CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 101 to 120 of 255

_id 63a9
authors Hellgardt, Michael
year 1993
title Architectural Theory and Design Grammars
source [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Eindhoven (The Netherlands) 11-13 November 1993
summary The idea of artificial brains and artificial intelligence (AI) has been subject to criticism. The objection of J. Searle, for instance, which has been published in 1984 and which was partially directly addressed to one of the centres of AI, the Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, is mainly based on two points: (1) interactions between physiological and mental functions, and (2) the intentionality and context-relatedness of meaning. - With an emphasis on architectural design, this paper is about the second point, because the problem of meaning is a neuralgic point in the discussion of "artificial intelligence in design" (AID). Technical parameters are incompatible with mechanisms of meaning in any field of artistic, cultural or non-technical expression. This point, that is the relation between acts of meaning and acts of technical problem-solving and, connectedly, the relation between technological and architectural design, has been widely ignored in the discussion on AID. The development seems to be dominated by the tacit assumption that architecture can be articulated and generated purely in technical and formal terms of information processing beyond the field of architecture itself. Design and shape grammars have become a well established field in the discussion of AID, also with respect to architecture. But questions of architectural history and theory are touched on only incidentally and not sufficiently in this discussion. The problem is not, in other words, simply to include more or less unrelated cases of architecture, or architectural concepts -even if these are famous ones, such as Laugier's original hut for instance but to establish structural relations between arguments of architectural theory and arguments of AID.

series eCAADe
email michael@hellgar.iaf.nl
last changed 2003/05/10 08:03

_id ddss9218
id ddss9218
authors Hensen, J.L.M.
year 1993
title Design support via simulation of building and plant thermal interaction
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture (Proceedings of a conference held in Mierlo, the Netherlands in July 1992), ISBN 0-7923-2444-7
summary Design decision support related to building energy consumption and/or indoor climate should be based on an integral approach to the environment, the building, heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) system, and the occupants. The tools to achieve this are now available in the form of computer simulation systems which treat the building and plant as an integrated dynamic system. Although its potentials reach beyond the area of Computer Aided Building Design, the paper describes building and plant energy simulation within the context of CABD, design decision support and design evaluation. Currently, computer simulation is only used indirectly as a design decision support mechanism; that is, its power is not delivered very efficiently to the design profession. This paper suggests some future research directions. These are aimed at providing a mechanism to overcome this problem by developing an intelligent front end' which bridges the gap between sophisticated computer simulation tools and the design profession.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id c5bb
authors Hirschberg, U., Meister, M. and Neumann, F.
year 1993
title Processing of Geographic Data for CAAD-supported Analysis and Design of Urban Development Areas
source [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Eindhoven (The Netherlands) 11-13 November 1993
summary The interdisciplinary research project aims at the development of a hard- and software environment to support the representation, analysis, manipulation and design of urban development areas for architects and city planners. It was started in 1990 and involves three groups at the ETH Zurich: Architecture/Urban design - Processing of Geographic Data/Photogrammetry -Computer Sciences/CAAD. The first part of this paper will give an introduction to the goals and implications of the project by comparing it with a similar project one of the authors took part in as a student. Then the paper gives a brief description of the work of the three groups involved, an overview of the methods they employed and the results that were achieved. The main focus will be on the work of the CAAD group . Finally some conclusions are drawn and problems are discussed. The future work includes the testing of the tool by students during the winter term 1993/94.

series eCAADe
email hirschberg@tugraz.at
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id c05c
authors Hovestadt, Ludger
year 1993
title A4 Digital Building: Extensive Computer Support for Building Design, Construction, and Management
source CAAD Futures 93 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-89922-7] (Pittsburgh / USA), 1993, pp. 405-421
summary The integrated design, construction, and management of buildings are described as being of unlimited complexity. The data structures required to support these tasks cannot be predefined and have- to be worked out during the design process. An instrument that integrates weakly and strongly structured data is necessary. A4 proposes - as a minimal structuring mechanism - the position of information in a dataspace. It offers diverse additional and optional structuring mechanisms. Examples from different domains show the particular strengths of the A4 integration model.
keywords Architecture, Intelligent Building, CAD, Multi-Media, Hypermedia, Active Objects, Virtual Reality, Multi-User, Expert System, Case-Based Reasoning, Communication, Data-Mining
series CAAD Futures
email hovestadt@arch.ethz.ch
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id f44f
authors Huang, Ying-Hsiu
year 2000
title Investigating the Cognitive Behavior of Generating Idea Sketches. Neural Network Simulation
source CAADRIA 2000 [Proceedings of the Fifth Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 981-04-2491-4] Singapore 18-19 May 2000, pp. 287-296
summary In idea sketches, there are a number of ambiguous shapes. Designers will associate and transform some shapes into others (Liu, 1993). Then, they evaluate these shapes in terms of functions and design requirements; furthermore, they would have generated other shapes that certified the design requirements (Huang, 1999). However, not only is the idea of design composed of one element, but also consisted of varied components. The purpose of this paper is to investigate how designers generate ideas of multi-component products, and to simulate this phenomenon by neural networks. At the same time, this paper attempts to study the design cognitive behavior of idea-generating stages, and explores the designers' cognitive phenomenon. Therefore, there are two stages in this paper: First, I conduct a cognitive experiment to realize how designers generate the multi-component product and acquire the sketches that designers generated. Second, I train the neural networks to simulate the behavior of idea generation and explore the cognitive phenomenon in design sketches. As a result, networks associate one shape that trained before, and then generate a complete idea. This phenomenon is similar to the cognitive behavior of designers who saw the ambiguous shape as one shape, which was retrieved from LTM. Moreover, the neural network is examined by a rectangle, which is totally different from the training patterns. The network will associate a confused shape. But the network will associate different shapes by adjusting some critical parameters. Designers can generate variable shapes from one shape, but the signal neural network can't simulate this kind of behavior. On the contrary, this paper proposes five sequential networks to generate variable shapes from the same shape and simulates how designers develop ideas.
series CAADRIA
email richhys@ms10.hinet.net
last changed 2000/08/07 07:11

_id 2864
authors Isakovic, Tatiana and Fischinger, Matej
year 1993
title Making Reinforced Concrete Cross-sections Design Easy and Understandable
source [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Eindhoven (The Netherlands) 11-13 November 1993
summary Modern computing facilities provide an alternative graphical approach to the design of cross-sections. A description of this process might be "strength evaluation", since, for any chosen cross-section, concrete strength, and reinforcement size, location, and yield strength, the flexural resistance (capacity) is defined by the bending moment-axial force interaction diagram. The factored forces are then plotted into the diagram and, by comparing the capacity and demand on the computer screen, the designer can decide about the suitability of the chosen cross-section. If necessary, the cross-sectional properties can be changed easily. There are several advantages of this design approach. The design procedure is fast, clear and economical. For example, all loading combinations for all the columns of the frame in Fig. 1 can be checked simultaneously. The procedure is the same for various shapes of cross-sections and it enables simple reinforcement optimization as well as the typization of cross-sections. For example, only two types of cross-sections can satisfy the design requirements for all the columns in the mentioned frame.
series eCAADe
last changed 2003/02/26 20:39

_id 09b4
authors Ismail, Ashraf and McCartney, Kevin
year 1993
title A Tool for Conceptual Design Evaluation Based on Compliance with Site-Development Briefs and Related Planning Regulations
source [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Eindhoven (The Netherlands) 11-13 November 1993
summary The need has been established for a computer based decision support tool to use during the conceptual stages of architectural design. The main functions are to check design compliance with the requirements of local planning authorities; characteristics evaluated will include building size, height, plot ratios, circulation and accessibility, and the preservation of natural features on site. This tool is being developed to operate under AutoCAD environment; the construction industry standard computer aided design software, following standard layering convention, integrated command lines, and pull-down menus. In addition to the common graphical output; i.c. plans, elevations and three dimensional models, it will generate textual analysis in report format to use as part of the Environmental Impact Analysis of proposed development. The tool's functions will be based upon the result of two types of field studies. First, interviews and questionnaires will be carried out with architects and planners of both private and public sectors. These will cover issues related to the performance of Computer Aided Architectural Design applications with regard to the evaluation of design schematics, and decision-making for the production of data for environmental statements. Second, field observation and participation will be carried out to observe decision-makers behaviour during assessment of building design proposals. A prototype is currently under development and will be tested against the expectations of the tool designer, Ashraf Ismail, and a team of professionals to be involved in the field studies. A critical analysis of the prototype design methodology and the study findings will be documented in the research thesis to be presented in June 1995.

series eCAADe
last changed 1998/08/24 09:01

_id fda4
authors Jalkanen, Janne
year 2000
title Building a spatially immersive display - HUTCAVE
source Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo, Finland
summary A spatially immersive display is a display that surrounds the user, thus removing or alleviating many disadvantages the common virtual reality systems, such as head-mounted displays have. The most common example of these spatially immersive displays is the CAVE, "CAVE Automatic Virtual Environment", first built at University of Illinois, in 1993. It combines a large field-of-view with high-resolution images and a high frame refresh rate. In this work, the current Virtual Reality (VR) and Virtual Environment (VE) systems are examined, and then the CAVE construction is presented. Principles of stereo vision are explained and current methods of obtaining both autostereoscopic and stereopsis-based vision are reviewed. Aspects of different projection methods, screens, mirrors, projectors, tracking equipment, and computing systems are examined. Also, recent work in CAVE audio, so far neglected in research, is presented. Some of the mathematics is also explained, since in most CAVE-systems some sort of optical folding is necessary. Two cases of CAVE construction are presented, both at the Helsinki University of Technology. The first is a single-wall installation built as a temporary system, and the second is a four-sided CAVE at a new location, superseding the temporary installation. Finally the conclusions are presented, both from the process management point of view, and from the technical point of view, examining the good and bad points of the chosen solutions.
series thesis:MSc
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id fbda
authors Jo, J.H.
year 1993
title A Computational Design Process Model Using a Genetic Evolution Approach
source University of Sydney, Department of Architectural and Design Science
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id ed78
authors Jog, Bharati
year 1993
title Integration of Computer Applications in the Practice of Architecture
source Education and Practice: The Critical Interface [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-02-0] Texas (Texas / USA) 1993, pp. 89-97
summary Computer Applications in Architecture is emerging as an important aspect of our profession. The field, which is often referred to as Computer-Aided Architectural Design (CAAD) has had a notable impact on the profession and academia in recent years. A few professionals have predicted that as slide rules were replaced by calculators, in the coming years drafting boards and parallel bars will be replaced by computers. On the other hand, many architects do not anticipate such a drastic change in the coming decade as present CAD systems are supporting only a few integral aspects of architectural design. However, all agree that architecture curricula should be modified to integrate CAAD education.

In 1992-93, in the Department of Architecture of the 'School of Architecture and interior Design' at the University of Cincinnati, a curriculum committee was formed to review and modify the entire architecture curriculum. Since our profession and academia relate directly to each other, the author felt that while revising the curriculum, the committee should have factual information about CAD usage in the industry. Three ways to obtain such information were thought of, namely (1) conducting person to person or telephone interviews with the practitioners (2) requesting firms to give open- ended feed back and (3) surveying firms by sending a questionnaire. Of these three, the most effective, efficient and suitable method to obtain such information was an organized survey through a questionnaire. In mid December 1992, a survey was organized which was sponsored by the School of Architecture and Interior Design, the Center for the Study of the Practice of Architecture (CSPA) and the University Division of Professional Practice, all from the University of Cincinnati.

This chapter focuses on the results of this survey. A brief description of the survey design is also given. In the next section a few surveys organized in recent years are listed. In the third section the design of this survey is presented. The survey questions and their responses are given in the fourth section. The last section presents the conclusions and brief recommendations regarding computer curriculum in architecture.

series ACADIA
last changed 1999/02/25 09:25

_id b549
authors Johnson, W., Jellinek, H., Klotz, L., Rao, R. and Card, S.
year 1993
title Bridging the paper and electronic worlds: the paper user interface
source Proc. of INTERCHI '93, ACM Press, pp. 507-512
summary Since its invention millenia ago, paper has served as one of our primary communications media. Its inherent physical properties make it easy to use, transport, and store, and cheap to manufacture. Despite these advantages, paper remains a second class citizen in the electronic world In this paper, we present a new technology for bridging the paper and the electronic worlds. In the new technology, the user interface moves beyond the workstation and onto paper itself. We describe paper user interface technology and its, implementation in a particular system called XAX.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 2d1f
authors Kavakli, Manolya and Bayazit, Nigan
year 1993
title An Experiment on the Image Schemata
source [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Eindhoven (The Netherlands) 11-13 November 1993
summary The main objective of this paper is to explain the process of knowledge acquisition utilising the method for the decomposition of the components of a system to extract design rules. The furnished drawing of a dwelling is considered as the language of a designer. These drawings contain the semantic knowledge that can be called general architectural know-how. This paper bases on the decomposition of the syntax of a room image. The syntax of a room image consists of walls, windows, circulation zones and furniture such as beds, wardrobes, commodes, dressing tables, etc. The syntax of a room image has some linkages. The designer put the syntax together with the joints of circulation zones as a grammar to match. The existing relations between the objects in a design can be called grammar. An experiment is applied to three classes of a CAAD course organised by the Turkish Chamber of Architects. The living room is given already furnished in the experiment and the rest of a dwelling is expected to be furnished. In the first phase, the experiment is applied on two different classes in different times. It is interesting that the same grammar is used by 6 of 8 couple of designers for 3 different types (A, B and D) of bedrooms. Only one of the bedrooms of C type) has different design styles in spite of looking much like each other. In the second phase, for the third class of 6 groups, plan is modified slightly. In this case all of the 6 couples of designers use the same grammar for 2 alternatives of D type bedroom for parents. An original method is applied in the elicitation of the knowledge in this experiment. The properties of the objects and their links are represented by a semantic network graph. This paper also presents the grammar of the furnished rooms and shows the density of preferences. Design rules are extracted from these drawings of a furnished dwelling by searching for similarities in the plans designed by different designers. The designers have some specifications about the grammar of furnishing and an image schema of the proposed room in their minds, depending on their education and experiences. During the design of a room, designers look for differences and the similarities existing in the syntax of the proposed room image and the image of furnished room on the screen. If these images match with each other, the designers satisfy with the result This paper investigates the image schemata of the designers by evaluating their drawings. Some design rules are represented by means of image schemata. Matching the joints of circulation zones, the designers put the syntax of different image schemata together and they can illustrate different alternatives, restricted by the translation of these image schemata.

series eCAADe
email bayazit@sariyer.cc.itu.edu.tr
last changed 1998/08/24 08:49

_id ddss9217
id ddss9217
authors Kim, Y.S. and Brawne, M.
year 1993
title An approach to evaluating exhibition spaces in art galleries
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture (Proceedings of a conference held in Mierlo, the Netherlands in July 1992), ISBN 0-7923-2444-7
summary There are certain building types in which movement of people is the most significant evaluation factor. Among these are art galleries and museums. Unlike other building types, which are often explicated by investigating the relationship between people and people, and between people and the built environment, art galleries and museums are a building type in which the social relationship between people hardly exists and peoples movement through space, that is, the functional relationship between people and space, is one of the most significant factors for their description. The typical museum experience is through direct, sequential, and visual contact with static objects on display as the visitor moves. Therefore, the movement pattern of the visitors must exert a significant influence on achieving the specific goal of a museum. There is a critical need for predicting the consequences of particular spatial configurations with respect to visitors movement. In this sense, it is the intention of this paper to find out the relationship between the spatial configuration of exhibition space and the visitors' movement pattern.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id caadria2003_a5-1
id caadria2003_a5-1
authors Knight, Michael W. and Brown, Andre G.P.
year 2003
title NAVRgate X, A Naturalistic Navigation Metaphor for Large Scale Virtual Environments
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 625-630
summary This paper describes the latest in a series of real-world, low-cost interfaces for virtual reality. nAVRgate (the AVR being Architectural Virtual Reality) has looked at real-world analogies for interfacing with 'real' virtual environments in an attempt to improve the sense of presence, the phenomenon of sense of presence in virtual environments (VEs) often being seen as the real essence of Virtual Reality (Laurel, 1993)
series CAADRIA
email mknight@liv.ac.uk, andygpb@liv.ac.uk
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id a12b
authors Kokosalakis, J., Farrow, J. and Spalton, N.
year 1993
title Introducing 2D Draughting and 3D CAD Modelling into the Information and Library Studies Curriculum in Response to Increasingly Complex Design Requirements of Information Resources
source [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Eindhoven (The Netherlands) 11-13 November 1993
summary This paper describes enhancements to the Information and Library Studies curriculum at the Liverpool John Moores University. In the design process for buildings and space utilised for learning resources informed client involvement is seen as important by the information professional. A new module has been introduced with the aim of providing students with the knowledge and skills to communicate effectively with building design professionals. It is apparent that CAD has a place in this teaching. The programme of study is outlined, including a discussion of significant, relevant examples produced by the CAAD staff of the School of the Built Environment. The teaching methods were drawn from experience in the well established curricula and delivery of CAAD to the architecture and environmental planning students using School of the Built Environment Macintosh hardware and software. From the Aldham Robarts Learning Resource Centre, (presently nearing completion) examples will be shown of animated models, design, organisational and staffing solutions to new technological demands. These include transfer of the Austin - Smith: Lord Intergraph/MicroStation 3D model to Zoom, animation with Electric Image and Theseus and assisting library staff to use ArchiCAD to design and consider shelf planning arrangements for negotiation with the architects. There are interesting lessons to be learned about the advantages of CAD for future client control.

keywords Information Professional, CAAD, Learning Resource Centre, Open Learning, Information and Library Studies, Curriculum.
series eCAADe
email BLTJKOKO@livjm.ac.uk
last changed 1998/08/24 08:43

_id f485
authors Kolarevic, Branko Radomir
year 1993
title Geometric Relations as a Framework For Design Conceptualization
source Harvard University, Graduate School of Design
summary This study introduces geometric relations as a framework for design conceptualiza-tion-its key premise is that nothing is more fundamental in design than formation and discovery of relationships. The study attempts to establish a formal model for the development of a dynamic computer based graphic environment for design conceptualization that can recognize, record and maintain geometric design relations, merge "depictive" and "propositional", explicit and implicit in design, and provide a qualitatively different way to explore shape, dimension, and geometric organization. The study presents an approach to this task of formalization, and explores some of the fundamental issues pertinent to the subject, such as computability and applicability to the task of designing. Specifically, the study explores a relational description of shapes based on the concept of regulating or construction lines as an explicit formulation of a strategy to form generation and creative discovery, and proposes a lexicon of geometric relations to serve as a basis for composition. It hypothesizes that the construction lines can become much more useful and interesting when they are used not just as a rigid skeleton, but to regulate the behavior of a drawing and to maintain its essential structure as its parts are manipulated. As a consequence, designers could structure the behavior of the object being designed under future transformations; drawings could become seman-tically charged and could be manipulated in a semantically sophisticated fashion. The first chapter places the issue in the broader context by arguing that designers form implicit relational models of their designs. This contention is supported by introducing some of the relevant literature on mental imagery. Second chapter introduces design relations and in particular geometric relations, as a focal point of this study. A dynamic computer -based graphic context for design conceptualization is presented and evalu-ated in the next two chapters and conclusions are drawn. In the third chapter, the model's computability is demonstrated and evaluated through ReDRAW, a limited implementation of a relations based graphic system. In the fourth chapter, the model's applicability in design conceptualization is discussed and supported by examples.
series thesis:PhD
email branko@pobox.upenn.edu
more http://www.gsd.harvard.edu/academic/asp/ddes/thesis_titles.html
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id ddss9202
id ddss9202
authors Koutamanis, A. and Mitossi, V.
year 1993
title Architectural computer vision: Automated recognition of architectural drawings
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture (Proceedings of a conference held in Mierlo, the Netherlands in July 1992), ISBN 0-7923-2444-7
summary Computer vision offers the ability to transform digitized drawings into documents that can be used with computer systems. Recognition of digitized drawings can occur at the levels of (a) geometric elements, (b) building elements, and (c) spatial articulation. The last two levels apply not only to digitized images but also to computer-produced ones. The enormous burden placed on the user for inputting and manipulating CAD drawings suggests that automated recognition can add to the capabilities of CAD by making the computer more flexible with respect to inputting design information and more responsive to the actual concerns of the designer.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id cb3c
authors Krishnamurti, Ramesh and Stouffs, Rudi
year 1993
title Spatial Grammars: Motivation, Comparison, and New Results
source CAAD Futures 93 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-89922-7] (Pittsburgh / USA), 1993, pp. 57-74
summary The paper starts by giving a motivation for studying grammars in design and is based on considerations of style, discovery, and constructive techniques. This paper goes on to survey a variety of spatial grammar formalisms from an implementation standpoint. For each formalism, the salient computational issues pertaining to rule application are discussed. Two aspects of shape grammars are considered in detail: (a) the conditions for reversibility of shape rules, and (b) the recognition of planar shapes.
keywords Spatial Grammars, Shape Rules, Shape Recognition
series CAAD Futures
email R.Stouffs@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id 3465
authors Kruger, M.W.
year 1993
title Artificial Reality
source Addison-Wesley
summary This book by artificial reality pioneer Myron Krueger presents a view of our future interaction with machines, when computer systems will sense our needs and respond to them. In its unique melding of aesthetics and technology, Artificial Reality II shows how simulated worlds allow people to interact with computers in profoundly new ways for problem-solving and recreation.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 2004_256
id 2004_256
authors Lai, Ih-Cheng
year 2004
title Interactive Patterns for Associating Ideas during Brainstorming
source Architecture in the Network Society [22nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-2-4] Copenhagen (Denmark) 15-18 September 2004, pp. 256-261
summary Idea association is an important behavior to generate diverse ideas during brainstorming. Through three linking principles (similarity, contrast and contiguity), idea association involves a dynamic linking process between ideas and design cases. Based on the knowledge representation issue-concept-form proposed by Oxman (1993), three interactive patterns between ideas and design cases are investigated. Finally, some computational mechanisms for supporting the linkage of idea association are discussed.
keywords Idea Association, Linking, Case Representation, Case Based Reasoning, Brainstorming
series eCAADe
last changed 2004/09/18 06:45

For more results click below:

show page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3show page 4this is page 5show page 6show page 7show page 8show page 9show page 10... show page 12HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_640334 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002