CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 251

_id ga0009
id ga0009
authors Lewis, Matthew
year 2000
title Aesthetic Evolutionary Design with Data Flow Networks
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary For a little over a decade, software has been created which allows for the design of visual content by aesthetic evolutionary design (AED) [3]. The great majority of these AED systems involve custom software intended for breeding entities within one fairly narrow problem domain, e.g., certain classes of buildings, cars, images, etc. [5]. Only a very few generic AED systems have been attempted, and extending them to a new design problem domain can require a significant amount of custom software development [6][8]. High end computer graphics software packages have in recent years become sufficiently robust to allow for flexible specification and construction of high level procedural models. These packages also provide extensibility, allowing for the creation of new software tools. One component of these systems which enables rapid development of new generative models and tools is the visual data flow network [1][2][7]. One of the first CG packages to employ this paradigm was Houdini. A system constructed within Houdini which allows for very fast generic specification of evolvable parametric prototypes is described [4]. The real-time nature of the software, when combined with the interlocking data networks, allows not only for vertical ancestor/child populations within the design space to be explored, but also allows for fast "horizontal" exploration of the potential population surface. Several example problem domains will be presented and discussed. References: [1] Alias | Wavefront. Maya. 2000, http://www.aliaswavefront.com [2] Avid. SOFTIMAGE. 2000, http://www.softimage.com [3] Bentley, Peter J. Evolutionary Design by Computers. Morgan Kaufmann, 1999. [4] Lewis, Matthew. "Metavolve Home Page". 2000, http://www.cgrg.ohio-state.edu/~mlewis/AED/Metavolve/ [5] Lewis, Matthew. "Visual Aesthetic Evolutionary Design Links". 2000, http://www.cgrg.ohio-state.edu/~mlewis/aed.html [6] Rowley, Timothy. "A Toolkit for Visual Genetic Programming". Technical Report GCG-74, The Geometry Center, University of Minnesota, 1994. [7] Side Effects Software. Houdini. 2000, http://www.sidefx.com [8] Todd, Stephen and William Latham. "The Mutation and Growth of Art by Computers" in Evolutionary Design by Computers, Peter Bentley ed., pp. 221-250, Chapter 9, Morgan Kaufmann, 1999.    
series other
email mlewis@cgrg.ohio-state.edu
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ddss9462
id ddss9462
authors Liggett, Robert S. and Jepson, William H.
year 1994
title Implementing an Integrated Environment for Urban Simulation CAD, Visualization and GIS
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary Using technology which has been adapted from military flight simulation hardware and software, researchers at UCLA's Graduate School of Architecture and Urban Planning are currently developing an integrated computing environment for Urban Simulation which includes a high-level visual simulation package, an industry standard CAD system, and a traditional two dimensional geographic information system and data bases. The focal point of the integrated system is a visual simulation engine which has been developed using Silicon Graphics' IRIS Performer application development environment. With this system, aerial photographs can be combined with street level video to efficiently create a realistic (down to plants, street signs and the graffiti on the walls) model of an urban neighbourhood which can then be used for interactive fly and walk-through demonstrations. Links have been established between this visual simulation system and AutoCAD to allow models (at varying levels of detail) to be generated using the CAD system and translated into the form required for the visualization system. Links between the GIS system (in this case ARC/INFO and ARCVIEW) and the visual simulation system provide the capability for dynamic query and display of information from the GIS data base in a real-time 3-dimensional format. Links between the CAD and GIS systems allow common base maps to be used for the GIS and modelling systems as well as automatic generation of 3-d form. While an earlier paper by the authors discussed proposed strategies for such an Urban Simulation System, this paper focuses on the results of actual implementation of these strategies, as well as the use of the system for modelling, exploration and display of alternative physical environments.
series DDSS
email robin@gsaup.ucla.edu
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id sigradi2006_e028c
id sigradi2006_e028c
authors Griffith, Kenfield; Sass, Larry and Michaud, Dennis
year 2006
title A strategy for complex-curved building design:Design structure with Bi-lateral contouring as integrally connected ribs
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 465-469
summary Shapes in designs created by architects such as Gehry Partners (Shelden, 2002), Foster and Partners, and Kohn Peterson and Fox rely on computational processes for rationalizing complex geometry for building construction. Rationalization is the reduction of a complete geometric shape into discrete components. Unfortunately, for many architects the rationalization is limited reducing solid models to surfaces or data on spread sheets for contractors to follow. Rationalized models produced by the firms listed above do not offer strategies for construction or digital fabrication. For the physical production of CAD description an alternative to the rationalized description is needed. This paper examines the coupling of digital rationalization and digital fabrication with physical mockups (Rich, 1989). Our aim is to explore complex relationships found in early and mid stage design phases when digital fabrication is used to produce design outcomes. Results of our investigation will aid architects and engineers in addressing the complications found in the translation of design models embedded with precision to constructible geometries. We present an algorithmically based approach to design rationalization that supports physical production as well as surface production of desktop models. Our approach is an alternative to conventional rapid prototyping that builds objects by assembly of laterally sliced contours from a solid model. We explored an improved product description for rapid manufacture as bilateral contouring for structure and panelling for strength (Kolarevic, 2003). Infrastructure typically found within aerospace, automotive, and shipbuilding industries, bilateral contouring is an organized matrix of horizontal and vertical interlocking ribs evenly distributed along a surface. These structures are monocoque and semi-monocoque assemblies composed of structural ribs and skinning attached by rivets and adhesives. Alternative, bi-lateral contouring discussed is an interlocking matrix of plywood strips having integral joinery for assembly. Unlike traditional methods of building representations through malleable materials for creating tangible objects (Friedman, 2002), this approach constructs with the implication for building life-size solutions. Three algorithms are presented as examples of rationalized design production with physical results. The first algorithm [Figure 1] deconstructs an initial 2D curved form into ribbed slices to be assembled through integral connections constructed as part of the rib solution. The second algorithm [Figure 2] deconstructs curved forms of greater complexity. The algorithm walks along the surface extracting surface information along horizontal and vertical axes saving surface information resulting in a ribbed structure of slight double curvature. The final algorithm [Figure 3] is expressed as plug-in software for Rhino that deconstructs a design to components for assembly as rib structures. The plug-in also translates geometries to a flatten position for 2D fabrication. The software demonstrates the full scope of the research exploration. Studies published by Dodgson argued that innovation technology (IvT) (Dodgson, Gann, Salter, 2004) helped in solving projects like the Guggenheim in Bilbao, the leaning Tower of Pisa in Italy, and the Millennium Bridge in London. Similarly, the method discussed in this paper will aid in solving physical production problems with complex building forms. References Bentley, P.J. (Ed.). Evolutionary Design by Computers. Morgan Kaufman Publishers Inc. San Francisco, CA, 1-73 Celani, G, (2004) “From simple to complex: using AutoCAD to build generative design systems” in: L. Caldas and J. Duarte (org.) Implementations issues in generative design systems. First Intl. Conference on Design Computing and Cognition, July 2004 Dodgson M, Gann D.M., Salter A, (2004), “Impact of Innovation Technology on Engineering Problem Solving: Lessons from High Profile Public Projects,” Industrial Dynamics, Innovation and Development, 2004 Dristas, (2004) “Design Operators.” Thesis. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2004 Friedman, M, (2002), Gehry Talks: Architecture + Practice, Universe Publishing, New York, NY, 2002 Kolarevic, B, (2003), Architecture in the Digital Age: Design and Manufacturing, Spon Press, London, UK, 2003 Opas J, Bochnick H, Tuomi J, (1994), “Manufacturability Analysis as a Part of CAD/CAM Integration”, Intelligent Systems in Design and Manufacturing, 261-292 Rudolph S, Alber R, (2002), “An Evolutionary Approach to the Inverse Problem in Rule-Based Design Representations”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 329-350 Rich M, (1989), Digital Mockup, American Institute of Aeronautics and Astronautics, Reston, VA, 1989 Schön, D., The Reflective Practitioner: How Professional Think in Action. Basic Books. 1983 Shelden, D, (2003), “Digital Surface Representation and the Constructability of Gehry’s Architecture.” Diss. Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA, 2003 Smithers T, Conkie A, Doheny J, Logan B, Millington K, (1989), “Design as Intelligent Behaviour: An AI in Design Thesis Programme”, Artificial Intelligence in Design, 293-334 Smithers T, (2002), “Synthesis in Designing”, Artificial Intelligence in Design ’02, 3-24 Stiny, G, (1977), “Ice-ray: a note on the generation of Chinese lattice designs” Environmental and Planning B, volume 4, pp. 89-98
keywords Digital fabrication; bilateral contouring; integral connection; complex-curve
series SIGRADI
email kenfield@mit.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id db00
authors Espina, Jane J.B.
year 2002
title Base de datos de la arquitectura moderna de la ciudad de Maracaibo 1920-1990 [Database of the Modern Architecture of the City of Maracaibo 1920-1990]
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 133-139
summary Bases de datos, Sistemas y Redes 134The purpose of this report is to present the achievements obtained in the use of the technologies of information andcommunication in the architecture, by means of the construction of a database to register the information on the modernarchitecture of the city of Maracaibo from 1920 until 1990, in reference to the constructions located in 5 of Julio, Sectorand to the most outstanding planners for its work, by means of the representation of the same ones in digital format.The objective of this investigation it was to elaborate a database for the registration of the information on the modernarchitecture in the period 1920-1990 of Maracaibo, by means of the design of an automated tool to organize the it datesrelated with the buildings, parcels and planners of the city. The investigation was carried out considering three methodologicalmoments: a) Gathering and classification of the information of the buildings and planners of the modern architectureto elaborate the databases, b) Design of the databases for the organization of the information and c) Design ofthe consultations, information, reports and the beginning menu. For the prosecution of the data files were generated inprograms attended by such computer as: AutoCAD R14 and 2000, Microsoft Word, Microsoft PowerPoint and MicrosoftAccess 2000, CorelDRAW V9.0 and Corel PHOTOPAINT V9.0.The investigation is related with the work developed in the class of Graphic Calculation II, belonging to the Departmentof Communication of the School of Architecture of the Faculty of Architecture and Design of The University of the Zulia(FADLUZ), carried out from the year 1999, using part of the obtained information of the works of the students generatedby means of the CAD systems for the representation in three dimensions of constructions with historical relevance in themodern architecture of Maracaibo, which are classified in the work of The Other City, generating different types ofisometric views, perspectives, representations photorealistics, plants and facades, among others.In what concerns to the thematic of this investigation, previous antecedents are ignored in our environment, and beingthe first time that incorporates the digital graph applied to the work carried out by the architects of “The Other City, thegenesis of the oil city of Maracaibo” carried out in the year 1994; of there the value of this research the field of thearchitecture and computer science. To point out that databases exist in the architecture field fits and of the design, alsoweb sites with information has more than enough architects and architecture works (Montagu, 1999).In The University of the Zulia, specifically in the Faculty of Architecture and Design, they have been carried out twoworks related with the thematic one of database, specifically in the years 1995 and 1996, in the first one a system wasdesigned to visualize, to classify and to analyze from the architectural point of view some historical buildings of Maracaiboand in the second an automated system of documental information was generated on the goods properties built insidethe urban area of Maracaibo. In the world environment it stands out the first database developed in Argentina, it is the database of the Modern andContemporary Architecture “Datarq 2000” elaborated by the Prof. Arturo Montagú of the University of Buenos Aires. The general objective of this work it was the use of new technologies for the prosecution in Architecture and Design (MONTAGU, Ob.cit). In the database, he intends to incorporate a complementary methodology and alternative of use of the informationthat habitually is used in the teaching of the architecture. When concluding this investigation, it was achieved: 1) analysis of projects of modern architecture, of which some form part of the historical patrimony of Maracaibo; 2) organized registrations of type text: historical, formal, space and technical data, and graph: you plant, facades, perspectives, pictures, among other, of the Moments of the Architecture of the Modernity in the city, general data and more excellent characteristics of the constructions, and general data of the Planners with their more important works, besides information on the parcels where the constructions are located, 3)construction in digital format and development of representations photorealistics of architecture projects already built. It is excellent to highlight the importance in the use of the Technologies of Information and Communication in this investigation, since it will allow to incorporate to the means digital part of the information of the modern architecturalconstructions that characterized the city of Maracaibo at the end of the XX century, and that in the last decades they have suffered changes, some of them have disappeared, destroying leaves of the modern historical patrimony of the city; therefore, the necessity arises of to register and to systematize in digital format the graphic information of those constructions. Also, to demonstrate the importance of the use of the computer and of the computer science in the representation and compression of the buildings of the modern architecture, to inclination texts, images, mapping, models in 3D and information organized in databases, and the relevance of the work from the pedagogic point of view,since it will be able to be used in the dictation of computer science classes and history in the teaching of the University studies of third level, allowing the learning with the use in new ways of transmission of the knowledge starting from the visual information on the part of the students in the elaboration of models in three dimensions or electronic scalemodels, also of the modern architecture and in a future to serve as support material for virtual recoveries of some buildings that at the present time they don’t exist or they are almost destroyed. In synthesis, the investigation will allow to know and to register the architecture of Maracaibo in this last decade, which arises under the parameters of the modernity and that through its organization and visualization in digital format, it will allow to the students, professors and interested in knowing it in a quicker and more efficient way, constituting a contribution to theteaching in the history area and calculation. Also, it can be of a lot of utility for the development of future investigation projects related with the thematic one and restoration of buildings of the modernity in Maracaibo.
keywords database, digital format, modern architecture, model, mapping
series SIGRADI
email jacky@convergence.com.ve., jjespina@yahoo.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:51

_id eb5f
authors Al-Sallal, Khaled A. and Degelman, Larry 0.
year 1994
title A Hypermedia Model for Supporting Energy Design in Buildings
source Reconnecting [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-03-9] Washington University (Saint Louis / USA) 1994, pp. 39-49
summary Several studies have discussed the limitations of the available CAAD tools and have proposed solutions [Brown and Novitski 1987, Brown 1990, Degelman and Kim 1988, Schuman et al 1988]. The lack of integration between the different tasks that these programs address and the design process is a major problem. Schuman et al [1988] argued that in architectural design many issues must be considered simultaneously before the synthesis of a final product can take place. Studies by Brown and Novitski [1987] and Brown [1990] discussed the difficulties involved with integrating technical considerations in the creative architectural process. One aspect of the problem is the neglect of technical factors during the initial phase of the design that, as the authors argued, results from changing the work environment and the laborious nature of the design process. Many of the current programs require the user to input a great deal of numerical values that are needed for the energy analysis. Although there are some programs that attempt to assist the user by setting default values, these programs distract the user with their extensive arrays of data. The appropriate design tool is the one that helps the user to easily view the principal components of the building design and specify their behaviors and interactions. Data abstraction and information parsimony are the key concepts in developing a successful design tool. Three different approaches for developing an appropriate CAAD tool were found in the literature. Although there are several similarities among them, each is unique in solving certain aspects of the problem. Brown and Novitski [1987] emphasize the learning factor of the tool as well as its highly graphical user interface. Degelman and Kim [1988] emphasize knowledge acquisition and the provision of simulation modules. The Windows and Daylighting Group of Lawrence Berkeley Laboratory (LBL) emphasizes the dynamic structuring of information, the intelligent linking of data, the integrity of the different issues of design and the design process, and the extensive use of images [Schuman et al 19881, these attributes incidentally define the word hypermedia. The LBL model, which uses hypermedia, seems to be the more promising direction for this type of research. However, there is still a need to establish a new model that integrates all aspects of the problem. The areas in which the present research departs from the LBL model can be listed as follows: it acknowledges the necessity of regarding the user as the center of the CAAD tool design, it develops a model that is based on one of the high level theories of human-computer interaction, and it develops a prototype tool that conforms to the model.

series ACADIA
email l-degelman@neo.tamu.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 5c68
authors Peng, C.
year 1994
title Exploring communication in collaborative design: co-operative architectural modelling
source Design Studies Vol 15 No 1 January 1994, pp. 19-44
summary An exploration of communication in collaborative design from the perspective of co-operative architectural modelling is reported. The objectives and problems of communication in collaborative design are described and anaysed by viewing design as, basically, disciplines of modelling complex objects. Three cases of teamwork in architectural modelling are studied, each demonstrating a rich and informative approach to collaboration. Looking at the cases from the co-operative modelling perspective, important conditions for communication are observed: firstly, the participation and co-ordination among heterogeneous systems of representation and action that individual members of a design team work with; and secondly, the interconnection between common goals shared by all participants and domain-oriented goals pursued by individuals. In exploring how the conditions were met, it was found useful to characterize communication in terms of the inter-relations between common images and distributed design developments. Two generic patterns of communication in collaborative design were found, which suggest two alternative conceptual frameworks for developing computational representations.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id e1a1
authors Rodriguez, G.
year 1996
title REAL SCALE MODEL VS. COMPUTER GENERATED MODEL
source Full-Scale Modeling in the Age of Virtual Reality [6th EFA-Conference Proceedings]
summary Advances in electronic design and communication are already reshaping the way architecture is done. The development of more sophisticated and user-friendly Computer Aided Design (CAD) software and of cheaper and more powerful hardware is making computers more and more accessible to architects, planners and designers. These professionals are not only using them as a drafting tool but also as a instrument for visualization. Designers are "building" digital models of their designs and producing photo-like renderings of spaces that do not exist in the dimensional world.

The problem resides in how realistic these Computer Generated Models (CGM) are. Moss & Banks (1958) considered realism “the capacity to reproduce as exactly as possible the object of study without actually using it”. He considers that realism depends on: 1)The number of elements that are reproduced; 2) The quality of those elements; 3) The similarity of replication and 4) Replication of the situation. CGM respond well to these considerations, they can be very realistic. But, are they capable of reproducing the same impressions on people as a real space?

Research has debated about the problems of the mode of representation and its influence on the judgement which is made. Wools (1970), Lau (1970) and Canter, Benyon & West (1973) have demonstrated that the perception of a space is influenced by the mode of presentation. CGM are two-dimensional representations of three-dimensional space. Canter (1973) considers the three-dimensionality of the stimuli as crucial for its perception. So, can a CGM afford as much as a three-dimensional model?

The “Laboratorio de Experimentacion Espacial” (LEE) has been concerned with the problem of reality of the models used by architects. We have studied the degree in which models can be used as reliable and representative of real situations analyzing the Ecological Validity of several of them, specially the Real-Scale Model (Abadi & Cavallin, 1994). This kind of model has been found to be ecologically valid to represent real space. This research has two objectives: 1) to study the Ecological Validity of a Computer Generated Model; and 2) compare it with the Ecological Validity of a Real Scale Model in representing a real space.

keywords Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa/
last changed 2004/05/04 12:42

_id 4b72
authors Tovey, M.
year 1994
title Form creation techniques for automotive CAD
source Design Studies, Vol. 15, No. 1, pp. 85-114
summary Although there is a significant commitment to the use of CAD in the car industry, the industrial designer makes less use of it than engineering designers do. Vehicle stylists responsible for the early stages of the process have found that CAD systems and procedures are ill-suited to their methods and needs. As there are considerable potential benefits to the overall proc if it can be based around integrated CAD systems using common data bases, there are good reasons for devising procedures for automotive stylists that overcome the problems which CAD systems seem to present. This project has been concerned with devising such procedures. It has included a collaborative exercise with a motor manufacturer and has resulted in a collection of recommended techniques for form creation on CAD for automotive designers.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id cdd0
authors Day, A.
year 1994
title From Map to Model: the Development of an Urban Information System
source Design Studies, Vol 15 No 3, July 1994
summary The use of three-dimensional computer models for urban planning and design is discussed with particular reference to a recently completed model of the City of Bath. Problems in making such models generally available are identified and a solution, which is particularly appropriate for nonexpert users, is proposed.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id daff
authors Richens, P.
year 1994
title CAD Research at the Martin Centre
source Automation in Construction, No. 3
summary The Martin Centre CADLAB has recently been established to investigate software techniques that could be of practical importance to architects within the next five years. In common with most CAD researchers, we are interested in the earlier, conceptual, stages of design, where commercial CAD systems have had little impact. Our approach is not Knowledge-Based, but rather focuses on using the computer as a medium for design and communication. This leads to a concentration on apparently superficial aspects such as visual appearance, the dynamics of interaction, immediate feedback, plasticity. We try to avoid building-in theoretical attitudes, and to reduce the semantic content of our systems to a low level on the basis that flexibility and intelligence are inversely related; and that flexibility is more important. The CADLAB became operational in January 1992. First year work in three areas – building models, experiencing architecture, and making drawings – is discussed.
series journal
email paul.richens@arct.cam.ac.uk
more http://www.arct.cam.ac.uk/research/pubs/pdfs/rich94a.pdf
last changed 2000/03/05 18:05

_id 58fa
authors Glanville, R.
year 1994
title Variety in Design
source Systems Research, vol. 11, no 3
summary It is argued that creativity might be amplified through the co-operative sharing of brain power (in contrast to Ashby's amplification of intelligence by restricting attention to the problem). This argument is extended to the act of design (seen as the making of the new), where it is proposed that the nature of the computer is to encourage co-operative sharing because, by making perfect copies, it denies ownership. This, in turn, underpins the processes of collaging and transformation that so suit the computer. A means of using the computer is proposed in which both sharing and distortion are encouraged, so that the new may be made while the individual's sense of creation and of origination is respected. Possible questions and difficulties are raised. Some are resolved.1
series journal paper
email ranulph@glanville.co.uk
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 0ecc
authors Anh, Tran Hoai
year 1994
title APPLICATION OF FULL-SCALE MODELLING IN VIETNAM: AN OUTLINE FOR DISCUSSION
source Beyond Tools for Architecture [Proceedings of the 5th European Full-scale Modeling Association Conference / ISBN 90-6754-375-6] Wageningen (The Netherlands) 6-9 September 1994, pp. 59-70
summary This paper discusses the possibility of applying full-scale modelling in Vietnam, a non-western so called developing country. It deals with two main questions: 1) Is the application of full-scale modelling to be restricted to the West only? 2) what are the possibilities, constraints and fields of application - with attention to the methodological validity and technical solution for full-scale modelling in Vietnam? It is argued that since full-scale modelling is based on people-environment interaction, it should, in principle, apply to studies about people–environment relation anywhere on earth. On the methodological validity, it is discussed that application of full-scale modelling in Vietnam faces similar methodological problems as encountered in European applications (such as people's behaviour in experiment, ability to understand the abstraction of models, etc.) although at another level as this paper will make clear. However, it would be needed to design a modelling kit that is of low costs and adapted to the availability of local materials and suitable for the climatic condition of Vietnam. Two fields of application are projected as most applicable in Vietnam: modelling in architectural education and research investigation. Application for user's participation in the design process will depend on the development of building policy in the country.
keywords Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
last changed 2004/05/04 09:00

_id cf2011_p127
id cf2011_p127
authors Benros, Deborah; Granadeiro Vasco, Duarte Jose, Knight Terry
year 2011
title Integrated Design and Building System for the Provision of Customized Housing: the Case of Post-Earthquake Haiti
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 247-264.
summary The paper proposes integrated design and building systems for the provision of sustainable customized housing. It advances previous work by applying a methodology to generate these systems from vernacular precedents. The methodology is based on the use of shape grammars to derive and encode a contemporary system from the precedents. The combined set of rules can be applied to generate housing solutions tailored to specific user and site contexts. The provision of housing to shelter the population affected by the 2010 Haiti earthquake illustrates the application of the methodology. A computer implementation is currently under development in C# using the BIM platform provided by Revit. The world experiences a sharp increase in population and a strong urbanization process. These phenomena call for the development of effective means to solve the resulting housing deficit. The response of the informal sector to the problem, which relies mainly on handcrafted processes, has resulted in an increase of urban slums in many of the big cities, which lack sanitary and spatial conditions. The formal sector has produced monotonous environments based on the idea of mass production that one size fits all, which fails to meet individual and cultural needs. We propose an alternative approach in which mass customization is used to produce planed environments that possess qualities found in historical settlements. Mass customization, a new paradigm emerging due to the technological developments of the last decades, combines the economy of scale of mass production and the aesthetics and functional qualities of customization. Mass customization of housing is defined as the provision of houses that respond to the context in which they are built. The conceptual model for the mass customization of housing used departs from the idea of a housing type, which is the combined result of three systems (Habraken, 1988) -- spatial, building system, and stylistic -- and it includes a design system, a production system, and a computer system (Duarte, 2001). In previous work, this conceptual model was tested by developing a computer system for existing design and building systems (Benr__s and Duarte, 2009). The current work advances it by developing new and original design, building, and computer systems for a particular context. The urgent need to build fast in the aftermath of catastrophes quite often overrides any cultural concerns. As a result, the shelters provided in such circumstances are indistinct and impersonal. However, taking individual and cultural aspects into account might lead to a better identification of the population with their new environment, thereby minimizing the rupture caused in their lives. As the methodology to develop new housing systems is based on the idea of architectural precedents, choosing existing vernacular housing as a precedent permits the incorporation of cultural aspects and facilitates an identification of people with the new housing. In the Haiti case study, we chose as a precedent a housetype called “gingerbread houses”, which includes a wide range of houses from wealthy to very humble ones. Although the proposed design system was inspired by these houses, it was decided to adopt a contemporary take. The methodology to devise the new type was based on two ideas: precedents and transformations in design. In architecture, the use of precedents provides designers with typical solutions for particular problems and it constitutes a departing point for a new design. In our case, the precedent is an existing housetype. It has been shown (Duarte, 2001) that a particular housetype can be encoded by a shape grammar (Stiny, 1980) forming a design system. Studies in shape grammars have shown that the evolution of one style into another can be described as the transformation of one shape grammar into another (Knight, 1994). The used methodology departs takes off from these ideas and it comprises the following steps (Duarte, 2008): (1) Selection of precedents, (2) Derivation of an archetype; (3) Listing of rules; (4) Derivation of designs; (5) Cataloguing of solutions; (6) Derivation of tailored solution.
keywords Mass customization, Housing, Building system, Sustainable construction, Life cycle energy consumption, Shape grammar
series CAAD Futures
email deborahbenros@gmail.com
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id 28f1
authors Carrara, Gianfranco, Kalay, Yehuda E. and Novembri, Gabriele
year 1994
title Knowledge-Based Computational Support for Architectural Design
source Reconnecting [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-03-9] Washington University (Saint Louis / USA) 1994, pp. 5-12
summary The process of architectural design aims to define a physical form that will achieve certain functional and behavioral objectives in a particular context. It comprises three distinct, but highly interrelated, operations: (1) Definition of the desired objectives; (2) production of alternative design solutions; (3) evaluation of the expected performances of the solutions and their comparison to the predefined objectives. Design can be viewed as a process of search for a solution that satisfies stated needs, while at the same time adapting the needs to the opportunities and limitations inherent in the emerging solution. // Computational techniques were developed to assist each one of the three operations, with varying degrees of success. We propose to integrate all three operations into one whole, by developing a computational model that will facilitate smooth transition from one operation to another. The role of computers in supporting this model will include providing a knowledge base of prototypical design objectives and solutions, storing project-specific design goals and solutions, and predicting their expected performances. This paper discusses the rationale and background for developing such a knowledge-based design system, and presents the parameters for implementing it as a computational tool to support architectural design. Examples from a prototype implementation serve to illustrate the discussion.
series ACADIA
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/05/15 19:17

_id ddss9501
id ddss9501
authors Wahab, Ibrahim
year 1994
title Creating a Data Base for Parking System in Cities - Malaysia
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary Transport, one of the major urban systems somehow give rise to a varying degree of problems in many different cities. Malaysia being among the developing nations is no exception to such problems. When urban development takes place, infrastructure has to be provided adequately. The needs of an efficient parking system have to be at par with the development itself. Parking for example plays a similar role and it is indeed vital for every motorists. This paper outlines the general problems related to parking in urban areas and a generalised software suitable for micro-computer system is developed. The rationale is to help local authorities improve financial management besides assisting them in physical planning and other aspects ofdecision making.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 1262
authors Alshawi, M.
year 1994
title A run time exchange of component information between CAD and object models: A standard interface
source The Int. Journal of Construction IT 2(2), pp. 37-52
summary Integrated computer aided design could only occur in engineering once CAD systems could represent physical features and components rather than graphical primitives. In most dedicated CAD systems, the knowledge of a complete component exists only for the duration of each drawing command and the data stored in the database is simply a set of graphic primitives. This paper proposes an approach for real time information transfer from and to CAD systems based on a high level object representation of the design drawing. Drawing components are automatically identified and represented in an object hierarchy that reflects the 'part-of' relation between the various components including building spaces. Such hierarchies transfer an industry standard CAD system i.e. AutoCAD, into a high level object oriented system that can communicate with external applications with relative ease.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id 48a7
authors Brooks
year 1999
title What's Real About Virtual Reality
source IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications, Vol. 19, no. 6, Nov/Dec, 27
summary As is usual with infant technologies, the realization of the early dreams for VR and harnessing it to real work has taken longer than the wild hype predicted, but it is now happening. I assess the current state of the art, addressing the perennial questions of technology and applications. By 1994, one could honestly say that VR "almost works." Many workers at many centers could doe quite exciting demos. Nevertheless, the enabling technologies had limitations that seriously impeded building VR systems for any real work except entertainment and vehicle simulators. Some of the worst problems were end-to-end system latencies, low-resolution head-mounted displays, limited tracker range and accuracy, and costs. The technologies have made great strides. Today one can get satisfying VR experiences with commercial off-the-shelf equipment. Moreover, technical advances have been accompanied by dropping costs, so it is both technically and economically feasible to do significant application. VR really works. That is not to say that all the technological problems and limitations have been solved. VR technology today "barely works." Nevertheless, coming over the mountain pass from "almost works" to "barely works" is a major transition for the discipline. I have sought out applications that are now in daily productive use, in order to find out exactly what is real. Separating these from prototype systems and feasibility demos is not always easy. People doing daily production applications have been forthcoming about lessons learned and surprises encountered. As one would expect, the initial production applications are those offering high value over alternate approaches. These applications fall into a few classes. I estimate that there are about a hundred installations in daily productive use worldwide.
series journal paper
email brooks@ai.mit.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ddss9420
id ddss9420
authors Christie, Colin Ian
year 1994
title User Interfaces and Systems for Remote Design Working on ISDN Systems
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary This paper will discuss the requirements and possible configurations of user interfaces suitable for remote working multi-disciplinary design practices. Telecom companies throughout Europe are making heavy investments in digital communication technology (ISDN). The networks being created will form a standard method of high speed data transfer which can be readily accessed by any computer hardware platform. There are great opportunities for remote working by design groups, not simply sharing data but also interactive working and video communications. Digital communications provide the electronic arterial system to the new field of remote computing,whilst cheap and effective hardware and software support systems provide readily usable platforms on which to build remote multi-disciplinary design practices where the exploitation of specialistknowledge and skills is not limited by traditional methods of communication. ISDN networks allow real time video, voice and design software interaction - indeed, everything except the designer's physical presence. However as with all computer technology and indeed communications technology the user interface which gives access and control is vitally important. The user interface should provide the following features: be transparent to the user and simple and reliable to operate; allow an interactive window/s into the remote site's design information whatever the type of application being dealt with; carry out data compression, file transfer and file management procedures with minimum input from the user; cause no conflicts with design software or secondary applications;be able to access different platforms.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9425
id ddss9425
authors Deguchi, Atsushi and Hagishima, Satoshi
year 1994
title Integration System for Urban Design from Planning Management to Visalization
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary Advanced tools based on CAD or GIS systems and simulation methods have recently been introduced to support the many aspects of urban planning (design, analysis, evaluation, presentation). This research aims at constructing a system by integrating these support tools and linking GIS and simulation tools. The major purpose of this system are to manage the geographical data base of the target urban area, utilize the digital information of the area for planning and analysis,evaluate the impact of alternative proposals on the physical environment such as sunlight and daylight, visualize the results of analysis, and support the management of urban redevelopment /development projects. This paper shows some applications to illustrate usefulness of the system. These examples are concerned with a contemporary problem in urban planning of Tokyo: redevelopment of low-rise high-density residential districts and high-rise development in the central business districts. Urban redevelopment for the high-density urban areas in Japan requiresa evaluation of alternative plans by visualizing their environmental impact. This system enables the quantitative analysis of the environmental impact by using 3-dimensional geographical data andsimulation methods. In general, the merit and effect of planning support systems are recognized in terms of the "efficiency" of the planning process. The primary function of GIS is thought to bethe unification and management of various pieces of information. In addition, this research indicates the effectiveness of the integrated system in terms of utilizing the geographical information and visualizing the image of the future environment.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id b4e1
authors Merz, R.
year 1994
title Shape deposition manufacturing
source Vienna University of Technology
summary This thesis addresses the issue of rapidly and automatically fabricating functional metal parts directly from CAD models. A newly developed process called Shape Deposition Manufacturing (SDM) is introduced. The process is based on the concept of layered manufacturing in SFF, but uses separate deposition and shaping steps to create a layer. Three dimensionally shaped layers are created using 5-axis CNC machining, to achieve the required geometric accuracy for fully functional shapes. Thermal deposition technologies (thermal spraying, welding) are used to achieve the required material properties. A novel, droplet based deposition process, microcasting, has been developed, to create well- bonded, high-strength material, while minimising the heat input into previously shaped layers. To create layers with a true three dimensional geometry, more detailed building strategies, than used by conventional SFF processes, are required by the SDM process. A CAD based planning system, which addresses these issues by decomposing a solid model of a part into layers and manufacturable, fully three dimensional segments is described. An automated testbed facility installed at Carnegie Mellon's Shape Deposition Laboratory is discussed, and shows the feasibility of automating the process. The microcasting process is explained in detail and its performance in the SDM environment is evaluated. Different strategies and material combinations for the support structure have been developed and are presented with detailed descriptions of several building strategies for parts with various complexity and material quality. Material properties of structures created by the SDM process are evaluated. Problems affecting the accuracy and material integrity of SDM created structures, which mainly involve the buildup of thermal stresses during material deposition, are identified and opened for future research. Finally, various parts, with different complexity, have been built with the SDM process, to show the feasibility and performance of the process. Building time and material usage are evaluated and compared to conventional SFF processes
series thesis:PhD
email merz@hydro.tuwien.ac.at
more http://www.arcs.ac.at/dissdb/rn024248
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

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