CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 101 to 120 of 356

_id ga0024
id ga0024
authors Ferrara, Paolo and Foglia, Gabriele
year 2000
title TEAnO or the computer assisted generation of manufactured aesthetic goods seen as a constrained flux of technological unconsciousness
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary TEAnO (Telematica, Elettronica, Analisi nell'Opificio) was born in Florence, in 1991, at the age of 8, being the direct consequence of years of attempts by a group of computer science professionals to use the digital computers technology to find a sustainable match among creation, generation (or re-creation) and recreation, the three basic keywords underlying the concept of “Littérature potentielle” deployed by Oulipo in France and Oplepo in Italy (see “La Littérature potentielle (Créations Re-créations Récréations) published in France by Gallimard in 1973). During the last decade, TEAnO has been involving in the generation of “artistic goods” in aesthetic domains such as literature, music, theatre and painting. In all those artefacts in the computer plays a twofold role: it is often a tool to generate the good (e.g. an editor to compose palindrome sonnets of to generate antonymic music) and, sometimes it is the medium that makes the fruition of the good possible (e.g. the generator of passages of definition literature). In that sense such artefacts can actually be considered as “manufactured” goods. A great part of such creation and re-creation work has been based upon a rather small number of generation constraints borrowed from Oulipo, deeply stressed by the use of the digital computer massive combinatory power: S+n, edge extraction, phonetic manipulation, re-writing of well known masterpieces, random generation of plots, etc. Regardless this apparently simple underlying generation mechanisms, the systematic use of computer based tools, as weel the analysis of the produced results, has been the way to highlight two findings which can significantly affect the practice of computer based generation of aesthetic goods: ? the deep structure of an aesthetic work persists even through the more “desctructive” manipulations, (such as the antonymic transformation of the melody and lyrics of a music work) and become evident as a sort of profound, earliest and distinctive constraint; ? the intensive flux of computer generated “raw” material seems to confirm and to bring to our attention the existence of what Walter Benjamin indicated as the different way in which the nature talk to a camera and to our eye, and Franco Vaccari called “technological unconsciousness”. Essential references R. Campagnoli, Y. Hersant, “Oulipo La letteratura potenziale (Creazioni Ri-creazioni Ricreazioni)”, 1985 R. Campagnoli “Oupiliana”, 1995 TEAnO, “Quaderno n. 2 Antologia di letteratura potenziale”, 1996 W. Benjiamin, “Das Kunstwerk im Zeitalter seiner technischen Reprodizierbarkeit”, 1936 F. Vaccari, “Fotografia e inconscio tecnologico”, 1994
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 6572
authors Fioravanti, A., Le Rose, L. and Sgueglia della Marra, C.
year 1994
title KAAD: A Didactical Experience
source The Virtual Studio [Proceedings of the 12th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design / ISBN 0-9523687-0-6] Glasgow (Scotland) 7-10 September 1994, pp. 257
summary Students in the last year of their course in Building Engineering in the "La Sapienza" University of Rome study questions of architectural design of considerable complexity, since they are characterised by a marked degree of multi-disciplinary work. In the preceding years, the students acquire specialist notions in the fields of thermal behaviour of buildings, technological equipment, static security, architectural composition, programming and costs, technical and constructional details, and so on. However, there is a need for integration at design level of the disciplines learned. At the CAAD Laboratory of the Department of Technical Architecture and Town-planning Technique, with the contribution of the National Research Council, a software known as KAAD (Knowledge-based Assistant for Architectural Design) has been devised, with the aim of providing an effective aid to the activity of design.
series eCAADe
last changed 1998/09/14 14:18

_id 68c8
authors Flemming, U., Coyne, R. and Fenves, S. (et al.)
year 1994
title SEED: A Software Environment to Support the Early Phases in Building Design
source Proceeding of IKM '94, Weimar, Germany, pp. 5-10
summary The SEED project intends to develop a software environment that supports the early phases in building design (Flemming et al., 1993). The goal is to provide support, in principle, for the preliminary design of buildings in all aspects that can gain from computer support. This includes using the computer not only for analysis and evaluation, but also more actively for the generation of designs, or more accurately, for the rapid generation of design representations. A major motivation for the development of SEED is to bring the results of two multi-generational research efforts focusing on `generative' design systems closer to practice: 1. LOOS/ABLOOS, a generative system for the synthesis of layouts of rectangles (Flemming et al., 1988; Flemming, 1989; Coyne and Flemming, 1990; Coyne, 1991); 2. GENESIS, a rule-based system that supports the generation of assemblies of 3-dimensional solids (Heisserman, 1991; Heisserman and Woodbury, 1993). The rapid generation of design representations can take advantage of special opportunities when it deals with a recurring building type, that is, a building type dealt with frequently by the users of the system. Design firms - from housing manufacturers to government agencies - accumulate considerable experience with recurring building types. But current CAD systems capture this experience and support its reuse only marginally. SEED intends to provide systematic support for the storing and retrieval of past solutions and their adaptation to similar problem situations. This motivation aligns aspects of SEED closely with current work in Artificial Intelligence that focuses on case-based design (see, for example, Kolodner, 1991; Domeshek and Kolodner, 1992; Hua et al., 1992).
series other
email ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id de4c
authors Flemming, U., Coyne, R. and Snyder, J.
year 1994
title Case-based design in the SEED system
source K. Khozeimeh ed., Computing in Civil Engineering, Volume 1, Proceedings of the First Congress held in conjunction with the A/E/C Systems `94, Washington, DC, June 20-22, 1994, New York: American Society of Civil Engineers
summary We present the requirements for case-based design in a software environment to support the early phases in building design and outline an approach to satisfy them. We briefly discuss implementation issues and the larger information management context for the work.
series other
email ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id a378
authors Friedell, M., Kochhar, S., Marks, J., Sistare, S. and Weitzman, L.
year 1994
title Cooperative design, Human-computer interaction, Interaction techniques, Graphical user interfaces, Design automation, Design methodologies, Automated design of graphical displays, Computer-aided design
source Proceedings of ACM CHI'94 Conference on Human Factors in Computing Systems 1994 v.2 pp.187-188
summary Computer-aided-design (CAD) systems are now used to design all kinds of artifacts, from jet fighters to works of art. A major challenge in the design of a CAD system itself is the user interface (UI). Developing the UI to a CAD system raises myriad questions about input devices and techniques, display devices and techniques, and the details of the dialogue that relates the two. But these questions are ancillary to one central question: what is the fundamental nature of the interaction between human and computer in the design process supported by the CAD system? Is the design activity essentially manual, with the computer playing the role of passive tool, like a pen or paintbrush? Or is the computer augmenting the human designer by actively restricting available design choices, or by playing the role of critic or "improver"? Or maybe the interaction paradigm is one of "interactive evolution," in which the computer is responsible for generating design alternatives, with the human merely choosing among choices suggested by the machine. Or perhaps the computer performs the design process completely automatically, with a final acceptance check being the only human contribution? The panelists will describe these different paradigms for human-computer cooperation in a set of related CAD systems and prototypes and discuss the conditions under which each paradigm might be most useful.
series other
last changed 2002/07/07 14:01

_id 2775
authors Fuchs, Wladyslaw and Wrona, Stefan K.
year 1994
title Looking for the Best Place for Computer Models in Architectural Education
source The Virtual Studio [Proceedings of the 12th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design / ISBN 0-9523687-0-6] Glasgow (Scotland) 7-10 September 1994, pp. 43-46
summary In the past, many Schools of Architecture were mastering skill of preparing hand made models and hand drawings as a main technique in design education (e.g. Warsaw School of Architecture). Introduction of CAAD to teaching process brings a new modelling techniques and a new possibilities. The role of computer models in architectural education is very promissing and still not fully recognized. Development of modelling techniques and communication media is much quicker than development of design studio concepts. Many concepts and experiments in this field had place in architectural schools all over the word. A new concept of design studio based on computer modelling techniques as a communication media is the subject of interest of the Warsaw School of Architecture. The virtuality versus reality in teaching concepts is one of the most important issues in our traditional, professionaly oriented school.
series eCAADe
email wrona@arch.pw.edu.pl
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id 673a
authors Fukuda, T., Nagahama, R. and Sasada, T.
year 1997
title Networked Interactive 3-D design System for Collaboration
source CAADRIA ‘97 [Proceedings of the Second Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 957-575-057-8] Taiwan 17-19 April 1997, pp. 429-437
summary The concept of ODE (Open Design Environment) and corresponding system were presented in 1991. Then the new concept of NODE. which is networked version of ODE. was generated to make wide area collaboration in 1994. The aim of our research is to facilitate the collaboration among the various people involved in the design process of an urban or architectural project. This includes various designers and engineers, the client and the citizens who may be affected by such a project. With the new technologies of hyper medium, network, and component architecture, we have developed NODE system and applied in practical use of the collaboration among the various people. This study emphasizes the interactive 3-D design tool of NODE which is able to make realistic and realtime presentation with interactive interface. In recent years, ProjectFolder of NODE system, which is a case including documents, plans, and tools to proceed project., is created in the World Wide Web (WWW) and makes hyper links between a 3-D object and a text, an image. and other digital data.
series CAADRIA
email wjm@mit.edu
last changed 2003/04/01 18:20

_id f586
authors Gabriel, G. and Maher, M.L.
year 2000
title Analysis of design communication with and without computer mediation
source Proceedings of Co-designing 2000, pp. 329-337
summary With recent developments in CAD and communication technologies, the way we visualise and communicate design representations is changing. A matter of great interest to architects, practitioners and researchers alike, is how computer technology might affect the way they think and work. The concern is not about the notion of 'support' alone, but about ensuring that computers do not disrupt the design process and collaborative activity already going on (Bannon and Schmidt, 1991). Designing new collaborative tools will then have to be guided by a better understanding of how collaborative work is accomplished and by understanding what resources the collaborators use and what hindrances they encounter in their work (Finholt et al., 1990). Designing, as a more abstract notion, is different than having a business meeting using video conferencing. In design it is more important to 'see' what is being discussed rather than 'watch' the other person(s) involved in the discussion. In other words the data being conveyed might be of more importance than the method with which it is communicated (See Kvan, 1994). Similarly, we believe that by using text instead of audio as a medium for verbal communication, verbal representations can then be recorded alongside graphical representations for later retrieval and use. In this paper we present the results of a study on collaborative design in three different environments: face-to-face (FTF), computer-mediated using video conferencing (CMCD-a), and computer-mediated using "talk by typing" (CMCD-b). The underlying aim is to establish a clearer notion of the collaborative needs of architects using computer-mediation. In turn this has the potential in assisting developers when designing new collaborative tools and in assisting designers when selecting an environment for a collaborative session.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id a3ef
authors Garcia, F., Fernandez, A. and Barrallo, J.
year 1994
title Discovering Fractal Geometry in CAAD
source The Virtual Studio [Proceedings of the 12th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design / ISBN 0-9523687-0-6] Glasgow (Scotland) 7-10 September 1994, pp. 69-74
summary Fractal geometry provides a powerful tool to explore the world of non-integer dimensions. Very short programs, easily comprehensible, can generate an extensive range of shapes and colors that can help us to understand the world we are living. This shapes are specially interesting in the simulation of plants, mountains, clouds and any kind of landscape, from deserts to rain-forests. The environment design, aleatory or conditioned, is one of the most important contributions of fractal geometry to CAAD. On a small scale, the design of fractal textures makes possible the simulation, in a very concise way, of wood, vegetation, water, minerals and a long list of materials very useful in photorealistic modeling.
series eCAADe
last changed 1998/09/14 07:21

_id a6fe
authors Gatermann, Harald
year 1994
title Using Hypermedia as a Teaching Tool in CAD Education
source The Virtual Studio [Proceedings of the 12th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design / ISBN 0-9523687-0-6] Glasgow (Scotland) 7-10 September 1994, p. 211
summary CAD-programs belong to the most complex kinds of software - complex and difficult in using and especially in learning for architects and for students. Some years ago we already tried to find ways for making the first steps easier for students and more comfortable for teachers: Our first attempt was to reduce the number of commands from 150 to only 20 in the first lesson by cutting off many of the pull-down-menus (it was even the time before the cad-program, we use, was running under windows). We supported the reduced menus on the screen by handing out a template with all the needed commands for the first lesson. We had two positive results: the first was a reduction of beginners frustrations about too many new things, the second was a homogenisation among the students´ know how: the very eager ones were no longer able to test too many new things! In the second lesson the students got another twenty new commands and so on (they could start the program with a batch rib-1, rib-2 etc.). Our second attempt was the development of new dialogues due to our experience in teaching and in looking at the same points of difficulties every year.

series eCAADe
last changed 1998/09/14 08:04

_id 0c35
authors Gavin, Lesley C.
year 1994
title The Integrated Teaching of CAAD in the School of Architecture at The Robert Gordon University
source The Virtual Studio [Proceedings of the 12th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design / ISBN 0-9523687-0-6] Glasgow (Scotland) 7-10 September 1994, p. 223
summary This paper discusses how the introduction to computers in architecture being integrated into the design studio can create a stimulating environment for the understanding of the fundamentals of computer aided design.
series eCAADe
email l.gavin@ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id ddss9430
id ddss9430
authors Gelder, Johan de and Lucardie, Larry
year 1994
title What Conceptual Modelling Is and Isn´t
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary It is generally agreed that conceptual modelling is an important activity in the development of knowledge based systems. The availability of an adequate conceptual model is of vital interest notonly for the design and implementation of knowledge based systems, but also for their validation, modification, maintenance and enhancement. In order to be able to develop adequate conceptualmodels a theory about the nature of knowledge is required and, in line with this theory, a methodology to reconstruct the meaning of concepts. Additionally, techniques have to be selected which enable the modelling, representation, validation and simulation of reconstructed concepts. In the development of knowledge based systems often techniques are used which are not very wellsuited to the reconstruction and representation of the concepts of an application area. The selection of a technique is not motivated by an explicitly formulated theory, but by the representation formalisms applied within the software used for the implementation of knowledge based systems. This often leads to inadequate conceptual models and consequently poorly functional and hardly maintainable systems, mainly because the representation of concepts is adapted to the limitations of the applied representation formalism. In this paper we explain how the conceptual modelling activity isusually tackled in thedevelopment of knowledge based systems and what the related problems are.
series DDSS
email jdg@bouw.tno.nl
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 211f
authors Giangrande, A., Marinelli, A.M. and Sansoni, C.
year 1994
title A CAAD Based Method for Designing Industrial Plants in Sensitive Landscapes
source The Virtual Studio [Proceedings of the 12th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design / ISBN 0-9523687-0-6] Glasgow (Scotland) 7-10 September 1994, pp. 75-83
summary The protection and management of the visual landscape require new conceptual and operative tools to better link (integrate) the creative and the evaluation phases of the design process. These tools should aid the designer to take into account and evaluate the visual impact of a new project from the early steps of the process: that is the same as saying that we have to upset the logic of EIA (Environmental Impact Assessment), a procedure that usually is applied when the project is finished or is coming to an end. This paper illustrates the first results of a research that aims to produce a system to aid the designer of buildings or infrastructures — industry plants, transport systems, etc. — that could generate a strong impact on the surrounding landscape. To this end we applied some methods and techniques which was worked out in scientific fields that have developed a lot in the late years: MCDA (Multi-Criteria Decision Aid) and CAAD (Computer Aided Architectural Design). The paper describes a software prototype to aid design of industrial installations for the early design phases.

series eCAADe
email c.sansoni@archiworld.it
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id ddss9431
id ddss9431
authors Gilleard, John and Man-kit, Yip
year 1994
title Development of a Graphic Interface for the Preliminary Design of Air Conditioning Systems
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary The paper describes a preliminary design model for air-conditioning systems (ACS). Using a commercially available drafting tool (AutoCAD) and an ACS design program (HevaSketch) the model attempts to develop a comprehensive solution at an early phase of ACS design. Contextual knowledge (in the form of local building codes and equipment) is made available to the designer through a linked database. output from the model is in the the form of 2D and 3D drawings, parts and material schedules and detailed design calculations.
series DDSS
email bejohn©hkpcc.hkp.hk
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 58fa
authors Glanville, R.
year 1994
title Variety in Design
source Systems Research, vol. 11, no 3
summary It is argued that creativity might be amplified through the co-operative sharing of brain power (in contrast to Ashby's amplification of intelligence by restricting attention to the problem). This argument is extended to the act of design (seen as the making of the new), where it is proposed that the nature of the computer is to encourage co-operative sharing because, by making perfect copies, it denies ownership. This, in turn, underpins the processes of collaging and transformation that so suit the computer. A means of using the computer is proposed in which both sharing and distortion are encouraged, so that the new may be made while the individual's sense of creation and of origination is respected. Possible questions and difficulties are raised. Some are resolved.1
series journal paper
email ranulph@glanville.co.uk
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id cc19
authors Glennie, William L.
year 1994
title Europe '94 - A Visitor's Report on the State of CAAD in Education
source The Virtual Studio [Proceedings of the 12th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design / ISBN 0-9523687-0-6] Glasgow (Scotland) 7-10 September 1994, pp. 262
summary During May, June and July of this year, I had the pleasure of visiting twelve institutions across Europe where computers are being used in the teaching of Architecture. There are as many different approaches to the incorporation of computers in the curriculum as there are places, and they all have some degree of success. My greatest surprise was the large size of these Schools, even in relatively small countries. Dealing with a huge number of students makes any kind of mandatory computer instruction almost impossible. In spite of all difficulties, enthusiasm and willingness to work directly with students was the single most important characteristic in the faculty and staff who are having the greatest success. Support staff dedicated to the maintenance of equipment and software were provided at most of the institutions. For those who do not have this benefit it is critical to relieve the teaching and research faculty of the need for these time-consuming tasks. Formal research activities are not essential to effective education. The process of setting up such efforts is again a distraction from the more important job of teaching. If research projects grow naturally out of the curriculum, they may be pursued without impeding instruction. Most serious of all, there is a substantial lack of communication and cooperation among these schools, and by implication, among all of the other schools in Europe. The mechanism of annual conferences held by ECAADE is insufficient to exchange information and interests. There were several occasions when I mentioned work that was being carried out at one place that would match very nicely with efforts at another. However, it is clearly impossible for any one school to spearhead this kind of collection and coordination of activities. The only appropriate organisation for this kind of exchange would be a centralised service initiated and maintained by the European Community. It is very important that such a body does not attempt to limit or direct the work of individual schools, rather simply serves as a clearinghouse through which the various groups can benefit from each other's work, to the mutual benefit of all.
series eCAADe
email glennie@rpi.edu
last changed 1998/09/14 14:20

_id ddss9432
id ddss9432
authors Goldschmidt, G.
year 1994
title Visual Reference for Design: Analogy, Transformation and the Act of Sketching
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary All designers know that it is impossible to infer a design solution from the givens of a task alone, no matter how complete and well presented they are. Therefore, designers seek to complementinformation they receive, and the material they bring into the task environment includes visual images. Images may be gathered from every imaginable source, from domain-specific images (in architecture they are usually classified and pertain to building type, location, period, technology, style or creator) through 'metaphoric' images (art, nature) to eclectic personal favourites. Inaddition, randomly encountered images may find their way into a database of references: a depository of potentially useful images. With the exception of factual information that fills in thetask givens, it is usually far from clear what purpose may be served by images in general, or to what use the specific images aligned for a particular task may be put. We propose that the singlemost significant 'on line' role of visual references during the process of designing is to suggest potential analogies to the entity that is being designed. The process of discovering and exploitingan analogy in design is complex; we shall explain it in terms of Gentner's structure mapping theory, which we adapt to visual structures. We further propose that the abstraction process thatmust take place for the successful identification and mapping from source (visual reference) onto target (designed entity) requires transformations of images, and such transformations are bestachieved through sketching. Sketching facilitates the two way process of movement from the pictorial to the diagrammatic and from the schematic to the figural. Such transformations musttake place to arrive at the match that allows conceptual transfer, mapping of structural relations and insight through analogy.
series DDSS
email arrggO1@technion.technion.ac.il
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id f7b9
authors Goldschmidt, G.
year 1994
title On visual design thinking: the via kids of architecture
source Design Studies 15 (2), pp. 158-174
summary Designers invariably use imagery to generate new form combinations which they represent through sketching. But they also do the reverse: they sketch to generate images of forms in their minds. Common belief regards such activity as non-rational. In contrast, we assert that interactive imagery through sketching is a rational mode of reasoning, characterized by systematic exchanges between conceptual and figural arguments. Cognitive science, strongly dominated by a linguistic paradigm, has yet to recognize the paramount role of visual reasoning in many instances of problem solving; and in design tool-making, computational and otherwise, we must learn to optimize rather than bypass intuitive visuality.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id sigradi2005_799
id sigradi2005_799
authors Gonzalo, Guillermo E.; Sara L. Ledesma, V.M. Nota, C.F. Martínez, G.I. Quiñones y G. Márquez Vega.
year 2005
title Methodology for the bioclimatic design: computer sustain for election of guidelines and strategies.
source SIGraDi 2005 - [Proceedings of the 9th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Lima - Peru 21-24 november 2005, vol. 2, pp. 799-805
summary After numerous studies and practical of use, field and laboratory measurements, carried out among the years 1994 and 1999, we arrived to the elaboration and presentation of a methodology for the bioclimatic design and energetically sustainable that already takes two books publications. With the support of more than 600 figures that facilitate the understanding of the concepts explained in the books and 26 computer software and databases, that are attached to the second book, the work is facilitated so that designers of buildings that have not been never in contact with a certain climate, or that they don’t have sufficiently assumed by means of the observation of the particularities of a certain climatic situation, to understand the form in that the climate influence their design, condition or determine the design solutions and averge strategies that will choose when carrying out an architecture work. [Full paper in Spanish]
series SIGRADI
email ggonzalo@herrera.unt.edu.ar
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id ddss9433
id ddss9433
authors Gorp, L.F.M. van, Gelder, J.T. de and Steenhuis, C.M.
year 1994
title A Functional Approach to Conceptual Modelling of Steel Structures
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary The life cycle of a steel structure can be divided into six main stages: design, detailing, manufacturing, erection, maintenance and demolition. For each stage, a different party is responsible,often using its own automation aids to assist its specific task. Since all parties operate on the same steel structure, there is a need for integration between the islands of automation. Most of the developments in this area, including ISO/STEP, are directed towards the development of conceptual models carrying all relevant information through the life cycle of the product. The conceptual models are developed following a probabilistic approach. In this approach, a conceptual model is inductively developed by analyzing and modelling empirical similarities. In this paper we explain the problems resulting from following a probabilistic modelling approach by presenting its consequences. This is illustrated by the logical product model developed in Eureka project "CIMSteel". A potential solution to these problems is proposed by presenting a functionalapproach to the development of an integrated system for design, detailing and manufacturing of steel structures. The strength of this approach is illustrated by a simple example.
series DDSS
email lvg@bouw.tno.nl
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

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