CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 4cf3
authors Kalay, Yehuda E.
year 1989
title Modeling Objects and Environments
source xix, 402 p. : ill. New York: Wiley, 1989. includes a short bibliography and index. Part of the Principles of Computer Aided Design series. --- See also review by Patricia G
summary McIntosh, in ACADIA Newsletter Vol. 9 No. 3 pp 20-23, June 1990. This book introduces the concept of modeling objects in the computer's memory so it can be used to aide the process of their design. Modeling is defined as an hierarchical abstraction of data and operators to manipulate it, subject to semantic integrity constraints that guarantee the realizability of the designed artifact in the real world. Starting with general concepts of modeling, the book moves on to discuss the modeling of shapes (form) in two and in three dimensions. The discussion covers both topology and geometry. Next the book introduces the concept of shape transformations (translation, scaling, rotation, etc.), both in absolute and in relative terms. The book then introduces the concept of assembly modeling, and adds non-graphical attributes to the representation. It concludes with a discussion on user interface and parametrization. The book includes many examples written in Pascal that complement the theory, and can be used as a basis for building a geometric modeling engine. It also includes exercises, so it can be used as a text book for a two-semester advance course in geometric modeling
keywords CAD, data structures, solid modeling, abstraction, polygons, solids, boolean operations, transforms, computer graphics, user interface, parametrization, B-rep, polyhedra, objects, PASCAL
series CADline
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 2a8b
authors Purcell, Patrick and Applebaum Dan
year 1990
title Light Table: An Interface To Visual Information Systems
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 229-238
summary A primary aim of the Light Table project was to see if a combination of the optical laser disc, local area networks, and interactive videographic workstation technology could bring a major visual collection, (such as the Rotch Visual Collections of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology), to a campuswide population of undergraduate users. VIS (Visual Information System) is the name being given to the new genre of information technology. Much research and development effort is currently being applied to areas where the image has a special significance, for example in architecture and planning, in graphic and fine arts, in biology, in medicine, and in photography. One particular advance in the technology of VIS has been the facility to access visual information across a distributed computer system via LAN (Local Area Networks) and video delivery systems, (such as campus TV cable). This advance allows users to retrieve images from both local and remote sources, dispatching the image search through the LAN, and receiving the images back at their workstation via dedicated channels on the campus TV cable. Light Table is the title of a system that acts as a computer-based interactive videographic interface to a variety of visual information systems described in the body of this paper. It takes its name from the traditional, back- lit, translucent light table that lecturers use to assemble and view collections of slides for talks and seminars. The component of Light Table which is being reported in greatest detail here, a software outcome called Galatea, is a versatile and robust system capable of controlling video devices in a networked environment.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id 0797
authors Purnomo, H.
year 1989
title SPACE - Generative Expert System: An Expert System for Designing a Layout of Single-Family Houses Using the Expansiva Building System
source Department of Architectural and Design Science, University of Sydney
summary This thesis describes an expert system for designing the layout of a single-family house using the Espansiva building system introduced by Jorn Utzon. The expert system uses two systems that are already available; the BUILD expert system shell as an automated reasoning system and the Eagle 3D modeler system for producing graphical output. Both programs run under the UNIX operating system on SUN microcomputers. The integration of BUILD, which is written in Prolog, with Eagle using one of the Eagle commands called 'weasel' is a major part of the implementation of the system. [Unpublished. -- CADLINE has abstract only.]
keywords Expert Systems, Floor Plans, Synthesis, Layout, Applications, Languages, PROLOG
series thesis:MSc
last changed 2002/12/14 18:12

_id c9f3
authors Shaviv, Edna
year 1989
title Implementation of Solid Modeling in High Hierarchy Architectural Language (HHAL)
source CAAD: Education - Research and Practice [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 87-982875-2-4] Aarhus (Denmark) 21-23 September 1989, pp. 8.2.1.8.2.21
summary This work illustrates the use of solid modeling for the representation and analysis of complex architectural structures and details. While the approach is a general one it is demonstrated and implemented on the visual representation and evaluation of Mediaeval Age basilican structures. Basilican structures have the advantage that rules of composition for defining their form are well formulated. These rules are imposed on the solid modeler as high hierarchy architectural language (HHALL). It is within this language that the basilican structures are described and analyzed.
keywords High Hierarchy Architectural Language (HHAL), Solid Modeling, Shape Grammar, Formal Language, Design Systems, Basilican Structures
series eCAADe
email arredna@techunix.technion.ac.il
last changed 2003/05/16 19:36

_id sigradi2012_30
id sigradi2012_30
authors Angeluzzi, Gustavo; Hanns, Daniela Kutschat
year 2012
title Um levantamento de requisitos gerais para o desenvolvimento e posicionamento de DOOTERS – um aplicativo lúdico de listas de tarefas para iPhone [A survey of general requirements for developing and positioning DOOTERS - a to-do list application for iPhone]
source SIGraDi 2012 [Proceedings of the 16th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Brasil - Fortaleza 13-16 November 2012, pp. 191-195
summary DOOTERS is a to-do list application for iPhone which entertains and motivates the user to get things done. It was developed based on requirements obtained trough: 1. the study of several personal information organizing methods (Covey, 1989; Allen, 2005; Foster, 2006); 2. answers to a task lists user focused questionnaire; 3. observation of to-do list users while creating lists and organizing tasks; 4. comparison of digital and non-digital task list media (paper, computer and mobile device); 5. analysis of profiles, behaviors and to-do list applications for iPhone. In this paper, the authors present the process of obtaining requirements for developing and positioning DOOTERS.
keywords information and interface design, requirements, to-do list application, iPhone, DOOTERS
series SIGRADI
email dk.hanns@uol.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id 44b3
authors Cajati, Claudio
year 1989
title Towards A KB System / Image-Databases - Integrated Interface: A Tool For Architectural Education
source CAAD: Education - Research and Practice [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 87-982875-2-4] Aarhus (Denmark) 21-23 September 1989, pp. 9.9.1-9.9.7
summary Focusing on the tasks of university architectural education, a special stress is first laid on the possibility of going beyond some limits of traditional CAAD. as coming out from the recent debate, and on the opportunities offered by knowledge based systems as metadesign supports in architectural domains. Particularly, with regard to image-databases, their importance for explaining and exemplifying the knowledge representation in KB Systems, and their integration via intelligent interface are discussed. At last, some possible uses of the whole as an educational tool in the daily university training are proposed.
keywords Architectural Education, KB System, Image-database, Interface
series eCAADe
email cajatic@libero.it
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id 235d
authors Catalano, Fernando
year 1990
title The Computerized Design Firm
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 317-332
summary This paper is not just about the future of computerized design practice. It is about what to do today in contemplation of tomorrow-the issues of computercentered practice and the courses of action open to us can be discerned by the careful observer. The realities of computerized design practice are different from the issues on which design education still fixes its attention. To educators, the present paper recommends further clinical research on computerized design firms and suggests that case studies on the matter be developed and utilized as teaching material. Research conducted by the author of this paper indicates that a new form of design firm is emerging-the computerized design firm-totally supported and augmented by the new information technology. The present paper proceeds by introducing an abridged case study of an actual totally electronic, computerized design practice. Then, the paper concentrates on modelling the computerized design firm as an intelligent system, indicating non-trivial changes in its structure and strategy brought about by the introduction of the new information technology into its operations - among other considerations, different strategies and diverse conceptions of management and workgroup roles are highlighted. In particular, this paper points out that these structural and strategic changes reflect back on the technology of information with pressures to redirect present emphasis on the individual designer, working alone in an isolated workstation, to a more realistic conception of the designer as a member of an electronic workgroup. Finally, the paper underlines that this non-trivial conception demands that new hardware and software be developed to meet the needs of the electronic workgroup - which raises issues of human-machine interface. Further, it raises the key issues of how to represent and expose knowledge to users in intelligent information - sharing systems, designed to include not only good user interfaces for supporting problem-solving activities of individuals, but also good organizational interfaces for supporting the problem-solving activities of groups. The paper closes by charting promising directions for further research and with a few remarks about the computerized design firm's (near) future.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id 600f
authors Cortes, Chaves Camila
year 1989
title Design Software of the '90s
source Architectural and Engineering Systems. July, 1989. vol. 5: pp. 30
summary The design firm of the '90s will have the ability to use the right tool for the right task, permitting tailored resources to be used more effectively. This mean portable, modular and multiuser software running on machines specifically designed for a particular environment with the option to tap other sources. Designers will enter the 21st century using integrated design knowledge-based support systems with knowledge-based inferencing systems, information management systems for text and graphics, a CAD/modeling package, and a flexible user interface with speech recognition, eye tracking and manual input device. Some of these are discussed in this article
keywords practice, construction, systems, software, integration
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:07

_id a718
authors Cuomo, Donna L. and Sharit, Joseph
year 1989
title A Study of Human Performance in Computer-Aided Architectural Design
source International Journal of Human-Computer Interaction. 1989. vol. 1: pp. 69-107 : ill. includes bibliography
summary This paper describes the development and application of a cognitively-based performance methodology for assessing human performance on computer-aided architectural design (CAAD) tasks. Two CAAD tasks were employed that were hypothesized to be different in terms of the underlying cognitive processes required for these tasks to be performed. Methods of manipulating task complexity within each of these tasks were then developed. Six architectural graduate students were trained on a commercially available CAAD system. Each student performed the two experimental design tasks at one of three levels of complexity. The data collected included protocols, video recordings of the computer screen, and an interactive script (time-stamped record of every command input and the computers textual response). Performance measures and methods of analysis were developed which reflected the cognitive processes used by the human during design (including problem- solving techniques, planning times, heuristics employed, etc.) and the role of the computer as a design aid. The analysis techniques used included graphical techniques, Markov process analysis, protocol analysis, and error classification and analysis. The results of the study indicated that some measures more directly reflected human design activity while others more directly reflected the efficiency of interaction between the computer and the human. The discussion of the results focuses primarily on the usefulness of the various measures comprising the performance methodology, the usefulness of the tasks employed including methods for manipulating task complexity, and the effectiveness of this system as well as CAAD systems in general for aiding human design processes
keywords protocol analysis, problem solving, planning, CAD, design process, performance, architecture
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id e1c9
authors Danahy, John and Wright, Robert
year 1989
title Computing and Design in the Canadian Schools of Architecture and Landscape Architecture: A Proposed Research Agenda for Integrated CAD & GIS in the 1990's
source New Ideas and Directions for the 1990’s [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Gainsville (Florida - USA) 27-29 October 1989, pp. 227-244
summary Conventional computer systems currently used by architecture and landscape architecture are not addressing complex decision making, system interface, dynamic manipulation and real time visualization of data. This paper identifies a strategy by which Canadian Schools could form a supportive network, incorporate and expand their research development. Within this larger framework schools would have better tools, a larger research base and access to funding as a group. The following discussion is an idea of what we at the Canadian Schools need to do differently over the next five years in our research and teaching in order to make a unique contribution to our fields.
series ACADIA
email jwdanahy@rogers.com
last changed 2003/04/26 19:42

_id 0f73
authors Ervin, Stephen M.
year 1990
title Designing with Diagrams: A Role for Computing in Design Education and Exploration
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 107-122
summary Environmental designers, design educators and design students using computers are a constituency with a set of requirements for database structure and flexibility, for knowledge representation and inference mechanisms, and for both graphical and non-graphical operations, that are now articulatable and to-date largely unmet. This is especially so in the area called 'preliminary' or 'schematic' design, where our requirements are related to, but different from, those of our colleagues in mechanical and electrical engineering, whose needs have dominated the notable developments in this area. One manifestation of these needs is in the peculiar form of graphics called diagrams , and the ways in which environmental designers (architects, landscape architects., urban designers) use them. Our diagrams are both similar to and different from structural, circuit, or logical diagrams in important ways. These similarities and differences yield basic insights into designing and design knowledge, and provide guidance for some necessary steps in the development of the next generation of CAD systems. Diagrams as a form of knowledge representation have received little scrutiny in the literature of graphic representation and computer graphics. In the following sections I present an overview of the theoretical basis for distinguishing and using diagrams; examine some of the computational requirements for a system of computer-aided diagramming; describe a prototype implementation called CBD (Constraint Based Diagrammer) and illustrate one example of its use; and speculate on the implications and potential applications of these ideas in computer-aided design education.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id 4104
authors Ervin, Stephen McTee
year 1989
title The structure and function of diagrams in environmental design :a computational inquiry
source Massachusetts Institute of Technology
summary The design process often begins with a graphical description of the proposed device or system and sketching is the physical expression of the design engineer's thinking process. Computer Aided Design is a technique in which man and machine are blended into a problem solving team, intimately coupling the best characteristics of each. Solid modelling is developed to act as the common medium between man and the computer. At present it is achieved mainly by designing with volumes and hence does not leave much room for sketching input, the traditional physical expression of the thinking process of the design engineer. This thesis describes a method of accepting isometric free hand sketching as the input to a solid model. The design engineer is allowed to make a sketch on top of a digitizer indicating (i) visible lines; (ii) hidden lines; (iii) construction lines; (iv) centre lines; (v) erased lines; and (vi) redundant lines as the input. The computer then processes this sketch by identifying the line segments, fitting the best possible lines, removing the erased lines, ignoring the redundant lines and finally merging the hidden lines and visible lines to form the lines in the solid in an interactive manner. The program then uses these lines and the information about the three dimensional origin of the object and produces three dimensional information such as the faces, loops, holes, rings, edges and vertices which are sufficient to build a solid model. This is achieved in the following manner. The points in the sketch are first written into a file. The computer than reads this file, breaks the group of points into sub-groups belonging to individual line segments, fits the best lines and identify the vertices in two dimensions. These improved lines in two dimensions are then merged to form the lines and vertices in the solid. These lines are then used together with the three dimensional origin (or any other point) to produce the wireframe model in three dimensions. The loops in the wireframe models are then identified and surface equations are fitted to these loops. Finally all the necessary inputs to build a B-rep solid model are produced.
series thesis:PhD
email servin@gsd.harvard.edu
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id a672
authors Flemming, Ulrich
year 1990
title Syntactic Structures in Architecture: Teaching Composition with Computer Assistance
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 31-48
summary The present paper outlines a plan for the teaching of architectural composition with computer assistance.The approach is to introduce students to a series of architectural languages characterized by a vocabulary of elements and a grammar whose rules indicate how these elements can be placed in space. Exercises with each language include the analysis of precedents; the generation of forms using a given rule set; and follow-up studies with an expanded rule set. The paper introduces languages and exercises through illustrative examples. This architectural content can be taught in the traditional way. The use of computers is motivated by expectations which are stated, and some basic requirements for the needed software are listed. Work to develop this software has started.
series CAAD Futures
email ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2003/02/26 16:24

_id ef95
authors Fregier, Marius
year 1989
title Do You Need Weapons to Keep out of "Artichaud Melanie" - Or How to Teach Prolog Programming to CAD System Design Students
source CAAD: Education - Research and Practice [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 87-982875-2-4] Aarhus (Denmark) 21-23 September 1989, pp. 8.1.1-8.1.9
summary A course aimed on the use of prolog for studying, prototyping and developing CAD systems is presented. This course is based on a practical training. Its objectives, topics, teaching method and applications are briefly introduced . Exercises focussed on interests and.capabilities of CAD designers are presented. These exercises follow a progression which integrate Step by step, different aspects of the application fields. At list these exercises lead to a single application concerned with intelligent graphics.
keywords Education in CAD System Construction, Graphical Extensions to Prolog, Experts Systems, Graphical Interactive Capture of Data, Intelligent Graphic
series eCAADe
last changed 1998/08/24 10:01

_id 22ed
authors Glaser, Migges M.
year 1989
title ART + COM Lab Report - BERKOM Project "New Media in Urban Planning"
source CAAD: Education - Research and Practice [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 87-982875-2-4] Aarhus (Denmark) 21-23 September 1989, pp. 6.1.1-6.1.6
summary The highly developed glasfiber technology of the Berlin ISDN-B prototype network will make it possible to test a future benefit of the possibilities of real time visual communication for architects and planers in their home office. In the project an external user will be able to share high end visual outputs of a Service Center for Visualisation with his own low end CAAD workstation via ISDN-B. The capabilities of these services will range from a still picture archive, real time access to video film archive, a variety of conventional database services to special postproduction for his own 3D data models. The transferred 3D model can be rendered an animated on the Center's systems, if requested also integrated into a video background film. The production will than be available on his workstation screen. These new means will be evaluated in the view of the architects new possibilities for the design process.
keywords Multimedia, CAAD Services, Computer Animation
series eCAADe
last changed 1998/08/24 09:58

_id 0711
authors Kunnath, S.K., Reinhorn, A.M. and Abel, J.F.
year 1990
title A Computational Tool for Evaluation of Seismic Performance of RC Buildings
source February, 1990. [1] 15 p. : ill. graphs, tables. includes bibliography: p. 10-11
summary Recent events have demonstrated the damaging power of earthquakes on structural assemblages resulting in immense loss of life and property (Mexico City, 1985; Armenia, 1988; San Francisco, 1989). While the present state-of-the-art in inelastic seismic response analysis of structures is capable of estimating response quantities in terms of deformations, stresses, etc., it has not established a physical qualification of these end-results into measures of damage sustained by the structure wherein system vulnerability is ascertained in terms of serviceability, repairability, and/or collapse. An enhanced computational tool is presented in this paper for evaluation of reinforced concrete structures (such as buildings and bridges) subjected to seismic loading. The program performs a series of tasks to enable a complete evaluation of the structural system: (a) elastic collapse- mode analysis to determine the base shear capacity of the system; (b) step-by-step time history analysis using a macromodel approach in which the inelastic behavior of RC structural components is incorporated; (c) reduction of the response quantities to damage indices so that a physical interpretation of the response is possible. The program is built around two graphical interfaces: one for preprocessing of structural and loading data; and the other for visualization of structural damage following the seismic analysis. This program can serve as an invaluable tool in estimating the seismic performance of existing RC buildings and for designing new structures within acceptable levels of damage
keywords seismic, structures, applications, evaluation, civil engineering, CAD
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 12:41

_id 49a8
authors McCall, R., Fischer, G. and Morch, A.
year 1990
title Supporting Reflection-in-Action in the Janus Design Environment
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 247-259
summary We have developed a computer-based design aid called Janus, which is based on a model of computer-supported design that we think has significance for the future of architectural education. Janus utilizes a knowledge-based approach to link a graphic construction system to hypertext. This allows the computer to make useful comments on the solutions that students construct in a CAD-like environment. These comments contain information intended to make students think more carefully about what they are doing while they are doing it. In other words, Janus promotes what Donald Schon has called "reflection-inaction" (Schon, 1983). The Janus design environment is named for the Roman god with a pair of faces looking in opposite directions. In our case the faces correspond to complementary design activities we call construction and argumentation. Construction is the activity of graphically creating the form of the solution e.g., a building. Traditionally this has been done with tracing paper, pencils, and pens. Argumentation is the activity of reasoning about the problem and its solution. This includes such things as considering what to do next, what alternative courses of action are available, and which course of action to choose. Argumentation is mostly verbal but partly graphical.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id 69b2
authors McCartney, Allan
year 1989
title Terrain Modelling Using AutoCad
source CAAD: Education - Research and Practice [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 87-982875-2-4] Aarhus (Denmark) 21-23 September 1989, pp. 9.4.1-9.4.8
summary This paper describes the use of a widely-used CAD drafting system, in conjunction with a specialist contouring package, to provide a low-cost facility for terrain modelling, volumetric calculation, and landscape visualisation. One such system is in use at the Department of Architecture & Landscape, Manchester Polytechnic, to enable graduate students on the Landscape Design course to explore the visual and quantitative implications of design proposals, particularly when related to large scale landscape modelling. It is also in commercial use by professional surveyors, waste management contractors, local authorities etc. In addition to AutoCAD, two further packages are employed, one to recover coordinates from existing AutoCAD drawings, and the other to generate contours and volumes from those, or other coordinate data files. The first known as BADGER (Basic AutoCAD Data Grabber & Exchange Routine), and the other is SURVCAD CONTOURS - a contouring program capable of converting large coordinate data files (2500 + points) to a 2.5D terrain model.
keywords Terrain Modelling, Landscape Visualisation, CAD, Volumetrics
series eCAADe
last changed 1998/08/24 10:11

_id a6a5
authors Mortola, Elena
year 1989
title The Interface for Designing
source CAAD: Education - Research and Practice [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 87-982875-2-4] Aarhus (Denmark) 21-23 September 1989, pp. 8.5.1-8.5.15
summary A case which supports the use of computer graphics in design process is presented in this paper. The case is put forward in three stages: the first stage analyzes the relationship between drawing and design (design-by-drawing) and explores the transformations generated by the computer graphics. The second stage describes a didactic experience in the Faculty of Architecture of Rome. The third stage describes a project related to design interface.
keywords Design, Computer, Drawing, Methods
series eCAADe
email mortola@uniroma3.it
last changed 1998/08/24 10:08

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