CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id 315caadria2004
id 315caadria2004
authors Kuo-Chung Wen, Wei-Lung Chen
year 2004
title Application of Genetic Algorithms to Establish Flooding Evacuation Path Model in Metropolitan Area
source CAADRIA 2004 [Proceedings of the 9th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 89-7141-648-3] Seoul Korea 28-30 April 2004, pp. 557-570
summary This research has shown the difficulties associated with the GIS and the flooding evacuation path search through the huge searching space generated during the network analysis process. This research also presents an approach to these problems by utilizing a search process whose concept is derived from natural genetics. Genetic algorithms (GAs) have been introduced in the optimization problem solving area by Holland (1975) and Goldberg (1989) and have shown their usefulness through numerous applications. We apply GA and GIS to choice flooding evacuation path in metropolitan area in this study. We take the region of Shiji city in Taiwan for case. That could be divided into four parts. First, is to set the population of GA operation. Second, is to choose crossover and mutation. Third, is to calculate the fitness function of each generation and to select the better gene arrangement. Fourth, is to reproduce, after evolution, we can establish Flooding Evacuation Path that more reflect really human action and choice when flood takes place. However we can apply GA to calculate different evacuation path in different time series. Final, we compare and establish real model of evacuation path model to choosing flooding evacuation path.
series CAADRIA
email wenkc@ms1.hinet.net
last changed 2004/05/20 17:39

_id ddss2004_d-63
id ddss2004_d-63
authors Wen, K.-C. and W.-L. Chen
year 2004
title Applying Genetic Algorithms to Establish Disaster Decision Support System for Flooding Evacuation Path of Hsichih Area in Taiwan
source Van Leeuwen, J.P. and H.J.P. Timmermans (eds.) Developments in Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, Eindhoven: Eindhoven University of Technology, ISBN 90-6814-155-4, p. 63-75
summary Because of the special geography features and subtropics weather in Taiwan, we need to provide correct information to help people making decision when they are in disaster. So the disaster decision support system must offer proper information of evacuation path to people. This research has shown the difficulties associated with the GIS and the flooding evacuation path search through the huge searching space generated during the network analysis process. This research also presents an approach to these problems by utilizing a search process whose concept is derived from natural genetics. Genetic algorithms (GAs) have been introduced in the optimization problem solving area by Holland (1975) and Goldberg (1989) and have shown their usefulness through numerous applications. We apply GA and GIS to choice flooding evacuation path in metropolitan area in this study. We take the region of Shiji city in Taiwan for case. Firstly, we establish the node relationship of GA calculation, the level of the weight is the standard of the date that is exported by Disaster Database. Secondly, we apply GA to calculate different evacuation path in different time series. Finally, we build the model of choosing flooding evacuation path.
keywords Genetic Algorithms, Decision Support System, GIS, Evacuation Path
series DDSS
last changed 2004/07/03 20:13

_id 4bf3
authors Blinn, James F.
year 1989
title Optimal Tubes
source IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications. September, 1989. vol. 9: pp. 8-13 : ill. (some col.)
summary The author discusses how to cut down the number of polygons required to model and render the Voyager spacecraft. The geometric problem is to find the tangent lines from a point to a circle. There are two ways to go about solving this, one using garden-variety analytical geometry and the other using high tech homogeneous coordinates. The author in this column discusses the simple way
keywords programming, geometry, algorithms, computer graphics, techniques
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 8bdf
authors Crocker, Gary A. and Reinke, William F.
year 1989
title Boundary Evaluation in a Non-Manifold Environment
source November, 1989. 30 p., [16] p. of ill. includes bibliography
summary The recent availability of Non-Manifold Topology (NMT) enables the coexistence of wireframe geometry, surfaces, and solids in a single representation with complete topological resolution. This in turn allows a new approach to boundary evaluation. This new approach merges a set of primitives into a single Boundary REPresentation (B-rep), and selects the desired Boolean results without destroying any B-rep entities. The results of the Boolean operations are displayed by drawing only selected entities. The B-rep resulting from the merge contains a complete description of the input primitives. While traditional algorithms allow incremental addition of primitives, this new approach also allows incremental deletion of primitives from the merged B-rep. Changes in Boolean operators and/or their order of evaluation can be reflected in the B-rep simply by changing the criteria of the selection process. Constructive Solid Geometry (CSG) editing operations can be mirrored in the B-rep incrementally, i.e. without performing complete reevaluation of the B-rep from its constituent primitive definitions. In addition, the domain of boundary evaluation has been extended to include Boolean operations between wireframe geometry, surfaces, and solids. This new approach has been successfully implemented and tested to boundary evaluation. Test results have shown an order of magnitude reduction in the cost associated with reflecting CSG editing operations on existing B-reps, with only minimal additional cost for initial construction. Also shown are examples of Boolean operations between solids, surfaces, and wires
keywords computational geometry, boolean operations, solid modeling, B-rep, CSG, representation, topology, curved surfaces, intersection, curves,
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id sigradi2006_e028c
id sigradi2006_e028c
authors Griffith, Kenfield; Sass, Larry and Michaud, Dennis
year 2006
title A strategy for complex-curved building design:Design structure with Bi-lateral contouring as integrally connected ribs
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 465-469
summary Shapes in designs created by architects such as Gehry Partners (Shelden, 2002), Foster and Partners, and Kohn Peterson and Fox rely on computational processes for rationalizing complex geometry for building construction. Rationalization is the reduction of a complete geometric shape into discrete components. Unfortunately, for many architects the rationalization is limited reducing solid models to surfaces or data on spread sheets for contractors to follow. Rationalized models produced by the firms listed above do not offer strategies for construction or digital fabrication. For the physical production of CAD description an alternative to the rationalized description is needed. This paper examines the coupling of digital rationalization and digital fabrication with physical mockups (Rich, 1989). Our aim is to explore complex relationships found in early and mid stage design phases when digital fabrication is used to produce design outcomes. Results of our investigation will aid architects and engineers in addressing the complications found in the translation of design models embedded with precision to constructible geometries. We present an algorithmically based approach to design rationalization that supports physical production as well as surface production of desktop models. Our approach is an alternative to conventional rapid prototyping that builds objects by assembly of laterally sliced contours from a solid model. We explored an improved product description for rapid manufacture as bilateral contouring for structure and panelling for strength (Kolarevic, 2003). Infrastructure typically found within aerospace, automotive, and shipbuilding industries, bilateral contouring is an organized matrix of horizontal and vertical interlocking ribs evenly distributed along a surface. These structures are monocoque and semi-monocoque assemblies composed of structural ribs and skinning attached by rivets and adhesives. Alternative, bi-lateral contouring discussed is an interlocking matrix of plywood strips having integral joinery for assembly. Unlike traditional methods of building representations through malleable materials for creating tangible objects (Friedman, 2002), this approach constructs with the implication for building life-size solutions. Three algorithms are presented as examples of rationalized design production with physical results. The first algorithm [Figure 1] deconstructs an initial 2D curved form into ribbed slices to be assembled through integral connections constructed as part of the rib solution. The second algorithm [Figure 2] deconstructs curved forms of greater complexity. The algorithm walks along the surface extracting surface information along horizontal and vertical axes saving surface information resulting in a ribbed structure of slight double curvature. The final algorithm [Figure 3] is expressed as plug-in software for Rhino that deconstructs a design to components for assembly as rib structures. The plug-in also translates geometries to a flatten position for 2D fabrication. The software demonstrates the full scope of the research exploration. Studies published by Dodgson argued that innovation technology (IvT) (Dodgson, Gann, Salter, 2004) helped in solving projects like the Guggenheim in Bilbao, the leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy, and the Millennium Bridge in London. Similarly, the method discussed in this paper will aid in solving physical production problems with complex building forms. References Bentley, P.J. (Ed.). Evolutionary Design by Computers. Morgan Kaufman Publishers Inc. San Francisco, CA, 1-73 Celani, G, (2004) “From simple to complex: using AutoCAD to build generative design systems” in: L. Caldas and J. Duarte (org.) Implementations issues in generative design systems. First Intl. Conference on Design Computing and Cognition, July 2004 Dodgson M, Gann D.M., Salter A, (2004), “Impact of Innovation Technology on Engineering Problem Solving: Lessons from High Profile Public Projects,” Industrial Dynamics, Innovation and Development, 2004 Dristas, (2004) “Design Operators.” Thesis. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2004 Friedman, M, (2002), Gehry Talks: Architecture + Practice, Universe Publishing, New York, NY, 2002 Kolarevic, B, (2003), Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing, Spon Press, London, UK, 2003 Opas J, Bochnick H, Tuomi J, (1994), “Manufacturability Analysis as a Part of CAD/CAM Integration”, Intelligent Systems in Design and Manufacturing, 261-292 Rudolph S, Alber R, (2002), “An Evolutionary Approach to the Inverse Problem in Rule-Based Design Representations”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 329-350 Rich M, (1989), Digital Mockup, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Reston, VA, 1989 Schön, D., The Reflective Practitioner: How Professional Think in Action. Basic Books. 1983 Shelden, D, (2003), “Digital Surface Representation and the Constructability of Gehry’s Architecture.” Diss. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2003 Smithers T, Conkie A, Doheny J, Logan B, Millington K, (1989), “Design as Intelligent Behaviour: An AI in Design Thesis Programme”, Artificial Intelligence in Design, 293-334 Smithers T, (2002), “Synthesis in Designing”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 3-24 Stiny, G, (1977), “Ice-ray: a note on the generation of Chinese lattice designs” Environmental and Planning B, volume 4, pp. 89-98
keywords Digital fabrication; bilateral contouring; integral connection; complex-curve
series SIGRADI
email kenfield@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id f4fb
authors Karasick, Michael
year 1989
title On the Representation and Manipulation of Rigid Solids
source McGill University, Department of Computer Science, Montreal
summary Solid modeling studies how to represent geometric properties of solids by computer. A fundamental operation is the construction of representations of solids. Algorithms for set operations construct boundary representations of solids from boundary representations of other solids. A correct and efficient intersection algorithm for polyhedral solids that uses boundary representations is described. A finite-precision implementation of the algorithm uses incidence tests that use symbolic inference in order to limit errors due to finite-precision approximations. The incidence tests are described and experimental evidence is presented to show that the incidence tests are both empirically reliable and practical. The intersection algorithm uses a new boundary representation called the Star-Edge representation. A complementation algorithm for solids that uses the new representation is given, and an algorithm is given that uses the new representation to determine if two boundary representations describe the same solid. A canonical boundary representation for solids is described and used to prove a lower bound for the same-object problem.
series thesis:PhD
email msk@us.ibm.com
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id ed07
authors Love, James
year 1990
title A Case Study in Knowledge-Based System Development : Envelope Design for Reduction of Traffic Noise Transmission
source February, 1990. 19 p. : some ill. and table. includes a bibliography
summary Researchers have demonstrated the value of replication of research and explicit testing of concepts in artificial intelligence (Ritchie and Hanna 1989). In this study, a rule- based system was implemented as an exercise in the application of the theory and practice of knowledge-based systems development to architectural design analysis. The test domain was the selection of wall and window assemblies to provide adequate noise reduction given a set of traffic and building site conditions. This domain was chosen for two reasons: (1) considerable detailed heuristic information was available; and (2) it avoided large solutions spaces, 'errorful' and time-dependent data, and unreliable knowledge. Development of the system in conjunction with an extensive literature review revealed that publications on construction and performance of rule-based systems provided insufficient detail on key aspects of system architecture. Topics suffering from neglect or insufficiently rigorous treatment included algorithms used in automated inference, methods for selection of inference procedures, the integration of numerical and symbolic processing, the formulation of explanation mechanisms to deal with integrated numerical and symbolic processing, testing methods, and software standardization. Improving the quality and scope of knowledge in these areas is essential if expert systems are to be applied effectively in architectural design
keywords CAD, expert systems, acoustics, applications, knowledge base, design, architecture, AI, analysis
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:09

_id 7812
authors Straber, W. and Seidel, H.-P. (eds.)
year 1989
title Theory and Practice of Geometric Modeling
source Springer-Verlag
summary This book originates from the lectures given at the international conference "Theory and Practice of Geometric Modeling", Blaubeuren, FRG, October 3-7, 1988, that brought together leading experts from universities, system developers, and system users, to discuss new concepts and future trends in geometric modeling. The book covers a variety of topics on an advanced level and is organized as follows. Part A contains new algorithms and techniques for modeling objects that are bounded by free form surfaces. Part B focuses on surface/surface intersections, new types of blending surfaces and speed ups for ray tracing. Part C contains some new geometric tools. Part D discusses different representation schemes in solid modeling, conversions between these different schemes, and some applications. Part E covers some issues of product modeling, automatic tolerancing, high level specification of solid models (constraints, features) and the need for better user interfaces.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 2786
authors Woodwark, J.R.
year 1989
title Splitting Set-Theoretic Solid Models into Connected Components
source 10 p. : ill. Winchester: IBM UK Scientific Center, IBM United Kingdom Laboratories Limited, June, 1989. IBM UKSC 210. includes bibliography In general, there is no way to tell how many pieces (connected components) a set-theoretic (CSG) solid model represents, except via conversion to a boundary model. Recent work on the elimination of redundant primitives has been linked with techniques for identifying connected components in quad-trees and oct-trees into a strategy to attack this problem. Some success has been achieved, and an experimental Prolog program, working in two dimensions, that finds connected components and determines the set-theoretic representation of each component, is reported, and further developments proposed. CSG / quadtree / octree / primitives / algorithms. 43. Woodwark, J. R. and Quinlan K. M. 'Reducing the Effect of Complexity on Volume Model Evaluation.' Computer Aided Design. April, 1982. pp. 89-95 : ill. includes bibliography.
summary A major problem with volume modelling systems is that processing times may increase with model complexity in a worse than linear fashion. The authors have addressed this problem, for picture generation, by repeatedly dividing the space occupied by a model, and evaluating the sub-models created only when they meet a criterion of simplicity. Hidden surface elimination has been integrated with evaluation, in such a way that major portions of the model which are not visible are never evaluated. An example demonstrates a better than linear relationship between model complexity and computation time, and also shows the effect of picture complexity on the performance of the process
keywords CAD, computational geometry, solid modeling, geometric modeling, algorithms, hidden surfaces, CSG
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 8775
authors Cigolle, Mark and Coleman, Kim
year 1990
title Computer Integrated Design: Transformation as Process
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 333-346
summary To bring together poetry, magic and science, to explore beyond preconceptions, to invent spaces and forms which re-form and inform man's experience, these are the possibilities of architecture. Computer integrated design offers a means for extending the search, one which integrates both conceptual and perceptual issues in the making of architecture. The computer may assist in generating constructs which would not have been created by conventional methods. The application of computer techniques to design has to date been focused primarily on production aspects, an area which is already highly organizable and communicable. In conceptual and perceptual aspects of design, computer techniques remain underdeveloped. Since the impetus for- the development of computer applications has come from the immediate economics of practice rather than a theoretically based strategy, computer-aided design is currently biased toward the replication of conventional techniques rather than the exploration of new potentials. Over the last two years we have been involved in experimentation with methodologies which engage the computer in formative explorations of the design idea. Work produced from investigations by 4th and 5th year undergraduate students in computer integrated design studios that we have been teaching at the University of Southern California demonstrates the potential for the use of the computer as a principal tool in the exploration of syntax and perception, space and program. The challenge is to approach the making of architecture as an innovative act, one which does not rely on preconceived notions of design.
series CAAD Futures
email kcoleman@usc.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id e832
authors Galle, Per
year 1989
title Branch & Sample : A Simple Strategy for Constraints Satisfaction
source March, 1989. 29: pp. 395-408 : ill. includes bibliography
summary Many constraint satisfaction problems have too many solutions for exhaustive generation. Optimization techniques may help in selecting a small number of solutions for consideration, but a reasonable measure of optimality is not always at hand. A simple algorithm called Branch & Sample is suggested as an alternative to optimization. Combining breath-first and depth- first search Branch & Sample finds solution distributed over the search tree. The aim is to obtain a limited set of solutions that corresponds well to the intuitive motion of a representative, uniformly scattered sample. A precise definition of this notion is discussed in relation to the algorithm whose effect is illustrated by two geometric design problems. The performance of the algorithm is evaluated and it is concluded that Branch & Sample is applicable to certain types of problems, and refinements can extend the scope of application
keywords automation, design, constraints, backtracking
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:08

_id 1a4e
authors Goel, Ashok Kumar
year 1989
title Integration of case-based reasoning and model-based reasoning for adaptive design problem solving
source Ohio State University
summary In the case-based approach to design, a novel problem is solved by adapting a design known to solve a related problem. Adapting a known design to solve a related problem by the commonly used methods of heuristic association and search, however, can be computationally expensive if the adaptation search space is not small. The adaptation space, then, needs to be decomposed into smaller and simpler spaces that can be searched more efficiently and effectively. The knowledge for decomposing the adaptation search space can be represented as a behavior-structure model that specifies how the structure of the known design results in its output behaviors. This research investigates the use of such behavior-structure models for adapting the designs of physical devices. Comprehension of how the output behaviors of a design arise from its structure is represented as a behavioral component-substance model for the design. The model explicitly specifies (i) the expected output behaviors of the design including its functions, (ii) the elementary structural and behavioral interactions between components and substances constituting the structure of the design, and (iii) the internal causal behaviors of the design that compose the elementary interactions into its output behaviors. The causal behaviors of the design, in this model, are indexed by the expected output behaviors for which they are responsible. The model aids case-based design in several ways. First, it identifies conceptual primitives for specifying the functions of designs, which are used to index the known designs stored in a case-based memory. Second, it identifies elementary types of behavior transformations and elementary types of structure modifications. Third, it provides knowledge for decomposition of the adaptation search space into smaller spaces so that the search for the needed structure modifications is localized. Fourth, it leads to a novel method for simulating the behavioral effects of structure modifications. The output and causal behaviors of the modified design, in this method, are derived by revising the output and causal behaviors of the known design. This integrative approach unifies case-based methods, associative methods, heuristic search methods, decomposition methods, and model-based methods into one architecture for adaptive design problem solving. Core portions of this approach have been implemented in an experimental design system called KRITIK.  
keywords Case Based Reasoning; Model Based Reasoning; Adaptive Design; Problem Solving
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id a68b
authors Mackenzie, C.A.
year 1989
title Inferring Relational Design Grammars
source Environment and Planning B. 1989. vol. 16: pp. 252-287
summary The hierarchical structure afforded by linguistic systems, together with inter-element relationships, is suggested as a means of representing interpretations of generative design processes. The utility of relational descriptions for describing spatial arrangements and performing geometric transformations is discussed. Tree systems are shown to be a useful representation for relational descriptions, by making explicit the possible hierarchical organizations, and a search mechanism is introduced to look for 'interesting' design interpretations. A method for inferring tree automata from positive sample sets is employed to infer relational grammars. Issues in the representation and the grammatical inference method are discussed in the light of examples from the domain of spatial configuration
keywords inference, shape grammars, design, synthesis, relations, search
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 2a8b
authors Purcell, Patrick and Applebaum Dan
year 1990
title Light Table: An Interface To Visual Information Systems
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 229-238
summary A primary aim of the Light Table project was to see if a combination of the optical laser disc, local area networks, and interactive videographic workstation technology could bring a major visual collection, (such as the Rotch Visual Collections of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology), to a campuswide population of undergraduate users. VIS (Visual Information System) is the name being given to the new genre of information technology. Much research and development effort is currently being applied to areas where the image has a special significance, for example in architecture and planning, in graphic and fine arts, in biology, in medicine, and in photography. One particular advance in the technology of VIS has been the facility to access visual information across a distributed computer system via LAN (Local Area Networks) and video delivery systems, (such as campus TV cable). This advance allows users to retrieve images from both local and remote sources, dispatching the image search through the LAN, and receiving the images back at their workstation via dedicated channels on the campus TV cable. Light Table is the title of a system that acts as a computer-based interactive videographic interface to a variety of visual information systems described in the body of this paper. It takes its name from the traditional, back- lit, translucent light table that lecturers use to assemble and view collections of slides for talks and seminars. The component of Light Table which is being reported in greatest detail here, a software outcome called Galatea, is a versatile and robust system capable of controlling video devices in a networked environment.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id 22bd
authors Hoffmann, C.M., Hopcroft, J.E. and Karasick, M.S.
year 1989
title Robust Set Operations on Polyhedral Solids
source IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications. November, 1989. vol. 9: pp. 50-59 : ill. includes bibliography
summary The paper describes an algorithm for performing regularized Boolean operations on polyhedral solids. Robustness is achieved by adding symbolic reasoning as a supplemental step to resolve possible numerical uncertainty. Additionally, numerical redundancy and numerical computation based on derived quantities are reduced as much as possible. It also discusses the authors' experience with the implementation of the algorithm
keywords algorithms, polyhedra, solids, representation, computational geometry, geometric modeling, boolean operations
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 12:41

_id 0e93
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 1989
title Interactive Animation on the Macintosh II
source CAAD: Education - Research and Practice [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 87-982875-2-4] Aarhus (Denmark) 21-23 September 1989, pp. 9.5.1-9.5.6
summary The efficiency of images in communication between humans has so far been used almost exclusively by TV and other mass medias. The costs have been too great to encourage the use of images in the financially restricted everyday practice of architecture. With a range of application programs for the Apple Macintosh II the vision has come close to reality. It is now possible to create guided walks with the chance to choose different routes and views in a model of buildings and surroundings in 256 colour graphics. The makers of these programs may not have foreseen this use for their products and that is why it takes quite a lot of effort to make all the necessary images. With some supplementary routines however, this will be made much easier. Animation can also be used to visualize different processes inside a building. We have been studying the working environment in mechanical industry. The goal of this project is to make communication possible between the workers at all levels of an organization in planning changes and has so far been very successful. The use of this technique is only limited by our imagination and funding. Some examples to be tested in the near future are "Escape at a fire", "Animation of a Dairy", "Traffic situations in a parking lot-, "CAD-working place" and others. One of the difficulties in interactive planning with users has been to come close enough to their reality. With animated images it is possible to visualize what is going to happen and what it is going to look like in a more understandable way. In education this must be a challenging possibility. Changes and processes are some of the most difficult subjects to describe and explain! The software used is a handful of individual programs which, thanks to the graphics standards of the Macintosh, can exchange data with each other.

series eCAADe
email Jonas.af_Klercker@caad.lth.se
more http://www.caad.lth.se/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 45e6
authors Agger, Kristian and Lentz, Uffe (Eds.)
year 1989
title CAAD: Education - Research and Practice [Conference Proceedings]
source eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 87-982875-2-4 / Aarhus (Denmark) 21-23 September 1989
summary In the announcement of the sixth eCAADe Conference we stated that It is held at a time where CAAD is moving into practice very fast, with heavy influence on research and education. We stated that research is directed towards the early design phases, and that education is facing the problem of mass education.

In that situation much benefit can be obtained from collaboration with practice. We decided to give the conference the title “CAAD: Education - Research and Practice” to state the importance of practice as a test bench.

The conference papers cover education and research in depth in many important areas and give a good overview, whereas the practical theme is more or less missing, indicating, that experience here is still modest.

At the lecture material market and the exhibition the situation is opposite and shows state of art in practical use.

series eCAADe
email uffe.lentz@a-aarhus.dk
last changed 1998/08/24 09:36

_id 450c
authors Akin, Ömer
year 1990
title Computational Design Instruction: Toward a Pedagogy
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 302-316
summary The computer offers enormous potential both in and out of the classroom that is realized only in limited ways through the applications available to us today. In the early days of the computer it was generally argued that it would replace the architect. When this idea became obsolete, the prevailing opinion of proponents and opponents alike shifted to the notion of the computer as merely adding to present design capabilities. This idea is so ingrained in our thinking that we still speak of "aiding" design with computers. It is clear to those who grasp the real potential of this still new technology - as in the case of many other major technological innovations - that it continues to change the way we design, rather than to merely augment or replace human designers. In the classroom the computer has the potential to radically change three fundamental ingredients: student, instruction, and instructor. It is obvious that changes of this kind spell out a commensurate change in design pedagogy. If the computer is going to be more than a passive instrument in the design studio, then design pedagogy will have to be changed, fundamentally. While the practice of computing in the studio continues to be a significant I aspect of architectural education, articulation of viable pedagogy for use in the design studio is truly rare. In this paper the question of pedagogy in the CAD studio will be considered first. Then one particular design studio taught during Fall 1988 at Carnegie Mellon University will be presented. Finally, we shall return to issues of change in the student, instruction, and instructor, as highlighted by this particular experience.
series CAAD Futures
email oa04@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id sigradi2012_30
id sigradi2012_30
authors Angeluzzi, Gustavo; Hanns, Daniela Kutschat
year 2012
title Um levantamento de requisitos gerais para o desenvolvimento e posicionamento de DOOTERS – um aplicativo lúdico de listas de tarefas para iPhone [A survey of general requirements for developing and positioning DOOTERS - a to-do list application for iPhone]
source SIGraDi 2012 [Proceedings of the 16th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Brasil - Fortaleza 13-16 November 2012, pp. 191-195
summary DOOTERS is a to-do list application for iPhone which entertains and motivates the user to get things done. It was developed based on requirements obtained trough: 1. the study of several personal information organizing methods (Covey, 1989; Allen, 2005; Foster, 2006); 2. answers to a task lists user focused questionnaire; 3. observation of to-do list users while creating lists and organizing tasks; 4. comparison of digital and non-digital task list media (paper, computer and mobile device); 5. analysis of profiles, behaviors and to-do list applications for iPhone. In this paper, the authors present the process of obtaining requirements for developing and positioning DOOTERS.
keywords information and interface design, requirements, to-do list application, iPhone, DOOTERS
series SIGRADI
email dk.hanns@uol.com.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id a74a
authors Asanowicz, Alexander
year 1989
title Four Easy Questions
source CAAD: Education - Research and Practice [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 87-982875-2-4] Aarhus (Denmark) 21-23 September 1989, pp. 9.18.1-9.18.4
summary Should we teach CAAD? - yes, but why? Answer to this question is clear too. Question three - "when?" - on the 5, 6 and 7 term. Why so rate? - it is a compromise because "Architecture is an art" and students of architecture should know how to make a project without computers. How to teach CAAD? - we should teach haw to use professional computer programs and not programming. We must work out a new manual for architects. It should be constructed in such a way as to correspond to consecutive steps of the architectural design process.
keywords CAAD, Manuals, Architectural Design Process
series eCAADe
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

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