in design. In developing knowledge-based systems for computer-aided decision applications an effective human-machine interface is essential. A model for knowledge-based graphical interfaces is proposed. This model incorporates knowledge for graphics interpretation, extraction of features of graphics objects and identification of prototypical objects. An experimental system developed in Prolog and C is demonstrated in the domain of structural design. The system shows one way of combining knowledge-based systems technology with computer graphics and indicates how knowledge-based interfaces improve the system's interactive capabilities. Finally, the system, OPTIMA, is presented. The system is designed as an integrated knowledge-based decision system using frames, rule bases, menu inputs, algebraic computation and optimization algorithms. The system has been written in LISP, Prolog and C and implemented on SUN Microsystems workstations. The performance of the system is demonstrated using two example problems from the domains of structural and architectural design respectively. The knowledge-based approach to design optimization is shown to be considerably easier and more efficient than those using conventional programs.
keywords Knowledge Base, Systems, CAD, Representation, Design, Frames, Computer Graphics, User Interface, Decision Making
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 696c
authors Beheshti, M. and Monroy, M.
year 1988
title Requirements for Developing an Information System for Architecture
source CAAD futures Ĺ87 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-42916-6] Eindhoven (The Netherlands), 20-22 May 1987, pp. 149-170
summary This paper discusses possibilities of developing new tools for architectural design. It argues that architects should meet the challenge of information technology and computer-based design techniques. One such attempt has been the first phase of the development of an architectural design information system (ADIS), also an architectural design decision support system. The system should benefit from the developments of the artificial intelligence to enable the architect to have access to information required to carry out design work. In other words: the system functions as a huge on-line electronic library of architecture, containing up-to-date architectural design information, literature, documents, etc. At the same time, the system offers necessary design aids such as computer programs for design process, drawing programs, evaluation programs, cost calculation programs, etc. The system also provides data communication between the architect and members of the design coalition team. This is found to be of vital importance in the architectural design process, because it can enable the architect to fit in changes, brought about in the project by different parties. Furthermore, they will be able, to oversee promptly the consequences of changes or decisions in a comprehensive manner. The system will offer advantages over the more commonly applied microcomputer based CAAD and IGDM (integrated graphics database management) systems, or even larger systems available to an architect. Computer programs as well as hardware change rapidly and become obsolete. Therefore, unrelenting investment pressure to up-date both software and hardware exists. The financial burden of this is heavy, in particular for smaller architectural practices (for instance an architect working for himself or herself and usually with few or no permanent staff). ADIS, as an on-line architectural design aid, is constantly up-dated by its own organisation. This task will be co-ordinated by the ADIS data- base administrator (DBA). The processing possibilities of the system are faster, therefore more complex processing tasks can be handled. Complicated large graphic data files, can be easily retrieved and manipulated by ADIS, a large system. In addition, the cost of an on-line system will be much less than any other system. The system is based on one model of the architectural design process, but will eventually contain a variety of design models, as it develops. The development of the system will be an evolutionary process, making use of its users' feed-back system. ADIS is seen as a step towards full automation of architectural design practices. Apart from being an architectural design support system, ADIS will assist the architect in his/her administrative and organisational activities.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 887e
authors Belajcic, N. D.
year 1988
title Computer Implementation of Shape Grammars
source Department of Architectural Science, University of Sydney
summary An approach is taken that shape grammars can be used as a possible vehicle for automated design generation. Historical background of shape grammars is discussed with emphasis on vocabulary/syntax aspect of the design process and significance of class solutions to problems. Similarities with expert system mechanics and structure is highlighted and advantages and disadvantages of rule-based and frame-based systems are considered. These concepts are implemented in a computer program written in LISP employing icon driven graphic interface with tools for creating shapes and rules. Finally, problems associated with adopted reasoning strategies are reported and areas of further development and improvement suggested. [UNPUBLISHED. CADLINE has abstract only]
keywords Shape Grammars, Design Process
series thesis:MSc
last changed 2002/12/14 18:10

_id 2a36
authors Ben-Moshe, R. and Sorgen, A.
year 1988
title Parametric Shape Definition by Example
source 12, [13] p., [7] p. of ill. Israel: MICROCAD, 1988(?). includes bibliography
summary Incorporation of parametric design facilities into CAD systems presents some serious problems. The major issues are: (1) functionality - the need to cater for a great variety of designs, (2) natural user interface, with no need for the user to acquire programming skills, (3) integration and consistency with the 'host' CAD environment
keywords parametrization, user interface, CAD, geometric modeling, mechanical engineering, CAM
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id cf2011_p127
id cf2011_p127
authors Benros, Deborah; Granadeiro Vasco, Duarte Jose, Knight Terry
year 2011
title Integrated Design and Building System for the Provision of Customized Housing: the Case of Post-Earthquake Haiti
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 247-264.
summary The paper proposes integrated design and building systems for the provision of sustainable customized housing. It advances previous work by applying a methodology to generate these systems from vernacular precedents. The methodology is based on the use of shape grammars to derive and encode a contemporary system from the precedents. The combined set of rules can be applied to generate housing solutions tailored to specific user and site contexts. The provision of housing to shelter the population affected by the 2010 Haiti earthquake illustrates the application of the methodology. A computer implementation is currently under development in C# using the BIM platform provided by Revit. The world experiences a sharp increase in population and a strong urbanization process. These phenomena call for the development of effective means to solve the resulting housing deficit. The response of the informal sector to the problem, which relies mainly on handcrafted processes, has resulted in an increase of urban slums in many of the big cities, which lack sanitary and spatial conditions. The formal sector has produced monotonous environments based on the idea of mass production that one size fits all, which fails to meet individual and cultural needs. We propose an alternative approach in which mass customization is used to produce planed environments that possess qualities found in historical settlements. Mass customization, a new paradigm emerging due to the technological developments of the last decades, combines the economy of scale of mass production and the aesthetics and functional qualities of customization. Mass customization of housing is defined as the provision of houses that respond to the context in which they are built. The conceptual model for the mass customization of housing used departs from the idea of a housing type, which is the combined result of three systems (Habraken, 1988) -- spatial, building system, and stylistic -- and it includes a design system, a production system, and a computer system (Duarte, 2001). In previous work, this conceptual model was tested by developing a computer system for existing design and building systems (Benr__s and Duarte, 2009). The current work advances it by developing new and original design, building, and computer systems for a particular context. The urgent need to build fast in the aftermath of catastrophes quite often overrides any cultural concerns. As a result, the shelters provided in such circumstances are indistinct and impersonal. However, taking individual and cultural aspects into account might lead to a better identification of the population with their new environment, thereby minimizing the rupture caused in their lives. As the methodology to develop new housing systems is based on the idea of architectural precedents, choosing existing vernacular housing as a precedent permits the incorporation of cultural aspects and facilitates an identification of people with the new housing. In the Haiti case study, we chose as a precedent a housetype called é─˙gingerbread housesé─¨, which includes a wide range of houses from wealthy to very humble ones. Although the proposed design system was inspired by these houses, it was decided to adopt a contemporary take. The methodology to devise the new type was based on two ideas: precedents and transformations in design. In architecture, the use of precedents provides designers with typical solutions for particular problems and it constitutes a departing point for a new design. In our case, the precedent is an existing housetype. It has been shown (Duarte, 2001) that a particular housetype can be encoded by a shape grammar (Stiny, 1980) forming a design system. Studies in shape grammars have shown that the evolution of one style into another can be described as the transformation of one shape grammar into another (Knight, 1994). The used methodology departs takes off from these ideas and it comprises the following steps (Duarte, 2008): (1) Selection of precedents, (2) Derivation of an archetype; (3) Listing of rules; (4) Derivation of designs; (5) Cataloguing of solutions; (6) Derivation of tailored solution.
keywords Mass customization, Housing, Building system, Sustainable construction, Life cycle energy consumption, Shape grammar
series CAAD Futures
email deborahbenros@gmail.com
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id c9e4
authors Birmingham, William P. and Siewiorek, Daniel P.
year 1988
title Automated knowledge Acquisition for a Computer Hardware Synthesis System
source 19 p. : ill. Engineering Design Research Center, CMU, June, 1988. EDRC 18-06-88. includes bibliography
summary The MICON Synthesizer Version 1 (M1) is a rule-based system which produces a complete small computer design from a set of abstract specifications. The ability of M1 to produce designs depends on the encoding of large amounts of domain knowledge. An automated knowledge acquisition tool, CGEN, works symbiotically with M1 by gathering the knowledge required by M1. CGEN acquires knowledge about how to build and when to use various computer structures. This paper overviews the operation of CGEN by providing an example of the types of knowledge acquired and the mechanisms employed. A novel knowledge-intensive generalization scheme is presented. Generalization is a pragmatic necessity for knowledge acquisition in this domain. A series of experiments to test CGEN's capabilities are explained. A description of the architecture and knowledge-base of M1 is also provided
keywords electrical engineering, automation, knowledge acquisition, knowledge base, systems
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 8ac0
authors Birmingham, William P., Gupta, Anurag P. and Siewiorek, Daniel P.
year 1988
title The MICON System for Computer Design
source 11 p. : ill. Pittsburgh, PA: Engineering Design Research Center, CMU, November, 1988. EDRC 18-10-89. includes bibliography
summary The MICON system is an integrated collection of programs which automatically synthesizes small computer systems from high level specifications. The system address multiple levels of design, from logical through physical, providing a rapid prototyping capability. Two programs form MICON's nucleus: a knowledge-based synthesis tool called M1; and, an automated knowledge acquisition tool named CGEN which is used to teach M1 how to design. Other tools in the MICON system are an integrated database and associated data management tools. The system is fully functional, having been used to generate working designs. This paper describes the architecture and operation of the MICON system
keywords integrated circuits, electrical engineering, design, systems, automation, integration
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id a1a1
authors Cornick, T. and Bull, S.
year 1988
title Expert Systems for Detail Design in Building
source CAAD futures Ĺ87 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-42916-6] Eindhoven (The Netherlands), 20-22 May 1987, pp. 117-126
summary Computer-Aided Architectural Design (CAAD) requires detailed knowledge of the construction of building elements to be effective as a complete design aid. Knowledge-based systems provide the tools for both encapsulating the "rules" of construction - i.e. the knowledge of good construction practice gained from experience - and relating those rules to geometric representation of building spaces and elements. The "rules" of construction are based upon the production and performance implications of building elements and how these satisfy various functional criteria. These building elements in turn may be related to construction materials, components and component assemblies. This paper presents two prototype knowledge-based systems, one dealing with the external envelope and the other with the internal space division of buildings. Each is "component specific" and is based upon its own model of the overall construction. This paper argues that "CAAD requires component specific knowledge bases and that integration of these knowledge bases into a knowledge-based design system for complete buildings can only occur if every knowledge base relates to a single coordinated construction model".
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id 5f4b
authors Coyne, R.D.
year 1988
title Logic Models of Design
source Pitman, London
summary This monograph places design in a theoretical context which applies developments in knowledge-based systems, logic programming and planning to design. It addresses two important design issues: the interpretation of designs, which concerns the discovery of implicit design attributes, a key activity in design evaluation that can be modelled by deductive inference in logic programming; and the process of generation, whereby a design description is produced which exhibits these implicit design attributes. Implicit attributes can be seen as analogous to the semantic content of natural language utterances. The work presented here is mainly concerned with design generation, and an operational model of design is investigated in which operations on processes are treated in a similar way to operations on form. It is argued that there are advantages in representing control knowledge as rules in a design system, and that logic is an effective medium for this purpose. This is demonstrated by means of programs developed in Prolog and C using the example of spatial layout in buildings. Primarily, this book is directed at those in artificial intelligence (AI) involved in logic programming, planning and expert systems. However, since AI techniques are finding widespread application in industry, the use of an architectural design example makes this work relevant to architects, designers, engineers and developers of intelligent architectural design software.
series other
email Richard.Coyne@ed.ac.uk
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ab54
authors Coyne, Richard D.
year 1988
title Logic Models of Design
source 317 p. London: Pitman, 1988. CADLINE has abstract only
summary This book constitutes both a theoretical and a technical exploration into modelling design tasks in logic. It provides a framework for describing design processes based on logic, achieved primarily by gathering together various strands evident in theories of reasoning, problem solving, design and knowledge engineering. The book demonstrates the applicability of logic programming and knowledge-based techniques to design, particularly in the area of controlling generative systems. The design task by which this is demonstrated is spatial layout, though the issues reach further than this one application
keywords reasoning, logic, design process
series CADline
email Richard.Coyne@ed.ac.uk
last changed 2003/05/17 08:13

_id 88cb
authors Gero, John S. and Oksala, Tarkko (editors)
year 1988
title Knowledge-Based Systems in Architecture
source TIPS'88 - Knowledge Based Design in Architecture, Acta Polytechnica Scandinavica (1988 : Helsinki, Finland). 143 p. 1989
summary The technology of knowledge-based systems can be found in texts on artificial intelligence. There is very little published so far on knowledge-based systems in architecture. To this end an international conference -- TIPS' 88: Knowledge-Based Design in Architecture -- was organized for August 1988 in Finland. Thirteen papers from that conference have been selected and edited for this monograph. They are grouped under five parts: Introduction; Schemas and Models; Processes and Knowledge; Modeling Buildings; and Creativity and Knowledge-Based Systems
keywords knowledge base, architecture, representation, expert systems,building, creativity
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

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