CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id 439f
authors Galle, Per
year 1990
title A language of Abstract Floor Plans
source Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design. 1990. vol. 17: pp. 173-204 : ill. includes bibliography
summary Theoretical and experimental results from the implementation of a system for computer-aided floor-plan design are reported. The system is based on a potentially exhaustive search for solutions that satisfy user-specified constraints, but the paper concentrates on techniques for limiting and guiding the search. The emphasis is on two aspects of floor-plan design: the use of a formalized concept of sketching, and the language in which design constraints are specified by the user. A well-defined concept of abstract draft plans is achieved by limiting corner coordinates to intervals, rather than single numbers. Mathematical properties of draft and their defining constraints as derived from the user's constraints are outlined, and the role of drafts in computer- aided floor plan design is investigated and illustrated by examples. The specification language is based on a small set of primitives whose combined power of expression is also illustrated. The syntax and semantics of the language are formally defined (in two appendices), and the importance of careful development of languages for future design automation is pointed out
keywords floor plans, design, CAD, architecture, automation, synthesis, combinatorics, layout
series CADline
last changed 1999/02/12 14:08

_id eb5f
authors Al-Sallal, Khaled A. and Degelman, Larry 0.
year 1994
title A Hypermedia Model for Supporting Energy Design in Buildings
source Reconnecting [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-03-9] Washington University (Saint Louis / USA) 1994, pp. 39-49
summary Several studies have discussed the limitations of the available CAAD tools and have proposed solutions [Brown and Novitski 1987, Brown 1990, Degelman and Kim 1988, Schuman et al 1988]. The lack of integration between the different tasks that these programs address and the design process is a major problem. Schuman et al [1988] argued that in architectural design many issues must be considered simultaneously before the synthesis of a final product can take place. Studies by Brown and Novitski [1987] and Brown [1990] discussed the difficulties involved with integrating technical considerations in the creative architectural process. One aspect of the problem is the neglect of technical factors during the initial phase of the design that, as the authors argued, results from changing the work environment and the laborious nature of the design process. Many of the current programs require the user to input a great deal of numerical values that are needed for the energy analysis. Although there are some programs that attempt to assist the user by setting default values, these programs distract the user with their extensive arrays of data. The appropriate design tool is the one that helps the user to easily view the principal components of the building design and specify their behaviors and interactions. Data abstraction and information parsimony are the key concepts in developing a successful design tool. Three different approaches for developing an appropriate CAAD tool were found in the literature. Although there are several similarities among them, each is unique in solving certain aspects of the problem. Brown and Novitski [1987] emphasize the learning factor of the tool as well as its highly graphical user interface. Degelman and Kim [1988] emphasize knowledge acquisition and the provision of simulation modules. The Windows and Daylighting Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) emphasizes the dynamic structuring of information, the intelligent linking of data, the integrity of the different issues of design and the design process, and the extensive use of images [Schuman et al 19881, these attributes incidentally define the word hypermedia. The LBL model, which uses hypermedia, seems to be the more promising direction for this type of research. However, there is still a need to establish a new model that integrates all aspects of the problem. The areas in which the present research departs from the LBL model can be listed as follows: it acknowledges the necessity of regarding the user as the center of the CAAD tool design, it develops a model that is based on one of the high level theories of human-computer interaction, and it develops a prototype tool that conforms to the model.

series ACADIA
email l-degelman@neo.tamu.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 68c8
authors Flemming, U., Coyne, R. and Fenves, S. (et al.)
year 1994
title SEED: A Software Environment to Support the Early Phases in Building Design
source Proceeding of IKM '94, Weimar, Germany, pp. 5-10
summary The SEED project intends to develop a software environment that supports the early phases in building design (Flemming et al., 1993). The goal is to provide support, in principle, for the preliminary design of buildings in all aspects that can gain from computer support. This includes using the computer not only for analysis and evaluation, but also more actively for the generation of designs, or more accurately, for the rapid generation of design representations. A major motivation for the development of SEED is to bring the results of two multi-generational research efforts focusing on `generative' design systems closer to practice: 1. LOOS/ABLOOS, a generative system for the synthesis of layouts of rectangles (Flemming et al., 1988; Flemming, 1989; Coyne and Flemming, 1990; Coyne, 1991); 2. GENESIS, a rule-based system that supports the generation of assemblies of 3-dimensional solids (Heisserman, 1991; Heisserman and Woodbury, 1993). The rapid generation of design representations can take advantage of special opportunities when it deals with a recurring building type, that is, a building type dealt with frequently by the users of the system. Design firms - from housing manufacturers to government agencies - accumulate considerable experience with recurring building types. But current CAD systems capture this experience and support its reuse only marginally. SEED intends to provide systematic support for the storing and retrieval of past solutions and their adaptation to similar problem situations. This motivation aligns aspects of SEED closely with current work in Artificial Intelligence that focuses on case-based design (see, for example, Kolodner, 1991; Domeshek and Kolodner, 1992; Hua et al., 1992).
series other
email ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 417a
authors Cipriani, R., Lagomarsino, A.D., Stagnaro, A., Valenti, E. and Sambolino, T.
year 1990
title Some Years' Experience Teaching CAAD
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 347-361
summary In the conventional way of teaching architecture, it is common to think of design as the final synthesis of an intellectual process (composizione in Italian) integrating different elements from different curriculum subjects: history, structural analysis., technology, regional and urban planning, and so on. These elements, being comprehensive of their specific domains, together build the project. This process is supported by a long traditional that cannot easily be modified; however, we must not consider it to be the only one. Architectural practice should be much more. The Scuole di Architettura has walked a long and difficult road in the last thirty years., with a significant widening of interest in social, political, and economic issues. There have been recurring attempts at epistemological reformulation in some areas. There has been an acknowledgment of a crisis in contemporary town planning and a dimming of several certitudes that had developed with the birth and growth of the modernist school. And there has been a weakening of the promises that had given life to the vigorous discussion about town and regional planning. All of this leads to a reconsideration of the meaning and the deeper assumptions that the project implies, a question mark at the center of the human sciences that architectural practice involves. The old tradition., which assigned composition a central role in the project, is no longer sufficient because it is related to a reductive reading of epistemology that views human sciences as defining segments of physical knowledge of the actual world. Contemporary reflection on the difference between understanding and unfolding, together with the attention given to interpreting a moment as compared to purely describing one, gives to the project the task of inquiry instead of solution.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id 45b4
authors Coyne, Richard D.
year 1990
title Logic of Design Actions
source Knowledge Based Systems. 1990. vol. 3: pp. 242-257
summary The way in which knowledge about design can be incorporated into knowledge-based design systems is discussed and demonstrated within the framework of an overall logical/ linguistic model of the design process. The technique of hierarchical planning is discussed within this framework. The domain under consideration is that of spatial layout in buildings
keywords space allocation, logic, design process, knowledge base, planning
series CADline
email Richard.Coyne@ed.ac.uk
last changed 2003/05/17 08:13

_id 2ccd
authors Kalisperis, Loukas N.
year 1994
title 3D Visualization in Design Education
source Reconnecting [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-03-9] Washington University (Saint Louis / USA) 1994, pp. 177-184
summary It has been said that "The beginning of architecture is empty space." (Mitchell 1990) This statement typifies a design education philosophy in which the concepts of space and form are separated and defined respectively as the negative and positive of the physical world, a world where solid objects exist and void-the mere absence of substance-is a surrounding atmospheric emptiness. Since the beginning of the nineteenth century, however, there has been an alternative concept of space as a continuum: that there is a continuously modified surface between the pressures of form and space in which the shape of the space in our lungs is directly connected to the shape of the space within which we exist. (Porter 1979). The nature of the task of representing architecture alters to reflect the state of architectural understanding at each period of time. The construction of architectural space and form represents a fundamental achievement of humans in their environment and has always involved effort and materials requiring careful planning, preparation, and forethought. In architecture there is a necessary conversion to that which is habitable, experiential, and functional from an abstraction in an entirely different medium. It is often an imperfect procedure that centers on the translation rather than the actual design. Design of the built environment is an art of distinctions within the continuum of space, for example: between solid and void, interior and exterior, light and dark, or warm and cold. It is concerned with the physical organization and articulation of space. The amount and shape of the void contained and generated by the building create the fabric and substance of the built environment. Architecture as a design discipline, therefore, can be considered as a creative expression of the coexistence of form and space on a human scale. As Frank Ching writes in Architecture: Form, Space, and Order, "These elements of form and space are the critical means of architecture. While the utilitarian concerns of function and use can be relatively short lived, and symbolic interpretations can vary from age to age, these primary elements of form and space comprise timeless and fundamental vocabulary of the architectural designer." (1979)

series ACADIA
email lnk@email.psu.edu
last changed 2000/03/13 19:27

_id c903
authors Mark, Earl
year 1990
title Case Studies in Moviemaking and Computer-Aided Design
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 393-412
summary A movie which is developed from site location video, sync sound, and computer graphics animation can provide a highly convincing simulation of reality. A movie that conveys a sense of the space, materials and juxtaposition of objects of a proposed architectural design provides a special kind of realism, where the representation may be of a proposed building that exists only within the mind of an architect. For an experienced architect, however, the movie may not provide a good surrogate experience for what it feels like to actually be within the architectural space. In these case studies, a few projects that combine moviemaking and computer-aided design technologies are examined. These projects were completed using a combination of resources at the MIT School of Architecture and Planning and the Harvard Graduate School of Design. The integrated use of these media is presented as conceptualized with the Electronic Design Studio, a research project that has been supported over the past five years by Project Athena at MIT. The impact of movies and computer-aided design on the perception of architectural space is also reported- based on a pilot study of twenty architectural students.
series CAAD Futures
email ejmark@virginia.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id 2a8b
authors Purcell, Patrick and Applebaum Dan
year 1990
title Light Table: An Interface To Visual Information Systems
source The Electronic Design Studio: Architectural Knowledge and Media in the Computer Era [CAAD Futures ‘89 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-262-13254-0] Cambridge (Massachusetts / USA), 1989, pp. 229-238
summary A primary aim of the Light Table project was to see if a combination of the optical laser disc, local area networks, and interactive videographic workstation technology could bring a major visual collection, (such as the Rotch Visual Collections of the Massachusetts Institute of Technology), to a campuswide population of undergraduate users. VIS (Visual Information System) is the name being given to the new genre of information technology. Much research and development effort is currently being applied to areas where the image has a special significance, for example in architecture and planning, in graphic and fine arts, in biology, in medicine, and in photography. One particular advance in the technology of VIS has been the facility to access visual information across a distributed computer system via LAN (Local Area Networks) and video delivery systems, (such as campus TV cable). This advance allows users to retrieve images from both local and remote sources, dispatching the image search through the LAN, and receiving the images back at their workstation via dedicated channels on the campus TV cable. Light Table is the title of a system that acts as a computer-based interactive videographic interface to a variety of visual information systems described in the body of this paper. It takes its name from the traditional, back- lit, translucent light table that lecturers use to assemble and view collections of slides for talks and seminars. The component of Light Table which is being reported in greatest detail here, a software outcome called Galatea, is a versatile and robust system capable of controlling video devices in a networked environment.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/03 15:58

_id ddss9503
id ddss9503
authors Wineman, Jean and Serrato, Margaret
year 1994
title Visual and Spatial Analysis in Office Design
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary The demands for rapid response to complex problems, flexibility, and other characteristics of today's workplace, such as a highly trained work force, have led many organizations to move from strict hierarchical structures to a more flexible project team organization. The organizational structure is broader and flatter, with greater independence given to organizational units, in this case the project teams. To understand the relationship between project team communication patterns and the design and layout of team space, a study was conducted of an architectural office before and after a move to new space. The study involved three project teams. Information was collected on individual communication patterns; perceptions of the ease of communication; and the effectiveness of the design and layout of physical space to support these communications. In order to provide guidance for critical decision-making in design, these communication data were correlated with a series of measures for the specification of team space enclosure and layout. These group/team space measures were adaptations of existing measures of individual work space, and included an enclosure measure, based on an enclosure measure developed by Stokols (1990); a measure of visual field, based on the "isovist" fields of Benedikt (1979); and an "integration" measure, based on the work of Hillier and Hanson (1984). Results indicate both linear and non-linear relationships between interaction patterns and physical space measures. This work is the initial stage of a research program to define a set of specific physical measures to guide the design of supportive work space for project teams and work groups within various types of organizations.
series DDSS
email jean.winem@arch.gatech.edu
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 64b2
authors Brown, G. Z.
year 1990
title Desirable Interface Characteristics of Knowledge-Based Energy Software Used by Architects
source March, 1990. 14 p. : ill. includes bibliography
summary This paper describes ongoing research projects on the development of user interfaces for energy software to be used by architects. The paper takes the position that the goal of knowledge-based design software should be to help the architect to visualize the unimagined. In order to approach this goal the unique characteristics of the architectural design process must be understood and used in the creation of software. The two characteristics discussed are: the architectural design process emphasizes synthesis rather than analysis, and the symbols used to transmit knowledge are primarily graphic abstractions rather than alpha-numeric abstractions
keywords user interface, architecture, design process, knowledge base, software, energy
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 5509
authors Koutamanis, Alexandros
year 1990
title Development of a computerized handbook of architectural plans
source Delft University of Technology
summary The dissertation investigates an approach to the development of visual / spatial computer representations for architectural purposes through the development of the computerized handbook of architectural plans (chap), a knowledge-based computer system capable of recognizing the metric properties of architectural plans. This investigation can be summarized as an introduction of computer vision to the computerization of architectural representations: chap represents an attempt to automate recognition of the most essential among conventional architectural drawings, floor plans. The system accepts as input digitized images of architectural plans and recognizes their spatial primitives (locations) and their spatial articulation on a variety of abstraction levels. The final output of chap is a description of the plan in terms of the grouping formations detected in its spatial articulation. The overall structure of the description is based on an analysis of its conformity to the formal rules of its “stylistic” context (which in the initial version of chap is classical architecture). Chapter 1 suggests that the poor performance of computerized architectural drawing and design systems is among others evidence of the necessity to computerize visual / spatial architectural representations. A recognition system such as chap offers comprehensive means for the investigation of a methodology for the development and use of such representations. Chapter 2 describes a fundamental task of chap: recognition of the position and shape of locations, the atomic parts of the description of an architectural plan in chap. This operation represents the final and most significant part of the first stage in processing an image input in machine environment. Chapter 3 moves to the next significant problem, recognition of the spatial arrangement of locations in an architectural plan, that is, recognition of grouping relationships that determine the subdivision of a plan into parts. In the absence of systematic and exhaustive typologic studies of classical architecture that would allow us to define a repertory of the location group types possible in classical architectural plans, Chapter 3 follows a bottom-up approach based on grouping relationships derived from elementary architectural knowledge and formalized with assistance from Gestalt theory and its antecedents. The grouping process described in Chapter 3 corresponds both in purpose and in structure to the derivation of a description of an image in computer vision [Marr 1982]. Chapter 4 investigates the well-formedness of the description of a classical architectural plan in an analytical manner: each relevant level (or sublevel) of the classical canon according to Tzonis & Lefaivre [1986] is transformed into a single group of criteria of well-formedness which is investigated independently. The hierarchical structure of the classical canon determines the coordination of these criteria into a sequence of cognitive filters which progressively analyses the correspondence of the descriptions derived as in Chapter 3 to the constraints of the canon. The methodology and techniques presented in the dissertation are primarily considered with respect to chap, a specific recognition system. The resulting specification of chap gives a measure of the use of such a system within the context of a computerized collection of architectural precedents and also presents several extensions to other areas of architecture. Although these extensions are not considered as verifiable claims, Chapter 5 describes some of their implications, including on the role of architectural drawing in computerized design systems, on architectural typologies, and on the nature and structure of generative systems in architecture.
series thesis:PhD
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 0b62
authors Maher, Mary Lou
year 1990
title Process Models for Design Synthesis
source AI Magazine. 1990. vol. 11: pp. 49-58
summary Models of design processes provide guidance in the development of knowledge-based systems for design. The basis for such models comes from both research in design theory and methodology as well as problem solving in artificial intelligence. Three models are presented: decomposition, case-based reasoning, and transformation. Each model provides a formalism for representing design knowledge and experience in distinct and complementary forms
keywords design process, knowledge base, systems, theory, decomposition, representation, reasoning
series CADline
email mary@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/05/17 08:19

_id sigradi2007_af89
id sigradi2007_af89
authors Rodrigues, Gelly; Gabriela Celani
year 2007
title Cognitive modeling of the creative process in architecture by means of the object-oriented programming technique [Modelagem cognitiva do processo criativo em arquitetura por meio da técnica de programação orientada a objetos]
source SIGraDi 2007 - [Proceedings of the 11th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] México D.F. - México 23-25 October 2007, pp. 275-279
summary The aim of this research was to investigate the relationship between the object-oriented paradigm and the design process in architecture. The work was inspired by Mitchell´s (1990) comparison between architectural types and classes of objects. An analogy was set between the development of classes and the structuring of design problems based on architectural typologies. The method was then compared to Alexander´s (1964) in terms of levels of abstraction. Two classes were implemented, illustrating the application of the object-oriented paradigm in architectural design. The method developed is expected to help architects develop a new understanding of the design process.
keywords Design process; design method; object-oriented programming
series SIGRADI
email gelly@fec.unicamp.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:59

_id ecaade2015_37
id ecaade2015_37
authors Forster, Julia; Fritz, Sara, Schleicher, Johannes and Rab, Nikolaus
year 2015
title Developer Tools for Smart Approaches to Responsible-Minded Planning Strategies
source Martens, B, Wurzer, G, Grasl T, Lorenz, WE and Schaffranek, R (eds.), Real Time - Proceedings of the 33rd eCAADe Conference - Volume 1, Vienna University of Technology, Vienna, Austria, 16-18 September 2015, pp. 545-551
wos WOS:000372317300059
summary The city of Vienna follows a long-term initiative to become a Smart City. Within 2050 it aims to reduce 80% of the CO2 emissions (in comparison to 1990) and looks forward to generate ways for a sustainable energy production. (Smart City Framework Strategy 2014) Reaching this targets requires a complex planning process which involves interdisciplinary stakeholders and decision makers. An interactive multi-dimensional environment, comprising spatial objects and data models, is a helpful tool during these planning processes. This paper proposes a suitable path for the development of a structural framework for such an environment. The benefits of such an environment are shown in detail, based on an application of the economic solar heat potential in Vienna.
series eCAADe
email julia.forster@tuwien.ac.at
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id c0a3
authors Harfmann, Anton C. and Chen, Stuart S.
year 1989
title Component Based Computer Aided Learning for Students of Architecture and Civil Engineering
source New Ideas and Directions for the 1990’s [ACADIA Conference Proceedings] Gainsville (Florida - USA) 27-29 October 1989, pp. 193-208
summary The paper describes the methodology and the current efforts to develop an interdisciplinary computer aided learning system for architects and civil engineers. The system being developed incorporates a component oriented relational database with an existing interactive 3-dimensional modeling system developed in the School of Architecture and Planning at SUNY Buffalo. The software will be used in existing courses in architecture and civil engineering as a teaching aid to help students understand the complex 3-dimensional interrelationships of structural components. Initial implementation has focused on the modeling of the components and assemblies for a lowrise steel frame structure. Current implementation efforts are focusing on the capability to view connections in various ways including the ability to "explode" a connection to better understand the sequence of construction and load paths. Appropriate codes, limit states of failure and specific data will be linked to each specific component in an expert system shell so that the system can offer feedback about a student generated connection and perhaps offer other possible connections a library of standard connections. Future expansion of the system will include adding other "systems" of a building, such as mechanical, electrical, plumbing, enclosure etc., to help students visualize the integration of the various parts.
series ACADIA
email HARFMAAC@UCMAIL.UC.EDU
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id c3f1
authors Jackson, Daniel M.
year 1990
title Electronic Telecommunications and the Emergence ofGlobal Architecture
source School of Architecture and Planning, State University of New York at Buffalo
summary The act of communicating is an organizational behavior which can be learned and modified to create the most efficient environment for the exchange of information. A state of effective communication relies not only upon its methods but also upon its underlying state of organization. In utilizing the computer to decrease the obstruction of time and distance, the profession can accelerate and become more efficient in communicating on the three most basic levels of information and thought transfer: (1) between the architect and the client; (2) between the architect and the design team (whether they are within the same office or are distant consultants); and (3) between the constantly growing and universally accessible sources of both specific and general knowledge and data bases. The use of the computer as a tool for instantaneous access to knowledge pools, clients and other professionals poses several questions which should be of great concern within the architectural community which has become compartmentalized. This paper explores how the computer can aid the architect in communication amongst peers, with the client, and eventually, with the builder and user. Furthermore, this paper proposes a 'global network' or 'global office' as an extension of current practice wherein the architect's entire scope of design knowledge is broadened.

[Citation from CADLine]

keywords Architecture; Communication; Information; Practice
series thesis:MSc
last changed 2002/12/14 18:17

_id 06e1
authors Keul, Alexander
year 1996
title LOST IN SPACE? ARCHITECTURAL PSYCHOLOGY - PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE
source Full-Scale Modeling in the Age of Virtual Reality [6th EFA-Conference Proceedings]
summary A methodological review by Kaminski (1995) summed up five perspectives in environmental psychology - patterns of spatial distribution, everyday “jigsaw puzzles”, functional everyday action systems, sociocultural change and evolution of competence. Architectural psychology (named so at the Strathclyde conference 1969; Canter, 1973) as psychology of built environments is one leg of environmental psychology, the second one being psychology of environmental protection. Architectural psychology has come of age and passed its 25th birthday. Thus, a triangulation of its position, especially in Central Europe, seems interesting and necessary. A recent survey mainly on university projects in German-speaking countries (Kruse & Trimpin, 1995) found a marked decrease of studies in psychology of built environments. 1994, 25% of all projects were reported in this category, which in 1975 had made up 40% (Kruse, 1975). Guenther, in an unpublished survey of BDP (association of professional German psychologists) members, encountered only a handful active in architectural psychology - mostly part-time, not full-time. 1996, Austria has two full-time university specialists. The discrepancy between the general interest displayed by planners and a still low institutionalization is noticeable.

How is the research situation? Using several standard research data banks, the author collected articles and book(chapter)s on architectural psychology in German- and English-language countries from 1990 to 1996. Studies on main architecture-psychology interface problems such as user needs, housing quality evaluations, participatory planning and spatial simulation / virtual reality did not outline an “old, settled” discipline, but rather the sketchy, random surface of a field “always starting anew”. E.g., discussions at the 1995 EAEA-Conference showed that several architectural simulation studies since 1973 caused no major impact on planner's opinions (Keul&Martens, 1996). “Re-inventions of the wheel” are caused by a lack of meetings (except this one!) and of interdisciplinary infrastructure in German-language countries (contrary to Sweden or the United States). Social pressures building up on architecture nowadays by inter-European competition, budget cuts and citizen activities for informed consent in most urban projects are a new challenge for planners to cooperate efficiently with social scientists. At Salzburg, the author currently manages the Corporate Design-process for the Chamber of Architecture, Division for Upper Austria and Salzburg. A “working group for architectural psychology” (Keul-Martens-Maderthaner) has been active since 1994.

keywords Model Simulation, Real Environments
series EAEA
type normal paper
email alexander.keul@sbg.ac.at
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id maver_105
id maver_105
authors Maver, Thomas W.
year 1994
title Information Technology in Design: A Perspective
source Journal of Housing, Building and Planning, vol 1, 0218-6536
summary In October 1990 a small group of people met at Ross Priory on the shores of Loch Lomond in Scotland to celebrate 21 years of computer aided building design. The calloboration- called CAAD Comes of Age - took the form of a seminar with papers presented by academics and design practitioners whose experience of this subject spanned these formative years during which the subject has grown from the minority time interest of a few eccentric academics into a multi- billion dollar business A number of the papers and much of the discussion focused on what had transpired over the 21 year period and how the evolution of the subject corresponded to the predictions which had been made at various times in the past This paper gathers together some of the perceptions which emerged from the event.
series other
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/09/03 13:36

_id maver_097
id maver_097
authors Maver, Thomas W.
year 1994
title Information Technology in Design: A Perspective
source Journal of Housing, Building and Planning, vol 1, 0218-6536
summary In October 1990 a small group of people met at Ross Priory on the shores of Loch Lomond in Scotland to celebrate 21 years of computer aided building design. The calloboration- called CAAD Comes of Age - took the form of a seminar with papers presented by academics and design practitioners whose experience of this subject spanned these formative years during which the subject has grown from the minority time interest of a few eccentric academics into a multi- billion dollar business A number of the papers and much of the discussion focused on what had transpired over the 21 year period and how the evolution of the subject corresponded to the predictions which had been made at various times in the past This paper gathers together some of the perceptions which emerged from the event.
series other
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/09/03 13:01

_id 2a19
authors Mumayiz, S. A. and Jain, Rajendra K.
year 1990
title Interactive Airport Landside Simulation: An Object-Oriented Approach
source August, 1990. 30 p. : ill. Includes bibliography
summary This paper intends to explore the different aspects in the design and implementation of an airport land side simulation model. Major features and properties of objects in the objects-oriented programming environment are discussed and related to the simulation environment with an attempt to find analogues between the two, to represent the airport landside environment in an object oriented environment. The preliminary effort using an object-oriented approach to design and implement a simulation environment is presented and discussed
keywords OOPS, simulation, design, architecture, planning, evaluation
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

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