CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 41 to 60 of 258

_id 5b34
authors Langendorf, R.
year 1992
title The 1990's: information systems and computer visualization for urban design, planning and management
source Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design 19, pp. 723-738
summary Contributed by Susan Pietsch (spietsch@arch.adelaide.edu.au)
keywords 3D City Modeling, Development Control, Design Control
series other
last changed 2001/06/04 18:38

_id e714
authors Lawrence, Roderick J.
year 1991
title SIMULATIONS OF ARCHITECTURAL PROJECTS: METHODS AND APPLICATIONS AT FULL-SCALE
source Proceedings of the 3rd European Full-Scale Modelling Conference / ISBN 91-7740044-5 / Lund (Sweden) 13-16 September 1990, pp. 53-64
summary This paper briefly examines five interrelated themes concerning the use of full-scale simulation models in architectural projects, in the context of research and professional practice. First, the meaning of design is discussed. Second, a multi-functional interpretation of building performance is presented. Third, the main reasons for simulating design projects, in general, and for using full-scale models, in particular, are summarized. Then the antecedent or prerequisite conditions for public participation to occur effectively are discussed. Finally, an overview of the use of full-scale simulation models in European workshops enables us to table four ma n classes of functions for full-scale models.
keywords Full-scale Modeling, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
email lawrence@uni2a.unige.ch
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2004/05/04 13:18

_id a33e
authors Linn, Gudrun
year 1991
title BATHROOM DESIGN AND FUNCTION ANALYSIS - BRIEF REPORTS FROM TWO RESEARCH PROJECTS
source Proceedings of the 3rd European Full-Scale Modelling Conference / ISBN 91-7740044-5 / Lund (Sweden) 13-16 September 1990, pp. 38-39
summary The problem behind this research project was the fact that Swedish standard bathrooms were (and most of them still are) difficult to clean, because of the building design. This has consequences not only for the inhabitants but also for the home helpers who assist old and disabled people in their own dwellings. The most difficult-to-clean spaces in a dwelling are the bathroom and the toilet-room. These spaces also are the most dirtied. In Sweden there of ten is a toilet in the bathroom. The aim of the project was to find out what or how much of physical agility a Swedish standard bathroom demands from the person who carries out the cleaning of it.
keywords Full-scale Modeling, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2004/05/04 13:18

_id e7a7
authors Madrazo, Leandro
year 1990
title The Integration of Computer Modeling in Architectural Design
source From Research to Practice [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Big Sky (Montana - USA) 4-6 October 1990, pp. 103-116
summary The integration of computers in architectural design is explored from the perspective of both architectural education and professional practice. The main part of this paper attempts to define the conditions necessary for an effective interaction between computers and architects in the process of design. In the second part, a specific example, developed by the author during the course of his practice, is used to illustrate the use of available systems in professional practice.
series ACADIA
email madrazo@salleURL.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id ac36
authors McCullough, Malcolm
year 1990
title Low-Threshold Modeling
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 413-426
summary This is a case study of teaching at the University of Texas at Austin. It is about using an electronic design studio to provide architecture students with their first exposure to computing. It suggests that, despite the limitations of present technology, there is reason to lower the thresholds to computer-aided design. The study presents a studio which attempted such by allowing students to find their own level of commitment to use of electronic media for geometric modeling. More generally, the paper aims to document issues presently facing the many professional schools not having substantial traditions in computer-aided design education.
series CAAD Futures
email mmmc@umich.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id 07aa
authors McIntosh, John and Pihlak, Madis
year 1990
title The Thousand-Acre Sketch Problem
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 427-440
summary An unusually large sketch problem in urban design was given to an undergraduate studio class to introduce visualization techniques and to explore fundamental urban design principles. This thousand-acre sketch problem was distributed to students on a floppy disk as a three- dimensional computer model. The availability of a large number of Macintosh IIs and access to a pre-release version of the three-dimensional modeling program ModelShop allowed us to conduct this prototype electronic studio. This paper looks at the productivity gains experienced by our students during this project and discusses the increased level of understanding witnessed in student performance. More importantly, this sketch problem is examined as a philosophical parable for several pedagogical issues of design education in the microcomputer age.
series CAAD Futures
email john.mcintosh@asu.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id 8ca2
authors Miller, Frank C.
year 1990
title Form Processing Workshop: Architectural Design and Solid Modeling at MIT
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 441-455
summary Computing impacts the preliminary architectural design process as a tool for observation and analysis, as a formal prototyping tool, and as a vehicle to generate variations of objects and assemblies. Through the use of both traditional and computing tools, the Form Processing Workshop examines the relationship between design decisions and design tools. The Workshop utilizes several software applications, with emphasis on the use of a solid modeler. This curriculum was developed with the support of MIT's Project Athena.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id 0565
authors Oxman, Robert and Oxman, Rivka
year 1990
title The Computability of Architectural Knowledge
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 171-185
summary In an important contribution to the theoretical foundation of design computing, Mitchell noted "an increasingly urgent need to establish a demonstrably sound, comprehensive, rigorously formalized theoretical foundation upon which to base practical software development efforts" (Mitchell, 1986). In this paper we propose such a theoretical framework. A basic assumption of this work is that the advancement of design computing is dependent upon the emergence of a rigorous formulation of knowledge in design. We present a model of knowledge in architectural design which suggests a promising conceptual basis for dealing with knowledge in computer-aided design systems. We require models which can represent the formal knowledge and manipulative operations of the designer in all of their complexity-that is formal models rather than just geometric models. Shape Grammars (Stiny,1980) represent an example of such models, and constitute a relatively high level of design knowledge as compared to, for example, use of symmetry operations to generate simple formal configurations. Building upon an understanding of the classes of design knowledge as the conceptual basis for formal modeling systems may contribute a new realization of the potential of the medium for design. This will require a comprehensive approach to the definition of architectural and design knowledge. We consider here the implications of a well-defined body of architectural and design knowledge for design education and the potential mutual interaction-in a knowledge-rich environment-of design learning and CAAD learning. The computational factors connected with the representation of design knowledge and its integration in design systems are among the key problems of CAAD. Mitchell's model of knowledge in design incorporates formal knowledge in a comprehensive, multi-level, hierarchical structure in which types of knowledge are correlated with computational concepts. In the main focus of this paper we present a structured, multi-level model of design knowledge which we discuss with respect to current architectural theoretical considerations. Finally, we analyze the computational and educational relevance of such models.
series CAAD Futures
email arrro01@techunix.technion.ac.il
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id avocaad_2001_19
id avocaad_2001_19
authors Shen-Kai Tang, Yu-Tung Liu, Yu-Sheng Chung, Chi-Seng Chung
year 2001
title The visual harmony between new and old materials in the restoration of historical architecture: A study of computer simulation
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In the research of historical architecture restoration, scholars respectively focus on the field of architectural context and architectural archeology (Shi, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995; Fu, 1995, 1997; Chiu, 2000) or on architecture construction and the procedure of restoration (Shi, 1988, 1989; Chiu, 1990). How to choose materials and cope with their durability becomes an important issue in the restoration of historical architecture (Dasser, 1990; Wang, 1998).In the related research of the usage and durability of materials, some scholars deem that, instead of continuing the traditional ways that last for hundreds of years (that is to replace new materials with old ones), it might be better to keep the original materials (Dasser, 1990). However, unavoidably, some of the originals are much worn. Thus we have to first establish the standard of eliminating components, and secondly to replace identical or similar materials with the old components (Lee, 1990). After accomplishing the restoration, we often unexpectedly find out that the renewed historical building is too new that the sense of history is eliminated (Dasser, 1990; Fu, 1997). Actually this is the important factor that determines the accomplishment of restoration. In the past, some scholars find out that the contrast and conflict between new and old materials are contributed to the different time of manufacture and different coating, such as antiseptic, pattern, etc., which result in the discrepancy of the sense of visual perception (Lee, 1990; Fu, 1997; Dasser, 1990).In recent years, a number of researches and practice of computer technology have been done in the field of architectural design. We are able to proceed design communication more exactly by the application of some systematic softwares, such as image processing, computer graphic, computer modeling/rendering, animation, multimedia, virtual reality and so on (Lawson, 1995; Liu, 1996). The application of computer technology to the research of the preservation of historical architecture is comparatively late. Continually some researchers explore the procedure of restoration by computer simulation technology (Potier, 2000), or establish digital database of the investigation of historical architecture (Sasada, 2000; Wang, 1998). How to choose materials by the technology of computer simulation influences the sense of visual perception. Liu (2000) has a more complete result on visual impact analysis and assessment (VIAA) about the research of urban design projection. The main subjects of this research paper focuses on whether the technology of computer simulation can extenuate the conflict between new and old materials that imposed on visual perception.The objective of this paper is to propose a standard method of visual harmony effects for materials in historical architecture (taking the Gigi Train Station destroyed by the earthquake in last September as the operating example).There are five steps in this research: 1.Categorize the materials of historical architecture and establish the information in digital database. 2.Get new materials of historical architecture and establish the information in digital database. 3.According to the mixing amount of new and old materials, determinate their proportion of the building; mixing new and old materials in a certain way. 4.Assign the mixed materials to the computer model and proceed the simulation of lighting. 5.Make experts and the citizens to evaluate the accomplished computer model in order to propose the expected standard method.According to the experiment mentioned above, we first address a procedure of material simulation of the historical architecture restoration and then offer some suggestions of how to mix new and old materials.By this procedure of simulation, we offer a better view to control the restoration of historical architecture. And, the discrepancy and discordance by new and old materials can be released. Moreover, we thus avoid to reconstructing ˇ§too newˇ¨ historical architecture.
series AVOCAAD
email tsk.aa88g@nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id avocaad_2001_20
id avocaad_2001_20
authors Shen-Kai Tang
year 2001
title Toward a procedure of computer simulation in the restoration of historical architecture
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In the field of architectural design, “visualization¨ generally refers to some media, communicating and representing the idea of designers, such as ordinary drafts, maps, perspectives, photos and physical models, etc. (Rahman, 1992; Susan, 2000). The main reason why we adopt visualization is that it enables us to understand clearly and to control complicated procedures (Gombrich, 1990). Secondly, the way we get design knowledge is more from the published visualized images and less from personal experiences (Evans, 1989). Thus the importance of the representation of visualization is manifested.Due to the developments of computer technology in recent years, various computer aided design system are invented and used in a great amount, such as image processing, computer graphic, computer modeling/rendering, animation, multimedia, virtual reality and collaboration, etc. (Lawson, 1995; Liu, 1996). The conventional media are greatly replaced by computer media, and the visualization is further brought into the computerized stage. The procedure of visual impact analysis and assessment (VIAA), addressed by Rahman (1992), is renewed and amended for the intervention of computer (Liu, 2000). Based on the procedures above, a great amount of applied researches are proceeded. Therefore it is evident that the computer visualization is helpful to the discussion and evaluation during the design process (Hall, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998; Liu, 1997; Sasada, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1993, 1997, 1998). In addition to the process of architectural design, the computer visualization is also applied to the subject of construction, which is repeatedly amended and corrected by the images of computer simulation (Liu, 2000). Potier (2000) probes into the contextual research and restoration of historical architecture by the technology of computer simulation before the practical restoration is constructed. In this way he established a communicative mode among archeologists, architects via computer media.In the research of restoration and preservation of historical architecture in Taiwan, many scholars have been devoted into the studies of historical contextual criticism (Shi, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995; Fu, 1995, 1997; Chiu, 2000). Clues that accompany the historical contextual criticism (such as oral information, writings, photographs, pictures, etc.) help to explore the construction and the procedure of restoration (Hung, 1995), and serve as an aid to the studies of the usage and durability of the materials in the restoration of historical architecture (Dasser, 1990; Wang, 1998). Many clues are lost, because historical architecture is often age-old (Hung, 1995). Under the circumstance, restoration of historical architecture can only be proceeded by restricted pictures, written data and oral information (Shi, 1989). Therefore, computer simulation is employed by scholars to simulate the condition of historical architecture with restricted information after restoration (Potier, 2000). Yet this is only the early stage of computer-aid restoration. The focus of the paper aims at exploring that whether visual simulation of computer can help to investigate the practice of restoration and the estimation and evaluation after restoration.By exploring the restoration of historical architecture (taking the Gigi Train Station destroyed by the earthquake in last September as the operating example), this study aims to establish a complete work on computer visualization, including the concept of restoration, the practice of restoration, and the estimation and evaluation of restoration.This research is to simulate the process of restoration by computer simulation based on visualized media (restricted pictures, restricted written data and restricted oral information) and the specialized experience of historical architects (Potier, 2000). During the process of practicing, communicates with craftsmen repeatedly with some simulated alternatives, and makes the result as the foundation of evaluating and adjusting the simulating process and outcome. In this way we address a suitable and complete process of computer visualization for historical architecture.The significance of this paper is that we are able to control every detail more exactly, and then prevent possible problems during the process of restoration of historical architecture.
series AVOCAAD
email tsk.aa88g@nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 2105
authors Sirikasem, Peerapong and Degelman, Larry 0.
year 1990
title The Use of Video-Computer Presentation Techniques to Aid in Communication Between Architect and Client
source From Research to Practice [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Big Sky (Montana - USA) 4-6 October 1990, pp. 205-216
summary In an attempt to enhance the communication between architect and client, research was conducted in the use of computer modeling and video imaging techniques for the final architectural presentation process. By superimposing the painted building design from the CAD system onto a digitized image of the intended location, a composite image was achieved. These techniques have advantages in creating a realistic composite image of a proposed building design in its intended location within a short period of time. In order to provide more visual clues, a multiple view presentation format using a series of selected views (multiple views) was used. In addition, the research had further attempted to present the video- computer presentation in an animation sequence. The animation presentations were evaluated by comparing them with the multiple view presentations. Manual rendering and single viewpoint displays were also included in the comparisons in order to validate the results. Questionnaires were used to measure the capability of each presentation format to communicate the intended information to the audiences. The experiments were conducted with non-architecture subject groups in the local Bryan/College Station area.
series ACADIA
email l-degelman@neo.tamu.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id c767
authors Sirikasem, Peerapong
year 1990
title Video-Computer Imaging Techniques: the Effect of Presentation by Animation and Multiple Views on Comnnunicative Effectiveness of an Architectural Design
source Texas A&M University
summary In an attempt to enhance the communication between architect and client, research was conducted in the use of computer modeling and video imaging techniques for the final architectural presentation process. By superimposing the painted building design from the computer-aided design (CAD) system onto a digitized image of the intended location, a composite image was achieved. These techniques have advantages in creating realistic composite images of proposed building designs in their intended location within a short period of time. In order to provide more visual clues, a multiple view presentation was examined. In addition, the research attempted to present the video-computer in an animation sequence. This was done by creating a series of sequential composite images, and recording them frame by frame onto the video tape. Then, the animation presentation was played back in real time. The animation presentations were evaluated by comparing them with the multiple view presentations. Manual rendering and single viewpoint displays were also included in the comparisons in order to aid in interpretation of the results. Questionnaires were used to measure the capability of each presentation format in communicating the building design information to non-architecturally trained persons. The results indicate that video-computer presentations were equal to or better than manual rendering. The video-computer presentations, with their short production time, were more practical to use in the architectural process than the conventional presentations. The results of the comparisons revealed that video-computer presentations in animation format were superior to those of multiple view format in the depth cue category. On the other hand, video-computer presentations by multiple view format was found to be superior to animation format in communicating both size and scale. These results occurred under the different complexity levels of the buildings used.  
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id e17f
authors Turner, J.A., Tsou, J.-Y. and Prayoonhong, C.
year 1990
title Information Modeling Applied to Cost and Energy Analysis During the Early Stages of Building Design
source International Conference Proceedings on Systems Research (5th. : 1990 ). [6] p. : ill. includes bibliography
summary The evaluation of design solutions by computer can only be achieved if the information describing the building design is in a form accessible by the computer. This not only demands that the data is in a machine-readable form, but that the data is logically organized, classified, and grouped so that its 'knowledge' can be found, extracted, used and modified by the variety of external sources. The article presents applications of information modeling to the design of knowledge bases to support design cost control and energy analysis
keywords knowledge base, systems, analysis, architecture, energy, information, modeling, cost, evaluation
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 12:41

_id 7a4c
authors Turner, James A. and Hall, Theodore W.
year 1990
title An Application of Geometric Modeling and Ray Tracing to the Visual and Acoustical Analysis of a Municipal Open-Air Auditorium
source From Research to Practice edited by J. Peter Jordan, pp. 173-185, Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture
summary The APRL of The University of Michigan was recently contracted to develop geometric models of a large open-air auditorium on the Detroit River to facilitate computer aided visual and acoustical analysis. This paper is a summary of the approaches taken to construct solid and surface models of the auditorium, and to develop general software for acoustical simulation. The project was a cooperative effort between: faculty and students of the APRL; Kent L. Hubbell Architects, a local architecture office; Robert Darvas Associates, a local structural engineering firm; and OC Birdair.
series other
email turner@umich.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 2bb6
authors Van Bakergem, Dave
year 1990
title Image Collections in the Design Studio
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 261-271
summary No matter what the medium, architects are constantly using images in all aspects of design thinking. Whether it is the perception of the environment, an image in the mind's eye, an abstract drawing or a photographic record, designers use images to conceive of, and manipulate their design ideas. Managing these image collections occurs at a variety of levels in the creative process and is dependent on the type of image that is called upon for reference. The most basic example would be the image collection residing in the mind's memory which is a result of the designer’s world experiences and the relative impressiveness of each experience. Clearly, personal memory plays a significant role in the use of imagery in design, but it is unreliable and can be abstracted in uncontrollable ways. The sketchbook and later photographic collections of the grand tour were the beginnings of efforts to manage and utilize image collections as an aid to drawing and thinking about design. Now the capacity to use electronic means of creating, altering, storing, and retrieving images will enable designers to effectively use large image collections in ways that have not been possible before. This paper describes current work at the School of Architecture at Washington University in a graduate design studio. The students use a powerful 3D modeling CAD system (HOKDraw) to design and present their studio projects. In addition, we are experimenting with an image storage and retrieval system which is directly linked to the CAD model through a relational database (INGRES). Access to the database and images is instantly available through the command language and graphic display. The CAD model in effect becomes a 3D menu to an extensive image database stored on an optical memory disc recorder. Several collections are available to the studio members: the library's slide collection which relates to the studio project, specific photographs and drawings of the project site, and personal image collections stored by individuals for their own reference. The commonly accessible images are basically background material and images collected by the students to document the site, urban context and building typology. The personal images collections are any images (drawings, photographs, published images, CAD images) created or collected by the students for purposes of informing their design thinking. This work relates to the use of precedents and typology in architecture as a point of departure as well as in development of design ideas.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id 5447
authors Van Pelt, Robert-Jan and Seebohm, Thomas
year 1990
title Of Computer Memory and Human Remembrance: History of Urban Form Through Three-Dimensional Computer Modeling
source From Research to Practice [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Big Sky (Montana - USA) 4-6 October 1990, pp. 45-59
summary After a discussion of the problematic relationship between architectural history, computer aided design and the design studio, a course is described which provides an overview of the history of urban form through readings and three-dimensional modeling by computer. One objective of the course was to model a hypothetical, archaic Greek city on a hypothetical but realistic site and to transform the model of that city through time to the 20th century. An overview is given of the computer modeling techniques, of the successes and failures of the first offering of the course and of suggestions for improving future offerings of the course.
series ACADIA
email tseebohm@fes.uwaterloo.ca
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id 63ad
authors Wang, Chao-Jen
year 1999
title Architectural Design Thinking in Virtual Reality
source CAADRIA '99 [Proceedings of The Fourth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 7-5439-1233-3] Shanghai (China) 5-7 May 1999, pp. 71-80
summary Throughout the history of the development of architectural design, from the use of planar representations to three-dimensional media using prespective and physical models, up to the present application of computer drafting, computer modeling, animation and other new design media, drawing has traditionally been used by designers to carry out the most basic design reasoning. Through discussion by Bridges and Charitos (1997, pp. 143), virtual reality (VR) has become a new design medium used by designers. Given that different media lead to different phenomena in design reasoning (Mitchell, 1990), this paper probes into differences in the attributes of design reasoning derived from traditional drawing and those observed when virtual reality is used to perform design tasks.
series CAADRIA
email jerryjan@iaa.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2000/01/13 10:09

_id e8ec
authors Weber, Benz
year 1991
title LEARNING FROM THE FULL-SCALE LABORATORY
source Proceedings of the 3rd European Full-Scale Modelling Conference / ISBN 91-7740044-5 / Lund (Sweden) 13-16 September 1990, pp. 12-19
summary The team from the LEA at Lausanne was not actually involved in the construction of the laboratory itself. During the past five years we have been discovering the qualities and limitations of the lab step by step through the experiments we performed. The method in which we use it is quite different from that of its creators. Since 1985 the external services has been limited to clients coming to the laboratory alone. We help them only with basic instructions for the use of the equipment. Most of these experiments are motivated by the excellent possibilities to discuss the design of a new hospital or home for elderly with the people directly affected by it, such as patients, nurses, doctors and specialists for the technical equipment. The main issues discussed in these meetings are of the dimensions and functional organisation of the spaces. The entire process for a normal room including construction, discussions and dismantling of the full-scale model is between three and five days. Today these types of experiments are occupying the lab only about twenty days a year.
keywords Full-scale Modeling, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2004/05/04 13:23

_id caadria2006_573
id caadria2006_573
authors WEN-YEN TANG, SHENG-KAI TANG
year 2006
title THE DEVELOPMENT OF A TACTILE MODELING INTERFACE
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 573-575
summary Recently, more and more researchers dedicated in the development of human computer interaction for CAD systems, such as gestural input of three dimensional coordinates (Lee, Hu, and Selker, 2005), flexible manipulation of NURBS objects (Cohen, Markosian, Zeleznik, Hughes, and Barzel, 1999; Emmerik, 1990), and the creation of force feedback (Wu, 2003). These research results indicated that the more intuitive control the device can provide in modeling process, the more creative solutions can be generated (Lee, Hu, and Selker, 2005; Schweikardt and Gross, 2000; Wu, 2003).
series CAADRIA
email sp297922@giga.net.tw, tonytang@cmu.edu
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id e1f9
authors Carini, A., Apollonio, F. And Tolomellia, A.
year 1992
title RESEARCH ACTIVITY 1990-92 AT THE L.T.N.-OIKOS BOLOGNA: EUROPAN AND BARRIER-FREE BATHROOMS
source Proceedings of the 4rd European Full-Scale Modelling Conference / Lausanne (Switzerland) 9-12 September 1992, Part A, pp. 31-42
summary During the three year period 1990-1992, the research activity carried out in the Typological Laboratory has been focused on two specific themes: flexibility and typological innovation in dwelling-areas and features of the bathroom for disabled users. These themes reflect two among the chief subjects calling the attention of the Residential Building Committee of the Ministry of Public Works to which - as everybody knows - the Laboratory is subordinated. Both themes have been approached through specific application pro rams which took as reference points, respectively, the Programm of EUROPAN Competitions and the proposals for bringing up to date.
keywords Full-scale Modeling, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2004/05/04 13:29

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