CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 41 to 60 of 358

_id e2c3
authors Edmonds A.E., Candy L., Jones R. and Soufi B.
year 1994
title Support for Collaborative Design: Agents and Emergence
source Communications of the ACM, (July 1994)
summary Collaborative Design is a complex group activity involving participants with heterogenous skills. Any useful support system must take that heterogenety into account. This article demonstrates that group support agents are viable for design tasks. It explores the problem of supporting emergence, a significant feature of the sreative design process.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id db00
authors Espina, Jane J.B.
year 2002
title Base de datos de la arquitectura moderna de la ciudad de Maracaibo 1920-1990 [Database of the Modern Architecture of the City of Maracaibo 1920-1990]
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 133-139
summary Bases de datos, Sistemas y Redes 134The purpose of this report is to present the achievements obtained in the use of the technologies of information andcommunication in the architecture, by means of the construction of a database to register the information on the modernarchitecture of the city of Maracaibo from 1920 until 1990, in reference to the constructions located in 5 of Julio, Sectorand to the most outstanding planners for its work, by means of the representation of the same ones in digital format.The objective of this investigation it was to elaborate a database for the registration of the information on the modernarchitecture in the period 1920-1990 of Maracaibo, by means of the design of an automated tool to organize the it datesrelated with the buildings, parcels and planners of the city. The investigation was carried out considering three methodologicalmoments: a) Gathering and classification of the information of the buildings and planners of the modern architectureto elaborate the databases, b) Design of the databases for the organization of the information and c) Design ofthe consultations, information, reports and the beginning menu. For the prosecution of the data files were generated inprograms attended by such computer as: AutoCAD R14 and 2000, Microsoft Word, Microsoft PowerPoint and MicrosoftAccess 2000, CorelDRAW V9.0 and Corel PHOTOPAINT V9.0.The investigation is related with the work developed in the class of Graphic Calculation II, belonging to the Departmentof Communication of the School of Architecture of the Faculty of Architecture and Design of The University of the Zulia(FADLUZ), carried out from the year 1999, using part of the obtained information of the works of the students generatedby means of the CAD systems for the representation in three dimensions of constructions with historical relevance in themodern architecture of Maracaibo, which are classified in the work of The Other City, generating different types ofisometric views, perspectives, representations photorealistics, plants and facades, among others.In what concerns to the thematic of this investigation, previous antecedents are ignored in our environment, and beingthe first time that incorporates the digital graph applied to the work carried out by the architects of “The Other City, thegenesis of the oil city of Maracaibo” carried out in the year 1994; of there the value of this research the field of thearchitecture and computer science. To point out that databases exist in the architecture field fits and of the design, alsoweb sites with information has more than enough architects and architecture works (Montagu, 1999).In The University of the Zulia, specifically in the Faculty of Architecture and Design, they have been carried out twoworks related with the thematic one of database, specifically in the years 1995 and 1996, in the first one a system wasdesigned to visualize, to classify and to analyze from the architectural point of view some historical buildings of Maracaiboand in the second an automated system of documental information was generated on the goods properties built insidethe urban area of Maracaibo. In the world environment it stands out the first database developed in Argentina, it is the database of the Modern andContemporary Architecture “Datarq 2000” elaborated by the Prof. Arturo Montagú of the University of Buenos Aires. The general objective of this work it was the use of new technologies for the prosecution in Architecture and Design (MONTAGU, Ob.cit). In the database, he intends to incorporate a complementary methodology and alternative of use of the informationthat habitually is used in the teaching of the architecture. When concluding this investigation, it was achieved: 1) analysis of projects of modern architecture, of which some form part of the historical patrimony of Maracaibo; 2) organized registrations of type text: historical, formal, space and technical data, and graph: you plant, facades, perspectives, pictures, among other, of the Moments of the Architecture of the Modernity in the city, general data and more excellent characteristics of the constructions, and general data of the Planners with their more important works, besides information on the parcels where the constructions are located, 3)construction in digital format and development of representations photorealistics of architecture projects already built. It is excellent to highlight the importance in the use of the Technologies of Information and Communication in this investigation, since it will allow to incorporate to the means digital part of the information of the modern architecturalconstructions that characterized the city of Maracaibo at the end of the XX century, and that in the last decades they have suffered changes, some of them have disappeared, destroying leaves of the modern historical patrimony of the city; therefore, the necessity arises of to register and to systematize in digital format the graphic information of those constructions. Also, to demonstrate the importance of the use of the computer and of the computer science in the representation and compression of the buildings of the modern architecture, to inclination texts, images, mapping, models in 3D and information organized in databases, and the relevance of the work from the pedagogic point of view,since it will be able to be used in the dictation of computer science classes and history in the teaching of the University studies of third level, allowing the learning with the use in new ways of transmission of the knowledge starting from the visual information on the part of the students in the elaboration of models in three dimensions or electronic scalemodels, also of the modern architecture and in a future to serve as support material for virtual recoveries of some buildings that at the present time they don’t exist or they are almost destroyed. In synthesis, the investigation will allow to know and to register the architecture of Maracaibo in this last decade, which arises under the parameters of the modernity and that through its organization and visualization in digital format, it will allow to the students, professors and interested in knowing it in a quicker and more efficient way, constituting a contribution to theteaching in the history area and calculation. Also, it can be of a lot of utility for the development of future investigation projects related with the thematic one and restoration of buildings of the modernity in Maracaibo.
keywords database, digital format, modern architecture, model, mapping
series SIGRADI
email jacky@convergence.com.ve., jjespina@yahoo.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:51

_id 68c8
authors Flemming, U., Coyne, R. and Fenves, S. (et al.)
year 1994
title SEED: A Software Environment to Support the Early Phases in Building Design
source Proceeding of IKM '94, Weimar, Germany, pp. 5-10
summary The SEED project intends to develop a software environment that supports the early phases in building design (Flemming et al., 1993). The goal is to provide support, in principle, for the preliminary design of buildings in all aspects that can gain from computer support. This includes using the computer not only for analysis and evaluation, but also more actively for the generation of designs, or more accurately, for the rapid generation of design representations. A major motivation for the development of SEED is to bring the results of two multi-generational research efforts focusing on `generative' design systems closer to practice: 1. LOOS/ABLOOS, a generative system for the synthesis of layouts of rectangles (Flemming et al., 1988; Flemming, 1989; Coyne and Flemming, 1990; Coyne, 1991); 2. GENESIS, a rule-based system that supports the generation of assemblies of 3-dimensional solids (Heisserman, 1991; Heisserman and Woodbury, 1993). The rapid generation of design representations can take advantage of special opportunities when it deals with a recurring building type, that is, a building type dealt with frequently by the users of the system. Design firms - from housing manufacturers to government agencies - accumulate considerable experience with recurring building types. But current CAD systems capture this experience and support its reuse only marginally. SEED intends to provide systematic support for the storing and retrieval of past solutions and their adaptation to similar problem situations. This motivation aligns aspects of SEED closely with current work in Artificial Intelligence that focuses on case-based design (see, for example, Kolodner, 1991; Domeshek and Kolodner, 1992; Hua et al., 1992).
series other
email ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id de4c
authors Flemming, U., Coyne, R. and Snyder, J.
year 1994
title Case-based design in the SEED system
source K. Khozeimeh ed., Computing in Civil Engineering, Volume 1, Proceedings of the First Congress held in conjunction with the A/E/C Systems `94, Washington, DC, June 20-22, 1994, New York: American Society of Civil Engineers
summary We present the requirements for case-based design in a software environment to support the early phases in building design and outline an approach to satisfy them. We briefly discuss implementation issues and the larger information management context for the work.
series other
email ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 8c54
authors Flemming, U.
year 1994
title Get with the program: common fallacies in critiques of computer-aided architectural design
source Environment and Planning B: Planning and Design 21, pp. 106-116
summary Contributed by Susan Pietsch (spietsch@arch.adelaide.edu.au)
keywords 3D City Modeling, Development Control, Design Control
series other
email ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2003/02/26 16:24

_id a3ef
authors Garcia, F., Fernandez, A. and Barrallo, J.
year 1994
title Discovering Fractal Geometry in CAAD
source The Virtual Studio [Proceedings of the 12th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design / ISBN 0-9523687-0-6] Glasgow (Scotland) 7-10 September 1994, pp. 69-74
summary Fractal geometry provides a powerful tool to explore the world of non-integer dimensions. Very short programs, easily comprehensible, can generate an extensive range of shapes and colors that can help us to understand the world we are living. This shapes are specially interesting in the simulation of plants, mountains, clouds and any kind of landscape, from deserts to rain-forests. The environment design, aleatory or conditioned, is one of the most important contributions of fractal geometry to CAAD. On a small scale, the design of fractal textures makes possible the simulation, in a very concise way, of wood, vegetation, water, minerals and a long list of materials very useful in photorealistic modeling.
series eCAADe
last changed 1998/09/14 07:21

_id ddss9429
id ddss9429
authors Geerling, Heinrich
year 1994
title A Proposal for a Framework for Business Re-engineering in Design and Realization of Artificial Environments
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary According to the Top-Down design process', this paper gives a generic and qualitative description of a Concurrent Engineering Environment, that should support the problem solving procedure in town planning and architecture in a modern quality oriented society. A system that is based on the principal of democracy might guarantee the preservation of quality in the projection and realization of artificial environments. This environment can be seen as a part of the today often discussed "digital democracy", which practically is based on a infrastructure of computers, interfaces, software systems, a network, databases and a data presentation, that is able to comprise the expectations of professionals involved in the architecture and town planning process. The paper will discuss what the role of the designer and coordinator of this computer environment looks like,in order to design, plan, build and coordinate activities for the realization of this Concurrent Environment and how several software engineers work concurrently to develop tools that guarantee a modular integration. The backbone of this environment is the definition and use of standards for data exchange. Basically those standards are derived from two domains: artifacts will be described in a product model data, while natural resources are described in spatial data. Town planning has to integrate both models. It will be discussed briefly how far the data modelling language EXPRESS of part 11 of the ISO 10303 (Express Language Reference Manual) might be useful to model GIS related problems. An example will describe how a scenario of activities, from registration of real world data to recognition of requirements of society, the definition of development plans through design(competition), lawfulness checking and construction until demolition should look like.
series DDSS
email gee@cim.pe.u-tokyo.ac.jp
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9432
id ddss9432
authors Goldschmidt, G.
year 1994
title Visual Reference for Design: Analogy, Transformation and the Act of Sketching
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary All designers know that it is impossible to infer a design solution from the givens of a task alone, no matter how complete and well presented they are. Therefore, designers seek to complementinformation they receive, and the material they bring into the task environment includes visual images. Images may be gathered from every imaginable source, from domain-specific images (in architecture they are usually classified and pertain to building type, location, period, technology, style or creator) through 'metaphoric' images (art, nature) to eclectic personal favourites. Inaddition, randomly encountered images may find their way into a database of references: a depository of potentially useful images. With the exception of factual information that fills in thetask givens, it is usually far from clear what purpose may be served by images in general, or to what use the specific images aligned for a particular task may be put. We propose that the singlemost significant 'on line' role of visual references during the process of designing is to suggest potential analogies to the entity that is being designed. The process of discovering and exploitingan analogy in design is complex; we shall explain it in terms of Gentner's structure mapping theory, which we adapt to visual structures. We further propose that the abstraction process thatmust take place for the successful identification and mapping from source (visual reference) onto target (designed entity) requires transformations of images, and such transformations are bestachieved through sketching. Sketching facilitates the two way process of movement from the pictorial to the diagrammatic and from the schematic to the figural. Such transformations musttake place to arrive at the match that allows conceptual transfer, mapping of structural relations and insight through analogy.
series DDSS
email arrggO1@technion.technion.ac.il
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9434
id ddss9434
authors Grant, M.
year 1994
title Urban Gis - The Application of the Information Technologies to Urban Management
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary Many cities in the UK and indeed throughout the developed world are characterised by the all too familiar symptoms of urban blight caused by insensitive intervention in the environment. The common denominator within this class of problem is the lack of a coordinated, integrated approach to the planning, design and maintenance of our cities. The cycle of development and redevelopment calls for input from a diverse range of disciplines relating to architecture, civilengineering, transport engineering, and the management of city utilities. This lack of a common up datable information base renders access to a global view of the city difficult, if not impossible.This problem has provided the motivation to move towards an integrated philosophy regarding information collection, collation and dissemination. The impetus is provided primarily through theincreasing complexity of urban management but also through central governments policy to progress towards decentralisation of services. Fiscal pressure to increase efficiency, lower manpower resources and arrive at speedier judgements all point to an increasing reliance on the information technologies. Current work at ABACUS within Strathclyde University addresses research whose objective is to identify, and then prototype, a relevant urban information system. It is proposed that by attributing a geometrical framework with those physical quantities thatare relevant to the formal and functional evaluation of the urban environment, the means of evaluating the qualities and quantities of the buildings aswell as the social and economic prospects may be realised.
series DDSS
email abacus@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9441
id ddss9441
authors Hammond, Barbara
year 1994
title Computer Aided Urban Design
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary The product of the Urban Design process in the public sector in the UK is usually a briefing document of some kind which communicates design ideas in outline both to the lay public and to private developers. The problem with briefing effectively is that outline expression of ideas does not provide a strong basis for negotiation with developers; the temptation therefore is to work up one proposal in detail and to present it as the only option. This type of prescriptive briefing may be successful in situations where the public body has control over the land, the economy is buoyant and the site has a simple context. Its problems are that it is labour intensive, so some areas are covered in detail, others not at all; it is seen as restrictive by developers, so may create a climate of conflict rather than certainty; it is not responsive to change; it covers specific sites thoroughly but does not deal well with large, complex areas; on large sites it tends towards a homogeneous environment whereas the nature of towns and cities is pluralistic and heterogeneous; it confines the Urban Designer to site specific work rather than allowing concentration on the whole urban system. Urban Designers at the London Docklands Development Corporation felt that CAD might present some answers to these problems in facilitating an iterative, interactive briefing process which could respond quickly to change; whereby varying options for development could be investigated fully but quickly and resource-efficiently; which could be used to communicate design ideas effectively to non-professionals; which could help to make negotiation with developers more effective, less confrontational; which could deal with large, complex sites effectively. The idea was that a piece of city could be modeled on the computer and an urban design study would then be carried out on it which would test varying options for development, resulting in an outline, but three dimensional, model for an area which could be used in three ways: as a briefing tool, as part of a marketing exercise and as a tool to aid effective negotiation and consultation at the planning stage. A pilot project was carried out on a set of development sites at East India Dock and, following the success of this, a full study was carried at Surrey Quays Centre. The paper describes these projects and discusses both their products and their effect on the developmentprocess as aids in decision making.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9442
id ddss9442
authors Hensen, Jan
year 1994
title Energy Related Design Decisions Deserve Simulation Approach
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary Building energy consumption and indoor climate result from complex dynamic thermal interactions between outdoor environment, building structure, heating, ventilating and air-conditioning (HVAC) system and occupants. Apart from a few trivial relations, this reality is too complicated to be casted in simple expressions, rules or graphs. As shown in a previous paper, there are now tools available - in the form of computer simulation systems - which treat the building and plant as an integrated, dynamic system. It is argued that these can and should be used in the context of design decision support and design evaluation related to thermal energy. The paper will give ageneral overview of building energy design tools which range from simplified design tools (SDT's) to comprehensive modelling and simulation systems. It will be demonstrated why SDT's are very limited in scope and range of applicability. With respect to building energy simulation the paper will compare simplified models with comprehensive models in terms of ressource needs, applicability etc. In view of the risk involved when using SDT´s or simplified models, the paper strongly promotes the use of comprehensive tools in combination with emerging intelligent front ends. The message ofthe paper will be: let the machine do the work.
series DDSS
email jan@csru.strathclyde.ac.uk
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9444
id ddss9444
authors Hill, Shauna and Streilein, André
year 1994
title Architectural Photogrammetry & Knowledge-Base Systems Record & Redevelopment
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary In redevelopment projects, the purpose of heritage recording is part of an investigative process to achieve understanding about structures so that designers can make the appropriate design decisions. It is desirable to integrate the knowledge of the recording and documentation specialist, who has first-hand knowledge of the building, with the interpretative process of evaluating the building information and making design decisions. New developments in the fields of photogram-metric recording and computer science has led to improved "image understanding". This paper describes research that is the result of exploring the concept of integrating new digital photogram-metric recording processes with an automated expert evaluation tool. The goal of this research is to expedite the acquisition of heritage building information for use by a knowledge-based system capable of providing the designer with building performance evaluations. Photogrammetry records all data as a series of three-dimensional coordinates which make it a natural partner for today's three-dimensional CAD systems. Generating a three-dimensional model of architecturally significant physical forms and details can provide a basis for evaluation, understanding, education, and design. The purpose of knowledge-based systems in construction is to enhance the decision-making process with specialized knowledge and experience. The linkage of CAD databases with knowledge-based systems provides a source of input data, such as a three-dimensional model, significant to a particular problem. This research is a collaborative effort between two groups, the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich Switzerland, and the University of Manitoba in Winnipeg, Canada.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9446
id ddss9446
authors Horgen, Turid
year 1994
title Post Occupancy Evaluation as a Strategy to Develop an Improved Work Environment
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary A post-occupancy evaluation is a formal way of finding out whether a recently occupied, remodelled, or built environment is performing, as was intended in its programming or design, and a term which has been developed in the professional field in the United States over the last 20 years. The Scandinavian approach to the same question has emphasised surfacing the values of the users of the work environment as a tool for a more comprehensive approach to space planning and design. A recent case-study of the Taubman Building at Harvard University's John F. Kennedy School of Government was aimed at blending the two strategies for evaluation, defined postoccupancy evaluation as a dialogue with the client, as a process to help the client reflect on spatial and technological improvements, or alternate strategies for organisational locations in buildings, and offers an interesting example of a possible future direction for POE's. Sheila Sheridan, Director of Facilities and Services at the Kennedy School, commissioned the case-study, and has been using it result in her daily work. Jacqueline Vischer, who has developed a survey of seven key dimensions of work-place comfort for commercial office buildings throughout eastern North America, and Turid Horgen, who has developed tools for participatory environmental evaluation and programming, widely used in Scandinavia, carried out the study and facilitated the evaluation process. The study is also done in the context of the ongoing research on these issues in the design Inquiry Group at the School of Architecture and Planning at MIT, which is involved in a larger program for developing strategies and tools for more effective programming and management of corporate space. This research defines the workplace environment as the interaction between four dimensions: space, technology, organisation and finance. Our approach is to integrate programming and evaluation with organisational planning and organisational transformation.Post occupancy evaluation is seen as a way to inform the client about his organisational culture as he manages the fit between a facility and its uses, and as one of several tools to bridge the frameworks and viewpoints and the many "languages" which are brought into the decision making process of designing the built environment.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 2ccd
authors Kalisperis, Loukas N.
year 1994
title 3D Visualization in Design Education
source Reconnecting [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-03-9] Washington University (Saint Louis / USA) 1994, pp. 177-184
summary It has been said that "The beginning of architecture is empty space." (Mitchell 1990) This statement typifies a design education philosophy in which the concepts of space and form are separated and defined respectively as the negative and positive of the physical world, a world where solid objects exist and void-the mere absence of substance-is a surrounding atmospheric emptiness. Since the beginning of the nineteenth century, however, there has been an alternative concept of space as a continuum: that there is a continuously modified surface between the pressures of form and space in which the shape of the space in our lungs is directly connected to the shape of the space within which we exist. (Porter 1979). The nature of the task of representing architecture alters to reflect the state of architectural understanding at each period of time. The construction of architectural space and form represents a fundamental achievement of humans in their environment and has always involved effort and materials requiring careful planning, preparation, and forethought. In architecture there is a necessary conversion to that which is habitable, experiential, and functional from an abstraction in an entirely different medium. It is often an imperfect procedure that centers on the translation rather than the actual design. Design of the built environment is an art of distinctions within the continuum of space, for example: between solid and void, interior and exterior, light and dark, or warm and cold. It is concerned with the physical organization and articulation of space. The amount and shape of the void contained and generated by the building create the fabric and substance of the built environment. Architecture as a design discipline, therefore, can be considered as a creative expression of the coexistence of form and space on a human scale. As Frank Ching writes in Architecture: Form, Space, and Order, "These elements of form and space are the critical means of architecture. While the utilitarian concerns of function and use can be relatively short lived, and symbolic interpretations can vary from age to age, these primary elements of form and space comprise timeless and fundamental vocabulary of the architectural designer." (1979)

series ACADIA
email lnk@email.psu.edu
last changed 2000/03/13 19:27

_id b9c4
authors Kim, Inhan
year 1994
title Data representations in an integrated architectural design environment
source University of Strathclyde, Dept. of Architecture and Building Science
summary The architectural design process is very complex and involves cross-disciplinary communication among many related fields. Given the further problems arising from the technological advances in building materials and construction methods, an integrated design environment becomes a central design issue. There have been many attempts to analyse and structure the design process as a uniform hierarchical framework. Most of the attempts resulted in a vague and inappropriate outcome due to the lack of understanding of architectural design complexity and inconsistent design data control sequence. A design problem cannot be comprehensively stated because the design problem has a multi-disciplinary nature and the design problem itself evolves as solutions are attempted by the designer. Therefore, an ideal CAAD system should have the capability to accommodate the multi-disciplinary nature of design and should not prescribe or restrict design concepts and design knowledge. A well designed integrated design environment provides more information and invokes creative imagination for each design stage, and therefore creative decision making by the designer can be achieved. This thesis proposes a prototype architectural design environment, Hybrid Integrated Design Environment [HIDE], which aims to integrate all applications for designing a building. Within the object-oriented design environment, a unified data model and a data management system have been implemented to seamlessly connect all applications. Development of the environment needs to consider the fundamental interaction between each module. Devising a data structure that is appropriate to an effective data communication among the various design stages is essential in a totally integrated CAAD system. The suggested unified data model organizes the structure of the design data to keep the design consistent throughout the design and construction process. By means of the unified data model, integrated CAAD systems could represent and exchange design information at a semantic level, i.e. the user’s way of thinking, such as exchanging components and features of a building rather than graphical primitives. In consequence, the unified data model reduces the misunderstandings and communication problems among the multiple disciplines of architectural design. The suggested data management system supports the consistent and straight forward mechanisms for controlling the data representation through the inter-connected modules. It is responsible for creating, maintaining, and viewing a consistent database of the design description. It also helps to perform effective data communication among the various design stages to ensure quality and time saving in the final construction of the building. To support inter-disciplinary communication of design concepts and decisions, the integrating of relevant CAAD tools is essential. In the environment, the integration of CAAD tools has been performed on the basis of how well computerized design tools can assist designers to develop better solutions, enabling them to manipulate and appraise varying solutions quickly and with a minimum of effort in an environment conducive to creative design. A well designed user interface system can also benefit the seamless working environment. The proposed user friendly interface system allows a user to explore the environment in a highly interactive manner. From the development of the early data model to the final design, a user could benefit from the prototypes and methods of the user interface system. The ultimate goal of the prototype environment is to suggest a future design environment which helps the architect to have minimum discontinuity in his creativity and make the design process similar to the natural design process with the help of a set of design assistance modules. A prototype version of HIDE has been implemented and a demonstration of the environment is part of this thesis.
series thesis:PhD
email ihkim@khu.ac.kr
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id a43d
authors Kim, Inhan
year 1994
title Unified Data Organization and Management in an Integrated Design Environment
source The Virtual Studio [Proceedings of the 12th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design / ISBN 0-9523687-0-6] Glasgow (Scotland) 7-10 September 1994, pp. 254
summary The architectural design process is very complex and it is not easily confined to a single design environment. As the design process gets more complex due to the technological advances in building materials and construction methods, an integrated design system becomes a central design issue. To have an integrated design system, all applications should be integrated in a unified environment within which there should be a data structure to facilitate an effective data communication among the various design stages and data control facility to seamlessly connect all these applications. A primary purpose of this work is to suggest an object oriented architectural design environment for the essential part of the seamless environment for designing a building. Within the object-oriented design environment, a unified data model and detailed data control module have been implemented to seamlessly connect all these applications. The unified data model organizes the structure of the design data to keep the design consistent throughout the design and construction process. It also helps to do effective data communication among the various design stages to ensure quality and time saving in the final construction of the building. The data management module supports the consistent and easy mechanisms in controlling the data representation through the inter-connected modules. It is also responsible for creating, maintaining, and viewing a consistent database of the design description. In the suggested design environment, each architectural element partially describes the model and individual elements are aggregated hierarchically. Some parts of the projection are defined and other can be inherited from above. Also, creation of an improved or new design element can easily be accommodated in the environment. The integrated database in the suggested environment is the basis by which design data can be shared among the design tools of the design environment. The database organizes the design description within each representation, correlates equivalent descriptions across the representations, and attempts to maintain these correspondences as the design incrementally evolves.

series eCAADe
last changed 1998/09/14 14:16

_id c5b9
authors Klosterman, R.
year 1994
title International support for computers in planning
source Environment and Planning b: Planning and Design 21, pp. 387-391
summary Contributed by Susan Pietsch (spietsch@arch.adelaide.edu.au)
keywords 3D City Modeling, Development Control, Design Control
series other
last changed 2001/06/04 18:38

_id c4ae
id c4ae
authors Knapp, Robert W. and McCall, Raymond
year 1996
title PHIDIAS II - In Support of Collaborative Design
source Design Computation: Collaboration, Reasoning, Pedagogy [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-05-5] Tucson (Arizona / USA) October 31 - November 2, 1996, pp. 147-154
summary The World Wide Web in combination with Java and Virtual Reality Modeling Language (VRML) create great opportunities for collaboration by distributed design teams. To take advantage of these opportunities, we have begun to create a version of the PHIDIAS hyperCAD system (McCall, Bennett and Johnson 1994) that will support communication and collaboration among designers over the Word Wide Web. PHIDIAS is an intelligent, hypermedia-based system for computer-aided design. Our strategy is to divide PHIDIAS into two parts: 1) a client-side user interface and 2) a server-side hyperCAD database engine. The client-side interface is being implemented using Java and VRML. Implementing the PHIDIAS front-end with Java enables program code distribution via the World Wide Web. VRML provides PHIDIAS with client-side computation and display of 3D graphics.
series ACADIA
last changed 2004/03/18 08:35

_id cc90
authors Kolarevic, Branko
year 1998
title CAD@HKU
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 17, no. 4, pp. 16-17
summary Since 1993, we have experimented with Virtual Design Studios (VDS) as an on-going research project that investigates the combination of current computer-aided design (CAD), computer networks (Internet), and computer supported collaborative work (CSCW) techniques to bring together studentsat geographically distributed locations to work in a virtual atelier. In 1993 the theme of the first joint VDS project was in-fill housing for the traditional Chinese walled village of Kat Hing Wai in the New Territories north of Hong Kong, and our partners included MIT and Harvard in Boston (USA), UBC in Vancouver (Canada), and Washington University in St. Louis (USA). In 1994 we were joined by Cornell (USA) and Escola Tecnica Superior d’Arquitectura de Barcelona (Spain) to re-design Li Long housing in Shanghai, and 1995 added the Warsaw Institute of Technology (Poland) for the ACSA/Dupont competition to design a Center for Cultural and Religious Studies in Japan. The 1996 topic was an international competition to design a monument located in Hong Kong to commemorate the return of Hong Kong to Chinese sovereignty in 1997. Communication was via e-mail, the WorldWide Web with limited attempts at VRML, and network video. Several teaching and research experiments conducted through these projects have demonstrated the viability and potential of using electronic, telecommunications, and videoconferencing technologies in collaborative design processes. Results of these VDS have been presented at conferences worldwide, explained in journal papers and published in Virtual Design Studio, edited by J. Wojtowicz, published by HKU Press.
series ACADIA
email branko@pobox.upenn.edu
last changed 2002/12/14 08:21

_id cec8
authors Kolarevic, Branko
year 1994
title Lines, Relations, Drawing and Design
source Reconnecting [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-03-9] Washington University (Saint Louis / USA) 1994, pp. 51-61
summary This paper introduces a computer-based graphic environment for design conceptualization, or more specifically, for shape delineation and dynamic drawing manipulation, based on construction (regulating) lines and their geometric based on construction (regulating) lines and their geometric relations. It also presents ReDRAW-a limited prototype of a relationsbased graphic system.
series ACADIA
email branko@pobox.upenn.edu
last changed 2002/12/20 11:39

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