CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 61 to 80 of 354

_id a4fe
authors Encarnacao, J. and Goebel, M., Rosenblum, M.
year 1994
title European Activities in Virtual Reality
source Computer Graphics and Applications, Vol. 14, No. 1, January 1994
summary We survey European activities in virtual reality, with an emphasis on selected efforts in architecture and sound, telepresence, scientific visualization, simulation, software design, and entertainment. This article surveys European activities and funding for VR with two caveats: First, nearly a year separates writing and publication. For most scientific fields, this publication delay for survey material would be minimal: for virtual reality, significant changes might have since occurred in some programs. We took advantage of the revision period to upgrade our information and the references as much as possible. Second, some long standing, significant European efforts go unmentioned as outside the scope of our short survey or as duplicates of others included. Despite the limitations, this sampling of Europe's leading efforts collectively gives an accurate snapshot of current European activity.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id c967
authors Fantacone, Enrico
year 1994
title Exporting CAD Teaching into Developing Countries
source The Virtual Studio [Proceedings of the 12th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design / ISBN 0-9523687-0-6] Glasgow (Scotland) 7-10 September 1994, p. 222
summary In 1986 the Faculty of Architecture was established in Maputo. It is financed by the Italian Ministry of Foreign Affairs and managed by a Scientific Council of the Faculty of Architecture of "Università La Sapienza" of Rome. The need to create human technical resources beeing able to work profesionally as soon as they finish their studies, made the teaching basis for lab exercises and design. The new architects (the first six students graduated in 1991), need to design and make very important decisions without any control by more experienced local technical institutions. The creation of a CAAD laboratory, and the teaching of information technologies and metodologies in architectural designing aimes to achieve a double goal: (-) to make the new architects able to manage on their own, because of the lack of qualified human resources, large quantity of data, and difficult design problems; (-) to make University, the most important scientific center in the country, an information exchange center between developped countries, and Moçambique.
series eCAADe
last changed 1998/09/14 08:12

_id 6572
authors Fioravanti, A., Le Rose, L. and Sgueglia della Marra, C.
year 1994
title KAAD: A Didactical Experience
source The Virtual Studio [Proceedings of the 12th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design / ISBN 0-9523687-0-6] Glasgow (Scotland) 7-10 September 1994, pp. 257
summary Students in the last year of their course in Building Engineering in the "La Sapienza" University of Rome study questions of architectural design of considerable complexity, since they are characterised by a marked degree of multi-disciplinary work. In the preceding years, the students acquire specialist notions in the fields of thermal behaviour of buildings, technological equipment, static security, architectural composition, programming and costs, technical and constructional details, and so on. However, there is a need for integration at design level of the disciplines learned. At the CAAD Laboratory of the Department of Technical Architecture and Town-planning Technique, with the contribution of the National Research Council, a software known as KAAD (Knowledge-based Assistant for Architectural Design) has been devised, with the aim of providing an effective aid to the activity of design.
series eCAADe
last changed 1998/09/14 14:18

_id 673a
authors Fukuda, T., Nagahama, R. and Sasada, T.
year 1997
title Networked Interactive 3-D design System for Collaboration
source CAADRIA ‘97 [Proceedings of the Second Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 957-575-057-8] Taiwan 17-19 April 1997, pp. 429-437
summary The concept of ODE (Open Design Environment) and corresponding system were presented in 1991. Then the new concept of NODE. which is networked version of ODE. was generated to make wide area collaboration in 1994. The aim of our research is to facilitate the collaboration among the various people involved in the design process of an urban or architectural project. This includes various designers and engineers, the client and the citizens who may be affected by such a project. With the new technologies of hyper medium, network, and component architecture, we have developed NODE system and applied in practical use of the collaboration among the various people. This study emphasizes the interactive 3-D design tool of NODE which is able to make realistic and realtime presentation with interactive interface. In recent years, ProjectFolder of NODE system, which is a case including documents, plans, and tools to proceed project., is created in the World Wide Web (WWW) and makes hyper links between a 3-D object and a text, an image. and other digital data.
series CAADRIA
email wjm@mit.edu
last changed 2003/04/01 18:20

_id ddss9429
id ddss9429
authors Geerling, Heinrich
year 1994
title A Proposal for a Framework for Business Re-engineering in Design and Realization of Artificial Environments
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary According to the Top-Down design process', this paper gives a generic and qualitative description of a Concurrent Engineering Environment, that should support the problem solving procedure in town planning and architecture in a modern quality oriented society. A system that is based on the principal of democracy might guarantee the preservation of quality in the projection and realization of artificial environments. This environment can be seen as a part of the today often discussed "digital democracy", which practically is based on a infrastructure of computers, interfaces, software systems, a network, databases and a data presentation, that is able to comprise the expectations of professionals involved in the architecture and town planning process. The paper will discuss what the role of the designer and coordinator of this computer environment looks like,in order to design, plan, build and coordinate activities for the realization of this Concurrent Environment and how several software engineers work concurrently to develop tools that guarantee a modular integration. The backbone of this environment is the definition and use of standards for data exchange. Basically those standards are derived from two domains: artifacts will be described in a product model data, while natural resources are described in spatial data. Town planning has to integrate both models. It will be discussed briefly how far the data modelling language EXPRESS of part 11 of the ISO 10303 (Express Language Reference Manual) might be useful to model GIS related problems. An example will describe how a scenario of activities, from registration of real world data to recognition of requirements of society, the definition of development plans through design(competition), lawfulness checking and construction until demolition should look like.
series DDSS
email gee@cim.pe.u-tokyo.ac.jp
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9430
id ddss9430
authors Gelder, Johan de and Lucardie, Larry
year 1994
title What Conceptual Modelling Is and Isn´t
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary It is generally agreed that conceptual modelling is an important activity in the development of knowledge based systems. The availability of an adequate conceptual model is of vital interest notonly for the design and implementation of knowledge based systems, but also for their validation, modification, maintenance and enhancement. In order to be able to develop adequate conceptualmodels a theory about the nature of knowledge is required and, in line with this theory, a methodology to reconstruct the meaning of concepts. Additionally, techniques have to be selected which enable the modelling, representation, validation and simulation of reconstructed concepts. In the development of knowledge based systems often techniques are used which are not very wellsuited to the reconstruction and representation of the concepts of an application area. The selection of a technique is not motivated by an explicitly formulated theory, but by the representation formalisms applied within the software used for the implementation of knowledge based systems. This often leads to inadequate conceptual models and consequently poorly functional and hardly maintainable systems, mainly because the representation of concepts is adapted to the limitations of the applied representation formalism. In this paper we explain how the conceptual modelling activity isusually tackled in thedevelopment of knowledge based systems and what the related problems are.
series DDSS
email jdg@bouw.tno.nl
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9431
id ddss9431
authors Gilleard, John and Man-kit, Yip
year 1994
title Development of a Graphic Interface for the Preliminary Design of Air Conditioning Systems
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary The paper describes a preliminary design model for air-conditioning systems (ACS). Using a commercially available drafting tool (AutoCAD) and an ACS design program (HevaSketch) the model attempts to develop a comprehensive solution at an early phase of ACS design. Contextual knowledge (in the form of local building codes and equipment) is made available to the designer through a linked database. output from the model is in the the form of 2D and 3D drawings, parts and material schedules and detailed design calculations.
series DDSS
email bejohn©hkpcc.hkp.hk
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id sigradi2005_799
id sigradi2005_799
authors Gonzalo, Guillermo E.; Sara L. Ledesma, V.M. Nota, C.F. Martínez, G.I. Quiñones y G. Márquez Vega.
year 2005
title Methodology for the bioclimatic design: computer sustain for election of guidelines and strategies.
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 2, pp. 799-805
summary After numerous studies and practical of use, field and laboratory measurements, carried out among the years 1994 and 1999, we arrived to the elaboration and presentation of a methodology for the bioclimatic design and energetically sustainable that already takes two books publications. With the support of more than 600 figures that facilitate the understanding of the concepts explained in the books and 26 computer software and databases, that are attached to the second book, the work is facilitated so that designers of buildings that have not been never in contact with a certain climate, or that they don’t have sufficiently assumed by means of the observation of the particularities of a certain climatic situation, to understand the form in that the climate influence their design, condition or determine the design solutions and averge strategies that will choose when carrying out an architecture work. [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email ggonzalo@herrera.unt.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id ddss9433
id ddss9433
authors Gorp, L.F.M. van, Gelder, J.T. de and Steenhuis, C.M.
year 1994
title A Functional Approach to Conceptual Modelling of Steel Structures
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary The life cycle of a steel structure can be divided into six main stages: design, detailing, manufacturing, erection, maintenance and demolition. For each stage, a different party is responsible,often using its own automation aids to assist its specific task. Since all parties operate on the same steel structure, there is a need for integration between the islands of automation. Most of the developments in this area, including ISO/STEP, are directed towards the development of conceptual models carrying all relevant information through the life cycle of the product. The conceptual models are developed following a probabilistic approach. In this approach, a conceptual model is inductively developed by analyzing and modelling empirical similarities. In this paper we explain the problems resulting from following a probabilistic modelling approach by presenting its consequences. This is illustrated by the logical product model developed in Eureka project "CIMSteel". A potential solution to these problems is proposed by presenting a functionalapproach to the development of an integrated system for design, detailing and manufacturing of steel structures. The strength of this approach is illustrated by a simple example.
series DDSS
email lvg@bouw.tno.nl
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9434
id ddss9434
authors Grant, M.
year 1994
title Urban Gis - The Application of the Information Technologies to Urban Management
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary Many cities in the UK and indeed throughout the developed world are characterised by the all too familiar symptoms of urban blight caused by insensitive intervention in the environment. The common denominator within this class of problem is the lack of a coordinated, integrated approach to the planning, design and maintenance of our cities. The cycle of development and redevelopment calls for input from a diverse range of disciplines relating to architecture, civilengineering, transport engineering, and the management of city utilities. This lack of a common up datable information base renders access to a global view of the city difficult, if not impossible.This problem has provided the motivation to move towards an integrated philosophy regarding information collection, collation and dissemination. The impetus is provided primarily through theincreasing complexity of urban management but also through central governments policy to progress towards decentralisation of services. Fiscal pressure to increase efficiency, lower manpower resources and arrive at speedier judgements all point to an increasing reliance on the information technologies. Current work at ABACUS within Strathclyde University addresses research whose objective is to identify, and then prototype, a relevant urban information system. It is proposed that by attributing a geometrical framework with those physical quantities thatare relevant to the formal and functional evaluation of the urban environment, the means of evaluating the qualities and quantities of the buildings aswell as the social and economic prospects may be realised.
series DDSS
email abacus@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id aeeb
authors Grant, M. and Paterson, I.
year 1994
title Urban Modelling
source The Virtual Studio [Proceedings of the 12th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design / ISBN 0-9523687-0-6] Glasgow (Scotland) 7-10 September 1994, pp. 135-139
summary This project was an investigation into the application of Urban Information Systems [UIS] based on 3-Dimensional computer models. The research centred on a collaboration between the Architecture and Buildings Aids Computer Unit, Strathclyde [ABACUS] and the Edinburgh Old Town Renewal Trust [EOTRT] to develop a detailed computer model of Edinburgh's old town. The area of particular interest is the development of an interface to a database of property related information. This provides a means of analysing the multi-layered and multi-dimensional spatial data which is characteristic of urban environments. The research also investigated how, by using multi media technology as a data integration tool , urban models could be used to improve decision making in the framework of urban management.

series eCAADe
email I.Paterson@abertay.ac.uk
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id 412e
authors Gross, M.D., Do, E. and McCall, R.J.
year 1997
title Collaboration and Coordination in Architectural Design: approaches to computer mediated team work
source TeamCAD 97, 17-23
summary In 1993 and 1994, instructors and students of architecture at several universities around the world* collaborated briefly on two "virtual design studio" projects. Using off-the-shelf technology of the time-email, CU-See-Me internet video, international conference calls, and exchange of CAD drawings, images, and Quicktime animations-this ambitious project explored the possibility of bringing together diverse members of an international design team together to collaborate on a short term (two week) project. Central to the "Virtual Design Studio" was a 'digital pinup board', an area where participating designers could post and view drawings and textual comments; video links and email exchange provided the media for direct communication media about designs. A report on the project [21] makes clear that the process was not without technical difficulties: a significant amount of communication concerned scheduling and coordinating file formats; disappointingly little was devoted to discussions of design issues. Although it's clear that many of the minor technical problems that inevitably plague a forward-looking effort like the Virtual Design Studio will be solved in the near term, the project also reveals the need for research on software and design practices to make computer mediated design collaboration realize its attractive promise.
series journal paper
email mdgross@u.washington.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id ddss9439
id ddss9439
authors Halin, G., Bignon, J.C. and Leonard, D.
year 1994
title Contributions of a Complex Object Retrieval Model to a Dynamical Architectural Design Process
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary When a new Architectural Construction Project starts, all the steps of the technical design are completely redefined. The experience gained in old projects is not easily reusable. Only personal experience of each project member is relevant. The global experience of a project is difficult to manage and to define. The designers of new project have many things to learn from previous experiences that may or not be good. The use of experiences may avoid either looking for asolution to previously resolved problems or making the same mistakes. To realise experience reuse during an architectural technical design we proposed to combine two actual research works:(i) a Dynamical Architectural Construction Process (DACP), (ii) a Complex Object Management System (COMS). The first work puts forward an original construction process based on a model that uses a geometrical definition of an architectural object to produce the constructive definition of this same object. The original features of this model are: (i) the insertion of a logic level between the volume level of an architectural object and its element level, (ii) dynamic management of the different representations of an architectural object during its technical life cycle. The COMS capabilities concern memorisation and retrieval of complex objects. The use of classicalData Management Systems to store these objects is either impossible or unusable due to data dispersion. In our approach, an architectural experience is viewed as an complex object. The COMS manages an Object Base which contains different Architectural Construction Experiences in previous projects forms. At any time during the DACP, the designer can asked the COMS to retrieve a part or a whole of a previous project that illustrates its current technical state. Thearticle presents two research projects and a study of the contribution of experience reuse in a construction process.
series DDSS
email halin@norman.crai.ciril.fr
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9440
id ddss9440
authors Hall, Tony
year 1994
title Visualisation for the Evaluation of Planning Proposals - An Example Based on Colchester, UK
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary Computer visualisation has an important role to play in the assessment of planning proposals both large and small but planning agencies have been slow to take advantage of it. Although appropriatehardware and software are now available at comparatively reasonable prices, staff time for data input is still a major cost. An economic way of proceeding can be to model in advance important and sensitive parts of a town so that small development proposals within them can be visualised comparatively quickly and cheaply as they come in. Following a request from the Borough Council, the High Street in Colchester, Essex, was modelled using 3D Studio. This model was then used to assess the visual impact of pedestrianisation and traffic control measures and it was then available to assist the routine development control process in this part of town. The paperevaluates the success of this approachand makessuggestions for its future use. Its possible developmentinto a multi-media facility is also discussed.
series DDSS
email thall@v-e.anglia.ac.uk
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id caadria2018_365
id caadria2018_365
authors Ham, Jeremy J.
year 2018
title Exploring the Intersection of Music and Architecture Through Spatial Improvisation
source T. Fukuda, W. Huang, P. Janssen, K. Crolla, S. Alhadidi (eds.), Learning, Adapting and Prototyping - Proceedings of the 23rd CAADRIA Conference - Volume 1, Tsinghua University, Beijing, China, 17-19 May 2018, pp. 121-130
summary Creative practice design research brings forth rich opportunities for the exploration of inter-domain connections between music and architecture. Through inter-disciplinary creative practice explorative project work founded on a methodology of improvisation on the digital drum kit, two stages of design research project work are outlined. In the first stage, a language of polyrhythmic drumming is parametrically spatialized as a reflective lens on an extant creative practice. From here, a new form of 'Spatial Improvisation' is explored, where conceptual spatial forms are generated from improvisations on the digital drum kit. This new musico-spatial design practice involves mediating a spatio-temporal-dynamical 'Y-Condition (Martin, 1994)' wherein temporal and dynamic design decisions translate from the musical domain into the spatial domain through 'spatial thinking-in-action'.
keywords Music and Architecture; Design Research ; Spatial Improvisation; Design Process; Parametric Digital Design
series CAADRIA
email jeremy@surfcoastarchitecture.com.au
last changed 2018/05/17 07:07

_id ddss9441
id ddss9441
authors Hammond, Barbara
year 1994
title Computer Aided Urban Design
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary The product of the Urban Design process in the public sector in the UK is usually a briefing document of some kind which communicates design ideas in outline both to the lay public and to private developers. The problem with briefing effectively is that outline expression of ideas does not provide a strong basis for negotiation with developers; the temptation therefore is to work up one proposal in detail and to present it as the only option. This type of prescriptive briefing may be successful in situations where the public body has control over the land, the economy is buoyant and the site has a simple context. Its problems are that it is labour intensive, so some areas are covered in detail, others not at all; it is seen as restrictive by developers, so may create a climate of conflict rather than certainty; it is not responsive to change; it covers specific sites thoroughly but does not deal well with large, complex areas; on large sites it tends towards a homogeneous environment whereas the nature of towns and cities is pluralistic and heterogeneous; it confines the Urban Designer to site specific work rather than allowing concentration on the whole urban system. Urban Designers at the London Docklands Development Corporation felt that CAD might present some answers to these problems in facilitating an iterative, interactive briefing process which could respond quickly to change; whereby varying options for development could be investigated fully but quickly and resource-efficiently; which could be used to communicate design ideas effectively to non-professionals; which could help to make negotiation with developers more effective, less confrontational; which could deal with large, complex sites effectively. The idea was that a piece of city could be modeled on the computer and an urban design study would then be carried out on it which would test varying options for development, resulting in an outline, but three dimensional, model for an area which could be used in three ways: as a briefing tool, as part of a marketing exercise and as a tool to aid effective negotiation and consultation at the planning stage. A pilot project was carried out on a set of development sites at East India Dock and, following the success of this, a full study was carried at Surrey Quays Centre. The paper describes these projects and discusses both their products and their effect on the developmentprocess as aids in decision making.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 26b4
authors Harfman, Anton and Frazer, Michael J. (Eds.)
year 1994
title Reconnecting [Conference Proceedings]
source ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-03-9 / Washington University (Saint Louis / USA) 1994, 232 p.
summary This book captures and binds disparate streams of information in a single volume and attempts to reconnect us to the experience of architecture through holding a book in our hands. Just as architecture uses the connections among the dissimilar as the sites for design intervention and invention, the content of this book attempts to connect the objective processes that are characteristic of computers with the subjective processes that are characteristic of creativity. The chosen format juxtaposes technical work in the first half with pedagogical explorations in the second half. By recognizing their differences and separating them from each other, the process of reconnecting can occur. Within both the technical and pedagogical sections, a continuous stream of information connects the papers across the bottom of the page. Against the technical papers, we have placed the keynote paper by Professor Paul Laseau. Against the pedagogical papers, we have placed a drawing done by Trent Tesch that is a visual interpretation of cyberspace based on the novel, Neuromancer, by William Gibson. While turning these pages, consider the accidents that take place through the juxtaposition of streams of thought sharing a single page.
series ACADIA
email anton.harfmann@uc.edu
more http://www.acadia.org
last changed 1999/03/29 07:34

_id ddss9442
id ddss9442
authors Hensen, Jan
year 1994
title Energy Related Design Decisions Deserve Simulation Approach
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary Building energy consumption and indoor climate result from complex dynamic thermal interactions between outdoor environment, building structure, heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) system and occupants. Apart from a few trivial relations, this reality is too complicated to be casted in simple expressions, rules or graphs. As shown in a previous paper, there are now tools available - in the form of computer simulation systems - which treat the building and plant as an integrated, dynamic system. It is argued that these can and should be used in the context of design decision support and design evaluation related to thermal energy. The paper will give ageneral overview of building energy design tools which range from simplified design tools (SDT's) to comprehensive modelling and simulation systems. It will be demonstrated why SDT's are very limited in scope and range of applicability. With respect to building energy simulation the paper will compare simplified models with comprehensive models in terms of ressource needs, applicability etc. In view of the risk involved when using SDT´s or simplified models, the paper strongly promotes the use of comprehensive tools in combination with emerging intelligent front ends. The message ofthe paper will be: let the machine do the work.
series DDSS
email jan@csru.strathclyde.ac.uk
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9444
id ddss9444
authors Hill, Shauna and Streilein, André
year 1994
title Architectural Photogrammetry & Knowledge-Base Systems Record & Redevelopment
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary In redevelopment projects, the purpose of heritage recording is part of an investigative process to achieve understanding about structures so that designers can make the appropriate design decisions. It is desirable to integrate the knowledge of the recording and documentation specialist, who has first-hand knowledge of the building, with the interpretative process of evaluating the building information and making design decisions. New developments in the fields of photogram-metric recording and computer science has led to improved "image understanding". This paper describes research that is the result of exploring the concept of integrating new digital photogram-metric recording processes with an automated expert evaluation tool. The goal of this research is to expedite the acquisition of heritage building information for use by a knowledge-based system capable of providing the designer with building performance evaluations. Photogrammetry records all data as a series of three-dimensional coordinates which make it a natural partner for today's three-dimensional CAD systems. Generating a three-dimensional model of architecturally significant physical forms and details can provide a basis for evaluation, understanding, education, and design. The purpose of knowledge-based systems in construction is to enhance the decision-making process with specialized knowledge and experience. The linkage of CAD databases with knowledge-based systems provides a source of input data, such as a three-dimensional model, significant to a particular problem. This research is a collaborative effort between two groups, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich Switzerland, and the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id f42b
id f42b
authors Hofmeyer, Herm
year 1994
title KONSTRUKTIEF ONTWERPEN MET BEHULP VAN COMPUTERPROGRAMMATUUR (1) VERSLAG AFSTUDEERPROJECT (2) BIJLAGE GEBRUIKSAANWIJZING, CODE EN TOELICHTING BIJ PROGRAMMA
source Technische Universiteit Eindhoven, Department of Architecture, Building and Planning, Structural Design Group
summary This thesis presents the first basics of an expertsystem to transform a spatial into a structural design. The system thus relates space-allocation techniques and structural design software for stress-engineering. For the implementation Prolog-2 was used. Although in Dutch, the thesis provided background information for more recently written papers for eCAADe (2005) and CAADRIA (2006). The thesis was published as a paper in Design Studies (2006).
keywords space-allocation; structural design; expert system
series thesis:MSc
type normal paper
email h.hofmeyer@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2006/04/21 05:58

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