CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 121 to 140 of 244

_id ddss9212
id ddss9212
authors Prins, M., Bax, M.F.TH., Carp, J.C. and Tempelmans Plat, H.
year 1993
title A design decision support system for building flexibility and costs
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture (Proceedings of a conference held in Mierlo, the Netherlands in July 1992), ISBN 0-7923-2444-7
summary Because of possible changes in demand, buildings must have some flexibility. In this paper a building model, a financial-economic model and a process model will be presented, which together constitute a design decision support system. This system may be used to decide on flexibility and costs of building variants in all phases of the design process.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ebb2
authors Proctor, George
year 2000
title Reflections on the VDS, Pedagogy, Methods
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 15-16
summary After having conducted a Digital Media based design studio at Cal Poly for six years, we have developed a body of experience I feel is worth sharing. When the idea of conducting a studio with the exclusive use of digital tools was implemented at our college, it was still somewhat novel, and only 2 short years after the first VDS- Virtual Design Studio (UBC, UHK et.al.-1993). When we began, most of what we explored required a suspension of disbelief on the part of both the students and faculty reviewers of studio work. In a few short years the notions we examined have become ubiquitous in academic architectural discourse and are expanding into common use in practice. (For background, the digital media component of our curriculum owes much to my time at Harvard GSD [MAUD 1989-91] and the texts of: McCullough/Mitchell 1990, 1994; McCullough 1998; Mitchell 1990,1992,1996; Tufte 1990; Turkel 1995; and Wojtowicz 1993; and others.)
series ACADIA
email georger@cybertects.com
last changed 2002/12/15 15:37

_id ddss9204
id ddss9204
authors Pullen, W.R., Wassenaar, C.L.G., van Heti'ema, I., Dekkers, J.T., Janszen, I., Boender, C.G.E., Tas, A. and Stegeman, H.
year 1993
title A decision support system for housing of (public) organizations
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture (Proceedings of a conference held in Mierlo, the Netherlands in July 1992), ISBN 0-7923-2444-7
summary In this paper we present a hierarchical decision support system for the allocation of organisations to available buildings, and for the allocation of employees of an organisation to the work units of a building. For both allocation problems a mathematical model and optimisation algorithm is developed, taking into account the relevant criteria, such as the extent to which the allocated floorspace is in accordance with the standards, and the extent to which departments are housed in connecting zones of a building. The decision support system is illustrated by two practical applications.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id a302
authors Saggio, Antonino
year 1992
title A New Tool for Studio Teaching - Object Based Modeling
source CAAD Instruction: The New Teaching of an Architect? [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Barcelona (Spain) 12-14 November 1992, pp. 251-264
summary The scope of this paper is to present Computer Aided Architectural Design (and more particularly the dynamic and incremental modeling characteristics of Object Based Modeling) as a tool to reinforce the teaching of architectural design. Utilized within a method based on a cyclical application of "Concept and Testing", OBM has the possibility to work as an amplifier of design ideas and as a meaningful tool for the advancement of architectural design. Three related experiences support this hypothesis. The role played in concrete designs by an Object Based Modeling environment. Teaching with CAAD and OBM in the realm of documentation and analysis of architecture. Previous applications of the Concept-Testing methodology in design studios. The central sections of the paper focus on the analysis of these experiences, while the last section provides a 15 week, semester based, studio structure that incorporates OBM in the overall calendar and in key assignments. While the scope of this work coincides with the thesis presented at the Acadia '92 conference in Charleston (South Carolina), to focus the argument more clearly content, text and illustrations differ in several parts.

series eCAADe
email Antonino.Saggio@Uniroma1.it
last changed 2003/05/16 19:36

_id c93a
authors Saggio, Antonino
year 1992
title Object Based Modeling and Concept-Testing: A Framework for Studio Teaching
source Mission - Method - Madness [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-01-2] 1992, pp. 49-63
summary This chapter concludes with a proposal for a studio structure that incorporates computers as a creative stimulus in the design process. Three related experiences support this hypothesis: the role played in concrete designs by an Object Based Modeling environment, teaching with Computer Aided Architectural Design and OBM in the realm of documentation and analysis of architecture, previous applications of the Concept-Testing methodology in design studios. Examples from these three areas provide the framework for mutual support between OBM and a C-T approach for studio teaching. The central sections of the chapter focus on the analysis of these experiences, while the last section provides a 15 week, semester based, studio structure that incorporates OBM in the overall calendar and in key assignments.

series ACADIA
email Antonino.Saggio@Uniroma1.it
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id d9fa
authors Salomon, Gavriel
year 1990
title Effects with and of Computers and the Study of Computer-based Learning Environments
source Chapter in Computer-Based Learning Environments and Problem Solving, ed. E. De Corte, M. C. Linn, H. Mandl, and L. Verschaffel. New York: Springer-Verlag
summary Several factors have contributed to the developments in computer-based learning environments. Improvements and advances in hardware capabilities have afforded greater computing power. Advances in cognitive and instructional science have moved thinking beyond the limits of behavioural psychology. The new systems of computer-based learning environments are being designed with a view to facilitating complex problem-solving through integrating wholes of knowledge (Dijkstra, Krammer & Merriënboer, 1992). Thus, many see in the computer a means to enhance students' cognitive skills and general problem-solving ability. This is in spite of the fact that studies have failed to conclusively confirm the hypothesis that computer-based learning environments facilitate the acquisition and transfer of higher-order thinking and learning skills (Dijkstra, Krammer & Merriënboer, 1992). Salomon (1992) argues that computers make possible student involvement in higher-order thinking skills by performing many of the lower-level cognitive tasks, by providing memory support and by juggling interrelated variables. Through a partnership with the computer, the user may also benefit from the effect of cognitive residue resulting in improvement or mastery of a skill or strategy. Salomon explains: The intellectual partnership with computer tools creates a zone of proximal development whereby learners are capable of carrying out tasks they could not possible carry out without the help and support provided by the computer. This partnership can both offer guidance that might be internalized to become self-guidance and stimulate the development of yet underdeveloped skills, resulting in a higher level of skill mastery (p.252).
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id e87d
authors Schierle, G. Goetz
year 1992
title Computer Aided Design for Wind and Seismic Forces
source Mission - Method - Madness [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-01-2] 1992, pp. 187-194
summary A computer program, Lateral Design Graphs (LDG), to consider lateral wind and seismic forces in the early design stages, is presented. LDG provides numeric data and graphs to visualize the effect of building height, shape, and framing system on lateral forces. Many critical decisions effecting lateral forces and elements to resist them are made at early design stages. Costly changes or reduced safety may result if they are not considered. For example, building height, shape and configuration impact lateral forces and building safety; so does the placement of shear walls in line with space needs. But the complex and time consuming nature of lateral force design by hand makes early consideration often not practical. Therefore the objectives of LDG are to: 1) visualize the cause and effect of lateral forces; 2) make the design process more transparent; 3) develop informed intuition; 4) facilitate trade-off studies at an early stage; 5) help to teach design for lateral forces.
series ACADIA
email schierle@usc.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id 886c
authors Shu, Li and Flowers, W.
year 1992
title Groupware Experiences in Three- Dimensional Computer-Aided Design
source CSCW 92 Proceedings, 92
summary A system that allows people to simultaneously modify a common design in a graphically rich environment was developed to identify and examine groapware interface issues unique to three-dimensional computer-aided design. Experiments confirmed that a simultaneous mode of edit access is preferred over a turn-taking mode for two-person interactions. Also, independent points of view (e.g., isometric versus top view) between designers optimized parallel activity. Further experiments that aimed to transfer software-usage knowledge through the groupware system led to the development of the viewpoint. The viewpoint is a tool that indicates the points of view of different designers as well as provides a method of pointing effective in an environment where arbitrary, contrasting points of views are allowed.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id ebc6
authors Stoker, Douglas F. and Jones, Dennis B.
year 1992
title RISCAD: A SIMPLIFIED APPROACH TO CAD SYSTEM DESIGN
source Mission - Method - Madness [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-01-2] 1992, pp. 113-123
summary When employing CAD systems to the design task, it is usually the case that 90% of the work is accomplished by 10% of the capabilities of the system. These capabilities are often more appropriate to the tasks of modeling and drafting rather than exploring design alternatives. CAD system design might well benefit from the application of the RISC philosophy, namely, identify and incorporate only those capabilities most appropriate and frequently used in the design process and make them very powerful and efficient, provide the ability to combine those capabilities to form compound operations, simplify and streamline the user interface and maximize the use of computational power. The RISCAD system (Reduced Instruction Set Computer Aided Design System) takes this approach.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email dbjones@vt.edu
last changed 2006/03/22 20:41

_id 592a
authors Takemura, H. and Kishino, F.
year 1992
title Cooperative work environment using virtual workspace
source Proceedings of the Conference on Computer-Supported Cooperative Work: 226-232. New York: The Association for Computing Machinery
summary A virtual environment, which is created by computer graphics and an appropriate user interface, can be used in many application fields, such as teleopetution, telecommunication and real time simulation. Furthermore, if this environment could be shared by multiple users, there would be more potential applications. Discussed in this paper is a case study of building a prototype of a cooperative work environment using a virtual environment, where more than two people can solve problemscooperatively, including design strategies and implementirig issues. An environment where two operators can directly grasp, move or release stereoscopic computer graphics images by hand is implemented. The system is built by combining head position tracking stereoscopic displays, hand gesture input devices and graphics workstations. Our design goal is to utilize this type of interface for a future teleconferencing system. In order to provide good interactivity for users, we discuss potential bottlenecks and their solutions. The system allows two users to share a virtual environment and to organize 3-D objects cooperatively.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id ddss9201
id ddss9201
authors Van Bakel, A.P.M.
year 1993
title Personality assessment in regard to design strategies
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture (Proceedings of a conference held in Mierlo, the Netherlands in July 1992), ISBN 0-7923-2444-7
summary This paper discusses some preliminary results of several knowledge-acquisition and documentation-structuring techniques that were used to assess the working styles of architects. The focus of this assessment was on their strategic design behaviour. Hettema's Interactive Personality Model (Hettema 1979, 1989) was used to explain and interpret these results. The methods used to acquire the necessary data are protocol analysis, card sorting and interviews. The results suggest that at least three parameters can be used to explain and differentiate the strategic design behaviour of architects. These parameters are S (site-oriented), B (brief-oriented) and C (concept-oriented). A priority hierarchy of these parameters reveals six major distinguishable working styles. These results are captured in a new design model that can be used in data bank implementations.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id c54a
authors Welch, W. and Witkin, A.
year 1992
title Variational surface modeling
source Computer Graphics, 26, Proceedings, SIGGRAPH 92
summary We present a newapproach to interactivemodeling of freeform surfaces. Instead of a fixed mesh of control points, the model presented to the user is that of an infinitely malleable surface, with no fixed controls. The user is free to apply control points and curves which are then available as handles for direct manipulation. The complexity of the surface's shape may be increased by adding more control points and curves, without apparent limit. Within the constraints imposed by the controls, the shape of the surface is fully determined by one or more simple criteria, such as smoothness. Our method for solving the resulting constrained variational optimization problems rests on a surface representation scheme allowing nonuniform subdivision of B-spline surfaces. Automatic subdivision is used to ensure that constraints are met, and to enforce error bounds. Efficient numerical solutions are obtained by exploiting linearities in the problem formulation and the representation.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 3b2a
authors Westin, S., Arvo, J. and Torrance, K.
year 1992
title Predicting reflectance functions from complex surfaces
source Computer Graphics, 26(2):255-264, July 1992
summary We describe a physically-based Monte Carlo technique for approximating bidirectional re•ectance distribution functions (BRDFs) for a large class of geometries by directly simulating optical scattering. The technique is more general than previous analytical models: it removes most restrictions on surface microgeometry. Three main points are described: a new representation of the BRDF, a Monte Carlo technique to estimate the coef•cients of the representation, and the means of creating a milliscale BRDF from microscale scattering events. These allowthe prediction of scattering from essentially arbitrary roughness geometries. The BRDF is concisely represented by a matrix of spherical harmonic coef•cients; the matrix is directly estimated from a geometric optics simulation, enforcing exact reciprocity. The method applies to roughness scales that are large with respect to the wavelength of light and small with respect to the spatial density at which the BRDF is sampled across the surface; examples include brushed metal and textiles. The method is validated by comparing with an existing scattering model and sample images are generated with a physically-based global illumination algorithm.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 29e7
authors Batty, M.
year 1992
title Urban modeling in computer-graphic and geographic information system environments
source Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design 19, pp. 663-688
summary Contributed by Susan Pietsch (spietsch@arch.adelaide.edu.au)
keywords 3D City Modeling, Development Control, Design Control
series other
last changed 2001/06/04 18:27

_id 6964
authors Daniel, T.
year 1992
title Data visualization for decision support in environmental management
source Landscape and Urban Planning 21, pp. 261-263
summary Contributed by Susan Pietsch (spietsch@arch.adelaide.edu.au)
keywords 3D City Modeling, Development Control, Design Control
series other
last changed 2001/06/04 18:27

_id 2006_040
id 2006_040
authors Ambach, Barbara
year 2006
title Eve’s Four Faces-Interactive surface configurations
source Communicating Space(s) [24th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-5-9] Volos (Greece) 6-9 September 2006, pp. 40-44
summary Eve’s Four Faces consists of a series of digitally animated and interactive surfaces. Their content and structure are derived from a collection of sources outside the conventional boundaries of architectural research, namely psychology and the broader spectrum of arts and culture. The investigation stems from a psychological study documenting the attributes and social relationships of four distinct personality prototypes; the “Individuated”, the “Traditional”, the “Conflicted” and the “Assured”. (York and John, 1992) For the purposes of this investigation, all four prototypes are assumed to be inherent, to certain degrees, in each individual; however, the propensity towards one of the prototypes forms the basis for each individual’s “personality structure”. The attributes, social implications and prospects for habitation have been translated into animations and surfaces operating within A House for Eve’s Four Faces. The presentation illustrates the potential for constructed surfaces to be configured and transformed interactively, responding to the needs and qualities associated with each prototype. The intention is to study the effects of each configuration and how it may be therapeutic in supporting, challenging or altering one’s personality as it oscillates and shifts through the four prototypical conditions.
keywords interaction; digital; environments; psychology; prototypes
series eCAADe
type normal paper
last changed 2006/09/11 16:22

_id 4704
authors Amirante, I., Rinaldi, S. and Muzzillo, F.
year 1992
title A Tutorial Experiment Concerning Dampness Diagnosis Supported by an Expert System
source CAAD Instruction: The New Teaching of an Architect? [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Barcelona (Spain) 12-14 November 1992, pp. 159-172
summary (A) The teaching of Technology of Building Rehabilitation in Italian Universities - (B) Experimental course of technological rehabilitation with computer tools - (C) Synthesis of technological approach - (D) Dampness diagnostic process using the Expert System - (E) Primary consideration on tutorial experience - (F) Bibliography
series eCAADe
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 0293
authors Asanowicz, A., Jakimowicz, A., Koperski, A. And Sawicki, B.
year 1992
title Education Center of Computer Aided Design: Technical University of Bialystok, Poland - Hopes, Possibilities, Limitations.
source CAAD Instruction: The New Teaching of an Architect? [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Barcelona (Spain) 12-14 November 1992, pp. 267-272
summary This paper describes a Project of Professional Computer Aided Design Education in Bialystock (Poland).

series eCAADe
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id a6d8
authors Baletic, Bojan
year 1992
title Information Codes of Mutant Forms
source CAAD Instruction: The New Teaching of an Architect? [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Barcelona (Spain) 12-14 November 1992, pp. 173-186
summary If we assume that the statements from this quote are true, than we have to ask ourselves the question: "Should we teach architecture as we do?" This paper describes our experience in developing a knowledge base using a neural network system to serve as a "intelligent assistant" to students and other practicing architects in the conceptual phase of their work on housing design. Our approach concentrated on rising the awareness of the designer about the problem, not by building rules to guide him to a solution, but by questioning the categories and typologies by which he classifies and understands a problem. This we achieve through examples containing mutant forms, imperfect rules, gray zones between black and white, that carry the seeds of new solutions.
series eCAADe
email bbaletic@arhitekt.hr
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id e039
authors Bertin, Vito
year 1992
title Structural Transformations (Basic Architectural Unit 6)
source CAAD Instruction: The New Teaching of an Architect? [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Barcelona (Spain) 12-14 November 1992, pp. 413-426
summary While the teaching of the phenomenon of form as well as space is normally seen within an environment of free experimentation and personal expression, other directions prove to be worth of pursuit. The proposed paper represents such an exploration. The generation of controlled complexity and structural transformations have been the title of the project which forms the base of this paper. In it, the potential for creative development of the student was explored in such a way, that as in the sciences a process can be reproduced or an exploration utilized in further experimentation. The cube as a well proven B.A.U. or basic architectural unit has again been used in our work. Even a simple object like a cube has many properties. As properties are never pure, but always related to other properties, and looking at a single property as a specific value of a variable, it is possible to link a whole field of objects. These links provide a network of paths through which exploration and development is possible. The paper represents a first step in a direction which we think will compliment the already established basic design program.

series eCAADe
email vito@osk.threewebnet.or.jp
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

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