CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 81 to 100 of 162

_id 578d
authors Helpenstein, H. (Ed.)
year 1993
title CAD geometry data exchange using STEP
source Berlin: Springer-Verlag
summary With increasing demand for data exchange in computer integrated manufacturing, a neutral connection between dissimilar systems is needed. After a few national and European attempts, a worldwide standardization of product data has been developed. Standard ISO 10303 (STEP - STandard for Exchange of Product data) produced in its first version those parts that are relevant for CAD geometrical data. A European consortium of 14 CAD vendors and users was supported by the ESPRIT programme to influence the emerging standard and implement early applications for it. Over the years 1989-1992, project CADEX (CAD geometry data EXchange) worked out application protocols as a contribution to STEP; developed a software toolkit that reads, writes, and manipulates STEP data; and, based on this toolkit, implemented data exchange processors for ten different CAD and FEA systems. This book reports the work done in project CADEX and describes all its results in detail.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 2979
authors Henry, D. and Furness, T.A.
year 1993
title Spatial Perception in Virtual Environments: Evaluating an Architectural Application
source IEEE Virtual Reality Annual International Symposium, 1993, Seattle
summary Over the last several years, professionals from many different fields have come to the Human Interface Technology Laboratory (H.I.T.L) to discover and learn about virtual environments. In general, they are impressed by their experiences and express the tremendous potential the tool has in their respective fields. But the potentials are always projected far in the future, and the tool remains just a concept. This is justifiable because the quality of the visual experience is so much less than what people are used to seeing; high definition television, breathtaking special cinematographic effects and photorealistic computer renderings. Instead, the models in virtual environments are very simple looking; they are made of small spaces, filled with simple or abstract looking objects of little color distinctions as seen through displays of noticeably low resolution and at an update rate which leaves much to be desired. Clearly, for most applications, the requirements of precision have not been met yet with virtual interfaces as they exist today. However, there are a few domains where the relatively low level of the technology could be perfectly appropriate. In general, these are applications which require that the information be presented in symbolic or representational form. Having studied architecture, I knew that there are moments during the early part of the design process when conceptual decisions are made which require precisely the simple and representative nature available in existing virtual environments.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id c5bb
authors Hirschberg, U., Meister, M. and Neumann, F.
year 1993
title Processing of Geographic Data for CAAD-supported Analysis and Design of Urban Development Areas
source [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Eindhoven (The Netherlands) 11-13 November 1993
summary The interdisciplinary research project aims at the development of a hard- and software environment to support the representation, analysis, manipulation and design of urban development areas for architects and city planners. It was started in 1990 and involves three groups at the ETH Zurich: Architecture/Urban design - Processing of Geographic Data/Photogrammetry -Computer Sciences/CAAD. The first part of this paper will give an introduction to the goals and implications of the project by comparing it with a similar project one of the authors took part in as a student. Then the paper gives a brief description of the work of the three groups involved, an overview of the methods they employed and the results that were achieved. The main focus will be on the work of the CAAD group . Finally some conclusions are drawn and problems are discussed. The future work includes the testing of the tool by students during the winter term 1993/94.

series eCAADe
email hirschberg@tugraz.at
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id caadria2007_675
id caadria2007_675
authors Huang, Joseph Chuen-Huei
year 2007
title Decision Support System for Modular Houses
source CAADRIA 2007 [Proceedings of the 12th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Nanjing (China) 19-21 April 2007
summary Presently, only a small percentage of people in the world typically hire an architect to design and build a home which is tailored to their preference. Besides the architect’s fee, clients also need to wait an interminable time for design and construction. Factory-made prefabricated housing systems tried to solve this problem previously. However, most pioneers failed to address the issues of variability and individual needs (Kieran & Timberlake, 2004). Plants closed because they produced more than the market demand, and prefabricated housing provided less flexibility than the traditional stick-built housing. The advanced digital technology makes it possible to communicate design ideas and concepts to others more effectively. The project delivery process leads itself to customization, embodying principles of lean production (Pine, 1993), flexible computer-integrated design interaction with clients, and reduced cycle times; all effecting rapid response between consumers and producers.
series CAADRIA
email huanchu1@iit.edu
last changed 2008/06/16 08:48

_id 09b4
authors Ismail, Ashraf and McCartney, Kevin
year 1993
title A Tool for Conceptual Design Evaluation Based on Compliance with Site-Development Briefs and Related Planning Regulations
source [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Eindhoven (The Netherlands) 11-13 November 1993
summary The need has been established for a computer based decision support tool to use during the conceptual stages of architectural design. The main functions are to check design compliance with the requirements of local planning authorities; characteristics evaluated will include building size, height, plot ratios, circulation and accessibility, and the preservation of natural features on site. This tool is being developed to operate under AutoCAD environment; the construction industry standard computer aided design software, following standard layering convention, integrated command lines, and pull-down menus. In addition to the common graphical output; i.c. plans, elevations and three dimensional models, it will generate textual analysis in report format to use as part of the Environmental Impact Analysis of proposed development. The tool's functions will be based upon the result of two types of field studies. First, interviews and questionnaires will be carried out with architects and planners of both private and public sectors. These will cover issues related to the performance of Computer Aided Architectural Design applications with regard to the evaluation of design schematics, and decision-making for the production of data for environmental statements. Second, field observation and participation will be carried out to observe decision-makers behaviour during assessment of building design proposals. A prototype is currently under development and will be tested against the expectations of the tool designer, Ashraf Ismail, and a team of professionals to be involved in the field studies. A critical analysis of the prototype design methodology and the study findings will be documented in the research thesis to be presented in June 1995.

series eCAADe
last changed 1998/08/24 09:01

_id fda4
authors Jalkanen, Janne
year 2000
title Building a spatially immersive display - HUTCAVE
source Helsinki University of Technology, Espoo, Finland
summary A spatially immersive display is a display that surrounds the user, thus removing or alleviating many disadvantages the common virtual reality systems, such as head-mounted displays have. The most common example of these spatially immersive displays is the CAVE, "CAVE Automatic Virtual Environment", first built at University of Illinois, in 1993. It combines a large field-of-view with high-resolution images and a high frame refresh rate. In this work, the current Virtual Reality (VR) and Virtual Environment (VE) systems are examined, and then the CAVE construction is presented. Principles of stereo vision are explained and current methods of obtaining both autostereoscopic and stereopsis-based vision are reviewed. Aspects of different projection methods, screens, mirrors, projectors, tracking equipment, and computing systems are examined. Also, recent work in CAVE audio, so far neglected in research, is presented. Some of the mathematics is also explained, since in most CAVE-systems some sort of optical folding is necessary. Two cases of CAVE construction are presented, both at the Helsinki University of Technology. The first is a single-wall installation built as a temporary system, and the second is a four-sided CAVE at a new location, superseding the temporary installation. Finally the conclusions are presented, both from the process management point of view, and from the technical point of view, examining the good and bad points of the chosen solutions.
series thesis:MSc
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id ed78
authors Jog, Bharati
year 1993
title Integration of Computer Applications in the Practice of Architecture
source Education and Practice: The Critical Interface [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-02-0] Texas (Texas / USA) 1993, pp. 89-97
summary Computer Applications in Architecture is emerging as an important aspect of our profession. The field, which is often referred to as Computer-Aided Architectural Design (CAAD) has had a notable impact on the profession and academia in recent years. A few professionals have predicted that as slide rules were replaced by calculators, in the coming years drafting boards and parallel bars will be replaced by computers. On the other hand, many architects do not anticipate such a drastic change in the coming decade as present CAD systems are supporting only a few integral aspects of architectural design. However, all agree that architecture curricula should be modified to integrate CAAD education.

In 1992-93, in the Department of Architecture of the 'School of Architecture and interior Design' at the University of Cincinnati, a curriculum committee was formed to review and modify the entire architecture curriculum. Since our profession and academia relate directly to each other, the author felt that while revising the curriculum, the committee should have factual information about CAD usage in the industry. Three ways to obtain such information were thought of, namely (1) conducting person to person or telephone interviews with the practitioners (2) requesting firms to give open- ended feed back and (3) surveying firms by sending a questionnaire. Of these three, the most effective, efficient and suitable method to obtain such information was an organized survey through a questionnaire. In mid December 1992, a survey was organized which was sponsored by the School of Architecture and Interior Design, the Center for the Study of the Practice of Architecture (CSPA) and the University Division of Professional Practice, all from the University of Cincinnati.

This chapter focuses on the results of this survey. A brief description of the survey design is also given. In the next section a few surveys organized in recent years are listed. In the third section the design of this survey is presented. The survey questions and their responses are given in the fourth section. The last section presents the conclusions and brief recommendations regarding computer curriculum in architecture.

series ACADIA
last changed 1999/02/25 09:25

_id 2d1f
authors Kavakli, Manolya and Bayazit, Nigan
year 1993
title An Experiment on the Image Schemata
source [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Eindhoven (The Netherlands) 11-13 November 1993
summary The main objective of this paper is to explain the process of knowledge acquisition utilising the method for the decomposition of the components of a system to extract design rules. The furnished drawing of a dwelling is considered as the language of a designer. These drawings contain the semantic knowledge that can be called general architectural know-how. This paper bases on the decomposition of the syntax of a room image. The syntax of a room image consists of walls, windows, circulation zones and furniture such as beds, wardrobes, commodes, dressing tables, etc. The syntax of a room image has some linkages. The designer put the syntax together with the joints of circulation zones as a grammar to match. The existing relations between the objects in a design can be called grammar. An experiment is applied to three classes of a CAAD course organised by the Turkish Chamber of Architects. The living room is given already furnished in the experiment and the rest of a dwelling is expected to be furnished. In the first phase, the experiment is applied on two different classes in different times. It is interesting that the same grammar is used by 6 of 8 couple of designers for 3 different types (A, B and D) of bedrooms. Only one of the bedrooms of C type) has different design styles in spite of looking much like each other. In the second phase, for the third class of 6 groups, plan is modified slightly. In this case all of the 6 couples of designers use the same grammar for 2 alternatives of D type bedroom for parents. An original method is applied in the elicitation of the knowledge in this experiment. The properties of the objects and their links are represented by a semantic network graph. This paper also presents the grammar of the furnished rooms and shows the density of preferences. Design rules are extracted from these drawings of a furnished dwelling by searching for similarities in the plans designed by different designers. The designers have some specifications about the grammar of furnishing and an image schema of the proposed room in their minds, depending on their education and experiences. During the design of a room, designers look for differences and the similarities existing in the syntax of the proposed room image and the image of furnished room on the screen. If these images match with each other, the designers satisfy with the result This paper investigates the image schemata of the designers by evaluating their drawings. Some design rules are represented by means of image schemata. Matching the joints of circulation zones, the designers put the syntax of different image schemata together and they can illustrate different alternatives, restricted by the translation of these image schemata.

series eCAADe
email bayazit@sariyer.cc.itu.edu.tr
last changed 1998/08/24 08:49

_id ddss9217
id ddss9217
authors Kim, Y.S. and Brawne, M.
year 1993
title An approach to evaluating exhibition spaces in art galleries
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture (Proceedings of a conference held in Mierlo, the Netherlands in July 1992), ISBN 0-7923-2444-7
summary There are certain building types in which movement of people is the most significant evaluation factor. Among these are art galleries and museums. Unlike other building types, which are often explicated by investigating the relationship between people and people, and between people and the built environment, art galleries and museums are a building type in which the social relationship between people hardly exists and peoples movement through space, that is, the functional relationship between people and space, is one of the most significant factors for their description. The typical museum experience is through direct, sequential, and visual contact with static objects on display as the visitor moves. Therefore, the movement pattern of the visitors must exert a significant influence on achieving the specific goal of a museum. There is a critical need for predicting the consequences of particular spatial configurations with respect to visitors movement. In this sense, it is the intention of this paper to find out the relationship between the spatial configuration of exhibition space and the visitors' movement pattern.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id caadria2003_a5-1
id caadria2003_a5-1
authors Knight, Michael W. and Brown, Andre G.P.
year 2003
title NAVRgate X, A Naturalistic Navigation Metaphor for Large Scale Virtual Environments
source CAADRIA 2003 [Proceedings of the 8th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 974-9584-13-9] Bangkok Thailand 18-20 October 2003, pp. 625-630
summary This paper describes the latest in a series of real-world, low-cost interfaces for virtual reality. nAVRgate (the AVR being Architectural Virtual Reality) has looked at real-world analogies for interfacing with 'real' virtual environments in an attempt to improve the sense of presence, the phenomenon of sense of presence in virtual environments (VEs) often being seen as the real essence of Virtual Reality (Laurel, 1993)
series CAADRIA
email mknight@liv.ac.uk, andygpb@liv.ac.uk
last changed 2003/12/02 06:47

_id a12b
authors Kokosalakis, J., Farrow, J. and Spalton, N.
year 1993
title Introducing 2D Draughting and 3D CAD Modelling into the Information and Library Studies Curriculum in Response to Increasingly Complex Design Requirements of Information Resources
source [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Eindhoven (The Netherlands) 11-13 November 1993
summary This paper describes enhancements to the Information and Library Studies curriculum at the Liverpool John Moores University. In the design process for buildings and space utilised for learning resources informed client involvement is seen as important by the information professional. A new module has been introduced with the aim of providing students with the knowledge and skills to communicate effectively with building design professionals. It is apparent that CAD has a place in this teaching. The programme of study is outlined, including a discussion of significant, relevant examples produced by the CAAD staff of the School of the Built Environment. The teaching methods were drawn from experience in the well established curricula and delivery of CAAD to the architecture and environmental planning students using School of the Built Environment Macintosh hardware and software. From the Aldham Robarts Learning Resource Centre, (presently nearing completion) examples will be shown of animated models, design, organisational and staffing solutions to new technological demands. These include transfer of the Austin - Smith: Lord Intergraph/MicroStation 3D model to Zoom, animation with Electric Image and Theseus and assisting library staff to use ArchiCAD to design and consider shelf planning arrangements for negotiation with the architects. There are interesting lessons to be learned about the advantages of CAD for future client control.

keywords Information Professional, CAAD, Learning Resource Centre, Open Learning, Information and Library Studies, Curriculum.
series eCAADe
email BLTJKOKO@livjm.ac.uk
last changed 1998/08/24 08:43

_id cc90
authors Kolarevic, Branko
year 1998
title CAD@HKU
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 16-17
summary Since 1993, we have experimented with Virtual Design Studios (VDS) as an on-going research project that investigates the combination of current computer-aided design (CAD), computer networks (Internet), and computer supported collaborative work (CSCW) techniques to bring together studentsat geographically distributed locations to work in a virtual atelier. In 1993 the theme of the first joint VDS project was in-fill housing for the traditional Chinese walled village of Kat Hing Wai in the New Territories north of Hong Kong, and our partners included MIT and Harvard in Boston (USA), UBC in Vancouver (Canada), and Washington University in St. Louis (USA). In 1994 we were joined by Cornell (USA) and Escola Tecnica Superior d’Arquitectura de Barcelona (Spain) to re-design Li Long housing in Shanghai, and 1995 added the Warsaw Institute of Technology (Poland) for the ACSA/Dupont competition to design a Center for Cultural and Religious Studies in Japan. The 1996 topic was an international competition to design a monument located in Hong Kong to commemorate the return of Hong Kong to Chinese sovereignty in 1997. Communication was via e-mail, the WorldWide Web with limited attempts at VRML, and network video. Several teaching and research experiments conducted through these projects have demonstrated the viability and potential of using electronic, telecommunications, and videoconferencing technologies in collaborative design processes. Results of these VDS have been presented at conferences worldwide, explained in journal papers and published in Virtual Design Studio, edited by J. Wojtowicz, published by HKU Press.
series ACADIA
email branko@pobox.upenn.edu
last changed 2002/12/14 08:21

_id ddss9202
id ddss9202
authors Koutamanis, A. and Mitossi, V.
year 1993
title Architectural computer vision: Automated recognition of architectural drawings
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture (Proceedings of a conference held in Mierlo, the Netherlands in July 1992), ISBN 0-7923-2444-7
summary Computer vision offers the ability to transform digitized drawings into documents that can be used with computer systems. Recognition of digitized drawings can occur at the levels of (a) geometric elements, (b) building elements, and (c) spatial articulation. The last two levels apply not only to digitized images but also to computer-produced ones. The enormous burden placed on the user for inputting and manipulating CAD drawings suggests that automated recognition can add to the capabilities of CAD by making the computer more flexible with respect to inputting design information and more responsive to the actual concerns of the designer.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id cd30
authors Koutamanis, Alexander
year 1993
title On the Correlation of Design and Computational Techniques in Architectural Education
source [eCAADe Conference Proceedings] Eindhoven (The Netherlands) 11-13 November 1993
summary Many studies employ analyses of human intelligence as justification or guideline for the development of machine intelligence. The main benefit brought on by such studies has been the improvement of our understanding of both human and machine intelligence. In teaching architecture with computers the same approach can make explicit design techniques architects use by means of equivalent or similar computational techniques. Explicitation of design techniques leads to a better understanding of architects' activities, as well as to which computer tools can offer automated support to these activities. In the curriculum of the Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology, relations and correspondences between computational and design techniques form a major underlying theme in computer-aided design courses. The purposes of this theme are (i) comprehension of the computational structure of a computer design tool, and (ii) explanation of how such computational structures relate to architectural design. (correspondences between the computational principles of computer programs and design techniques are instrumental in defining the scope of each computer tool in architectural design while improving the students' understanding of architectural design as a cognitive process and thus promoting automation as a natural extension of established conventional practices. The paper outlines the correlation of computational and design techniques in the case of electronic spreadsheets. Spreadsheets are introduced through a thorough presentation of the various kinds and aspects of constraint propagation, their underlying computational principle. Numerical constraint propagation is explained by means of spreadsheet applications for simple numerical calculations. Symbolic constraint propagation is presented in the framework of machine perception. Both forms are then linked to architectural design through parametric design and the recognition of spaces in floor plans. Exercises linked to spreadsheets and constraint propagation include the parametric calculation of stairs and making parametric variations of a building on the basis of floor area calculations.

series eCAADe
email a.koutamanis@bk.tudelft.nl
more http://caad.bk.tudelft.nl/koutamanis/
last changed 1998/08/24 08:56

_id 65c4
authors Kozma, R.B.
year 1993
title Will Media Influence Learning? Reframing the Debate
source Educational Technology Research and Development (1):1-31
summary This article addresses the position taken by Clark that media do not influence learning under any conditions. The article reframes the questions raised by Clark to explore the conditions under which media will influence learning. Specifically, it posits the need to consider the capabilities of media, and the methods that employ them, as they interact with the cognitive and social processes by which knowledge is constructed. This approach is examined within the context of two major media-based projects, one which uses computers and the other video. The article discusses the implications of this approach for media theory, research, and practice.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ab3c
authors Kramer, G.
year 1996
title Mapping a Single Data Stream to Multiple Auditory Variables: A Subjective Approach to Creating a Compelling Design
source Proceedings of the Third International Conferenceon Auditory Display, Santa FO Institute
summary Representing a single data variable changing in time via sonification, or using that data to control a sound in some way appears to be a simple problem but actually involves a significant degree of subjectivity. This paper is a response to my own focus on specific sonification tasks (Kramer 1990, 1993) (Fitch & Kramer, 1994), on broad theoretical concerns in auditory display (Kramer 1994a, 1994b, 1995), and on the representation of high-dimensional data sets (Kramer 1991a & Kramer & Ellison, 1991b). The design focus of this paper is partly a response to the others who, like myself, have primarily employed single fundamental acoustic variables such as pitch or loudness to represent single data streams. These simple representations have framed three challenges: Behavioral and Cognitive Science-Can sonifications created with complex sounds changing simultaneously in several dimensions facilitate the formation of a stronger internal auditory image, or audiation, than would be produced by simpler sonifications? Human Factors and Applications-Would such a stronger internal image of the data prove to be more useful from the standpoint of conveying information? Technology and Design-How might these richer displays be constructed? This final question serves as a starting point for this paper. After years of cautious sonification research I wanted to explore the creation of more interesting and compelling representations.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 3465
authors Kruger, M.W.
year 1993
title Artificial Reality
source Addison-Wesley
summary This book by artificial reality pioneer Myron Krueger presents a view of our future interaction with machines, when computer systems will sense our needs and respond to them. In its unique melding of aesthetics and technology, Artificial Reality II shows how simulated worlds allow people to interact with computers in profoundly new ways for problem-solving and recreation.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ddssup9613
id ddssup9613
authors Kulkarni, R.G., Stought, R.R. and Haynes, K.E.
year 1996
title Traffic Flow Landscapes
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary Major metropolitan areas and constituent independent jurisdictions face the problem of providing efficient transportation for their residents and in-and out commuters. A typical trip taker spends considerable time on the road to reach the workplace and other destinations. Though it may seem counter-intuitive, adding more links to existing road networks and/or increasing traffic capacity by adding lanes does not necessarily decrease travel times (eg. Braess' paradox). But it is certain that a dense redundant network of roads would provide a trip taker with alternate routes when traffic incidents occur. These types of questions raise the question of, how to evaluate the flow characteristics of the entire road network of a jurisdiction and its larger region in keeping the traffic moving? Further, how may the impact of adding more links/ lanes or the blocking of existing links! lanes be best measured? To answer these and related questions, we propose a methodology to evaluate a fitness criteria for road networks based on Kauffman's biological NK model (1993). We specify a transportation road traffic flow landscape analogous to the fitness landscape of the NK model. Using the transportation road traffic flow landscape we derive a road fitness index that can be used to evaluate either the entire road network's traffic flows or subparts of such network's traffic flows. We explore the possibility of investigating traffic flow landscapes to search for optimal routes to clear traffic. Finally we describe an approach for applying the theoretical framework developed in the paper to the traffic conditions on the road network of the city of Fairfax, Virginia.
keywords Fitness Landscapes, NK Model, Genotype, Gene, Self-Organization, ITS Technology
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 60c9
authors Laurel, B.
year 1993
title Computer as Theatre
source Addison-Wesley Publishing Company
summary I used Aristotelian poetics as a way to look at how plays in particular are made and constructed and to figure out what their parts are and how they work together. So some of the ways, in which there is a relationship, is the idea of action as being the primary element of a play. Often in the old days in particular working with the computer we did not think of the user taking action or getting something done. We thought of the computer presenting information. In the early days it felt much more like television. The idea of taking action and make choices is a very important one in understanding the deepest potential of interactivity. That said I could have based that book on a dramatic theory of Bertolt Brecht for example. There are other consistent, systematic theories of drama you could use to model and interact the system. The only reason I checked Aristotelian poetics is because it seemed so fundamental to me.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id cf40
authors Leyh, W.
year 1995
title Automatic assembly of a commercial cavity block system
source Automation in Construction 4 (2) (1995) pp. 147-167
summary In an earlier publication (Leyh, 1993) the "Experiences with the Construction of a Building Assembly Robot" have been dealt with. The application of that robot system for the automatic assembly of commercial cavity blocks is the subject of a subsequent report which consists of two parts: in the first, this paper, we primarily deal with the assembly methods, in the second we deal with their realization. What is characteristic of cavity blocks is the fact that they are at first assembled dry, without cementing material, and the masonry is later filled with mortar. As to their weight and dimension, the cavity blocks used by the company GISOTON are adjusted to the ergonomics of a mason. The entirely different characteristics and abilities of assembly robots are not taken into consideration. However, their dimensional tolerance is relatively small (0.5 mm). Furthermore as cavity bricks, they have conic and oval recesses. Both features are strongly favourable for automation. This paper will highlight specific problems during automized construction assembly with commercial standard assembly elements, and help to solve them.
keywords Robotics; Assembly methods; Jointing technique; Reference system; Gripper construction
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/06/02 07:36

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