CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 41 to 60 of 198

_id b66a
authors Dvorak, Robert W.
year 1989
title CAD Tools for Systems Theory and Bottom Up Design
source New Ideas and Directions for the 1990’s [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Gainsville (Florida - USA) 27-29 October 1989, pp. 209-226
summary The use of CAD is investigated in the teaching of systems theory to a fourth year group of design students. A comparison is made between the CAD group using MacArchitrion and a non-CAD group using traditional design methods. The paper includes a discussion of the meaning of systems design theories, relates the CAD and non-CAD student design methods and illustrates the results. It also includes recommendations for improvements so the computer can become more effective in this type of design teaching. Finally, it concludes with recommendations from the students at the end of the semester project. The basic premise for the CAD design group is that computers should encourage students to understand and use systems design theory.
series ACADIA
last changed 1999/10/10 12:27

_id 09a5
authors Eastman, Charles M.
year 1989
title Building Modeling in Architectural Design
source [8] p. : ill. Design & Computation . Los Angeles: Graduate School of Architecture and Urban Planning, UCLA, 1989? includes bibliography
summary This paper reviews building modeling from the perspective of U.S. architectural practice. During the previous twenty years of computer-aided architectural design, the underlying paradigm has mimicked a paper-based technology. The future of design, however, is proposed to be in building modeling. A review of building modeling is provided and some prospects for architectural design, based on its concepts, are proposed
keywords CAD, building, modeling, architecture, design
series CADline
email chuck.eastman@arch.gatech.edu
last changed 2003/05/17 08:15

_id 0f73
authors Ervin, Stephen M.
year 1990
title Designing with Diagrams: A Role for Computing in Design Education and Exploration
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 107-122
summary Environmental designers, design educators and design students using computers are a constituency with a set of requirements for database structure and flexibility, for knowledge representation and inference mechanisms, and for both graphical and non-graphical operations, that are now articulatable and to-date largely unmet. This is especially so in the area called 'preliminary' or 'schematic' design, where our requirements are related to, but different from, those of our colleagues in mechanical and electrical engineering, whose needs have dominated the notable developments in this area. One manifestation of these needs is in the peculiar form of graphics called diagrams , and the ways in which environmental designers (architects, landscape architects., urban designers) use them. Our diagrams are both similar to and different from structural, circuit, or logical diagrams in important ways. These similarities and differences yield basic insights into designing and design knowledge, and provide guidance for some necessary steps in the development of the next generation of CAD systems. Diagrams as a form of knowledge representation have received little scrutiny in the literature of graphic representation and computer graphics. In the following sections I present an overview of the theoretical basis for distinguishing and using diagrams; examine some of the computational requirements for a system of computer-aided diagramming; describe a prototype implementation called CBD (Constraint Based Diagrammer) and illustrate one example of its use; and speculate on the implications and potential applications of these ideas in computer-aided design education.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id 4104
authors Ervin, Stephen McTee
year 1989
title The structure and function of diagrams in environmental design :a computational inquiry
source Massachusetts Institute of Technology
summary The design process often begins with a graphical description of the proposed device or system and sketching is the physical expression of the design engineer's thinking process. Computer Aided Design is a technique in which man and machine are blended into a problem solving team, intimately coupling the best characteristics of each. Solid modelling is developed to act as the common medium between man and the computer. At present it is achieved mainly by designing with volumes and hence does not leave much room for sketching input, the traditional physical expression of the thinking process of the design engineer. This thesis describes a method of accepting isometric free hand sketching as the input to a solid model. The design engineer is allowed to make a sketch on top of a digitizer indicating (i) visible lines; (ii) hidden lines; (iii) construction lines; (iv) centre lines; (v) erased lines; and (vi) redundant lines as the input. The computer then processes this sketch by identifying the line segments, fitting the best possible lines, removing the erased lines, ignoring the redundant lines and finally merging the hidden lines and visible lines to form the lines in the solid in an interactive manner. The program then uses these lines and the information about the three dimensional origin of the object and produces three dimensional information such as the faces, loops, holes, rings, edges and vertices which are sufficient to build a solid model. This is achieved in the following manner. The points in the sketch are first written into a file. The computer than reads this file, breaks the group of points into sub-groups belonging to individual line segments, fits the best lines and identify the vertices in two dimensions. These improved lines in two dimensions are then merged to form the lines and vertices in the solid. These lines are then used together with the three dimensional origin (or any other point) to produce the wireframe model in three dimensions. The loops in the wireframe models are then identified and surface equations are fitted to these loops. Finally all the necessary inputs to build a B-rep solid model are produced.
series thesis:PhD
email servin@gsd.harvard.edu
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 84f6
authors Ferrari, Carlo and Naticchia, Berardo
year 1989
title Definition of Spatial Elements of the Building System: “Reasoner A” in the Castorp System
source CAAD: Education - Research and Practice [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 87-982875-2-4] Aarhus (Denmark) 21-23 September 1989, pp. 7.2.1-7.2.10
summary This paper tackles the problem of the functional and morphological definition of elementary spaces (in relation to the overall definition of the building object) through the study and the modelization of the designer's knowledge and of the cognitive processes which use it. An interactive automatic system which solves the problem of the placing of objects within a predefined environment is then described. This is the first element in a more general system which is meant as an intelligent aid to building design.
series eCAADe
last changed 2003/04/01 19:01

_id 68c8
authors Flemming, U., Coyne, R. and Fenves, S. (et al.)
year 1994
title SEED: A Software Environment to Support the Early Phases in Building Design
source Proceeding of IKM '94, Weimar, Germany, pp. 5-10
summary The SEED project intends to develop a software environment that supports the early phases in building design (Flemming et al., 1993). The goal is to provide support, in principle, for the preliminary design of buildings in all aspects that can gain from computer support. This includes using the computer not only for analysis and evaluation, but also more actively for the generation of designs, or more accurately, for the rapid generation of design representations. A major motivation for the development of SEED is to bring the results of two multi-generational research efforts focusing on `generative' design systems closer to practice: 1. LOOS/ABLOOS, a generative system for the synthesis of layouts of rectangles (Flemming et al., 1988; Flemming, 1989; Coyne and Flemming, 1990; Coyne, 1991); 2. GENESIS, a rule-based system that supports the generation of assemblies of 3-dimensional solids (Heisserman, 1991; Heisserman and Woodbury, 1993). The rapid generation of design representations can take advantage of special opportunities when it deals with a recurring building type, that is, a building type dealt with frequently by the users of the system. Design firms - from housing manufacturers to government agencies - accumulate considerable experience with recurring building types. But current CAD systems capture this experience and support its reuse only marginally. SEED intends to provide systematic support for the storing and retrieval of past solutions and their adaptation to similar problem situations. This motivation aligns aspects of SEED closely with current work in Artificial Intelligence that focuses on case-based design (see, for example, Kolodner, 1991; Domeshek and Kolodner, 1992; Hua et al., 1992).
series other
email ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id a672
authors Flemming, Ulrich
year 1990
title Syntactic Structures in Architecture: Teaching Composition with Computer Assistance
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 31-48
summary The present paper outlines a plan for the teaching of architectural composition with computer assistance.The approach is to introduce students to a series of architectural languages characterized by a vocabulary of elements and a grammar whose rules indicate how these elements can be placed in space. Exercises with each language include the analysis of precedents; the generation of forms using a given rule set; and follow-up studies with an expanded rule set. The paper introduces languages and exercises through illustrative examples. This architectural content can be taught in the traditional way. The use of computers is motivated by expectations which are stated, and some basic requirements for the needed software are listed. Work to develop this software has started.
series CAAD Futures
email ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2003/02/26 16:24

_id 63c7
authors Fox, C. William
year 1990
title Integrating Computing into an Architectural Undergraduate Program
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 377-386
summary This paper will discuss the process of integrating computing into the undergraduate architectural program at Temple University. It will address the selection and use of hardware and software consistent with the issues and concerns of introducing a new tool to expand the repertoire of skills available to students for use in the design process.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id ef95
authors Fregier, Marius
year 1989
title Do You Need Weapons to Keep out of "Artichaud Melanie" - Or How to Teach Prolog Programming to CAD System Design Students
source CAAD: Education - Research and Practice [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 87-982875-2-4] Aarhus (Denmark) 21-23 September 1989, pp. 8.1.1-8.1.9
summary A course aimed on the use of prolog for studying, prototyping and developing CAD systems is presented. This course is based on a practical training. Its objectives, topics, teaching method and applications are briefly introduced . Exercises focussed on interests and.capabilities of CAD designers are presented. These exercises follow a progression which integrate Step by step, different aspects of the application fields. At list these exercises lead to a single application concerned with intelligent graphics.
keywords Education in CAD System Construction, Graphical Extensions to Prolog, Experts Systems, Graphical Interactive Capture of Data, Intelligent Graphic
series eCAADe
last changed 1998/08/24 10:01

_id 2613
authors Frew, Robert S.
year 1990
title The Organization of CAD Teaching in Design Schools
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 387-392
summary This paper is the result of a survey of European CAD teaching that was conducted in 1987 and 1988. It makes comparisons with teaching at the Yale School of Architecture, and goes on to analyze the issues that should be addressed in a CAD program in a school of architecture.
series CAAD Futures
email frewr1@southernct.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id 8cff
authors Fridqvist, Sverker
year 1989
title Computers as a Creative Tool in Architecture
source CAAD: Education - Research and Practice [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 87-982875-2-4] Aarhus (Denmark) 21-23 September 1989, pp. 9.6.1-9.6.4
summary The School of Architecture at Lund Institute of Technology was augmented by the establishment of the Computer Studio in 1987. As a result the school now has a device for teaching and research in the architects' use of computers. We are now conducting several research projects as well as courses and an education project. The third and fourth years of the education at the school of architecture are arranged as education projects instead of traditional lecturing. The students choose from projects that are organised by different departments at the School of Architecture. The issue is that the students will ask for instruction when felt needed, and that learning will therefore be more efficient. The Computer Studio has conducted such a project during the first half of 1989. We have tried to encourage the students to use our different computers and programs in new and creative ways. One of the issues of the computer project is to teach the students how computers are used at the architects offices today as well as expected future developments. The students shall be acquainted well enough with present and future possibilities to make good choices when deciding upon buying computers for architectural use. Another issue is to develop new ways of making and presenting architecture by using computers. As a group the teachers at the school of architecture have a very restrictive attitude towards the use of computers. We hope that our project will open their minds for the possibilities of computers, and to engage them in the development of new ways to use computers creatively in architecture. An interesting question is if the use of computers will yield different outcomes of he students' work than traditional methods. An object for research is whether the added possibilities of considering different aspects of he design by using a computer will make for higher quality of the results.

series eCAADe
email Sverker.Fridqvist@caad.lth.se
more http://www.caad.lth.se/
last changed 1998/08/24 10:13

_id ecaade03_433_208_froehlich
id ecaade03_433_208_froehlich
authors Fröhlich, C., Hirschberg, U., Frühwirth, M. and Wondra, W.
year 2003
title no_LAb__in_feld - Is common- ground a word or just a sound? (Lou Reed, 1989)
source Digital Design [21th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-1-6] Graz (Austria) 17-20 September 2003, pp. 433-436
summary This paper describes the concept and the current state of development of a new laboratory for digital experimentation in architectural education and research. The novel forms of collaboration and learning for which it is intended and the quick pace of innovation in digital technology on which it depends both require an appropriately flexible spatial and technological framework. And it requires a particular mindset. The no_LAb__in_feld is not just another laboratory. It is a place, a community, a high-tech construction site, a permanent work in progress. It is the prototype of a next generation design studio.
keywords Design studio education: creative collaboration; digital playground; hybridinteractive installations; augmented reality
series eCAADe
email hirschberg@tugraz.at
more http://ikg.tugraz.at/
last changed 2003/09/18 07:13

_id e3c7
authors Galle, Per
year 1989
title Computer Methods in Architectural Problem Solving: Critique and Proposals
source CAAD: Education - Research and Practice [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 87-982875-2-4] Aarhus (Denmark) 21-23 September 1989, pp. 6.4.1-6.4.21
summary While the development of modeling and drafting tools for computer-aided design has reached a state of considerable maturity, computerized decision support in architectural sketch design is still in its infancy after more than 20 years. The paper analyzes the difficulties of developing computer tools for architectural problem solving in the early stages of design where decisions of major importance are made. The potentials of computer methods are discussed in relation to design as a static system of information and to design as a dynamic creative process. Two key problems are identified, and on this background current computer methods intended for use in architectural sketch design are critically reviewed. As a result some guidelines are suggested for future research into computer- aided architectural problem solving. The purpose of the paper is twofold: (1) to encourage research that will take this field into a state of maturity and acceptance by practitioners, and (2) to provoke further debate on the question of how to do it.

series eCAADe
last changed 1998/08/24 09:59

_id e832
authors Galle, Per
year 1989
title Branch & Sample : A Simple Strategy for Constraints Satisfaction
source March, 1989. 29: pp. 395-408 : ill. includes bibliography
summary Many constraint satisfaction problems have too many solutions for exhaustive generation. Optimization techniques may help in selecting a small number of solutions for consideration, but a reasonable measure of optimality is not always at hand. A simple algorithm called Branch & Sample is suggested as an alternative to optimization. Combining breath-first and depth- first search Branch & Sample finds solution distributed over the search tree. The aim is to obtain a limited set of solutions that corresponds well to the intuitive motion of a representative, uniformly scattered sample. A precise definition of this notion is discussed in relation to the algorithm whose effect is illustrated by two geometric design problems. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated and it is concluded that Branch & Sample is applicable to certain types of problems, and refinements can extend the scope of application
keywords automation, design, constraints, backtracking
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:08

_id a9b9
authors Galle, Per
year 1989
title Computer Methods in Architectural Problem Solving : Critique and Proposals
source Journal of Architectural and Planning Research. Spring, 1989. vol. 6: pp. 34-54 : ill. includes bibliography
summary While the development of modelling and drafting tools for computer-aided design has reached a state of considerable maturity, computerized decision support in architectural sketch design is still in its infancy after more than 20 years. The paper analyzes the difficulties of developing computer tools for architectural problem solving in the early stages of design where decisions of majors importance are made. The potentials of computer methods are discussed in relation to design as a static system of information, and to design as a creative process. Two key problems are identified, and on this background current computer methods intended for use in architectural sketch design are critically reviewed. As a result some guidelines are suggested for future research into computer-aided architectural problem solving. The purpose of the paper is twofold: (1) to encourage research that will take this field into a state of maturity and acceptance by practitioners, and (2) to provoke further debate on the question of how to do it
keywords architecture, CAD, design process, information, problem solving
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:08

_id abd8
authors Gero, John S. (editor)
year 1989
title Artificial Intelligence in Design
source 553 p. Southampton and Berlin: CMP/Springer-Verlag, 1989 CADLINE has abstract only.
summary This volume contains the selected papers in the design stream from the Fourth International Conference on Applications of Artificial Intelligence in Engineering. The 26 papers are grouped under the following headings: Structural Design; Mechanical Design; Architectural Design; Qualitative Reasoning in Design; Design Research Groups; Constraint-Based Systems in Design; Design Modeling; and Processes in Design
keywords AI, design, architecture, mechanical engineering, civil engineering, reasoning, modeling, constraints
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 88cb
authors Gero, John S. and Oksala, Tarkko (editors)
year 1988
title Knowledge-Based Systems in Architecture
source TIPS'88 - Knowledge Based Design in Architecture, Acta Polytechnica Scandinavica (1988 : Helsinki, Finland). 143 p. 1989
summary The technology of knowledge-based systems can be found in texts on artificial intelligence. There is very little published so far on knowledge-based systems in architecture. To this end an international conference -- TIPS' 88: Knowledge-Based Design in Architecture -- was organized for August 1988 in Finland. Thirteen papers from that conference have been selected and edited for this monograph. They are grouped under five parts: Introduction; Schemas and Models; Processes and Knowledge; Modeling Buildings; and Creativity and Knowledge-Based Systems
keywords knowledge base, architecture, representation, expert systems,building, creativity
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id eee2
authors Gero, John S. and Rosenman, Michael A.
year 1989
title A Conceptual Framework for Knowledge-Based Design Research at Sydney University's Design Computing Unit
source Southampton/Berlin: CMP/Springer- verlag, 1989. pp. 363-382. Published also in Artificial Intelligence in Engineering 5(2):363-383, 1990
summary This paper presents the conceptual framework behind the Design Computing Unit's knowledge-based design research. It commences with a brief overview before introducing the role of experience in design. The conceptual schema 'prototypes' is introduced and described within a framework of design as transforming required or expected functions to structure descriptions. Current projects related to this conceptual framework are briefly described
keywords CAD, knowledge base, design, prototypes, representation
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 4f00
authors Gero, John S. and Sudweeks, F. (editors)
year 1989
title Expert Systems in Engineering, Architecture and Construction
source 360 p University of Sydney: 1989. CADLINE has abstract only.
summary Engineering involves both cognitive and calculational processes. It involves judgement as well as numeracy. Cognitive processes and judgement are better served by expert systems than other existing technologies. Expert systems are not designed to replace technologies currently used in engineering, rather they are and will continue to augment them. Clearly, better tools are needed and further education of engineers is needed. This conference aims to provide a forum for the presentation of developments and applications of expert systems in engineering, primarily in Australasia. The 20 papers accepted for presentation span the spectrum of engineering applications of expert systems from analysis and diagnosis, through simulation and modeling, learning, to design and synthesis
keywords expert systems, knowledge base, design process, architecture, structures, engineering, construction, analysis, simulation, modeling, learning, synthesis
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 035e
authors Gero, John S.
year 1988
title Prototypes : A Basis for Knowledge-based Design
source Symposium on Knowledge Based Design in Architecture. 1988. pp. 3-8. Also published in Knowledge Based Systems in Architecture, Acta Polytechnica Scandinavica, Helsinki, edited by J. S. Gero and T. Oksala, 1989
summary A new conceptual schema called a prototype for the representation of generalized design knowledge is proposed. It contains knowledge necessary for the commencement and the continuation of a design. This paper briefly presents the schema and describes its use in designing. Its use in categorizing design processes is presented
keywords prototypes, representation, knowledge base, design
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

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