CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id 855d
authors Alavalkama, I., Aura, S. and Palmqvist H. (Eds.)
year 1993
title Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture
source Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3 / Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, 196 p.
summary The European Architectural Endoscopy Association was established in connection with the Association’s first international conference on August 25-28, 1993, which was hosted by the Department of Architecture at the Tampere University of Technology. The purpose of the EAEA is to promote experimentation, research, communication, exchange of experiences, collaboration, user participation and teaching in the field of endoscopy and environmental simulation. The first EAEA conference was attended by 25 people from 15 different universities. Working under the general heading of “Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture”, the conference had three specific themes for the first three days: Review of Existing Laboratories; Theories, Methods and Applications; and the Future of Endoscopy. In this volume we have compiled all the papers that were presented at the conference. The texts have been printed in the form we received them, without any attempt to edit them for consistency in style, adding hopefully to a sense of authenticity. Unfortunately, the impressive videos we saw at the conference on the possibilities of endoscopy and environmental simulation as a tool in architecture, cannot be documented here.

keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
email alavalka@arc.tut.fi
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 20c1
authors Alavalkama, Ilkka
year 1993
title Technical Aspects of the Urban Simulator in Tampere University of Technology
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 35-46
summary The colour video recording Urban Simulator in TUT was built very early compared with the development of video systems. A contract for planning the simulator electronics, mechanics and camera systems was made in january 1978 with two TUT students: Jani Granholm (computer science and engineering) and Ilkka Alavalkama (machine design and automation). Ease of control and maintenance were asked by side of ”human movement inside coloured small-scale architectural models”. From the beginning, all components of the system were carefully tested and chosen from various alternatives. Financial resources were quite limited, which lead to a long building process and to self-planned and produced mechanical and electronical elements. Some optical systems were constructed by using elements from various manufacturers.

keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id ae19
authors Armstrong, Richard
year 1993
title On The Technical Features Of The Endoscope - OES Modelscope as a Case in Point
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 153-156
summary The Olympus Optical Company of Japan was formed in 1919, with the introduction of the first generation single lens reflects camera, and soon after with the first microscope. Since that time, the organisation has developed and is now split into three main divisions: manufacturing and supplying cameras, microscopes and endoscopes. Other smaller specialist divisions exist suppling such products as dictaphones. Perhaps, rather surprisingly, the endoscope division is the largest part of the organisation. Through a world-wide organisation of four main business centers, Olympus Industrial, the name given to the industrial endoscope division, provides service and support to its customers. Each of the main business centers operates through agents and distributors. There are many different industries which gain the benefits of saved time and money provided by using endoscopes. To meet the needs of so many varied industries, there is a need to have a wide range of equipment. This includes light sources, to provide illumination, rigid borescopes, flexible fiberscopes, if views around corners are needed, and the new technology videoscopes. These instruments use the latest CCD technology with a small chip situated in the distal end of the scope, instead of fiberoptic image bundles used in fiberscopes.

keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 4c30
authors Aura, Seppo
year 1993
title Episode as a Unit of Analysis of Movement
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 53-66
summary Everybody who has read his Gordon Cullen or his Edmund H. Bacon knows that movement has long been recognized as a factor in environmental planning in many ways. For example, in the traditional Japanese promenade garden the importance of movement has always been appreciated. The promenader gains an intense experience of the succession, variation and rhythm of the surrounding scene. The spaces and paths lead him from one stage to another. The spatial structure of the Japanese promenade garden, as well as of traditional Japanese architecture in general, is joined most intensively to time and motion. The environment is in relation to the flow of change in many sense, both concretely and existentially. Taking an example of western urban environment. Here perhaps the most marked sequential spaces are to be found in small medieval, mediterranean towns. Thanks to their organic growth, narrow and winding streets and the emphasis on public squares, most of them provide exciting experiences if the observer is only interested in seeing the townscape from the point of view of movement. There are also examples of this kind of environment in Finland. In old wooden towns like Porvoo and Rauma one can still find varied and rhythmic streetscapes and networks of streets and squares, together with a human scale and an almost timeless atmosphere. One could say that such an opportunity to experience spaces sequentially, or as serial visions, is an important dimension for us, especially as pedestrians. And as Gordon Cullen has shown there is in any urban environment much scope to heighten this experience. For example, by creating a sense of ’entering in’ some place, ’leaving for’, ’moving towards’, ’turning into’, ’walking through’ some place or ’following on’ the flow of spaces. Or, as Edmund H. Bacon has said, the departure point of good town planning should be that the successive towns spaces give rise to a flow of harmonic experiences: present experiences merge with earlier ones and become a step towards a future. Or, again in the words of Donald Appleyard, Kevin Lynch and John R. Myer: “The experience of a city is basically of a moving view, and this is the view we must understand if we wish to reform the look of our cities”.
keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 6858
authors Bosselmann, Peter and Gilson, Kevin
year 1993
title Visualizing Urban Form
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 9-30
summary This article is about the use of visual simulation by urban designers. We explore briefly the history of simulation from its origins in the 1960s in the United States, explain guidelines for its application in urban design and planning projects, and discuss in greater detail how new simulation techniques might be integrated into design instruction and practice.
keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id c207
authors Branzell, Arne
year 1993
title The Studio CTH-A and the Searching Picture
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 129-140
summary What happens during an architect’s search for the best solution? How does he (or she) begin, which tools are chosen, what happens when he comes to a standstill? The activities – sketching, discussions with other people, making models, taking walks to think, visits to the library, etc? What is an ordinary procedure and what is more specific? Do the tools have an impact on the final solution chosen? What happens during periods of no activity? Are they important? In which fields of activities are signs of the searching process to be found? In other words — what is the process of creative thinking for architects? Mikael Hedin and myself at Design Methods, Chalmers University of Technology, have started research into architects’ problem-solving. We have finished a pilot study on a very experienced architect working traditionally, without Cad (”The Bo Cederlöf Case”). We have started preliminary discussions with our second ”Case”, an architect in another situation, who has been working for many years with Cad equipment (Gert Wingårdh). For our next case, we will study a third situation – two or more architects who share the responsibility for the solution and where the searching is a consequence of a dialogue between equal partners. At present, we are preparing a report on theories in and methods for Searching and Creativity. I will give you some results of our work up till now, in the form of ten hypotheses on the searching process. Finally, I would like to present those fields of activity where we have so far found signs of searching. Our approach, in comparison with earlier investigations into searching (the most respected being Arnheim’s study on Picasso’s completion of the Guernica) is to collect and observe signs of searching during the process, not afterwards. We are, to use a metaphor, following in the footsteps of the hunter, recording the path he chooses, what marks he makes, what tools, implements and equipment he uses. For practising architects: a better understanding of what is going on and encouragement to try new ways of searching, for architectural students: better preparation and training for problem solving. It all began while we compared the different objects in our collection of sketches at the Chalmers STUDIO for Visualisation and Communication. (For some years, we have been gathering sketches by Alvar Aalto, Jorn Utzon, Ralph Erskine, Erik and Tore Ahlsén, Lewerenz, Nyrén, Lindroos, Wingårdh and others in a permanent exhibition). We observed similarities in these sketches which allowed us to frame ten hypotheses about the searching process.

keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
email branzell@arch.chalmers.se
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 25de
authors Ervamaa, Pekka
year 1993
title Integrated Visualization
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 157-160
summary The Video and Multimedia studio at VTT, Technical Research Centre of Finland, started with endoscopy photography of scale models. Video recordings has been made since 1985 and computer graphic since 1989. New visualization methods and techniques has been taken into use as a part of research projects, but mainly we have been working with clients commissions only. Theoretical background for the visualizations is strong. Research professor Hilkka Lehtonen has published several papers concerning the theory of visualization in urban planning. This studio is the only professional level video unit at Technical Research Centre, which is a large polytechnic research unit. We produce video tapes for many other research units. All kind of integrated methods of visualization are useful in these video productions, too.
keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
email Pekka.Ervamaa@vtt.fi
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 49f3
authors Glanville, Ranulph
year 1993
title Looking into Endoscopy - The Limitations of Evaluation in Architectural Design
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 185-193
summary The means available to architects in their age-old task of creating (most usually, though not necessarily) buildings that do not yet exist (ie. virtual realities), can be seen as falling into two groups. Those that help us develop architectural ideas (exploring), and those that help us evaluate or test them (illustrating). In the former category, we have, for instance, the ”drawing on the back of the envelope”, the discursive brainstorm, and the design ”conversation with ourselves via paper and pencil” (the drawing strikes back). In the latter, we may include physical model building, careful (projective) drawing (including drawings that are instructions for making), mathematical and design science modelling and calculating, visualising techniques such as the rendered perspective, most CAD (computer aided design) work and architectural endoscopy. These techniques may be thought of in two ways, as Bosselman reported: the explanation (eg. the organisational plan) and the experience (eg the ”photo-realistic” perspective). Attached to these we have rules for success, such as those of ”style” (in the broad sense of the personal style that allows us to assume that we have answers to problems that have yet to appear). It should be clear even from the list above that there are many more techniques and technologies for evaluation (illustration) than for exploration (design): such is the mystery of design. It is the primary purpose of this paper to invite those involved in providing the enormous effort that has gone into making such techniques for illustration — evaluation — to consider how their efforts help with that other, and crucial, area — that of exploring: and to redress some of the balance of that effort towards exploration. For it occurs to me (as a teacher of architecture), that evaluation does not provide a course for action — it merely helps us determine what may be wrong (according to some criteria with which we choose not to argue). And, no matter how right or wrong a design may be, knowing that it is wrong doesn’t help us either modify it, or find a better initial idea. It only tells us we are not right — always assuming the evaluative model is correct; perhaps.
keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 2608
authors Hartman, Jan B.
year 1993
title Application of Endoscopy in Road–Design
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 109-116
summary Within the Dutch Ministry of Transport a special Division on Transport and Traffic Research is occupied with all aspects concerning mobility and traffic safety on a national level. Research and advice on the quality of the road–infrastructure is one of the main topics. For road–design a set of very detailed guidelines have been developed. Construction and reconstruction of parts of the high–way–network are tested against these guidelines. In this matter the actual road–user takes a central place. In the design–phase of a project on road-infrastructure contributions of a number of experts are taken into account. Expert–opinions on elements of the road–design result in a overall road–design. The road–scene of the overall–design is tested against visual requirements for safe driving, from a drivers point of view. Goal is to give advice on improvement of the visual quality of the road design. Research in this field is now carried out by Grontmij Consulting Engineers, mainly under authority of the Ministry of Transport. Key–word is Improvement of Quality. Who is going to notice? Who will benefit from it? Of course it is a comforting thought for road–owners and designers to know they won’t have to be ashamed for what they have come up with. Primary goal is that ‘We the people’ are provided with a high–standard road infrastructure. The road–scene research section studies the quality of the visual information as presented to the roadusers. We try to create visual circumstances in which drivers will be able to perform their driving task is a proper way. When the visual representation in the brain differs from reality, you have a serious problem. A traffic safety problem, with casualties and fatalities. A burden for society, financially and emotionally.

keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 69b3
authors Markelin, Antero
year 1993
title Efficiency of Model Endoscopic Simulation - An Experimental Research at the University of Stuttgart
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 31-34
summary At the Institute of Urban Planning at the University of Stuttgart early experiments were made with the help of endoscopes in the late 1970’s. The intention was to find new instruments to visualize urban design projects. The first experiment included the use of a 16 mm film of a 1:170 scale model of the market place at Karlsruhe, including design alternatives (with trees, without trees etc). The film was shown to the Karlsruhe authorities, who had to make the decision about the alternatives. It was said, that the film gave a great help for the decision-making and a design proposition had never before been presented in such understandable way. In 1975-77, with the support of the Deutsche Forschungsgemeinschaft (German Research Foundation) an investigation was carried out into existing endoscopic simulation facilities, such as those in Wageningen, Lund and Berkeley. The resulting publication was mainly concerned with technical installations and their applications. However a key question remained: ”Can reality be simulated with endoscopy?” In 1979-82, in order to answer that question, at the Institute was carried out the most extensive research of the time, into the validity of endoscopic simulation. Of special importance was the inclusion of social scientists and psychologists from the University of Heidelberg and Mannheim. A report was produced in 1983. The research was concerned with the theory of model simulation, its ways of use and its users, and then the establishment of requirements for effective model simulation. For the main research work with models or simulation films, psychological tests were developed which enabled a tested person to give accurate responses or evidence without getting involved in alien technical terminology. It was also thought that the use of semantic differentials would make the work imprecise or arbitrary.

keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 21f1
authors Martens, Bob
year 1993
title A Renaissance of Architectural Endoscopy?
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 143-152
summary Before individual activities in the field of endoscopy are to be explained a brief insight into the surrounding thereof may prove meaningful. At the Department for Spatial Simulation endoscopy is not treated independently, but principally in connection with other simulation techniques such as the simulation of architectural spatial formations in full-scale, CAAD, stereoscopy and holography. The term SAAD (Simulation Aided Architectural Design) refers to a combination of spatial simulation techniques. This aspect plays a major role at the Vienna University of Technology.

keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/Renaissance/rae.html
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 8bad
authors Matalasov, Michael
year 1993
title Technical Conception of Videosystems Laboratory at Moscow Institute of Architecture
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 47-50
summary The basic point of our conception is not to submit the architect to technical means, but give him freedom of choice and the opportunity to work in the environment closest to the real one. In our situation it means, that we should provide work in real videoinformative space. Thus, our conception of education is to give all the junior students compulsory general information about videosimulation, and to ensure optional more professional work of undergraduates while carrying out their school projects. We consider, that in the architect’s activity simulation (making small-scale models) plays an essential part, because the small-scale model is the first and the only source of true three-dimensional information about the object designed. At the same time videosimulation does not deny or substitute computer-aided design. To get reliable visual information from the model is possible with the help of special technical means equipped with periscopic devices. In Moscow Institute of Architecture this work has been carried out for 10 years.

keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id c308
authors Ohno, Ryuzo and Hata, Tomohiro
year 1993
title The Effect of Spatial Structure on Visual Search Behavior
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 89-98
summary People’s voluntary movement through an environment is essential for their comprehension of three dimensional space. It may be hypothesized that they move and look around in order to pick up wanted information at the time. This study investigated the following more specific hypotheses by an experiment using a user-controlled space-sequence simulator and the analysis of the subjects’ behavioral data recorded by the simulation system: (1) The strategy of visual search behavior (body movement and viewing direction) is influenced by spatial structure (form and organization). (2) The strategy can be explained by the amount of visual information in the environment, i.e., people move and look in a certain direction in order to maximize effective information at a given moment and position. - If these hypotheses are supported, we can predict people’s behavior in an unfamiliar place on the basis of the spatial structure.

keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
email rohno@n.cc.titech.ac.jp
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id eba1
authors Palmqvist, Henri
year 1993
title The Environmental Simulator and Applications of the Episode Theory in Teaching Architecture
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 67-74
summary Every architectural design consists of spaces and series of successive spaces. The way in which spaces are arranged to form a series can only be experienced by passing through them. This means that movement plays a very important role in the experience of our spatial environment. At the same time, this presents a major challenge to architects, and especially to students in architecture, who need to take into consideration how their designs are experienced in movement. Therefore, at the Department of Architecture in Tampere one of our aims in Architectural Design is to teach our students to see the spaces, masses, houses and housing areas they design from the point of view of movement. This training has mainly been provided in the context of a Basic Course and Professional Course I in Architectural Design and the related course on Time and Motion in Architecture. Projects related to the theory of time and motion are started with students in their first and second year. A major role in all this teaching has been played by our environmental simulator, with which we have been able to evaluate our work by using models on different scales (1/200, 1/100, 1/500). We have applied three main perspectives in our courses: analysis of space, series of spaces, and series of spaces in motion.

keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id cfd2
authors Penttilä, Hannu
year 1993
title Visualizing with Digital Tools - Endoscopy Versus Computer Modeling
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 161-166
summary This approach sees traditional video endoscopy and computer-based modeling techniques as two methods whose combination gives advantages for both. Endoscopy and computer based tools are not alternative nor rival techniques. New digital visualization possibilities are available within the context of CAD- systems. High-end and more expensive visualization has gained influence from commercial advertizing and also from entertainment industry. Traditional endoscope video has longer historical background and it’s roots are in model photography, model-based simulations and video techniques. The main focus of this paper is to describe Tampere architectural department’s computer based visualization facilities briefly with two cases studies. Our status and resources in traditional simulation have been rather good since mid 70’s, and now when also the basic digital facilities (word processing & CAD) exist, it will be our next challenge to deepen and develop the variety of available simulation methods, equipment – and naturally knowledge in combining them.
keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
email penttila@mittaviiva.fi
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 6f5f
authors Pfeilsticker, Arpad
year 1993
title Light Simulation in Urban Space
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 117-122
summary Even today for the city planners there are in only rare cases digital urban models available in which with help of computer-simulation an attempt can be made to develop a light conception. Therefore in the endoscopic urban space simulation I started to develop an analogues tool for the city planners, to give more emphasis to the light design in urban space
keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
email arpad.Pfeilsticker@t-online.de
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id cc06
authors Siitonen, Petri
year 1993
title Future of Endoscopy
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 181-184
summary Is there any future for endoscopy in environmental visualization? We all are astounded by the rapid development of computer graphics and its’ various applications in environmental visualization. The issue is, can computer graphics live up to all expectations in realtime visualization and can present endoscopy technology be developed to meet the challenge? What are the possibilities to combine the two techniques? The above in mind we started a project at the Faculty of Architecture in the Helsinki University of Technology. First we took a critical look at the current state of computer graphics concerning realtime environmental visualization. Second we studied the current use of endoscopes in association with The Department of Architecture in the University of Tampere and formed a concept for a ”second generation” endoscope. The spreadsheet in the following page is an abbreviation of our studies. As you may notice the endoscopes currently in use couldn’t get some of the +-answers I have marked down here. The endoscope technology referred here is from the coming endoscope of the Helsinki University of Technology.

keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
type normal paper
email psiitone@arc.tut.fi
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2006/12/26 06:39

_id 275e
authors Stenros, Anne
year 1993
title Orientation, Identification, Representation - Space and Perception in Architecture
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 75-88
summary Perception is essential to being in the world — through perception we are in the world. Perception is our way to understand reality and to acquire knowledge of it and be in interaction with the environment. Experiencing architecture is based on perception: the spatial orientation, identification and representation which together make possible our environmental experience. Architecture is not only seeing, but also experiencing. Environmental endoscopy makes it possible to study the environmental orientation, the spatial elements of the environment, but the identification and the representation which are included essentially in the overall perception of the environment presuppose the actual experience of the environment. This presentation discusses all these three levels of the spatial experience. In architecture, space can be discussed in many different ways: we can talk about, for example, architectural space that includes inside and outside space; we can discuss urban space that includes the physical structure of the whole built environment or we can talk about what has been called existential space, that includes the relationship between man and his physical environment. In this presentation space is considered in its wide, experience based meaning: space as the environment of perception, the interaction between man and space, or as a kind of cognitive space theory. Most essential in this discussion is the experience of place, the feeling of place, and its origins, since place is the most unique experience of space, it is man’s deepest experience of the environment.

keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 0319
authors Stenros, Helmer
year 1993
title The History of the Laboratory for Visual Simulation and Research Work in Tampere
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 3-8
summary Many things are born from lucky chances or as the sum of them. I see it that way when I consider those events and stages that have led to this meeting in Tampere. For myself, the study of the environmental simulator and the activities around it started in Copenhagen in 1977 in the meeting of the professors of architecture of the northern countries. I met Professor Acking from Lund University of Technology and he told me about his studies in perception and the black–and–white environmental simulator that they had built. When we started architectural education in Tampere in 1969, I had from the beginning looked for new ways to teach in order to renew the old, traditional ways of teaching architecture. After the meeting in Copenhagen, we decided to build our own environmental simulator in our faculty in Tampere.

keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 4cd5
authors Thiel, Philip
year 1993
title A Better Understanding of The Role of Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 123-128
summary As the most tool-dependent species on our planet, our technology determines our activities and thus defines our existence. Because of this a clear understanding of the ends-means relationship of our tools is of critical social- and professional-concern. Endoscopy, or the use of periscopic-like devices to extract human eye-level visual images, static or dynamic, from iconic scale models of proposed environments, is a case in point. Use is appropriate at advanced stages of planning and design, when such experiential simulations are necessary for both professional evaluation and lay approval. But note that the simulation is only a means to an end, and that the fundamental purpose is to evoke a response to a proposal. Simulation and response are opposite sides of the same coin, and the response is the goal. Any such responses are meaningful only with reference to the ultimate users’ experiential preferences, preferably explicitly established as ”performance specifications” before the start of the design process in consultation with a representative sample of these people. This implies the necessity of a means to identify these beneficiaries of our work, and a means to characterize their environmental ”experiential profiles”. It also requires a means for the discursive scripting of their experiential preferences. The development of a design oriented to the achievement of these ends then depends on a similar time-based scoring for the description of sequentially-experienced environmental attributes, hypothesized as related to these responses. Endoscopy then takes its place as the means for a penultimate check on the experiential design-hypotheses, in conjunction with suitable means to record the simulates’ responses in the same format as the original experiential performance specifications, for comparison therewith. The danger in being the most tool-dependent species on Earth is that in our necessary concern with technological means we may loose sight of our ultimate human ends; as suggested by the apothegm ”the operation was a success, but the patient died”. Our inexorable impetus toward technological development means that the specialized training that is inherent in professional education tends to separate and distance the perceptions of those so conditioned from those of the many others who are the presumed beneficiaries of their efforts.

keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

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