CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 21 to 40 of 218

_id f14c
authors Sariyildiz, Sevil
year 1991
title Conceptual Design by Means of Islamic-Geometric-Patterns within a CAAD-Environment
source Delft University of Technology
summary The starting point in this research was to develop a 3D grammar theory on top of existing 2D Islamic-geometric-patterns, trying to rescue their fundamental geometry contents to be applied in contemporary architecture without compromising any architectural style. As it is self evident the architectural design process consists of clearly distinct stages namely conceptual design, materialisation and further completion. A this conceptual stage the innovative item of the research deals with pattern grammars on 3D complex geometrical patterns, considering them as polyhedra and polytopes, for their use as an underlayer to a concept design, like architects use 2D rectangular and triangular grids by the conventional way. Handling these complex 3D patterns requires a special environment which is possible with CAAD. Within the CAAD environment, the handling of these complex patterns is easily done by means of 3D tools, because the 3D tools permit the user to make any possible manipulations and geometrical transformations in an easier way in space. To a geometrical patterns, there is some attention paid during the last 50 years by some scholars. The most complex geometrical patterns are highly developed in Islamic architecture because it is forbidden in Muslim religion to use man's portraits or sculptures of human beings in the religious buildings. All these approaches to complex patterns are analysed and studied as 2D elements. The question was how could we consider them in 3rd dimensions and use them instead of 2D underlayer, as 3D underlayers in the conceptual phase of the CAAD design. Pattern grammar is a generally employable aid (underlying pattern) for conceptual and material designs. On the basis of rules of symmetry and substitution, ordering principles have been worked out, which can be used for formal design methods as well as detailing systems (e.g. modular coordination). Through the realization of a pattern grammar a wider range of underlying patterns can be offered and a choice from these can be made in a more fundamental manner. At a subsequent stage the collection of "empty boxes" can be filled with (architectural) elements in such a way that another option is created between either filling up the boxes completely, filling them partly, or filling them in such a way that they overflow. It is self-evident that underlying patterns can also be used for details and decoration in a design. Concerning the materialisation of the concept design, within the 3D CAAD environment, substitution methods are partially developed. Further theoretical developments concerning the materialisation phase constantly backed up through feed-back with specialist matters (such as e.g. by means of expert systems, decision-support systems), must be worked out. As feed-back of the research, the possibilities of the design with 3D patterns have been tested and the procedures are explained. (*) Working with 3D patterns gives a designer more inspirations to develop new ideas and new concepts and gives the opportunity to handle the complexity. (*) The formal, structural and symmetrical qualities of geometrical patterns has a positive influence on the industrialisation of the building components. (*) Working with 3D tools which are able to handle complex geometry have a result because of the accuracy of the information, that there has hardly been a mistake made during the preparation and the assembly of the building components. This has also positive results concerning the financial aspects of the building process.
series thesis:PhD
email i.s.Sariyildiz@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 86c1
authors Shih, Shen-Guan
year 1991
title Case-based Representation and Adaptation in Design
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures: Education, Research, Applications [CAAD Futures ‘91 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 3-528-08821-4] Zürich (Switzerland), July 1991, pp. 301-312
summary By attempting to model the raw memory of experts, case-based reasoning is distinguished from traditional expert systems, which compile experts' knowledge into rules before new problems are given. A case-based reasoning system processes new problems with the most similar prior experiences available, and adapts the prior solutions to solve new problems. Case-based representation, of design knowledge utilizes the desirable features of the selected case as syntax rules to adapt the case to a new context. As a central issue of the paper, three types of adaptation aimed at topological modifications are described. The first type - casebased search - can be viewed as a localized search process. It follows the syntactical structure of the case to search for variations which provide the required functionality. Regarding the complexity of computation, it is recognized that when a context sensitive grammar is used to describe the desirable features, the search process become intractable. The second type of adaptation can be viewed as a process of self-organization, in which context-sensitive grammars play an essential role. Evaluations have to be simulated by local interaction among design primitives. The third type is called direct transduction. A case is translated directly to another structure according to its syntax by some translation functions. A direct transduction is not necessarily a composition of design operators and thus, a crosscontextual mapping is possible. As a perspective use of these adaptation methods, a CAD system which provides designers with the ability to modify the syntactical structure of a group of design elements, according to some concerned semantics, would support designers better than current CAD systems.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/07 10:03

_id 8b9e
authors Steinhage, Volker
year 1991
title POLYOC: Photogrammetric Measurements of Buildings and Architectural Models via Multi-View Steoreovision
source Experiences with CAAD in Education and Practice [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Munich (Germany) 17-19 October 1991
summary We present a new method to derive a reliable 3D description of buildings and architectural models based on stereo vision using multiple camera views. This multi-view stereo technique has been successfully applied to many objects and has proved to be more reliable and more accurate than the well known binocular and even trinocular stereo techniques. The method has the following attractive features: (-) Flexibility: Arbitrary positions of an arbitrary amount of different camera views are allowed. (-) Automatic Calibration of each camera view is obtained by a simple procedure. (-) Reliable Stereo Analysis: The matching of corresponding image features of different images relies on a basic paradigm of Hypothesis Prediction and Validation. (-) Knowledge Base: Heuristics can be applied to correct the object reconstruction. (-) CAD-lnterface: The 3D description of the reconstructed object can automatically transferred via DXF to a CAD-system. (-) Low Costs: No special and expensive technical equipment like a laser or an UV rangefinder is necessary. A camera, a PC with CAD-system and a digitizing device like a digitizing tablet with a pointing pen are sufficient.

series eCAADe
last changed 1998/08/23 07:55

_id ae74
authors Zamanian, Kiumarse and Fenves, Steven J.
year 1991
title A Framework for Modeling and Communicating Abstractions of Constructed Facilities
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures: Education, Research, Applications [CAAD Futures ‘91 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 3-528-08821-4] Zürich (Switzerland), July 1991, pp. 245-260
summary Management of information about constructed facilities in a computer-integrated environment is a challenging task because this information evolves from, and is viewed by many different disciplines throughout the facility's lifecycle. We present a general framework for modeling and reasoning about the components of a constructed facility at any desired level of abstraction, and communicating the information across disciplines at any stage in the lifecycle of the facility, as well as across stages. Our research has been motivated by an objective similar to that of STEP, which intends to establish an international protocol for the exchange of CAD data. The descriptive information about a facility is divided into two separate but linked groups: spatial and non-spatial attributes. The primary emphasis of this research is to provide a single, uniform representation and reasoning paradigm for dealing with the various spatial abstractions of the facility components regardless of their geometric dimensionalities.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/11/23 18:42

_id c455
authors Sumption, Brian, Haglund, Bruce and Zabrodsky, Alexander
year 1991
title Imagining Light: A Visualization of Daylighting Data
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures: Education, Research, Applications [CAAD Futures ‘91 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 3-528-08821-4] Zürich (Switzerland), July 1991, pp. 97-104
summary The task of designing effective lighting for buildings requires both artistic and technical competence. In this way it is archetypical of the discipline of architectural design. The interaction of buildings with solar lighting is complex and ever-changing. Added complexity comes with the use of electric lights and their daylight-sensitive control systems. State-of-the-art daylight prediction tools most often provide precision data that is in obscure numerical formats hindering the communication and perception of information hidden within. We are exploring the use of scientific visualization to transform incomprehensible tables of data into images that visually oriented designers will find more accessible. By representing lighting data and their interactions with the environment visually, students and design professionals may be able to "imagine the light" in ways that will help them understand and solve complex lighting design problems.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/07 10:03

_id ea6b
authors Boeve, Eddy
year 1991
title Modelling Interaction Tools in the Views Architecture IV. Design Tools
source First Moscow International HCI'91 Workshop Proceedings 1991 p.183
summary Views is a user-interface system in which the user interface is a layer above applications, guaranteeing consistency of the interface, and with a data-layer implementing external object representations, allowing exchange of objects between applications without loss of structure. Although Views offers an architecture to deal with user-interface aspects on a high level, in this report is shown that also low level interaction can be modelled with the architecture provided.
series other
last changed 2002/07/07 14:01

_id 227a
authors Bourdeau, L., Dubois, A.-M. and Poyet, P.
year 1991
title A Common Data Model for Computer Integrated Building
source computer Integrated Future, CIB W78 Seminar. September, 1991. Unnumbered : some ill. includes bibliography
summary The connection of various building performance evaluation tools in a collaborative way is an essential request to develop true CAD systems. It is a basic requirement for the future of integrated information systems for building projects, where data concerning multiple aspects of the project can be exchanged during the different design steps. This paper deals with the on-going research concerning the generation of a common data model in the framework of a European collaborative action, the COMBINE Project, which is supported by the CEC, General Directorate XII for Research Science and Development, within the JOULE programme. The first step of the research concerns the progressive construction of a conceptual model and the paper focuses on the development of this Integrated Data Model (IDM). The paper reports on the definition of the architecture of the IDM. The main issues and the methodology of the IDM development are presented. The IDM development methodology is based on successive steps dealing with the identification of the data and context which are considered by the Design Tool Prototypes (DTP) to be connected through the IDM, the conceptual integration of this knowledge, and the implementation of the model on an appropriate software environment
keywords standards, integration, communication, building, evaluation, modeling
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 12:41

_id 85f9
authors Brisson, E., Debras, P. and Poyet, Patrice
year 1991
title A First Step Towards an Intelligent Integrated Design System in the Building Field
source computer Integrated Future, CIB W78 Seminar. September, 1991. Unnumbered pages : ill. includes bibliography
summary This article presents the work the Knowledge Base Group is achieving towards the integration of Artificial Intelligence based facilities in the Building design process. After an overview of the current state of the integrated design process, the context and the technical guidelines to realize computer integrated software in the building design field is described. Then some tools are presented to model the knowledge (the HBDS method) and to implement such model in our Mips home-made knowledge modeling software platform (including object-oriented database management facilities, expert system reasoning facilities, hypertext edition facilities, 3D-design and 3D-view modules...). Finally the authors describe the Quakes application devoted to assess detached house anti-seismic capabilities during the design process. A deep conceptual model considers all the semantic entities (columns, resistant panels, openings, ...) involved in the anti-seismic expertise. Using both this conceptual model description of a detached house and the 3D design tool, they input the project. Then the seismic expertise is driven in a divide and conquer approach and records the alleged configuration recognized automatically linked to the corresponding section of the building regulation
keywords AI, design, knowledge, software, integration, building, CAD, structures
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id ascaad2014_002
id ascaad2014_002
authors Burry, Mark
year 2014
title BIM and the Building Site: Assimilating digital fabrication within craft traditions
source Digital Crafting [7th International Conference Proceedings of the Arab Society for Computer Aided Architectural Design (ASCAAD 2014 / ISBN 978-603-90142-5-6], Jeddah (Kingdom of Saudi Arabia), 31 March - 3 April 2014, pp. 27-36
summary This paper outlines a particular component of very well known project: Antoni Gaudí’s Sagrada Família Basilica in Barcelona (1882– on-going but scheduled for completion in 2026). At the time of writing the realisation of the project has proceeded for 87 years since Gaudí's death (1852-1926). As a building site it has been a living laboratory for the nexus between traditional construction offsite manufacturing and digital fabrication since the computers were first introduced to the project:CAD in 1989 closely followed by CAAD two years later. More remarkably CAD/CAM commenced its significant influence in 1991 with the take-up of sem robotised stone cutting and carving. The subject of this paper is an elevated auditorium space that is one of the relatively few ‘sketchy’ areas that Gaudí bequeathed the successors for the design of his magnum opus.
series ASCAAD
email mburry@rmit.edu.au
last changed 2016/02/15 12:09

_id 00bc
authors Chen, Chen-Cheng
year 1991
title Analogical and inductive reasoning in architectural design computation
source Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH Zurich
summary Computer-aided architectural design technology is now a crucial tool of modern architecture, from the viewpoint of higher productivity and better products. As technologies advance, the amount of information and knowledge that designers can apply to a project is constantly increasing. This requires development of more advanced knowledge acquisition technology to achieve higher functionality, flexibility, and efficient performance of the knowledge-based design systems in architecture. Human designers do not solve design problems from scratch, they utilize previous problem solving episodes for similar design problems as a basis for developmental decision making. This observation leads to the starting point of this research: First, we can utilize past experience to solve a new problem by detecting the similarities between the past problem and the new problem. Second, we can identify constraints and general rules implied by those similarities and the similar parts of similar situations. That is, by applying analogical and inductive reasoning we can advance the problem solving process. The main objective of this research is to establish the theory that (1) design process can be viewed as a learning process, (2) design innovation involves analogical and inductive reasoning, and (3) learning from a designer's previous design cases is necessary for the development of the next generation in a knowledge-based design system. This thesis draws upon results from several disciplines, including knowledge representation and machine learning in artificial intelligence, and knowledge acquisition in knowledge engineering, to investigate a potential design environment for future developments in computer-aided architectural design. This thesis contains three parts which correspond to the different steps of this research. Part I, discusses three different ways - problem solving, learning and creativity - of generating new thoughts based on old ones. In Part II, the problem statement of the thesis is made and a conceptual model of analogical and inductive reasoning in design is proposed. In Part III, three different methods of building design systems for solving an architectural design problem are compared rule-based, example-based, and case-based. Finally, conclusions are made based on the current implementation of the work, and possible future extensions of this research are described. It reveals new approaches for knowledge acquisition, machine learning, and knowledge-based design systems in architecture.
series thesis:PhD
email arch@mail.tku.edu.tw
last changed 2003/05/10 03:42

_id cdb1
authors Cornick, T., Noble, B. and Hallahan, C.
year 1991
title The Limitations of Current Working Practices on the Development of Computer Integrating Modelling in Construction
source computer Integrated Future, CIB W78 Seminar. Calibre, The Netherlands: Eindhoven University of Technology, september, 1991. Unnumbered. includes bibliography
summary For the construction Industry to improve its processes through the application computer-based systems, traditional working practices must first change to support the integrated control of design and construction. Current manual methods of practice accept the limitations of man to process a wide range of building performance and production information simultaneously. However when these limitations are removed, through the applications of computer systems, the constraints of manual methods need no longer apply. The first generation of computer applications to the Construction Industry merely modelled the divided and sequential processes of manual methods i.e. drafting, specification writing, engineering and quantity calculations, estimating, billing, material ordering data-bases and activity planning. Use of these systems raises expectations that connections within the computer between the processes modelled can actually be made and faster and more integrated information processing be achieved. 'Linking' software is then developed. The end result of this approach was that users were able to produce information faster, present it in an impressive manner but, in reality, no perceived improvement in actual building performance, production economy or efficiency was realized. A current government sponsored Teaching Company Programme with a UK design and build company is addressing the problem of how real economic benefit can be realized through improvement in, amongst other things, their existing computer applications. This work is being carried out by both considering an academic conceptual model of how 'designing for production' can be achieved in computer applications and what is immediately realizable in practice by modelling the integration of a limited number of knowledge domains to which computers are already being applied. i.e. billing from design, estimating and buying. This paper describes each area of work and how they are impacting on each other
keywords construction, building process, integration
series CADline
last changed 2003/06/02 11:58

_id 2e56
authors Coyne, Robert Francis
year 1991
title ABLOOS : an evolving hierarchical design framework
source Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Architecture
summary The research reported in this thesis develops an approach toward a more effective use of hierarchical decomposition in computational design systems. The approach is based on providing designers a convenient interactive means to specify and experiment with the decompositional structure of design problems, rather than having decompositions pre-specified and encoded in the design system. Following this approach, a flexible decomposition capability is combined with an underlying design method to form the basis for an extensible and evolving framework for cooperative (humdcomputer) design. As a testbed for this approach, the ABLOOS framework for layout design is designed and constructed as a hierarchical extension of LOOS.’The framework enables a layout task to be hierarchically decomposed, and for the LOOS methodology to be applied recursively to layout subtasks at appropriate levels of abstraction within the hierarchy; layout solutions for the subtasks are then recomposed to achieve an overall solution, Research results thus far are promising: ABLOOS has produced high quality solutions for a class of industrial layout design tasks (an analog power board layout with 60 components that have multiple complex constraints on their placement); the adaptability of the framework across domains and disciplines has been demonstrated; and, further development of ABLOOS is underway including its extension to layouts in 2 1/2D space and truly 3D arrangements. The contribution of this work is in demonstrating an effective, flexible and extensible capability for hierarchical decomposition in design. It has also produced a more comprehensive layout system that can serve as a foundation for the further investigation of hierarchical decomposition in a variety of design domains.
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 8570
authors Danahy, John
year 1991
title The Computer-Aided Studio Critic: Gaining Control of What We Look At
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures: Education, Research, Applications [CAAD Futures ‘91 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 3-528-08821-4] Zürich (Switzerland), July 1991, pp. 121-138
summary This paper presents an approach to teaching that put computer resources in the hands of a studio instructor. A design professor or tutor that is expert in the use of the tool. The studio master used the computer to "study" the propositions of students. This was done as an extension of his current teaching practice. The critic used the computer as another tool additional to discussion, pencil and paper, and working models. Computer walk-throughs and visual representations of concepts were used by the professor to convey his interpretation of the work to students. In this model the students did not have to use the computer. The model recognized the years of experience and expensive equipment required to create an adequate representation of a design scheme and view it in the very short time period available during desk critiques. This approach for studio teaching has not been identified and discussed in any depth in recent literature on CAD studio teaching. The emphasis of papers presented at CAD conferences has been on how to provide students with better software and skills needed to make effective use of computers in their studio work.
series CAAD Futures
email jwdanahy@rogers.com
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id c1ca
authors Daru, Roel
year 1991
title Sketch as Sketch Can - Design Sketching with Imperfect Aids and Sketchpads of the Future
source Experiences with CAAD in Education and Practice [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Munich (Germany) 17-19 October 1991
summary Sketching plays a manifold role in design and design education now as much as it did in the computerless days. Design sketching is indispensable during the early phases of the architectural design process. But if we ask architects and design educators alike what they are doing with computers, idea sketching is the least mentioned answer if not left out entirely. It is not because they are computer-illiterates, as the computer industry would tend to imply, but because their computers are not offering an adequate environment for design sketching. In education this means that those trying to create computeraided design sketching courses are confronted with the choice of either working with imperfect tools, or waiting for better tools. But by exploring the possibilities in available surrogates we will build the necessary experiences for specifying what is really useful for idea-sketching. Without such exercises, we will never go beyond the electronic metaphor of the sketchbook with pencil or marker.

series eCAADe
email mdaru@IAEhv.nl
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id eaca
authors Davis, L. (ed.)
year 1991
title Handbook of genetic algorithms
source Van Nostrand Reinhold, New York
summary This book sets out to explain what genetic algorithms are and how they can be used to solve real-world problems. The first objective is tackled by the editor, Lawrence Davis. The remainder of the book is turned over to a series of short review articles by a collection of authors, each explaining how genetic algorithms have been applied to problems in their own specific area of interest. The first part of the book introduces the fundamental genetic algorithm (GA), explains how it has traditionally been designed and implemented and shows how the basic technique may be applied to a very simple numerical optimisation problem. The basic technique is then altered and refined in a number of ways, with the effects of each change being measured by comparison against the performance of the original. In this way, the reader is provided with an uncluttered introduction to the technique and learns to appreciate why certain variants of GA have become more popular than others in the scientific community. Davis stresses that the choice of a suitable representation for the problem in hand is a key step in applying the GA, as is the selection of suitable techniques for generating new solutions from old. He is refreshingly open in admitting that much of the business of adapting the GA to specific problems owes more to art than to science. It is nice to see the terminology associated with this subject explained, with the author stressing that much of the field is still an active area of research. Few assumptions are made about the reader's mathematical background. The second part of the book contains thirteen cameo descriptions of how genetic algorithmic techniques have been, or are being, applied to a diverse range of problems. Thus, one group of authors explains how the technique has been used for modelling arms races between neighbouring countries (a non- linear, dynamical system), while another group describes its use in deciding design trade-offs for military aircraft. My own favourite is a rather charming account of how the GA was applied to a series of scheduling problems. Having attempted something of this sort with Simulated Annealing, I found it refreshing to see the authors highlighting some of the problems that they had encountered, rather than sweeping them under the carpet as is so often done in the scientific literature. The editor points out that there are standard GA tools available for either play or serious development work. Two of these (GENESIS and OOGA) are described in a short, third part of the book. As is so often the case nowadays, it is possible to obtain a diskette containing both systems by sending your Visa card details (or $60) to an address in the USA.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id a607
authors Durisch, Peter and Anderheggen, Edoardo
year 1991
title Leaving the Planar Universe
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures: Education, Research, Applications [CAAD Futures ‘91 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 3-528-08821-4] Zürich (Switzerland), July 1991, pp. 521-534
summary A computer program is presented which generates realistic images of planned buildings embedded in their future environment through photomontage. The planar universe of conventional photomontaging is extended to three dimensions. During an interactive preprocessing step, a three- dimensional model of the building's environment is created: Geometrical data is retrieved photogrammetrically from a number of site photographs. Atmospheric parameters and the relative weights of the components of natural daylight are also retrieved from the photographs. The final image, combining the artificial model of the building and the photographs of its surroundings, is rendered by an extended ray-tracing algorithm in three-dimensional object space.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/07 10:03

_id e4b3
authors Eastman, Charles M.
year 1991
title Use of Data Modeling in the Conceptual Structuring of Design Problems
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures: Education, Research, Applications [CAAD Futures ‘91 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 3-528-08821-4] Zürich (Switzerland), July 1991, pp. 225-244
summary An approach is presented for defining the information needed or used in a design task, based on data modeling techniques. Called EDM, it allows representation of the information complexity imposed both from the performances or technologies involved as well as imposed criteria, such as aesthetic intentions. Here, EDM is applied to the design of chairs, a design domain with highly diverse technologies and information structures. The relation is shown between the information considered and the class of designs possible. Also shown is the complexity of different design structures and the implication of information structures for conventional and creative design.
series CAAD Futures
email chuck.eastman@arch.gatech.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id e949
authors Eastman, Charles M.
year 1991
title Modeling of Buildings : Evolution and Concepts
source Computer Integrated Future, CIB W78 Seminar September, 1991. Unnumbered : ill. includes bibliography.
summary This presentation reviews the concepts of building modeling as they evolved historically, through research and previous and current products. It points out some limitations of current systems and concepts and identifies some additional ones that will probably be integrated into an eventual production quality building model
keywords building, modeling, architecture, design, CAD
series CADline
email chuck.eastman@arch.gatech.edu
last changed 2003/05/17 08:15

_id c967
authors Fantacone, Enrico
year 1994
title Exporting CAD Teaching into Developing Countries
source The Virtual Studio [Proceedings of the 12th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design / ISBN 0-9523687-0-6] Glasgow (Scotland) 7-10 September 1994, p. 222
summary In 1986 the Faculty of Architecture was established in Maputo. It is financed by the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and managed by a Scientific Council of the Faculty of Architecture of "Università La Sapienza" of Rome. The need to create human technical resources beeing able to work profesionally as soon as they finish their studies, made the teaching basis for lab exercises and design. The new architects (the first six students graduated in 1991), need to design and make very important decisions without any control by more experienced local technical institutions. The creation of a CAAD laboratory, and the teaching of information technologies and metodologies in architectural designing aimes to achieve a double goal: (-) to make the new architects able to manage on their own, because of the lack of qualified human resources, large quantity of data, and difficult design problems; (-) to make University, the most important scientific center in the country, an information exchange center between developped countries, and Moçambique.
series eCAADe
last changed 1998/09/14 08:12

_id ecaade2007_073
id ecaade2007_073
authors Francis, Sabu
year 2007
title Web Based Collaborative Architectural Practice Using a Fractal System
source Predicting the Future [25th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-0-9541183-6-5] Frankfurt am Main (Germany) 26-29 September 2007, pp. 727-734
summary I have been working on an architecture representation system in India since 1991; that markedly deviates from the need of traditional drawings as we know. Over three million square feet of work has been done that took advantage of this system as it was being developed. The system has now matured sufficiently to be put into practice as a comprehensive architectural system of practice. It takes advantage of creation of just-in-time dynamic multi-organizations that can get formed (and dismantled) over the Internet on a project to project basis. The raison d’être of the representation system is that it would expose the “source-code” (metaphorically) of any work of architecture to stakeholders, much the same way as an open-source software project exposes the internal representation to fellow developers. I believe the design of architecture must go through an “open source” process in order to produce socially responsible designs. Such a stance is explained in this paper. The paper also explains the system in detail; its mathematical basis and justifies the need for such an approach. It also explores how a collaborative practice can be put into place using the system in the context of Internet technologies.
keywords Collaborative practice, fractals, representation system
series eCAADe
email sf@sabufrancis.com
last changed 2007/09/16 15:55

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