CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id 4abb
authors Carlson, Christopher
year 1993
title Describing Spaces of Rectangular Dissections via Grammatical Programming
source CAAD Futures ‘93 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-89922-7] (Pittsburgh / USA), 1993, pp. 143-158
summary For the description of design spaces, grammatical programs offer several advantages over conventional grammars: (1) they integrate rewrite rules with more general non-deterministic functions, (2) they permit a range of programming styles from purely declarative to purely procedural, (3) they can describe spaces Of constrained, parametric designs, and (4) they permit design space descriptions to be developed modularly. We demonstrate these features of grammatical programming by way of a simple example that generates spaces of rectangular dissections.
keywords Generative Systems, Grammars, Design Spaces, Functional Logic Programming
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/07 10:03

_id 53da
authors Carlson, Christopher
year 1993
title Grammatical programming : an algebraic approach to the description of design spaces
source Carnegie Mellon University
summary The intuitiveness of spatial grammars makes them an attractive method of describing spaces of design. But grammars suffer from several inadequacies that limit their usefulness in design practice: (1) they cannot describe spaces of parametric, constrained designs, (2) they provide no control mechanisms for sequencing sets of rules, (3) they provide no 'subroutines' for dealing with complexity, and (4) they do not accommodate transformation mechanisms other than the rewrite rule. All of these inadequacies my [sic] be remedied by embedding grammars in a larger framework of nondeterministic functional programming, a paradigm we call 'grammatical programming.' In grammatical programs, rewrite rules are obtained from arbitrary nondeterministic functions by means of a 'rewrite closure' operator. Both rules and the designs they operate upon may be parametric and have attached constraints, permitting grammatical programs to describe spaces of parametric, constrained designs. Rewrite rules, and more generally, nondeterministic functions, are combined into compound functions by means of the operators of a control algebra, which provides functional composition, union, iteration, and a type of negation called 'failure.' The resulting modularity permits design space descriptions to be constructed, tested, and debugged piecewise, and to draw upon libraries of standard, debugged grammatical components. We begin this dissertation with an informal introduction to grammatical programming. We then give a formal, implementation-independent semantics of grammatical programs similar to the semantics of stratified logic programs. We discuss the implementation of a prototype compiler/interpreter and present case studies of the use of the prototype in describing spaces of rectangular dissections and a style of early Gothic traceries. We conclude with a discussion of lessons learned from the case studies and an agenda of further research necessary to make grammatical programming a useful tool in design practice.
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 6252
authors Drewe, Paul
year 2003
title The Relation Between the Internet Infrastructure and the Internet Industry
source CORP 2003, Vienna University of Technology, 25.2.-28.2.2003 [Proceedings on CD-Rom]
summary The scene is set by a survey of new location factors for mobile investment in Europe, published by the European Commission in 1993. This leads to two questions the first of which concerns the exact definition of the Internet industry in order to avoid confusion. The definitional issue appears to be far from simple. The second question is about the Internet infrastructure. This infrastructure, although new and almost invisible, can nevertheless be mapped and measured with less ambiguity than the Internet industry. How to connect the two? How to establish the importance of the Internet infrastructure for the location of the Internet industry? Technological determinism and urban dissolution are debunked as myths. A conceptual innovation is called for: to conceive of the connection between infrastructure and industry as a match between networks. By way of conclusion, this match is discussed from the viewpoint of non-hub cities or regions.
series other
email p.drewe@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2003/03/11 19:39

_id 63a9
authors Hellgardt, Michael
year 1993
title Architectural Theory and Design Grammars
source [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Eindhoven (The Netherlands) 11-13 November 1993
summary The idea of artificial brains and artificial intelligence (AI) has been subject to criticism. The objection of J. Searle, for instance, which has been published in 1984 and which was partially directly addressed to one of the centres of AI, the Carnegie Mellon University in Pittsburgh, is mainly based on two points: (1) interactions between physiological and mental functions, and (2) the intentionality and context-relatedness of meaning. - With an emphasis on architectural design, this paper is about the second point, because the problem of meaning is a neuralgic point in the discussion of "artificial intelligence in design" (AID). Technical parameters are incompatible with mechanisms of meaning in any field of artistic, cultural or non-technical expression. This point, that is the relation between acts of meaning and acts of technical problem-solving and, connectedly, the relation between technological and architectural design, has been widely ignored in the discussion on AID. The development seems to be dominated by the tacit assumption that architecture can be articulated and generated purely in technical and formal terms of information processing beyond the field of architecture itself. Design and shape grammars have become a well established field in the discussion of AID, also with respect to architecture. But questions of architectural history and theory are touched on only incidentally and not sufficiently in this discussion. The problem is not, in other words, simply to include more or less unrelated cases of architecture, or architectural concepts -even if these are famous ones, such as Laugier's original hut for instance but to establish structural relations between arguments of architectural theory and arguments of AID.

series eCAADe
email michael@hellgar.iaf.nl
last changed 2003/05/10 08:03

_id e1aa
authors Hovmark, Svante and Norell, Margareta
year 1993
title Social and Psychological Aspects of Computer-Aided Design Systems Social Aspects of Information Technology
source Behaviour and Information Technology 1993 v.12 n.5 p.267-275
summary A study was performed among design employees in three large companies to investigate the psychosocial effects of computer-aided design (CAD) work. The study included all technical employees of the departments selected, of whom about two-thirds worked with CAD systems. The results demonstrate that 90% of the CAD users have a positive attitude to CAD-work. No significant differences were found between CAD users and non-CAD users in terms of work load, autonomy, social support, job satisfaction, personal development, or degree of co-operation. Within the group of CAD users, those spending a larger number of weekly working hours with the CAD system reported lower work complexity, lower autonomy of work methods, and less job satisfaction. CAD users with a relatively higher number of years of CAD experience reported a greater work load, fewer CAD difficulties, and lower autonomy of work methods. Among draftspersons and designers, there were no significant differences in work activities between CAD users and non-CAD users.
series other
last changed 2002/07/07 14:01

_id 8402
authors Martens, Bob (Ed.)
year 1995
title The Future of Endoscopy
source [Proceedings of the 2nd European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 3-85437-114-4] Vienna (Austria), 30 August - 1 September 1995, 144p.
summary The first EAEA-Conference took place at Tampere University of Technology (Finland, 1993) serving as an meeting point for specialists of endoscopy in architecture and displayed an approach to the potentials of endoscopy. The Vienna Conference in 1995 continued this direction and tried furthermore to serve as a platform for non-advanced users. EAEA '95 Vienna aimed at a critical investigation of today's endoscopic culture. The Aspern-Workshop represented the highlight of this conference. Prior to the conference nine universities had submitted endoscopic and computer-assisted space simulations for this urban expansion area north of the Vienna Danube. The outcome was not to be regarded as a “noble competition” between the various institutions participating, but rather to sound out the actual potential of various simulation techniques and their combinations for future use. The conference proceedings contain the papers presented at the meeting by 23 experts from 15 universities. The papers cover such areas as the technical features of endoscopy and environmental simulation, theories supporting the use of endoscopy, practical applications, and discussions on the future of endoscopy and environmental simulation in comparison with other means of architectural representation.
keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
email b.martens@tuwien.ac.at
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id a4f8
authors Monedero, Javier
year 1993
title Renderings. Some Technical and Non Technical Questions Raised by the Use of Computers in the Visual Analysis of Architecture
source [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Eindhoven (The Netherlands) 11-13 November 1993
summary It should be expected, in a Congress, that participants bring with them, not only ideas, but also results or, at least, stimulating images. In the Laboratory of Architectural Graphic Techniques at the ETS of Barcelona, we have spent some time generating images directly related with architecture, based on the work of both students and professors. These images have been produced with academic purposes, but also in relation with some works carried out with City Institutions interested in the study of the evaluation of environment visual impact and the role that computers may play in this area. In our previous Congress, in Barcelona, we showed some of these images, obtained by direct digital processing of bitmaps. In another Congress, later, we showed some other images, obtained by rendering, with simple local models (Phong models) and some tricks that helped to make them more realistic. Although I do agree with the old chinese saying that a good image is worth a thousand words, in this case, I have thought more convenient to present a paper that may be read quietly by those interested in these subjects, that might be useful just as it gathers references known by many but grouped in a particular order, and that pretends, respectfully, to criticize the actual situation. This can explain why we consider that the results we have obtained should be improved by new and better techniques and why we think that this dissatisfaction should be shared by others who do not seem to feel the same as we do. The aim of this contribution is, therefore, to reflect on the actual situation and the ways there seem to be open for us to follow.

series eCAADe
email monedero@ega1.upc.es
last changed 1998/08/24 09:02

_id e92c
authors Dave, Bharat
year 1993
title A Computer-Assisted Diagramming System
source Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH Zurich
summary This research investigates characteristics and generation of graphic diagrams used in support of analysis, presentation and synthesis of information in various domains. The research is aimed at the development of a software system which can be used to specify, generate and manipulate diagrams similar to the way they are represented and operated upon in traditional media.Diagrams are graphic representations of symbolic propositions that allow tentative reasoning and inferencing, and enable a person to focus on selected aspects of a situation that are deemed of interest. The economy and directness of expression found in diagrams seem to be the prime reasons why they are so ubiquitous in many domains. Despite these advantages, studies into supporting diagrammatic representations using computers are rather sparse. This research is an attempt at developing a comprehensive framework of thought in this direction.In the context of design disciplines like architecture, this research forms a part of the continuum of studies in computer aided design techniques and tools. While a large number of tools and techniques in CAD have emerged so far, usage of such tools, due to their underlying representations, expects and demands commitment of too many details too early in the design process. This research is aimed at characterizing and developing a computer based diagramming system to support tentative reasoning using diagrams, and thus hopes to extend the scope of CAD environments in design. The thesis first articulates motivations for this topic in detail. Next, a discussion on the role played by diagrams as conceptual tools in various domains is presented. It is followed by a detailed look at characteristics and components of diagrams viewed as a graphic communication system. Next, a comprehensive set of requirements for an ideal software environment for diagramming tasks is developed. A prototype system called CDT was implemented and is used to demonstrate ideas developed in this research. The study concludes with some observations on contributions of this research effort and possible future extensions.
series thesis:PhD
email b.dave@architecture.unimelb.edu.au
last changed 2003/05/10 03:43

_id e3d3
authors Gudna , François and Zreik, Khaldoun
year 1993
title Analogy, Exploration and Generalization: Three Activities for Knowledge-Based Architectural Design Systems
source CAAD Futures ‘93 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-89922-7] (Pittsburgh / USA), 1993, pp. 255-272
summary We propose in this article a system architecture based on reasoning through analogy with past cases or situations. Starting with a project and a sketch provided by the user, the system locates analogous situations in the past and uses these to improve a problem's description. A sufficiently improved description will in turn activate a constraint-satisfaction mechanism. Previous situations are stored in a memory bank of objects that match the description of past problems to the generic descriptions of past solutions. Three mechanisms can be distinguished within the system: an analogy mechanism collects hypotheses about the variables and constraints to be satisfied in past situations, an exploratory mechanism searches through the solution space, a generalizing mechanism looks at experiences and memorizes only what is needed to collect hypotheses.
keywords Knowledge-Based System, Case-Based Reasoning, Constraints Satisfaction, Explanation-Based Learning, Object-Oriented Representation
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/04/07 10:03

_id 855a
authors Liew, B.K., Mathur, K., Tan, C.L., Tham, H.C., Teh, H.C., Loe, K.F., Heah, K.L.
year 1993
title PARADISE: An Intelligent CAD System architecture
source The Int. Journal of Construction IT 1(3), pp.1-24
summary This paper presents the architecture of an intelligent CAD system called PARADISE. The motivation is in addressing the lack in architectural computing that has to do with intelligent assistance of design at the early stages. A schema for representing and integrating design knowledge and graphical data called the Design Model (DM) is presented. Following which, work done in developing the CAD-based front end of PARADISE called the graphic subsystem (PGS) is described. The emphasis is at providing tools which facilitate the creation and manipulation of form and spaces at early design stages. We then describe the functionalities of our geometric reasoner (PGS) is described. The geometric reasoner is responsible for all reasoning between the syntax of design drawings and its related semantics. We highlight, in particular, the reasoning of implicit spaces.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id 98bd
authors Pea, R.
year 1993
title Practices of Distributed Intelligence and Designs for Education
source Distributed Cognitions, edited by G. Salomon. New York, NY: CambridgeUniversity Press
summary v Knowledge is commonly socially constructed, through collaborative efforts... v Intelligence may also be distributed for use in designed artifacts as diverse as physical tools, representations such as diagrams, and computer-user interfaces to complex tasks. v Leont'ev 1978 for activity theory that argues forcibly for the centrality of people-in-action, activity systems, as units of analysis for deepening our understanding of thinking. v Intelligence is distributed: the resources that shape and enable activity are distributed across people, environments, and situations. v Intelligence is accomplished rather than possessed. v Affordance refers to the perceived and actual properties of a thing, primarily those functional properties that determine how the thing could possibly be used. v Norman 1988 on design and psychology - the psychology of everyday things" v We deploy effort-saving strategies in recognition of their cognitive economy and diminished opportunity for error. v The affordances of artifacts may be more or less difficult to convey to novice users of these artifacts in the activities to which they contribute distributed intelligence. v Starts with Norman's seven stages of action Ř Forming a goal; an intention § Task desire - clear goal and intention - an action and a means § Mapping desire - unable to map goal back to action § Circumstantial desire - no specific goal or intention - opportunistic approach to potential new goal § Habitual desire - familiar course of action - rapidly cycle all seven stages of action v Differentiates inscriptional systems from representational or symbol systems because inscriptional systems are completely external, while representational or symbol systems have been used in cognitive science as mental constructs. v The situated properties of everyday cognition are highly inventive in exploiting features of the physical and social situation as resources for performing a task, thereby avoiding the need for mental symbol manipulations unless they are required by that task. v Explicit recognition of the intelligence represented and representable in design, specifically in designed artifacts that play important roles in human activities. v Once intelligence is designed into the affordances properties of artifacts, it both guides and constrains the likely contributions of that artifact to distributed intelligence in activity. v Culturally valued designs for distributed intelligence will change over time, especially as new technology becomes associated with a task domain. v If we treat distributed intelligence in action as the scientific unit of analysis for research and theory on learning and reasoning... Ř What is distributed? Ř What constraints govern the dynamics of such distributions in different time scales? Ř Through what reconfigurations of distributed intelligence might the performance of an activity system improve over time? v Intelligence is manifest in activity and distributed in nature. v Intelligent activities ...in the real world... are often collaborative, depend on resources beyond an individual's long-term memory, and require the use of information-handling tools... v Wartofsky 1979 - the artifact is to cultural evolution what the gene is to biological evolution - the vehicle of information across generations. v Systems of activity - involving persons, environment, tools - become the locus of developmental investigation. v Disagrees with Salomon et al.'s entity-oriented approach - a language of containers holding things. v Human cognition aspires to efficiency in distributing intelligence - across individuals, environment, external symbolic representations, tools, and artifacts - as a means of coping with the complexity of activities we often cal "mental." "
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id b665
authors Burdea G. and Coiffet, G.
year 1993
title Virtual Reality Technology
source Wiley Interscience
summary This in-depth review of current virtual reality technology and its applications provides a detailed analysis of the engineering, scientific and functional aspects of virtual reality systems and the fundamentals of VR modeling and programming. It also contains an exhaustive list of present and future VR applications in a number of diverse fields. Virtual Reality Technology is the first book to include a full chapter on force and tactile feedback and to discuss newer interface tools such as 3-D probes and cyberscopes. Supplemented with 23 color plates and more than 200 drawings and tables which illustrate the concepts described.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id cad5
authors Coyne, R.F., Flemming, U., Piela, P. and Woodbury, R.
year 1993
title Behavior Modeling in Design System Development
source CAAD Futures ‘93 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-89922-7] (Pittsburgh / USA), 1993, pp. 335-354
summary We describe the development approach for a software environment to support the early phases in building design called SEED. The combination of capabilities offered by SEED to designers is novel and includes the integrated handling of solution prototypes. We give the reasons for using an object-oriented software engineering approach in the development of the system, which starts with a comprehensive behavioral model of the system from the user's perspective based on actors and use cases. We illustrate results from the first development phase and sketch the next phases. At the time of the CAAD Futures '93 conference, we will be able to report our experience in developing a first system prototype and to demonstrate the prototype.
keywords Object-Oriented Software Engineering, Integrated Design Systems, Architectural Programming, Schematic Layout Design
series CAAD Futures
email ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2003/02/26 16:24

_id 8326
authors Diessenbacher, Claus and Rank, Ernst
year 1993
title Teaching Design with CAD?
source [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Eindhoven (The Netherlands) 11-13 November 1993
summary Abstract as well as functionally dependant design exercises are essential components of an architectural education at nearly every university. Their goal is to provide architect students with a feeling for proportions, colours, materials etc., and to teach and train them in threedimensional thinking. Pictures and concepts, developed by the designer are materialized by various technologies such as with pencil and paper in the traditional two-dimensional techniques or with clay, wood, paper etc. in three-dimensional modeling. Now the computer and the CAD-system join the palette of the designers available resources in presentation as both a two-dimensional and a three-dimensional medium. Although CAD is often considered and taught to be only a better drafting tool, the educational goal of our group at the University of Dortmund is to employ CAD as a design support medium. The prerequisites for work with the computer and the CAD system are provided in a compulsory two semester undergraduate subject. Basic programming, work with spreadsheets etc. are some exemplary themes provided in the form of lectures and practical exercises. A main emphasis of this instruction is the mastery of three-dimensional working technology with a comprehensive CAD-System. In cooperation of our computer science group and architecture chairs, seminars involving the use of CAD as a three-dimensional design tool, are offered as graduate courses. The seminars consist of loops of modeling and evaluating objects in a three-dimensional space. With this, the most possible realistic studies in colour, light and proportion take place exclusively on the computer.
series eCAADe
last changed 1998/08/24 08:26

_id e469
authors Johnson, Brian R.
year 1993
title The Graphics Application Paradigm: A Framework for User Understanding of CG/CAD Applications
source Education and Practice: The Critical Interface [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-02-0] Texas (Texas / USA) 1993, pp. 11-20
summary What do young architects need to know about computer graphics? What "immutable and eternal" models will allow them to perform their best as professional architects? At one time all computer users were computer programmers and the answer was thus rooted in programming expertise, but the era of personally developed software is largely past. An alternative more vocational approach would stress courses in the use of specific programs, but it is hard to imagine a more mutable "object of knowledge" than the practical details of computing in the late twentieth century. In fact, our students are deluged with information: commands, vocabulary, options, sales hyperbole, and "do this, it works" cookbooks. As educators, we face the challenge of identifying that which is "immutable and eternal", and presenting it to our students (and trying to focus their attention on it).
series ACADIA
email brj@u.washington.edu
last changed 1999/02/25 09:14

_id 4a5f
authors Liu, Yu-Tung
year 1993
title Recognizing Emergent Subshapes in Design Problem Solving: A Connectionist Investigation
source Education and Practice: The Critical Interface [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-02-0] Texas (Texas / USA) 1993, pp. 131-139
summary Human problem-solving behavior has been modelled as a search through the space as defined as problem states, within which earlier states move to subsequent ones by applying rules in the human mind until the goal state is found. This cognitive model of problem-solving has been broadly accepted and has become dominant in both cognitive psychology and artificial intelligence (AI). In the field of computeraided architectural design (CAAD), search models are also widely used for solving design problems, although various foci of design knowledge are differently represented by shape grammars, graphs, and knowledge-based systems using predicate logic for different purports.

In design search, design evolves from one state to another by exhaustively or heuristically applying proper rules. Each rule application involves, first, pattern-matching the antecedent of a rule to the current state and, second, transforming the matched portion of that state into the consequence of the rule. However pattern-matching techniques of current CAAD systems are still limited. In current CAAD systems, only those two squares can be dealt with by patternmatching for further development. However, a human designer can effortlessly recognize not only those two but other emergent subshapes, for example a smaller square in the middle where the two squares overlap and two L-shapes in the corners. Therefore a human designer can thoroughly deliberate all these alternatives before making a decision. In other words, human designer is capable of restructuring shapes in terms of emergent subshapes in any step of designing.

series ACADIA
email aleppo@arch.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id af46
authors Lue, Q.
year 1993
title Computer aided descriptive geometry
source Vienna University of Technology
summary The main aim of this thesis is the creation of a software package for descriptive geometry. Why there is a need for such a descriptive geometry software? In descriptive geometry the ability of space perception is trained by solving spatial problems graphically with the use of a few constructions: Hence the solution of each problem consists of two parts: 1) 3D-part: After analyzing the spatial problem it is cleared how to proceed step by step in space. 2) 2D-part: Due to the basic rules of descriptive geometry for each step of the solving strategy the corresponding 2D-construction has to be carried out graphically. By use of CAD-DG the 2nd part can be replaced again by a 3D-part: Each step is solved using the basic routines offered in the menu. That means that each step is solved analytically but instead of any output of numbers the solution is immediately displayed in the main views on the screen. Therefore the user neither needs to apply formulas of analytic geometry nor has to take care of any coordinates. He still works directly with geometric objects in a graphic representation
keywords Descriptive Geometry; Computer Graphics; Education; Interactive Graphic Software Package; Programming Technique; Educational Software
series thesis:PhD
more http://www.arcs.ac.at/dissdb/rn020701
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id ddss9214
id ddss9214
authors Friedman, A.
year 1993
title A decision-making process for choice of a flexible internal partition option in multi-unit housing using decision theory techniques
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture (Proceedings of a conference held in Mierlo, the Netherlands in July 1992), ISBN 0-7923-2444-7
summary Recent demographic changes have increased the heterogeneity of user groups in the North American housing market. Smaller households (e.g. elderly, single parent) have non-traditional spatial requirements that cannot be accommodated within the conventional house layout. This has created renewed interest in Demountable/Flexible internal partition systems. However, the process by which designers decide which project or user groups are most suited for the use of these systems is quite often complex, non-linear, uncertain and dynamic, since the decisions involve natural processes and human values that are apparently random. The anonymity of users when mass housing projects are conceptualized, and the uncertainty as to the alternative to be selected by the user, given his/her constantly changing needs, are some contributing factors to this effect. Decision Theory techniques, not commonly used by architects, can facilitate the decision-making process through a systematic evaluation of alternatives by means of quantitative methods in order to reduce uncertainty in probabilistic events or in cases when data is insufficient. The author used Decision Theory in the selection of flexible partition systems. The study involved a multi-unit, privately initiated housing project in Montreal, Canada, where real site conditions and costs were used. In this paper, the author outlines the fundamentals of Decision Theory and demonstrates the use of Expected Monetary Value and Weighted Objective Analysis methods and their outcomes in the design of a Montreal housing project. The study showed that Decision Theory can be used as an effective tool in housing design once the designer knows how to collect basic data.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9211
id ddss9211
authors Gilleard, J. and Olatidoye, O.
year 1993
title Graphical interfacing to a conceptual model for estimating the cost of residential construction
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture (Proceedings of a conference held in Mierlo, the Netherlands in July 1992), ISBN 0-7923-2444-7
summary This paper presents a method for determining elemental square foot costs and cost significance for residential construction. Using AutoCAD's icon menu and dialogue box' facilities, a non-expert may graphically select (i) residential configuration; (ii) construction quality level; (iii) geographical location; (iv) square foot area; and finally, (v) add-ons, e.g. porches and decks, basement, heating and cooling equipment, garages and carports etc. in order to determine on-site builder's costs. Subsequent AutoLisp routines facilitate data transfer to a Lotus 1-2-3 spreadsheet where an elemental cost breakdown for the project may be determined. Finally, using Lotus 1-2-3 macros, computed data is transferred back to AutoCAD, where all cost significant items are graphically highlighted.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 8ce2
authors Szalapaj, Peter J.
year 1993
title Contextual Hypermedia in the Design Studio
source [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Eindhoven (The Netherlands) 11-13 November 1993
summary The focus of this paper is on the development and use of hypermedia applications for the presentation of design studio projects, based upon the author's own recent experience of teaching CAD at both undergraduate and postgraduate level. The contention of this paper is that this activity cannot be reduced to routine Hypercard stack development. Instead, the development of applications in this area need to give support to the expression of the design-theoretical issues that are central to the presentation of any design studio project, by exploiting the many issues of concern that are emerging from the field of human- computer interaction (HCI) The hypermedia application i.e. in this case design-theoretical views of a design project, will inevitably influence the specification of a user-interface, and hence the presentation and appearance of the design project. This paper will investigate the extent to which the interface can be separated out from the application and the converse issue namely, whether non-contextual hypermedia environments restrict design applications.

series eCAADe
email P.Szalapaj@sheffield.ac.uk
last changed 1998/08/24 08:58

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