CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id e496
authors Gero, John S. and Maher, Mary Lou
year 1990
title Theoretical Requirements for Creative Design by Analogy
source Formal Methods in Engineering Design, Manufacturing and Assembly, International Workshop (1st. : 1990 : Fort Collins, Colorado). editor. P Fitzhorn. pp. 19-27. CADLINE has abstract only.
summary This paper adopts the conceptual schema 'prototypes' as its base for representing function-behavior-structure relationships. Within this representation design by a transformational analogy is presented as a selection process on either function or structure which then transforms the structure or function respectively
keywords prototypes, creativity, design process
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id eee2
authors Gero, John S. and Rosenman, Michael A.
year 1989
title A Conceptual Framework for Knowledge-Based Design Research at Sydney University's Design Computing Unit
source Southampton/Berlin: CMP/Springer- verlag, 1989. pp. 363-382. Published also in Artificial Intelligence in Engineering 5(2):363-383, 1990
summary This paper presents the conceptual framework behind the Design Computing Unit's knowledge-based design research. It commences with a brief overview before introducing the role of experience in design. The conceptual schema 'prototypes' is introduced and described within a framework of design as transforming required or expected functions to structure descriptions. Current projects related to this conceptual framework are briefly described
keywords CAD, knowledge base, design, prototypes, representation
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id ea98
authors Gero, John S.
year 1990
title Design Prototypes : A Knowledge Representation Schema for Design
source AI Magazine. 1990, vol. 11: pp. 26-36
summary This article commences with an elaboration of models of design as a process. It then introduces and describes a knowledge representation schema for design called design prototypes. This schema supports the initiation and continuation of the act of designing. Design prototypes are shown to provide a suitable framework to distinguish routine, innovative and creative design
keywords prototypes, knowledge, representation, design process
series CADline
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id e5e2
authors Coyne, R.D., Rosenman, M.A. and Radford, A.D. (et.al.)
year 1990
title Knowledge Based Design Systems
source 576 p. : ill Reading, Mass.: Addison-Wesley, 1990. includes bibliographies and index.
summary This book describes the bases, approaches, techniques, and implementations of knowledge-based design systems, and advocates and develops new directions in design systems generally. A formal model of design coupled with the notion of prototypes provides a coherent framework for all that follows and is a platform on which a comprehension of knowledge-based design rests. The book is divided into three parts. Part I, Design, examines and describes design and design processes, providing the context for the remainder of the book. Part II, Representation and Reasoning, explores the kinds of knowledge involved in design and the tools and techniques available for representing and controlling this knowledge. It examines the attributes of design that must be described and the ways in which knowledge-based methods are capable of describing and controlling them. Part III, Knowledge-Based Design, presents in detail the fundamentals of the interpretation of design, including the role of expert systems in interpreting existing designs, before describing how to produce designs within a knowledge-based environment. This part includes a detailed examination of design processes from the perspective of how to control these processes. Within each of these processes, the place and role of knowledge is presented and examples of knowledge-based design systems given. Finally, the authors examine central areas of human design and demonstrate what current knowledge-based design systems are capable of doing now and in the future
keywords knowledge base, design process, representation, CAD, AI, prototypes, expert systems
series CADline
email Richard.Coyne@ed.ac.uk
last changed 2003/05/17 08:13

_id 84e1
authors Kovacs, Laszio Bela and Galle, Per
year 1990
title Logic Programming for Concept Modelling and Support of Urban Housing Design : A Pilot Study
source 1990. 134 p. CADLINE has abstract only
summary Starting from a case study of manual sketch design of a residential area, the authors develop a prototypical site plan for low to medium density housing. The layout keeps pedestrian and vehicular traffic separated and provides open green area as well as a concentrated urban atmosphere. The constituents of the prototype layout are identified and a system of concepts devised accordingly. This conceptual analysis is formalized, using a Horn clause logic notation. Aspects of the resulting logic model concerning design of walking lines and plazas are refined into a considerable amount of detail. This exercise in knowledge representation seems to indicate that it will be possible, within the logic programming paradigm, to implement computerized support systems able to cooperate with and simulate designers working with architectural design. The main result of the study is that logical analysis of a particular prototype design can result in a collection of quite general concepts which are potentially useful in many other context than that of the prototype, for other kinds of design tasks. The report concludes by recommending several lines or aspects of future research in this area
keywords architecture, design, logic, programming, knowledge base, systems, CAD, layout, prototypes
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

_id a021
authors Woodbury, Robert F.
year 1990
title Variations in Solids : A Declarative Treatment
source Computers and Graphics. April, 1990. Vol. 14: 40 p. : ill. includes bibliography
summary Underlying the notions of variational geometry, design prototypes, features, and representation of assemblies seems to be a common concept of variations. This paper develops the core of a monotonically declarative system for variations on solids. It introduces a set of language constructs that are the basis for ASCEND, an object oriented equation solving language. It presents equations for representing certain spatial relationships between primitive geometric elements. Using plex grammar notation it develops a set of Euler operators that are monotonic in the strict sense required by the ASCEND language. These operators are collectively shown to generate representations for all plane models of 2-manifold objects and to generate only such representations. Finally it presents the core of a system for variations using the ASCEND language to implement both equation models and the new Euler operators
keywords prototypes, features, assemblies, representation, solid modeling, OOPS, languages, Euler operators, systems
series CADline
email rob_woodbury@sfu.ca
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id f9e5
authors Cherneff, Jonathan Martin
year 1990
title Knowledge Based Interpretation of Architectural Drawings
source Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Civil Engineering, Cambridge, MA
summary Architectural schematic drawings have been used to communicate building designs for centuries. The symbolic language used in these drawings efficiently represents much of the intricacy of the building process (e.g. implied business relationships, common building practice, and properties of construction materials). The drawing language is an accepted standard representation for building design, something that modern data languages have failed to achieve. In fact, the lack of an accepted standard electronic representation has hampered efforts at computer intergration and perhaps worsened industry fragmentation. In general, drawings must be interpreted, by a professional, and then reentered in order to transfer them from one CAD system to another. This work develops a method for machine interpretation of architectural (or other) schematic drawings. The central problem is to build an efficient drawing parser (i.e. a program that identifies the semantic entitites, characteristics, and relationships that are represented in the drawing). The parser is built from specifications of the drawing grammar and an underlying spatial model. The grammar describes what to look for, and the spatial model enables the parser to find it quickly. Coupled with existing optical recognition technology, this technique enables the use of drawings directly as: (1) a database to drive various AEC applications, (2) a communication protocol to integrate CAD systems, (3) a traditional user interface.
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id a33f
authors Cote, Pierre, Hartkopf , Volker and Loftness, Vivian (et al)
year 1990
title Vector Field Representation for the Evaluation of Multiple Performance Variables
source 1990. 6, [7] p., [3] p. of ill. includes bibliography
summary A vector field representation is proposed to simulate the spatial distribution of four building system performance variables: light, sound, radiant heat, and air flow. From this simulation, a measure of the impact of adding, deleting, or modifying an object in the field is computed. This measure serves as a passive evaluation of the user/designer's decision to modify the location or dimensions of the object in a space. This process of simulation-evaluation is performed by a performance module (PM), which is viewed as a component of a CAAD System (Computer Architectural Aided Design). This paper describes the motivation, objectives, methodology and preliminary results of the approach
keywords simulation, CAD, computation, evaluation, building, performance, architecture
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 411f
authors Coyne, Richard D. and Postmus, A.G.
year 1990
title Spatial Applications of Neural Networks in Computer-Aided Design
source Artificial Intelligence in Engineering. 1990. vol. 5: pp. 9-22. CADLINE has abstract only
summary Neural networks of PDP (parallel distributed processing), models of computation are based on mathematical models of neural processes. The authors explore the application of PDP to simple spatial reasoning in computer-aided design. Knowledge that provides a mapping from performances to design descriptions can be encoded into PDP systems in the form of learned patterns. The implementation of a simple PDP pattern associator is described. The system is shown to facilitate a rudimentary kind of associative or analogical reasoning. It also facilitates reasoning where only incomplete information is available. There are important concerns in design reasoning
keywords CAD, neural networks, design, representation, knowledge, reasoning
series CADline
email Richard.Coyne@ed.ac.uk
last changed 2003/05/17 08:13

_id a235
authors Danahy, John W.
year 1990
title Irises in a Landscape: An Experiment in Dynamic Interaction and Teaching Design Studio
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 363-376
summary The capacity of most computer-aided design systems is inadequate to represent landscape architectural ideas and compute landscape scenes quickly. As part of our teaching agenda, we decided to write software for the Silicon Graphics Iris workstations to tackle this problem directly. This paper begins with a discussion of our concerns about the use of CAD tools in the representation of landscape architectural space. Secondly, we discuss the approach that Toronto takes to computing and teaching with particular emphasis on the use of computers to support an integrated representational work environment. Finally, a fourth-year design studio that used our software is reviewed. Static illustrations of the system are presented here, although there is a videotape that demonstrates the dynamic nature of the system.
series CAAD Futures
email jwdanahy@rogers.com
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id c2ed
authors De Vries, Mark and Wagter, Harry
year 1990
title A CAAD Model for Use in Early Design Phases
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 215-228
summary In this paper we present a model for handling design information in the early design phases. This model can be used for representing both vague and exact defined information. The first part describes the difficulties involved in using CAD in the architectural design process and the characteristics of that process. Then we give a description of the design information and its representation during the design process. Next an overview of the architectural design process describes how design information is added and manipulated during the design process in order to achieve an effective result. Finally, we include a brief description of a simple prototype program to illustrate how this theory acts in practice.
series CAAD Futures
email Harry.Wagter@brighthouse.nl
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id 3207
authors Emmerik, Maarten J.G.M. van
year 1990
title Interactive design of parameterized 3D models by direct manipulation
source Delft University of Technology
summary The practical applicability of a computer-aided design system is strongly influenced by both the user interface and the internal model representation. A well designed user interface facilitates the communication with the system by offering an intuitive environment for for specification and representation of model information. An internal model representation, capable of storing geometric, topological and hierarchical dependencies between components in a model, increases the efficiency of the system by facilitating modification and elaboration of the model during the different stages of the design process. The subject of this thesis is the integration of a high level parameterized model representation with direct manipulation interface techniques for the design of three-dimensional objects. A direct manipulation interface enables the user to specify a model by interaction on a graphical representation, as an alternative for an abstract and error-prone apha-numerical dialogue style. A high level model representation is obtained by using a procedural modeling language with general purpose control structures, including arithmetic and logical expressions, repetition, conditionals, functions and procedures, and dedicated data types such as coordinate systems, geometric primitives and geometric constraints. The language interpreter is interconnected with a graphical interface, an incremental constraint solver and a geometrical modeler, using visual programming techniques. The developed techniques are implemented in a modeling system called GeoNode. The system incorporates paradigms of object-oriented design, with respect to both the user interface and to the system implementation. The applicability of the presented techniques is illustrated by examples in application domains such as solid modeling, kinematic analysis, feature modeling and top-down design.
keywords CAD/CAM
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 0f73
authors Ervin, Stephen M.
year 1990
title Designing with Diagrams: A Role for Computing in Design Education and Exploration
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 107-122
summary Environmental designers, design educators and design students using computers are a constituency with a set of requirements for database structure and flexibility, for knowledge representation and inference mechanisms, and for both graphical and non-graphical operations, that are now articulatable and to-date largely unmet. This is especially so in the area called 'preliminary' or 'schematic' design, where our requirements are related to, but different from, those of our colleagues in mechanical and electrical engineering, whose needs have dominated the notable developments in this area. One manifestation of these needs is in the peculiar form of graphics called diagrams , and the ways in which environmental designers (architects, landscape architects., urban designers) use them. Our diagrams are both similar to and different from structural, circuit, or logical diagrams in important ways. These similarities and differences yield basic insights into designing and design knowledge, and provide guidance for some necessary steps in the development of the next generation of CAD systems. Diagrams as a form of knowledge representation have received little scrutiny in the literature of graphic representation and computer graphics. In the following sections I present an overview of the theoretical basis for distinguishing and using diagrams; examine some of the computational requirements for a system of computer-aided diagramming; describe a prototype implementation called CBD (Constraint Based Diagrammer) and illustrate one example of its use; and speculate on the implications and potential applications of these ideas in computer-aided design education.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id db00
authors Espina, Jane J.B.
year 2002
title Base de datos de la arquitectura moderna de la ciudad de Maracaibo 1920-1990 [Database of the Modern Architecture of the City of Maracaibo 1920-1990]
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 133-139
summary Bases de datos, Sistemas y Redes 134The purpose of this report is to present the achievements obtained in the use of the technologies of information andcommunication in the architecture, by means of the construction of a database to register the information on the modernarchitecture of the city of Maracaibo from 1920 until 1990, in reference to the constructions located in 5 of Julio, Sectorand to the most outstanding planners for its work, by means of the representation of the same ones in digital format.The objective of this investigation it was to elaborate a database for the registration of the information on the modernarchitecture in the period 1920-1990 of Maracaibo, by means of the design of an automated tool to organize the it datesrelated with the buildings, parcels and planners of the city. The investigation was carried out considering three methodologicalmoments: a) Gathering and classification of the information of the buildings and planners of the modern architectureto elaborate the databases, b) Design of the databases for the organization of the information and c) Design ofthe consultations, information, reports and the beginning menu. For the prosecution of the data files were generated inprograms attended by such computer as: AutoCAD R14 and 2000, Microsoft Word, Microsoft PowerPoint and MicrosoftAccess 2000, CorelDRAW V9.0 and Corel PHOTOPAINT V9.0.The investigation is related with the work developed in the class of Graphic Calculation II, belonging to the Departmentof Communication of the School of Architecture of the Faculty of Architecture and Design of The University of the Zulia(FADLUZ), carried out from the year 1999, using part of the obtained information of the works of the students generatedby means of the CAD systems for the representation in three dimensions of constructions with historical relevance in themodern architecture of Maracaibo, which are classified in the work of The Other City, generating different types ofisometric views, perspectives, representations photorealistics, plants and facades, among others.In what concerns to the thematic of this investigation, previous antecedents are ignored in our environment, and beingthe first time that incorporates the digital graph applied to the work carried out by the architects of “The Other City, thegenesis of the oil city of Maracaibo” carried out in the year 1994; of there the value of this research the field of thearchitecture and computer science. To point out that databases exist in the architecture field fits and of the design, alsoweb sites with information has more than enough architects and architecture works (Montagu, 1999).In The University of the Zulia, specifically in the Faculty of Architecture and Design, they have been carried out twoworks related with the thematic one of database, specifically in the years 1995 and 1996, in the first one a system wasdesigned to visualize, to classify and to analyze from the architectural point of view some historical buildings of Maracaiboand in the second an automated system of documental information was generated on the goods properties built insidethe urban area of Maracaibo. In the world environment it stands out the first database developed in Argentina, it is the database of the Modern andContemporary Architecture “Datarq 2000” elaborated by the Prof. Arturo Montagú of the University of Buenos Aires. The general objective of this work it was the use of new technologies for the prosecution in Architecture and Design (MONTAGU, Ob.cit). In the database, he intends to incorporate a complementary methodology and alternative of use of the informationthat habitually is used in the teaching of the architecture. When concluding this investigation, it was achieved: 1) analysis of projects of modern architecture, of which some form part of the historical patrimony of Maracaibo; 2) organized registrations of type text: historical, formal, space and technical data, and graph: you plant, facades, perspectives, pictures, among other, of the Moments of the Architecture of the Modernity in the city, general data and more excellent characteristics of the constructions, and general data of the Planners with their more important works, besides information on the parcels where the constructions are located, 3)construction in digital format and development of representations photorealistics of architecture projects already built. It is excellent to highlight the importance in the use of the Technologies of Information and Communication in this investigation, since it will allow to incorporate to the means digital part of the information of the modern architecturalconstructions that characterized the city of Maracaibo at the end of the XX century, and that in the last decades they have suffered changes, some of them have disappeared, destroying leaves of the modern historical patrimony of the city; therefore, the necessity arises of to register and to systematize in digital format the graphic information of those constructions. Also, to demonstrate the importance of the use of the computer and of the computer science in the representation and compression of the buildings of the modern architecture, to inclination texts, images, mapping, models in 3D and information organized in databases, and the relevance of the work from the pedagogic point of view,since it will be able to be used in the dictation of computer science classes and history in the teaching of the University studies of third level, allowing the learning with the use in new ways of transmission of the knowledge starting from the visual information on the part of the students in the elaboration of models in three dimensions or electronic scalemodels, also of the modern architecture and in a future to serve as support material for virtual recoveries of some buildings that at the present time they don’t exist or they are almost destroyed. In synthesis, the investigation will allow to know and to register the architecture of Maracaibo in this last decade, which arises under the parameters of the modernity and that through its organization and visualization in digital format, it will allow to the students, professors and interested in knowing it in a quicker and more efficient way, constituting a contribution to theteaching in the history area and calculation. Also, it can be of a lot of utility for the development of future investigation projects related with the thematic one and restoration of buildings of the modernity in Maracaibo.
keywords database, digital format, modern architecture, model, mapping
series SIGRADI
email jacky@convergence.com.ve., jjespina@yahoo.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:51

_id 09f7
authors Goldschmidt, Gabriela
year 1990
title Serial Sketching : Feedback Mechanisms in Designing
source System Research, Informatics and Cybernetics, International Conference (5th : 1990 : Baden- Baden, Germany). For Cognition in Design Session, abbreviated paper
summary Designing is seen as a process of small-step transformations of partial images of a still non-existing entity. The ultimate objective of the process is the production of sufficiently coherent and comprehensive representations of design entity, so as to allow the construction of a visual simulation of it, physically or mentally. Sketching is universally used by designers throughout the front-edge of the process as a major tool for the generation, transformation, and representation of images. Serial sketching, often executed on consecutive layers of transparent paper, allows the designer to experiment with changes while fully controlling previous versions of an image. Feedback from each version informs subsequent transformations. This typical characteristic of design behavior is explored through on-line studies quotidian design activity and is compared to modes of production in other domains
keywords design process, cognition, sketching
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:08

_id 04aa
authors Harfmann, Anton C. and Chen, Stuart S.
year 1990
title Building Representation within a Component Based Paradigm
source From Research to Practice [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Big Sky (Montana - USA) 4-6 October 1990, pp. 117-127
summary This paper questions the use of a 2-dimensional medium to convey 3-dimensional information about design intent and proposes a computer-aided paradigm that could radically alter the way in which buildings are designed and built. The paradigm is centered about the accurate and rational representation (Rush, 86) of each individual component that makes up a building in a single, shared, computer based model. The single model approach couples the accurate physical representation of components with the accurate representation of technical information and knowledge about the assemblies of building components. It is anticipated that implementation of this approach will result in fewer communication problems that currently plague the fragmented process of practicing in the professions of architecture and engineering. The paper introduces the basic concepts within the paradigm and focuses on the development of intuitive, reasoning about the component-based design suitable for incorporation in a computer-aided setting.
series ACADIA
email HARFMAAC@UCMAIL.UC.EDU
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id c5bb
authors Hirschberg, U., Meister, M. and Neumann, F.
year 1993
title Processing of Geographic Data for CAAD-supported Analysis and Design of Urban Development Areas
source [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Eindhoven (The Netherlands) 11-13 November 1993
summary The interdisciplinary research project aims at the development of a hard- and software environment to support the representation, analysis, manipulation and design of urban development areas for architects and city planners. It was started in 1990 and involves three groups at the ETH Zurich: Architecture/Urban design - Processing of Geographic Data/Photogrammetry -Computer Sciences/CAAD. The first part of this paper will give an introduction to the goals and implications of the project by comparing it with a similar project one of the authors took part in as a student. Then the paper gives a brief description of the work of the three groups involved, an overview of the methods they employed and the results that were achieved. The main focus will be on the work of the CAAD group . Finally some conclusions are drawn and problems are discussed. The future work includes the testing of the tool by students during the winter term 1993/94.

series eCAADe
email hirschberg@tugraz.at
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id 39e0
id 39e0
authors Jablonski, Allen D.
year 1991
title Integrated Component-based Computer Design Modeling System: The Implications of Control Parameters on the Design Process
source New Jersey Institute of Technology, Newark, NJ Graduate Thesis - Master's Program College of Architecture
summary The design process is dependent on a clear order of integrating and managing all of the control parameters that impact on a building's design. All component elements of a building must be defined by their: Physical and functional relations; Quantitative and calculable properties; Component and/or system functions. This requires a means of representation to depict a model of a building that can be viewed and interpreted by a variety of interested parties. These parties need different types of representation to address their individual control parameters, as each component instance has specific implications on all of the control parameters.

Representations are prepared for periodic design review either manually through hand-drawn graphics and handcrafted models; or with the aid of computer aided design programs. Computer programs can profoundly increase the speed and accuracy of the process', as well as provide a level of integration, graphic representation and simulation, untenable through a manual process.

By maintaining a single control model in an Integrated Component-based Computer Design Modeling System (ICCDMS), interested parties could access the design model at any point during the process. Each party could either: 1. Analyze individual components, or constraints of the model, for interferences against parameters within that party's control; or 2. Explore design alternatives to modify the model, and verify the integration of the components or functions, within the design model, as allowable in relation to other control parameters.

keywords Architectural Design; Data Processing
series thesis:MSc
type extended abstract
email allenjabo@comcast.net
more http://www.library.njit.edu/etd/1990s/1990/njit-etd1990-005/njit-etd1990-005.html
last changed 2006/09/25 07:04

_id 26cb
authors Kalay, Yehuda E. and Steinfeld, Edward
year 1990
title The Impact of Computer-Aided Design on Representation in Architecture
source 1990. 24 p. : ill. includes bibliography
summary Representation can be defined as a process of abstraction and communication. Through some symbolic language, characteristics of a real or hypothetical object or experience are conveyed by one person to another. During the process of design there are two basic uses of representation: internal and external. Internal representation is used by the designer to create and transform the design in process. It is a conversation with oneself. External representations are used to communicate the evolving design to others, including others in the design team, so that it can be evaluated and criticized. Computers are used today in architecture primarily as a tool to carry on the practice of architecture as it has evolved during the recent past. The new technology has heretofore been adapted to conform to our habitual forms of representation. This paper explores how computer technology can support new methods of representation in architecture. Issues discussed include the form and content of internal computer-aided representations, loss of information due to abstraction, communication between internal and external representations, and the form and process of external representation
keywords CAD, architecture, representation
series CADline
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/06/02 08:24

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