CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id ga9921
id ga9921
authors Coates, P.S. and Hazarika, L.
year 1999
title The use of genetic programming for applications in the field of spatial composition
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Architectural design teaching using computers has been a preoccupation of CECA since 1991. All design tutors provide their students with a set of models and ways to form, and we have explored a set of approaches including cellular automata, genetic programming ,agent based modelling and shape grammars as additional tools with which to explore architectural ( and architectonic) ideas.This paper discusses the use of genetic programming (G.P.) for applications in the field of spatial composition. CECA has been developing the use of Genetic Programming for some time ( see references ) and has covered the evolution of L-Systems production rules( coates 1997, 1999b), and the evolution of generative grammars of form (Coates 1998 1999a). The G.P. was used to generate three-dimensional spatial forms from a set of geometrical structures .The approach uses genetic programming with a Genetic Library (G.Lib) .G.P. provides a way to genetically breed a computer program to solve a problem.G. Lib. enables genetic programming to define potentially useful subroutines dynamically during a run .* Exploring a shape grammar consisting of simple solid primitives and transformations. * Applying a simple fitness function to the solid breeding G.P.* Exploring a shape grammar of composite surface objects. * Developing grammarsfor existing buildings, and creating hybrids. * Exploring the shape grammar of abuilding within a G.P.We will report on new work using a range of different morphologies ( boolean operations, surface operations and grammars of style ) and describe the use of objective functions ( natural selection) and the "eyeball test" ( artificial selection) as ways of controlling and exploring the design spaces thus defined.
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 098a
authors Perron, Richard and Miller, Deron
year 1991
title Landscape of the Mind
source Reality and Virtual Reality [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-00-4] Los Angeles (California - USA) October 1991, pp. 71-86
summary The focus of this article is the exploration of landscape and the question of representation, more specifically how landscape principles can be represented through computation. It is a quest for essential qualities, through an application of philosophical questioning, and a response to a human perception of reality. Reality, as an invention of the human mind, is often thought of as a set of accepted conventions and constructs. Such a reality has an inherent dependency upon cognition where spatial and temporal principles may be defined within the natural and built environment, and further embraced within a cultural context. However, there also exist rules or relations that are neither invented nor formulated by the participants understanding. In effect these relations may not have been effectively articulated, a result perhaps of unfamiliar cues. Therefore, to the participant, these relations reside in the realm of the unknown or even the mystic. The aesthetic often resides in the realm of the mystic. The discovery of the aesthetic, is often an experience that comes from encountering physical and essential beauty where it has been produced through unconscious relations, perceived, yet transcending human understanding. The aspects of space and time, spatial and temporal properties and relations of things and events, are generally accepted conventions. Yet, the existence of a time order, is often not perceived. An understanding of spatial temporal properties may involve a temporal detachment from convention, allowing the release of previously unknown patterns and relations. Virtual realities are well constructed simulations of our environments, yet they may lack the embedded essential qualities of place. Virtual reality should transcend human perception and traditional modes of understanding, and most importantly our limited notions of the temporal nature of our environment. A desire to reach beyond the limits of perceived time order, may take us beyond existing sets of cultural values, and lead to the realization of new spatial/temporal conventions with the assistance of the computer.
series ACADIA
last changed 1999/10/10 12:27

_id a6be
authors Doyle, J.
year 1991
title Static and Dynamic Analysis of Structures, with an emphasis on mechanics and computer methods
source Kluwer Academic Pub., Dordrecht
summary This book is concerned with the static and dynamic analysis of structures. Specifically, it uses the stiffness formulated matrix methods for use on computers to tackle some of the fundamental problems facing engineers in structural mechanics. This is done by covering the Mechanics of Structures, its rephrasing in terms of the Matrix Methods and then their Computational implementation, all within a cohesive setting. Although the book is designed primarily as a text for use at the upper-graduate and beginning graduate level, many practising structural engineers will find it useful as a reference and self-study guide. Each chapter is supplemented with a collection of pertinent problems that indicate extensions of the theory and the applications. These problems, combined with selected references to relevant literature, can form the basis for further study. The book sets as its goal the treatment of structural dynamics starting with the basic mechanics and going all the way to their implementation on digital computers. Rather than discuss particular commercial packages, Professor Doyle has developed STADYN: a complete (but lean) program to perform each of the standard procedures used in commercial programs. Each module in the program is reasonably complete in itself, and all were written with the sole aim of clarity plus a modicum of efficiency, compactness and elegance.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 0d72
authors Millet, M.S., Hildebrand, G., Cohan, P. and Read, M.
year 1991
title ArchiMedia Case Studies: Integrative Architectural Education
source Reality and Virtual Reality [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-00-4] Los Angeles (California - USA) October 1991, pp. 127-134
summary Few people would argue that architectural education, ideally a complex holistic experience, completely integrates the many aspects and concerns that contribute to the design and realization of a building. This is hardly surprising given the vast array of information that architecture schools with limited resources attempt to present to students within constricted time frames. One may argue that in attempting to approach such a holistic educational goal, representations of reality on a computer screen are no more useful or provocative than conventional communication devices: slides, photographs, drawings, the spoken and printed word, moving pictures (film, video), and various combinations of all of these. The opportunities offered by computer-driven multimedia presentations, however, lie in the speed and relevance of connections made between associated ideas in various media formats. In particular, a multimedia presentation, if carefully authored and developed, can provide a wide range of interactive information gathering pathways. The approach called ArchiMedia offers a means for presenting a wide variety of information about a range of building types in an interactive format with the goal of supporting the creative and practical processes of communication among teachers and students.
series ACADIA
last changed 1999/10/10 12:27

_id 2914
authors Mortola, Elena and Giangrande, Alessandro
year 1991
title An Evaluation Module for "An Interface for Designing" (AID)- A Procedure based on Trichotomic Segmentation
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures: Education, Research, Applications [CAAD Futures ‘91 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 3-528-08821-4] Zürich (Switzerland), July 1991, pp. 139-154
summary The paper illustrates a model used to construct the evaluation module for "An Interface for Designing" (AID), a system to aid architectural design. The model can be used at the end of every cycle of analysis-synthesis-evaluation in the intermediate phases of design development. With the aid of this model it is possible to evaluate the quality of a project in overall terms to establish whether the project is acceptable, whether it should be elaborated ex-novo or whether it is necessary to begin a new cycle to improve it. In this last case it is also possible to evaluate the effectiveness of the possible actions and strategies for improvement. T he model is based on a procedure of trichotomic segmentation, developed within the MCDA (Multi- Criteria Decision Aid), which uses the outranking relation to compare the project with some evaluation profiles taken as projects for reference. In the paper an example of the application of the model in the teaching field will also be described.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/07 10:03

_id 29c2
authors Ozel, Filiz
year 1991
title An Intelligent Simulation Approach in Simulating Dynamic Processes in Architectural Environments
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures: Education, Research, Applications [CAAD Futures ‘91 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 3-528-08821-4] Zürich (Switzerland), July 1991, pp. 177-190
summary The implications of object-oriented data models and rule-based reasoning systems is being researched in a wide variety of application areas ranging from VLSI circuit design (Afsannanesh et al 1990) to architectural environments (Coyne et al 1990). The potential of this approach in the development of discrete event simulations is also being scrutinized (Birtwistle et al 1986). Such computer models are usually called "expert simulations" or "intelligent simulations". Typically rule-basing in such models allows the definition of intelligent-objects that can reason about the simulated dynamic processes through an inferencing system. The major advantage of this approach over traditional simulation languages is its ability to provide direct reference to real world objects and processes. The simulation of dynamic processes in architectural environments poses an additional Problem of resolving the interaction of architectural objects with other objects such as humans, water, smoke etc., depending on the process simulated. Object-oriented approach promises potential in solving this specific problem. The first part of this paper addresses expert simulation approach within the context of architectural settings, then the second part summarizes work done in the application of such an approach to an emergency egress simulation.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/07 10:03

_id 9c37
id 9c37
authors Coates P, Derix C, Krakhofer S and Karanouh A
year 2005
title Generating Architectural Spatial Configurations: two approaches using voronoi tessellations and particle systems
source Proceedings of the Generative Arts conference, Milan, 2005
summary It was one of the primary goals of the original Master’s programme in Computing and design at UEL in 1991 that we should work towards defining morphological generative processes for the conceptual design of architectural objects. These two papers offer a range of techniques which have been developed by two of this years MSc students (04-05) which show that we are getting close to this. The approaches range from computational geometric approaches (3d parametrics and voronoi diagrams) to emergent spatial organisation using agent based modelling. In many cases the resultant geometry is defined to the point where it can be transferred to advanced evaluation and fabrication systems, thus making this work sufficiently developed to begin to form a useful part in practical design processes.
keywords morphology, computational geometry, particle systems, physical simulation, voronoi diagrams
series other
type normal paper
email christian.derix@aedas.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2012/09/20 16:39

_id ddss9426
id ddss9426
authors Duijvestein, Kees
year 1994
title Integrated Design and Sustainable Building
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary In the international student-project "European Environmental Campus 91 TU Delft Dordrecht" 20 students from 13 European countries worked in september 1991, during three weeks on "EcologicalSketches for the Island of Dordrecht". They worked on four different scales: the region isle of Dordt / the district Stadspolders / the neighbourhood I the house and the block. The environmentaltheme's Energy, Water, Traffic & Noise, Landscape & Soil were together with spatial analyses combined with the different scales. This combination was organised following the scheme mentioned below. The characters stand for the students. During the first period they worked in research groups, during the last period more in design groups. For instance: student L works in the beginning with the students B, G and Q in the research group water. In the last period sheworks with K, M, N and 0 in the design group Neighbourhood. Those students worked earlier in the other research-groups and contribute now in the design-group their thematic environmental knowledge. The results were presented to the Dordrecht council, officials and press. In the next project in september and october 1993 we started earlier with the design groups. Ten Dutch and ten "Erasmus" students worked for six weeks on proposals for the Vinex location Wateringenthe Hague. Each morning they worked in the research groups each afternoon in the design groups. The research groups used the EcoDesign Tools, small applications in Excel on Apple Macintoshto quantify the environmental pressure.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id b04c
authors Goerger, S., Darken, R., Boyd, M., Gagnon, T., Liles, S., Sullivan, J. and Lawson, J.
year 1996
title Spatial Knowledge Acquisition from Maps and Virtual Environments in Complex Architectural Space
source Proc. 16 th Applied Behavioral Sciences Symposium, 22-23 April, U.S. Airforce Academy, Colorado Springs, CO., 1996, 6-10
summary It has often been suggested that due to its inherent spatial nature, a virtual environment (VE) might be a powerful tool for spatial knowledge acquisition of a real environment, as opposed to the use of maps or some other two-dimensional, symbolic medium. While interesting from a psychological point of view, a study of the use of a VE in lieu of a map seems nonsensical from a practical point of view. Why would the use of a VE preclude the use of a map? The more interesting investigation would be of the value added of the VE when used with a map. If the VE could be shown to substantially improve navigation performance, then there might be a case for its use as a training tool. If not, then we have to assume that maps continue to be the best spatial knowledge acquisition tool available. An experiment was conducted at the Naval Postgraduate School to determine if the use of an interactive, three-dimensional virtual environment would enhance spatial knowledge acquisition of a complex architectural space when used in conjunction with floor plan diagrams. There has been significant interest in this research area of late. Witmer, Bailey, and Knerr (1995) showed that a VE was useful in acquiring route knowledge of a complex building. Route knowledge is defined as the procedural knowledge required to successfully traverse paths between distant locations (Golledge, 1991). Configurational (or survey) knowledge is the highest level of spatial knowledge and represents a map-like internal encoding of the environment (Thorndyke, 1980). The Witmer study could not confirm if configurational knowledge was being acquired. Also, no comparison was made to a map-only condition, which we felt is the most obvious alternative. Comparisons were made only to a real world condition and a symbolic condition where the route is presented verbally.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 1ecb
authors Hallberg, Gun
year 1991
title Theories and Methods in Full-Scale Studies
source Proceedings of the 3rd European Full-Scale Modelling Conference / ISBN 91-7740044-5 / Lund (Sweden) 13-16 September 1990, pp. 34-37
summary By full-scale experiments we are studying functional dimensions and spatial requirements in the planning laboratory. That means, that by working in a place where the spatial dimensions could be altered and the consequences studied, we make trials to arrive at acceptable dimensions. Test subjects and various experimental set-ups enable us to study building function requirements in what we think, a quite fruitful way.
keywords Full-scale Modeling, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2003/08/25 08:12

_id 43
authors Horacio A. Torres. Lic. Geog. Cesira Morano. Guillermo Tella
year 1998
title Utilización de un Sig Para la Formulacion de un Diagnostico Socioterritorial de la Ciudad de Buenos Aires (Use of a GIS for the Formulation of a Socio-territorial Diagnostic of the City of Buenos Aires)
source II Seminario Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 978-97190-0-X] Mar del Plata (Argentina) 9-11 september 1998, pp. 324-331
summary The use of a GIS to assist the elaboration of a socioterritorial diagnosis of the City of Buenos Aires. This paper is based on the result of two research projects sponsored by the University of Buenos Aires (Project AR01 0 and Project Cl-94). From the beginning of 1998 onwards these results have been applied to the development of a "socio-territorial diagnosis" of the City of Buenos Aires, an applied research project funded by the Government of the City of Buenos Aires and carried out by the Facultad de Arquitectura, Diseho y Urbanismo, Universidad de Buenos Aires (Research Unit: PROHAB). The main goal of the analysis was the identification of the spatial distribution pattern of of the selected variables, directed to the delimitation of "social areas". The facilities provided by the GIS allowed us to perform this task in an exploratory manner. An analysis of the 3405 census tracts of the City of Buenos Aires (the central part of the agglomeration) is presented here. A great number of indices were constructed based on variables of the Argentine National Census of Population and Housing referred to housing conditions, housing type, provision of services, origin of the population, educational level, etc. This paper describes the various steps necessary for the application of a GIS, including the digitizing of the cartographic base and the statistical elaboration of the census information (provided by the INDEC in magnetic medium). A colour cartographic output that can be considered a first approximation of the "social map" of the city in 1991 is presented.
series SIGRADI
email htorres@fadu.uba.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:53

_id dfec
authors Hornyanszky-Dalholm, Elisabeth and Rydberg-Mitchell, Birgitta
year 1991
title THE FULL-SCALE METHOD AS A TOOL FOR PARTICIPATION
source Proceedings of the 3rd European Full-Scale Modelling Conference / ISBN 91-7740044-5 / Lund (Sweden) 13-16 September 1990, pp. 23-30
summary In Lund the full-scale laboratory is mainly used as a tool for citizen or user participation. Our intention is to develop the full-scale method further for this purpose. For several years now, we have carried through projects together with different users - mainly people from various types of working-places but recently also with dwellers. Most of our work has been financed by our clients, i.e. private enterprises, trade unions, county councils or municipalities, but since this summer we also receive support from the Swedish Council for Building Research. We have worked with many types of environments and their specific problems, but thanks to the research money we will now have an opportunity to develop our method in a more conscious manner. The purpose of our research is to increase the awareness of the different mechanisms involved in the participant/user process. We want to improve and refine our method and evaluate its advantages and disadvantages compared to other media for spatial communication. In our research program we will now present some criteria that have developed from our previous experiences and which we find essential to our future work.
keywords Full-scale Modeling, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
email Elisabeth.Hornyanszky-Dalholm@byggfunk.lth.se
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa
last changed 2004/05/04 13:16

_id ecaade2014_163
id ecaade2014_163
authors Ioannis Chatzikonstantinou
year 2014
title A 3-Dimensional Architectural Layout Generation Procedure for Optimization Applications : DC-RVD
source Thompson, Emine Mine (ed.), Fusion - Proceedings of the 32nd eCAADe Conference - Volume 1, Department of Architecture and Built Environment, Faculty of Engineering and Environment, Newcastle upon Tyne, England, UK, 10-12 September 2014, pp. 287-296
wos WOS:000361384700028
summary A procedure for generating 3-dimensional spatial configurations for optimization applications, termed Dimension Constrained Rectangular Voronoi Diagram (DC-RVD), is presented in this paper. The procedure is able to generate a non-overlapping configuration of spatial units in 3-dimensional space, given a string of real values. It constitutes an extension and adaptation of the Rectangular Voronoi Diagram generating procedure, found in the work of Choi and Young (1991). An extensive description of the procedure, with the relevant pseudocode is included in the paper. The procedure is tested in a stochastic optimisation-based decision support environment. Testing is done using a case study of a medium-sized family house. The result indicate promising performance.
keywords Optimization; layout; representation
series eCAADe
email i.chatzikonstantinou@yasar.edu.tr
last changed 2016/05/16 09:08

_id 2619
authors Otero, E.
year 1996
title EVALUATION OF THE OSLD HOUSING SYSTEM
source Full-Scale Modeling in the Age of Virtual Reality [6th EFA-Conference Proceedings]
summary In the production of low-income housing, one of the factors that most affects the low cost of each unit is its mass production. When it comes to building a proposed design it must have been sufficiently studied and evaluated. When designing low-income housing it is convenient to exhaust all the possibilities of simulation in order to produce a prototype that, once built, has reduced the risk of errors. Simulations allow to improve the prototype before proceeding to build it. The Real Scale Model (RSM) has proved to be a better simulation tool than computer generated models or 1:10 scale models. It allows to reproduce and evaluate perceptual experiences as well as being user friendly because most of the spatial variables can be represented. This research is another example of the use and effectiveness of the RSM in the field of design and architectural research.

A Real Scale Model of the basic unit was built by the students of the course Spatial Design Ability dictated by the LEE. The model was first evaluated empty and then a furnishing solution was proposed, built and evaluated. These evaluations were done by another group of students of the Faculty of Architecture and Planning using the Psychological Impressions Measuring Test (IMIP) developed by Luis La Scalea (1991). This test was designed to measure people’s psychological impressions produced by a space, and consists of a semantic differential structured by eleven pairs of opposing adjectives set on a scale of seven levels. The results of this first evaluation were analysed used to modify the prototype which was evaluated again in order to produce a final layout.

keywords Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa/
last changed 2004/05/04 12:41

_id f2f6
authors Papper, M., Danahy, J. and Baecker, R.
year 1991
title Predictable Modelling Interaction Using High-Level Constraints: Making Objects Behave As They Would In Our Environment
source Reality and Virtual Reality [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-00-4] Los Angeles (California - USA) October 1991, pp. 211-222
summary An approach for a graphical CAD system that is capable of representing physical and geometric aspects of a design using high-level constraints (HLCs) is presented. A prototype spatial planning system incorporating constraints is used in an interactive manner to refine designs by following an iterative approach which uses visual information to evaluate the design at each stage of iteration. High-level constraints aid this iterative approach by influencing (or constraining) the behavior of objects as they are interactively manipulated during the design stage of problem solving. High-level constraints also define the scaling properties of objects which are useful during the construction stage of problem solving. This system and its implications for the design of CAD systems incorporating HLCs are discussed.
series ACADIA
email jwdanahy@rogers.com
last changed 2003/04/26 19:54

_id 56d5
authors Paranandi, Murali
year 1991
title Observations on daylighting as demonstrated by the work of Alvar Aalto
source Kent State University
summary Daylight plays a dominant role in the works of Finnish architect Alvar Aalto. This thesis project investigates the role played by the natural light in his architectural works. One of the major concerns of this paper is to discover his intent behind the use of daylight, as well as to identify some of the techniques he devised to handle daylight. Literature research and physical model simulation studies have been incorporated as a method for the study. Significant works of Aalto have been surveyed. It has been observed that the use of daylight has been one of the preoccupations of Aalto since the design of Viipuri Library and Paimio Sanatorium. It was also observed that skylights play a prominent role in Aalto's architecture and that they are well developed and sophisticated devices. Some of the technical components and contributing factors of Aalto's skylights have been identified. Three case-studies were conducted through literature research and simulations. It was concluded that Aalto treats daylighting as one of the elements to embody sufficient psychological factors in man's built environment. It was discovered that the selection and the detailing of the skylights in each case has been predominantly guided by the climate, function, personal relationships, and the visual task of the individual space. Physical model simulations proved to be extremely helpful in understanding the modeling of the daylight and the spatial quality.
series thesis:MSc
email paranam@muohio.edu
last changed 2003/03/03 08:14

_id ddss9483
id ddss9483
authors Shyi, Gary C.-W. and Huang, Tina S.-T.
year 1994
title Constructing Three-Dimensional Mental Models from Two-Dimensional Displays
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary In the present study we adopted the tasks and the experimental procedures used in a recent series of study by Cooper (1990, 1991) for the purpose of examining how we utilized two-dimensional information in a line-drawing of visual objects to construct the corresponding three-dimensional mental structure represented by the 2-D displays. We expected that the stimulus materials we used avoided some of the problems that Cooper's stimuli had, and with that we examined the effect of complexity on the process of constructing 3-D models from 2-D displays. Such a manipulation helps to elucidate the difficulties of solving problems that require spatial abilities. We also investigated whether or not providing information representing an object viewed from different standpoints would affect the construction of the object's 3-D model. Some researchers have argued that 3-D models, once constructed, should be viewer-independent or viewpoint-invariant, while others have suggested that 3-D models are affected by the viewpoint of observation. Data pertinent to this issue are presented and discussed.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id bbdc
authors Tang, J.C.
year 1991
title Findings from observational studies of collaborative work
source international Joumal of Man-Machine Studies, 34(2), 143-160
summary The work activity of small groups of three to four people was videotaped and analyzed in order to understand collaborative work and to guide the development of tools to support it. The software tools we currently have are often based on a single user model. Even those that are based on multiple user models define structures of interaction that restrict fluid collaboration. We need observe how people collaborate then build software that facilitates collaboration based on those observations, giving the users the tools" that are "naturally" defined in face-to-face interaction. In this experiment small groups of people were observed in a collaborative design task using a shared drawing space. Specific features of collaborative work activity that raise design implications for collaborative technology: 1. collaborators use hand gestures to uniquely communicate significant information 2. the process of creating and using drawings conveys much information not contained in the resulting drawings 3. the drawing space is an important resource for the group in mediating their collaboration 4. there is a fluent mix of activity in the drawing space 5. the spatial orientation among the collaborators and the drawing space has a role in structuring their activity
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ae74
authors Zamanian, Kiumarse and Fenves, Steven J.
year 1991
title A Framework for Modeling and Communicating Abstractions of Constructed Facilities
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures: Education, Research, Applications [CAAD Futures ‘91 Conference Proceedings / ISBN 3-528-08821-4] Zürich (Switzerland), July 1991, pp. 245-260
summary Management of information about constructed facilities in a computer-integrated environment is a challenging task because this information evolves from, and is viewed by many different disciplines throughout the facility's lifecycle. We present a general framework for modeling and reasoning about the components of a constructed facility at any desired level of abstraction, and communicating the information across disciplines at any stage in the lifecycle of the facility, as well as across stages. Our research has been motivated by an objective similar to that of STEP, which intends to establish an international protocol for the exchange of CAD data. The descriptive information about a facility is divided into two separate but linked groups: spatial and non-spatial attributes. The primary emphasis of this research is to provide a single, uniform representation and reasoning paradigm for dealing with the various spatial abstractions of the facility components regardless of their geometric dimensionalities.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/11/23 18:42

_id 8b9e
authors Steinhage, Volker
year 1991
title POLYOC: Photogrammetric Measurements of Buildings and Architectural Models via Multi-View Steoreovision
source Experiences with CAAD in Education and Practice [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Munich (Germany) 17-19 October 1991
summary We present a new method to derive a reliable 3D description of buildings and architectural models based on stereo vision using multiple camera views. This multi-view stereo technique has been successfully applied to many objects and has proved to be more reliable and more accurate than the well known binocular and even trinocular stereo techniques. The method has the following attractive features: (-) Flexibility: Arbitrary positions of an arbitrary amount of different camera views are allowed. (-) Automatic Calibration of each camera view is obtained by a simple procedure. (-) Reliable Stereo Analysis: The matching of corresponding image features of different images relies on a basic paradigm of Hypothesis Prediction and Validation. (-) Knowledge Base: Heuristics can be applied to correct the object reconstruction. (-) CAD-lnterface: The 3D description of the reconstructed object can automatically transferred via DXF to a CAD-system. (-) Low Costs: No special and expensive technical equipment like a laser or an UV rangefinder is necessary. A camera, a PC with CAD-system and a digitizing device like a digitizing tablet with a pointing pen are sufficient.

series eCAADe
last changed 1998/08/23 07:55

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