CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 61 to 80 of 162

_id ddss9206
id ddss9206
authors Drach, A., Langenegger, M. and Heitz, S.
year 1993
title Working with prototypes: from cad to flexible tools for integrated building design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture (Proceedings of a conference held in Mierlo, the Netherlands in July 1992), ISBN 0-7923-2444-7
summary The formulation of design knowledge as concepts, goals and rules cannot be captured in fixed and valid statements. The dynamic modelling of concepts and goals is, on the contrary, part of the design process itself. Tools that effectively support architects in their design should therefore never use predefined mechanisms, but must be definable interactively according to design specifications. We propose the concept of prototypes as a cognitive model to represent and structure design knowledge. Prototypes incorporate an individual view of design in a synthetic and organizational model for a defined area of interest. They actively control and guide design processes in supporting the organizational concepts for solutions. The a+Tool implements these concepts on the basis of a modelling language. It provides a dynamic toolkit and user interface to support design as well as knowledge modelling.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9426
id ddss9426
authors Duijvestein, Kees
year 1994
title Integrated Design and Sustainable Building
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary In the international student-project "European Environmental Campus 91 TU Delft Dordrecht" 20 students from 13 European countries worked in september 1991, during three weeks on "EcologicalSketches for the Island of Dordrecht". They worked on four different scales: the region isle of Dordt / the district Stadspolders / the neighbourhood I the house and the block. The environmentaltheme's Energy, Water, Traffic & Noise, Landscape & Soil were together with spatial analyses combined with the different scales. This combination was organised following the scheme mentioned below. The characters stand for the students. During the first period they worked in research groups, during the last period more in design groups. For instance: student L works in the beginning with the students B, G and Q in the research group water. In the last period sheworks with K, M, N and 0 in the design group Neighbourhood. Those students worked earlier in the other research-groups and contribute now in the design-group their thematic environmental knowledge. The results were presented to the Dordrecht council, officials and press. In the next project in september and october 1993 we started earlier with the design groups. Ten Dutch and ten "Erasmus" students worked for six weeks on proposals for the Vinex location Wateringenthe Hague. Each morning they worked in the research groups each afternoon in the design groups. The research groups used the EcoDesign Tools, small applications in Excel on Apple Macintoshto quantify the environmental pressure.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 084b
authors Ellis, S.
year 1993
title Pictorial Communication in Virtual and Real Environments
source Washington, DC: Taylor and Francis
summary Includes contributions from thirty nine internationally renowned authors addressing the perceptual, physiological, scientific and engineering issues that impact on successful pictorial communication. The book's range is broad and diverse covering areas such as visual and spatial perception, telerobotics, manual and supervisory control, cartography, scientific visualisation and medical illustration 'The book is a grand collection of ideas,experimental findings and personal experiences of those who use computer graphic images to achieve communication ... it is a well-presented, interesting and wide-ranging collection of writings.' - Cartographic Journal 'I can do no more than heartily recommend this book to anyone with even a marginal interest in design and the use of displays.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 25de
authors Ervamaa, Pekka
year 1993
title Integrated Visualization
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 157-160
summary The Video and Multimedia studio at VTT, Technical Research Centre of Finland, started with endoscopy photography of scale models. Video recordings has been made since 1985 and computer graphic since 1989. New visualization methods and techniques has been taken into use as a part of research projects, but mainly we have been working with clients commissions only. Theoretical background for the visualizations is strong. Research professor Hilkka Lehtonen has published several papers concerning the theory of visualization in urban planning. This studio is the only professional level video unit at Technical Research Centre, which is a large polytechnic research unit. We produce video tapes for many other research units. All kind of integrated methods of visualization are useful in these video productions, too.
keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
email Pekka.Ervamaa@vtt.fi
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id a293
authors Fargas, Josep
year 1993
title Design Mediums and Other Phenomena of First Generation CAD Practice
source Education and Practice: The Critical Interface [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-02-0] Texas (Texas / USA) 1993, pp. 99-105
summary In the majority of architecture firms which use CAD tools, computer technology has been retrofitted to an existing traditional practice, with mixed results. I will addresses some of the more interesting phenomena which occur in first generation CAD practices of this type, taking as a case study one well- established firm in Barcelona which, after more than thirty years of a successful practice, has adopted computer technology to such an extent that it is now very difficult to find even an ink pen in their offices.

Less than three years after the introduction of its first computer workstation, the Barcelona office is fully computerized, from carrying out even basic design directly with computer technology, to developing inhouse software and maintaining an internet node via modem. This rapid adoption of the technology, although a relatively smooth one, was not free from strange side-effects. Because of the continuing involvement of a large part of the existing staff, the transition to computer aided design required the appearance of hybrid methodologies which are neither the traditional ones, nor what one might expect to find in the newly established CAD practice.

series ACADIA
email fargas@dtec.es
last changed 2003/05/14 19:58

_id db3b
authors Faugeras, O.
year 1993
title Three-dimensional computer vision, a geometric viewpoint
source MIT press
summary This monograph by one of the world's leading vision researchers provides a thorough, mathematically rigorous exposition of a broad and vital area in computer vision: the problems and techniques related to three-dimensional (stereo) vision and motion. The emphasis is on using geometry to solve problems in stereo and motion, with examples from navigation and object recognition.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 68c8
authors Flemming, U., Coyne, R. and Fenves, S. (et al.)
year 1994
title SEED: A Software Environment to Support the Early Phases in Building Design
source Proceeding of IKM '94, Weimar, Germany, pp. 5-10
summary The SEED project intends to develop a software environment that supports the early phases in building design (Flemming et al., 1993). The goal is to provide support, in principle, for the preliminary design of buildings in all aspects that can gain from computer support. This includes using the computer not only for analysis and evaluation, but also more actively for the generation of designs, or more accurately, for the rapid generation of design representations. A major motivation for the development of SEED is to bring the results of two multi-generational research efforts focusing on `generative' design systems closer to practice: 1. LOOS/ABLOOS, a generative system for the synthesis of layouts of rectangles (Flemming et al., 1988; Flemming, 1989; Coyne and Flemming, 1990; Coyne, 1991); 2. GENESIS, a rule-based system that supports the generation of assemblies of 3-dimensional solids (Heisserman, 1991; Heisserman and Woodbury, 1993). The rapid generation of design representations can take advantage of special opportunities when it deals with a recurring building type, that is, a building type dealt with frequently by the users of the system. Design firms - from housing manufacturers to government agencies - accumulate considerable experience with recurring building types. But current CAD systems capture this experience and support its reuse only marginally. SEED intends to provide systematic support for the storing and retrieval of past solutions and their adaptation to similar problem situations. This motivation aligns aspects of SEED closely with current work in Artificial Intelligence that focuses on case-based design (see, for example, Kolodner, 1991; Domeshek and Kolodner, 1992; Hua et al., 1992).
series other
email ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id a9bb
authors Flemming, Ulrich and Van Wyk, Skip (Eds.)
year 1993
title CAAD Futures ‘93 [Conference Proceedings]
source Fifth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design 1993/ ISBN 0-444-89922-7 / (Pittsbrugh / USA), 1993, 565 p.
summary The mission of the CAAD Futures series of conferences is to provide a forum for the presentation and discussion of innovative research and development in the area of computer- aided architectural design. CAAD Futures '93, sponsored by Carnegie Mellon University and its Department of Architecture, is the fifth conference in the series. In these proceedings, the papers accepted for presentation have been grouped into sections addressing similar topics or themes. The sections are presented in an order that proceeds roughly from the more specific, focused topics to the more general ones, ending with a group of papers illustrating emergent trends in practice, including urban planning and design.
series CAAD Futures
email ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2003/02/26 16:24

_id 5df5
authors Fournier, A., Gunawan, A. and Romanzin, C.
year 1993
title Common Illumination between Real and Computer Generated Scenes
source Proceedings Graphics Interface '93, pp. 254-262, 1993
summary The ability to merge a real video image (RVI) with a computer- generated image (CGI) enhances the usefulness of both. To go beyond "cut and paste" and chroma-keying, and merge the two images successfully, one must solve the problems of common viewing parameters, common visibility and common illumination. The result can be dubbed Computer Augmented Reality (CAR). We present in this paper techniques for approximating the common global illumination for RVIs and CGIs, assuming some elements of the scene geometry of the real world and common viewing parameters are known. Since the real image is a projection of the exact solution for the global illumination in the real world (done by nature), we approximate the global illumination of the merged image by making the RVI part of the solution to the common global illumination computation. The objects in the real scene are replaced by few boxes covering them; the image intensity of the RVI is used as the initial surface radiosity of the visible part of the boxes; the surface reflectance of the boxes is approximated by subtracting an estimate of the illuminant intensity based on the concept of ambient light; finally global illumination using a classic radiosity computation is used to render the surface of the CGIs with respect to their new environment and for calculating the amount of image intensity correction needed for surfaces of the real image. An example animation testing these techniques has been produced. Most of the geometric problems have been solved in a relatively ad hoc manner. The viewing parameters were extracted by interactive matching of the synthetic scene with the RVIs. The visibility is determined by the relative position of the "blocks" representing the real objects and the computer generated objects, and a moving computer generated light has been inserted. The results of the merging are encouraging, and would be effective for many applications.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id ee85
authors Fox, C. William
year 1993
title An Interactive Urban Database
source Education and Practice: The Critical Interface [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-02-0] Texas (Texas / USA) 1993, pp. 69-75
summary This paper describes a development process and mechanism for transmitting academic research and information to the community and the profession, and attempts to examine the effect of the information on the community. It is about my recent work with students on the design and development of a prototype interactive electronic document for archiving and visualizing information on an urban area. The work reflects the initial phase of a three year research grant and is a prototype document of a pilot area. The design and visualization of information for this area will establish the primary organization and graphic user interface, for the entire project. The final document will provide community organizations and city agencies with an interactive tool for visualizing and evaluating neighborhood planning and design proposals.

series ACADIA
last changed 1999/02/25 09:23

_id 4203
authors Fraser, Michael
year 1993
title Boundary Representation in Practice
source Education and Practice: The Critical Interface [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-02-0] Texas (Texas / USA) 1993, pp. 173-185
summary There is an essential contradiction between the making of buildings or built environments in a threedimensional modeler and the graphic control of this process. Three-dimensional modeling is a constructive activity, in which solids are assembled as they would be in an actual structure; it benefits the designer. Presentation and documentation, on the other hand, are prescriptive activities that direct some of the construction and all the visualization and criticism of the proposal; they benefit the user and builder.

A building while being designed can be visualized and criticized from its solid model, and the model can take a variety of forms depending on its part): computer-based, drawn in orthographic or perspective projection, constructed of cardboard or wood, or described narratively by means of text, programmatic data, performance model or animation. However, practicing architecture is the process of recording and communicating the decision making process and the contractual obligations that result. In actual practice, in contrast to the designer directed ideal, more participants are brought in sooner at the beginning of a project and with more publicity, which in turn means keeping more, not fewer, records. As the profession evolves, records of the string of design decisions will become more automated, more carefully structured and more retrievable. More buildings will be "tracked" and exposed to review in this way because public environmental sensitivity will improve. The communication between a single designer and his own thoughts will become less and less important.

series ACADIA
last changed 1999/02/25 09:39

_id 6718
authors Frost, M. and Amor, R.
year 1993
title The application of Radiance to daylighting simulation
source Building Simulation'93, Conference proceedings
summary The RADIANCE lighting simulation system was used to evaluate the daylighting inside two major buildings being constructed and refitted in New Zealand. This paper describes the utility and useability of such a simulation system for large projects of this nature. The ability to create many virtual snapshots of design alternatives and compare them both visually and numerically is explored, as are the problems Architects will find with describing a model to a simulation system of such complexity.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ddss9207
id ddss9207
authors Gauchel, J., Hovestadt, L., van Wyk, S. and Bhat, R.R.
year 1993
title Modular building models
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture (Proceedings of a conference held in Mierlo, the Netherlands in July 1992), ISBN 0-7923-2444-7
summary The development and implementation of a modular building model appropriate for computer aided design is described. The limitations of a unified building model with regard to concurrence and complexity in design is discussed. Current research suggests that to model real-world complexity, one must trade centralized control for autonomy. In this paper we develop a modular approach to building modelling that is based on object-oriented autonomy and makes it possible to define these models in a distributed concurrent manner. Such a modular and autonomous implementation brings inherent uncertainty and conflict which cannot be determined a priori.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ca14
authors Gavin, Lesley
year 1993
title Generative Modelling and Electronic Lego
source [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Eindhoven (The Netherlands) 11-13 November 1993
summary This paper shows work exemplifying the further extent of computer capabilities in the field of design. The work stems from a belief that for computers to be used effectively within the architectural profession their utility must stretch far beyond the process of description of geometric data, but be incorporated in the fundamental roots of design: that of conceptual design. Computers can be used to access the knowledge we have and then formulate this knowledge into a working language of design. Computers can be used to generate space and form in accordance with any relationship the designer may choose to set. This allows them to be used from the very conception of design. It is only by working from the very beginning, the very basis of the design of a building that we can fully develop the integration of computers in the construction industry. The work undertaken sets out primarily to explore one of the ways computers could be used in the field of architectural design. In recognition that an important byproduct of any design search is the enhanced understanding of the problem itself, the work was directed towards a particular project. This allowed each stage of thought to be to be considered as it arose and subsequently incorporated into the design model. The work does not attempt to automise the design process but simply tries to explore some of the opportunities offered by computers and see if they can be easily incorporated into the design process offering design solutions that may not otherwise have been considered. The exploration resulted in a simple design process model that incorporates the more accessible and useful aspects of computer technology.
keywords Generative Modelling, Rule Based Form, Random Factors, Shape Grammars
series eCAADe
email l.gavin@ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id e994
id e994
authors Gero, J. S.
year 1993
title The role of visual emergence in collaborative design
source Computational Support for Distributed Collaborative Design, Key Centre of Design Computing, University of Sydney, pp. 103-115
summary There are two fundamental approaches to the use of computers to support collaborative design: (i) to use the computer as a device which increases the efficiency of what designers could do previously, and (ii) to use the computer as an active device which allows designers to do what they could not readily do previously. // This paper is concerned with the latter approach by introducing the concept of visual or graphical emergence as one form of collaboration at a distance that can not readily be carried out without the aid of the computer.
series other
type normal paper
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
more http://www.arch.usyd.edu.au/~john/
last changed 2006/05/27 16:21

_id 49f3
authors Glanville, Ranulph
year 1993
title Looking into Endoscopy - The Limitations of Evaluation in Architectural Design
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 185-193
summary The means available to architects in their age-old task of creating (most usually, though not necessarily) buildings that do not yet exist (ie. virtual realities), can be seen as falling into two groups. Those that help us develop architectural ideas (exploring), and those that help us evaluate or test them (illustrating). In the former category, we have, for instance, the ”drawing on the back of the envelope”, the discursive brainstorm, and the design ”conversation with ourselves via paper and pencil” (the drawing strikes back). In the latter, we may include physical model building, careful (projective) drawing (including drawings that are instructions for making), mathematical and design science modelling and calculating, visualising techniques such as the rendered perspective, most CAD (computer aided design) work and architectural endoscopy. These techniques may be thought of in two ways, as Bosselman reported: the explanation (eg. the organisational plan) and the experience (eg the ”photo-realistic” perspective). Attached to these we have rules for success, such as those of ”style” (in the broad sense of the personal style that allows us to assume that we have answers to problems that have yet to appear). It should be clear even from the list above that there are many more techniques and technologies for evaluation (illustration) than for exploration (design): such is the mystery of design. It is the primary purpose of this paper to invite those involved in providing the enormous effort that has gone into making such techniques for illustration — evaluation — to consider how their efforts help with that other, and crucial, area — that of exploring: and to redress some of the balance of that effort towards exploration. For it occurs to me (as a teacher of architecture), that evaluation does not provide a course for action — it merely helps us determine what may be wrong (according to some criteria with which we choose not to argue). And, no matter how right or wrong a design may be, knowing that it is wrong doesn’t help us either modify it, or find a better initial idea. It only tells us we are not right — always assuming the evaluative model is correct; perhaps.
keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id c7c1
authors Glennie, William L.
year 1993
title The Future of CAAD Education
source [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Eindhoven (The Netherlands) 11-13 November 1993
summary The field of Computer-Aided Architectural Design (CAAD) is composed of two main threads of development, Academic and Professional, and can be described in three decades, which correspond roughly with three generations of computer systems. This paper presents a brief description of the entire period of school- and practice-based research and development on the applications of computers in Architectural design, and shows how these efforts have and have not been relevant to students' future experiences. Educators must take a fresh look at their current courses and research programs to make sure that they are relevant in the rapidly changing world of professional practice. With limited human and financial resources at most institutions, it is critical to make the best possible choices for the immediate and long-term benefit of today's students. While it is not appropriate for Schools of Architecture to operate strictly at the behest of the profession, we must prepare our students for the world in which they will practice. Therefore, I believe that it is important for the faculty at each School to consider the following questions: (-) Are our students prepared to enter realistic positions as soon as they graduate? (-) Do they have the background necessary to use computers effectively in the future? (-) Do our research efforts have results that designers are likely to use today or any time soon to make better buildings or to make buildings better?

series eCAADe
email glennie@rpi.edu
last changed 1998/08/24 08:24

_id c32f
authors Grant, Mike
year 1993
title Issue - Interactive Software Systems for the Urban Environment
source CAAD Futures ‘93 [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-444-89922-7] (Pittsburgh / USA), 1993, pp. 557-564
summary The research reported here sought to examine the prospect for linking data sets which are currently isolated within specific departments or held externally by utility companies or businesses each of whom are likely to benefit from pooling resources. These data sets are potentially capable of being merged into one comprehensive system with the prospect that the sum of the parts would be worth considerably more than their individual worth suggests.
keywords Computer-Aided Architectural Design, Urban Management Visualization, Geographical Information Systems
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/11/23 18:40

_id 56de
authors Handa, M., Hasegawa, Y., Matsuda, H., Tamaki, K., Kojima, S., Matsueda, K., Takakuwa, T. and Onoda, T.
year 1996
title Development of interior finishing unit assembly system with robot: WASCOR IV research project report
source Automation in Construction 5 (1) (1996) pp. 31-38
summary The WASCOR (WASeda Construction Robot) research project was organized in 1982 by Waseda University, Tokyo, Japan, aiming at automatizing building construction with a robot. This project is collaborated by nine general contractors and a construction machinery manufacturer. The WASCOR research project has been divided into four phases with the development of the study and called WASCOR I, II, III, and IV respectively. WASCOR I, II, and III finished during the time from 1982 to 1992 in a row with having 3-4 years for each phase, and WASCOR IV has been continued since 1993. WASCOR IV has been working on a automatized building interior finishing system. This system consists of following three parts. (1) Development of building system and construction method for automated interior finishing system. (2) Design of hardware system applied to automated interior finishing system. (3) Design of information management system in automated construction. As the research project has been developing, this paper describes the interim report of (1) Development of building system and construction method for automated interior finishing system, and (2) Design of hardware system applied to automated interior finishing system.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 2608
authors Hartman, Jan B.
year 1993
title Application of Endoscopy in Road–Design
source Endoscopy as a Tool in Architecture [Proceedings of the 1st European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 951-722-069-3] Tampere (Finland), 25-28 August 1993, pp. 109-116
summary Within the Dutch Ministry of Transport a special Division on Transport and Traffic Research is occupied with all aspects concerning mobility and traffic safety on a national level. Research and advice on the quality of the road–infrastructure is one of the main topics. For road–design a set of very detailed guidelines have been developed. Construction and reconstruction of parts of the high–way–network are tested against these guidelines. In this matter the actual road–user takes a central place. In the design–phase of a project on road-infrastructure contributions of a number of experts are taken into account. Expert–opinions on elements of the road–design result in a overall road–design. The road–scene of the overall–design is tested against visual requirements for safe driving, from a drivers point of view. Goal is to give advice on improvement of the visual quality of the road design. Research in this field is now carried out by Grontmij Consulting Engineers, mainly under authority of the Ministry of Transport. Key–word is Improvement of Quality. Who is going to notice? Who will benefit from it? Of course it is a comforting thought for road–owners and designers to know they won’t have to be ashamed for what they have come up with. Primary goal is that ‘We the people’ are provided with a high–standard road infrastructure. The road–scene research section studies the quality of the visual information as presented to the roadusers. We try to create visual circumstances in which drivers will be able to perform their driving task is a proper way. When the visual representation in the brain differs from reality, you have a serious problem. A traffic safety problem, with casualties and fatalities. A burden for society, financially and emotionally.

keywords Architectural Endoscopy
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

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