CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 341 to 354 of 354

_id 25f4
authors Reisman, S.
year 1994
title Multimedia computing: preparing for the 21st century
source Idea Group Publishing, Harrisburg, USA
summary Four sections sketch the main themes in multimedia: technology; application and use; application and development; end users. Each main theme is explained in a small collection of essays by different authors. Many of these essays present specific projects, whilst others simply sketch principal lines of development. The following topics are dealt with, for example: intellectual property, entrepreneurship and quality management in multimedia. Chapter 11 applies concepts from film theory to both video games and multimedia.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 0f6a
authors Saad, M.
year 1994
title Shared understanding in synchronous collaborative design
source University of Sydney, Department of Architectural and Design Science
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id b975
authors Salisbury, M., Anderson, S., Barzel, R. and Salesin, D.
year 1994
title Interactive pen-and-ink illustration
source Computer Graphics SIGGRAPH 1994 Proceedings, pages 101-108, July 1994
summary The goal of interactive pen-and-ink illustration is to be able to generate attractive and effective illustrations as easily as possible. We do this by having the computer perform the tedious work required to generate the many pen strokes in illustrations, while giving the user higher-level control over the darkness and textures used.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id fb39
authors Seebohm, Thomas
year 1994
title Review of Transformation in Design: A Formal Approach to Stylistic Change and Innovation in the Visual Arts
source Terry Knight, Transformation in Design: A Formal Approach to Stylistic Change and Innovation in the Visual Arts, Cambridge University Press, 1994, 258 p.
summary Shape grammars are languages of two- and three-dimensional forms analogous to spoken languages. A great deal of attention has been centered on them as a basis for supporting design with computers. They are sets of rules which can be used to create families of visually related designs. Each design, in the family of possible designs that can be created by a set of rules, is generated by successively applying rules from the set to the current state of a design until no more rules are applicable. A rule may be applied if certain shapes specified by the rule exist in the current state of the design. After application of a rule, the specified shapes are substituted with one or more replacement shapes specified by the rule thereby adding, subtracting or modifying shapes in the current design. From a single initial state many alternative designs can be generated because there is usually more than one applicable rule at any stage.
series other
email tseebohm@fes.uwaterloo.ca
last changed 2003/05/15 18:26

_id ecfa
authors Sillion, F.X. and Peuch, C.
year 1994
title Radiosity & Global Illumination
source Morgan Kaufmann Publishers, Inc., San Francisco, California
summary Radiosity & Global Illumination is a more theoretical coverage of global illumination. It has less code, but covers more topics than A Programmer's Perspective. In addition to the fundamental radiosity technique, this book discusses issues with control and complexity, and Monte Carlo techniques. Along with Peter Shirley's book, this provides fairly good coverage of the theory and practice of ray tracing based global illumination algorithms.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 8ea2
authors Simondetti, Alvise
year 2002
title Computer-generated physical modelling in the early stages of the design process
source Automation in Construction 11 (3) (2002) pp. 303-311
summary This paper illustrates some of the opportunities arising from the introduction of computer-generated physical modelling1 in the early stages of the architectural design process. The use of this technology in the design process differs from previous research and practise in that it looks at the use of computer-generated physical modelling recursively in design process rather than as a means to create a final presentation model [W.J. Mitchell, M. McCullough, Digital Design Media, Van Nostrand Reihnold, New York, 1994]. Previous research in the field by the author identified recursive strategy in the design process as the area in which computer-generated physical modelling offers unique opportunities to the designer. Three unique advantages in the use of computer-generated physical modelling technology are illustrated by three case studies. These advantages are: (1) understanding kinetic design, (2) understanding design involving complex geometry and (3) understanding design at the interface with the human body.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id 9779
authors Smeltzer, G.T.A., Mantelers, J.M.M. and Roelen, W.A.H.
year 1994
title The Application of Virtual Reality Systems in Architectural Design Processes
source BIT Note Publication 95/1, Building Information Technology, Eindhoven
summary This publication describes the development and the application of a Virtual Reality system for the architectural design process. It is based on the results of research into Virtual Reality technology and in particular into the possibilities of a natural interface between a designer and a design system. This description is also based on the development of a laboratory set up for a "full immersive" and a "partially immersive" Virtual Reality application. This application offers a designer the possibility of modifying and assessing a 3D design model in "Virtual Reality" and is used in the course of several case studies. One of these case studies was the making of a presentation of a house design to possibly interested parties. The other case study was the use of Virtual Reality in the course of a design process. Finally this publication includes the description of some future and anticipated developments. The research problem is mainly posed by the questions regarding the ways in which the design process changes under the influence of amongst other factors the Virtual Reality technology. Other questions concern the ways in which the interface between a designer and a design system can be made as natural as possible, the way in which a design model can behave as autonomous as possible, and the way in which a representation can be made as realistic as possible. With regard to these the starting points were respectively the use of sensors, the definition of behaviour characteristics and the use of illumination simulations.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 952f
authors Soloway, E., Guzdial, M. and Hay, K.
year 1994
title Learner-Centered Design: The Challenge for HCI in the 21st Century
source Interactions , no. April (1994): 36-48
summary In the 1980's a major transformation took place in the computing world: attention was finally being paid to making computers easier-to-use. You know the history: in the 1970's folks at Xerox were exploring so-called personal computers and developing graphical, point-and-click interfaces. The goal was to make using computers less cognitively taxing, there- by permitting the user to focus more mental cycles on getting the job done. For some time people had recognized that there would be benefits if users could interact with computers using visual cues and motor movements instead of testu- al/linguistic strings. However, computer cycles were costly; they could hardly be wasted on supporting a non-textual interface. There was barely enough zorch (i.e., computer power, measured in your favorite unit) to simply calculate the payroll.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id df9b
authors Terzidis, Constantinos A. 
year 1994
title Computer-aided extraction of morphological information from architectural drawings
source University of Michigan
summary Along with the popularization of Computer-Aided Design (CAD), it has been becoming increasingly necessary and desirable for a computer to recognize engineering drawings and diagrams. Methods exist for inputting and recognizing such engineering drawings and diagrams. This is primarily because they are drawn to conform to specific standards. In contrast, architectural drawings are not prepared in accordance to existing standards. Hence, the problem of reading, recognizing, and extracting morphological information from them automatically remains unsolved. It is this problem that this study focuses on. The research undertaken by this author has three distinct but interrelated objectives. The first objective is to design, implement, and test a computer-based framework which allows its user to extract automatically the geometric and/or architectural structures of a two-dimensional plan. The second objective entails designing, implementing, and testing a computer-based framework which may be employed to compare the geometric and/or architectural structures of individual plans or classes of such plans. The third objective is to integrate the two aforementioned frameworks. Computer vision techniques are used to investigate, analyze, and compare plans of buildings from a morphological standpoint. Such techniques can contribute toward detecting differences or similarities between individual plans. Their ability to search for, combine, and compare morphological information is both parsimonious and effective. Predicated on the assumption that designers derive knowledge from past solutions to form-making problems, this study focuses on the methods by which the morphological information which is contained in building plans can be extracted automatically and entered in a knowledge base. Conceptually, this is part of a larger project which entails investigating how knowledge can be incorporated in a CAD system in a manner which aids and supports the form-making process. Conceivably, the approach of this work is, wholly or partially, applicable to the problem of extracting useful information from graphic representations used in a variety of disciplines (e.g., engineering).
series thesis:PhD
email kostas@ucla.edu
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 4b72
authors Tovey, M.
year 1994
title Form creation techniques for automotive CAD
source Design Studies, Vol. 15, No. 1, pp. 85-114
summary Although there is a significant commitment to the use of CAD in the car industry, the industrial designer makes less use of it than engineering designers do. Vehicle stylists responsible for the early stages of the process have found that CAD systems and procedures are ill-suited to their methods and needs. As there are considerable potential benefits to the overall proc if it can be based around integrated CAD systems using common data bases, there are good reasons for devising procedures for automotive stylists that overcome the problems which CAD systems seem to present. This project has been concerned with devising such procedures. It has included a collaborative exercise with a motor manufacturer and has resulted in a collection of recommended techniques for form creation on CAD for automotive designers.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id e4b1
authors Van Acker, S., Verbeke, J. and Verleye, J.
year 1994
title CAAD Education at Sint-Lucas Brussels-Gent
source The Virtual Studio [Proceedings of the 12th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design / ISBN 0-9523687-0-6] Glasgow (Scotland) 7-10 September 1994, p. 229
summary The CAAD group at our Institute decided to use computer and CAAD-software in a creative way. For this reason we choose CAAD-software which is open, flexible and does not impose strict limitations on design exploration. Our primary goal is to investigate the use of the computer in the very first stages of the design process (upstream). Hence we are interested in ways to make CAAD-software more 'architect-minded' (i.e. the operational structure should be as close as possible to the thinking of the architect and the logic of the creative design process) such that it stimulates the creativity of the architect. In order to reach these goals, we try to stimulate the reflection of the students about these items.
series eCAADe
email jvb@archb.sintlucas.wenk.be
last changed 2003/05/16 19:36

_id 8155
authors Vásquez de Velasco, Guillermo and Angulo, Antonieta
year 1994
title CAAD-CAAI Integration by Means of High-Impact Small-Scale R&D Projects
source The Virtual Studio [Proceedings of the 12th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design / ISBN 0-9523687-0-6] Glasgow (Scotland) 7-10 September 1994, pp. 127-134
summary Pointing towards the ultimate goal of instrumental integration between our instructional and professional environments, the paper deals with the articulation of small scale R&D projects that, due to their consistency with main-stream tendencies, can have considerable impact on allowing people, institutions and enterprises to perform a relevant role in our dynamics of "Continuing Professional Development" and "Practice-Based Learning". The paper presents the results of a European Union R&D Project that aims to empower small and medium size enterprises of the building sector with the knowledge needed for the development of multimedia programmes with pedagogical value. The paper is explicit on addressing not only the achievements but also the difficulties that the consortium of European partners had to face, and makes reference to a future spin-off project that follows the same tactical approach.

series eCAADe
email vasquez@archone.tamu.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 19:36

_id 3c22
authors Wegener, M.
year 1994
title Operational Urban Models: State of the Art
source Journal of the American Planning Association 60(1), pp. 17-29
summary Contributed by Susan Pietsch (spietsch@arch.adelaide.edu.au)
keywords 3D City Modeling, Development Control, Design Control
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id cd89
authors Zhang, Dong Mei
year 1994
title A hybrid design process model using case-based reasoning
source University of Sydney
keywords Architectural Design; Data Processing; Case-Based Reasoning; Process Control; Data Processing
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

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