CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 81 to 100 of 358

_id ddss9484
id ddss9484
authors Sklar, Hinda
year 1994
title Opening Doors at Harvard's Graduate School of Design
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary Design communication has many forms and employs a wide array of references. Design pedagogy uses a rich body of sources and is informed by deep communication between faculty and student. Advancing technology for distribution and manipulation of digital design media and a pervasive computer network at the Harvard Graduate School of Design provide an ideal environment for investigating new methods of access to design resources. A research initiative called the DOORS project (Design-Oriented On-line Resource System) will make a variety of design reference materials available over the GSD's computer network Potentially, DOORS will provide access to: - the Frances Loeb Library's visual and special collections; - slides, drawings, photographs, videos; - private faculty slide collections; - maps and geographic information systems of text, numeric and other visual databases of three- dimensional computer models; - computer-generated animations and digital video segments with sound of multimedia projects. As early pilot versions of DOORS are released, faculty and students will gather visual information for study and modification, analyze images and models, compare and link design documentation in different formats, develop lectures and make presentations from computers in offices, classrooms, and studio work areas. Emphasis will be placed on flexibility, as this particular tool's success will hinge on its ability to respond to different approaches to design and instruction. DOORS proposes to offer three modalities, browsing, composition and presentation, to enable searching, organizati-on, and display. Using established library standards for record format, subject access and keyword indexing, browsing will offer flexible and diverse search criteria. Composition will provide tools for linking, annotation and manipulation of assembled materials. Individual presentations will be viewed in classrooms, studios or offices. A pilot project to assemble some of the basic technology and expertise required is currently under way. The objective of the pilot is to deliver a slice of material over the GSD's local area network in order to raise awareness of the tool's potential among faculty and students, to evaluate its effectiveness, and to formulate technical specifications for later project phases.
series DDSS
email hinda_sklar@venus.gsd.harvard.edu
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9485
id ddss9485
authors Smeets, Jos
year 1994
title Housing Performance, Data Management and Decisionmaking
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary This paper focusses on performance measurement in the framework of the strategic housing management. Reference is made to studies regarding two housing corporations in the Netherlands. The performance measurement is an element in the methodology of intervention planning and market positioning of housing estates. Aside of the measurement of technical and functional performances in this methodology market-technical and price-technical data are processed. These data sets, eventually, can be completed with data of consumer's living appreciation. An insight is acquired based on this methodology in (i) the market position of the estate; (ii) the performances of the dwelling and living environment; (iii) the relative position among estates. Diverse performance aspects and performance levels can be distinguished in the offered representation. The performance measurement is dealt with from 2 angles of incidence (i) from the dwelling and living environment; (ii) from the target group. On the level of the estate the performances are represented in the form of a quality profile. To enable the comparison of performances on the portfolio level a performance-index is developed, a so-called Housing Performance Rate (HPR). The performance measurement on estate and portfolio level is the basis of diverse management decisions, such as quality policy, rent policy, target groups policy and policies concerning neighbourhood management.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9489
id ddss9489
authors Spreckelmeyer, Kent F.
year 1994
title The Symbolic Dimensions of Workplace Evaluations
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary Post-Occupancy Evaluation (POE) techniques have been used during the past twenty years in a variety of workplace settings to measure specific occupant responses to the physical dimensions of the office environment. Typically, these measures have been used by environmental researchers and designers to improve instrumental aspects of the workplace, such as increased levels of occupant satisfaction with lighting, temperature, privacy, and office configuration. A growing body of evidence has begun to suggest that while instrumental approaches to workplace evaluation have produced improvements in specific office conditions, overall levels of worker satisfaction and perceptions of the general character of the office setting remain low. It has also been suggested that future pressures for reconfiguring the workplace -- increased use of individual communication technologies, working away from the office setting, rapid and continual changes in working patterns - will exacerbate these negative perceptions of workers. This paper will suggest ways in which POEs can be employed to identify and measure the less tangible aspects of office setting and how this information can be used to enhance the designers ability to address the cultural and social dimensions of the workplace. The central thesis of this paper is that POE theories and research methodologies must be focused on the symbolic dimensions of the workplace (i.e., office image, organizational culture, work purpose) in order to understand the ways in which the environment contributes to specific improvements in worker productivity, health, and satisfaction. Data will be presented from the author's recent POE studies of governmental offices and published supporting material found in Environment and Behaviour and The Journal of Architectu-ral and Planning Research. The author has conducted evaluation and programming studies for a number of private and governmental client groups in both office and health-care settings during the past fifteen years, and he will use evidence from this body of work as well as parallel studies of colleagues to support the thesis of the paper.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9493
id ddss9493
authors Teldenburg, J.A.F., Timmermans, H.J.P. and Borgers, A.W.J.
year 1994
title Design Tools in an Integrated Cad-Gis Environment: Space Syntax asan Example
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary The focus of this paper is how to make good use of the possibilities offered by integrated CAD-GIS software. It addresses the problem of the difference in types of information required by urban designers and urban planners to perform their tasks. It is stated that there is an overlap in these types of information. Both planners and designers can benefit from the extension of information offered to them by the other party. Integrated CAD-GIS software facilitates the exchange of information. There is a need for implementation in the integrated CAD-GIS environment of a type of information that addresses designers and planners alike. The paper takes Space Syntax models as an example of such information.
series DDSS
email j.a.f.teklenburg@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 1c42
authors Thiel, P.
year 1994
title Beyond Design Review: Implications for Design Practice, Education, and Research
source Environment and Behavior 26(3), pp. 363-376
summary Contributed by Susan Pietsch (spietsch@arch.adelaide.edu.au)
keywords 3D City Modeling, Development Control, Design Control
series other
last changed 2001/06/04 18:41

_id 4b72
authors Tovey, M.
year 1994
title Form creation techniques for automotive CAD
source Design Studies, Vol. 15, No. 1, pp. 85-114
summary Although there is a significant commitment to the use of CAD in the car industry, the industrial designer makes less use of it than engineering designers do. Vehicle stylists responsible for the early stages of the process have found that CAD systems and procedures are ill-suited to their methods and needs. As there are considerable potential benefits to the overall proc if it can be based around integrated CAD systems using common data bases, there are good reasons for devising procedures for automotive stylists that overcome the problems which CAD systems seem to present. This project has been concerned with devising such procedures. It has included a collaborative exercise with a motor manufacturer and has resulted in a collection of recommended techniques for form creation on CAD for automotive designers.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ddss9498
id ddss9498
authors Vriens, Dirk and Hendriks, Paul
year 1994
title Functionally Defining Systems: A Systems Theory Approach to Decision Support
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary Research into decision making seems to suffer from two related weaknesses. The first is lack of attention for the dynamic nature of the decision process and environment. Research attempts to encompass dynamic features are sparse. The second weakness is the allegation that decision alternatives can be discerned on an a priori basis, thus facilitating the use of a choice rule to pick the 'optimal' or 'satisficing' alternative (this is the basic assumption of the prevailing rationalistic approach of decision modelling). However, the assumption of an a priori conception of alterna-tives is not realistic, since it ignores the fact that the exploration and elaboration of alternatives forms an integral part of the decision process. Although several attempts have been made to overcome these problems, a coherent theory seems to be lacking. This paper explores the possibilities of systems theory as an offset for new decision modelling. A system (in the cybernet-ic sense) is, roughly speaking, a collection of elements related in such a manner that emergent properties (i.e., properties that consist the level of the whole, not at the level of its parts) come about. There are many different approaches to systems theory and not all of these are equally useful for decision research. For our purposes, systems that have 'adaptive' properties are worthwhile because they may encompass dynamic features. Furthermore, the use of adaptive, dynamic systems leads to a solution for the problem of the 'disembodied' conception and choice of alternatives, since the choice options automatically follow from the defined system and may change because of its dynamic nature. The important question is how a system can be defined in order to capture the dynamic nature of decision making. In order to answer this question, the paper starts with a short overview of problems with traditional modelling in decision making and systems theory. Next, it will be argued that the crux of defining systems that capture dynamics is to define them 'functionally', i.e. regarding the goals that enter the decision process. An outline of a method to do this will be given. In the last part, the consequences for computerized decision support will be stated.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 72a1
authors Ward, G.
year 1994
title The RADIANCE Lighting Simulation and Rendering System
source Computer Graphics Proceedings, Annual Conference Series, 1994, pp. 459-472
summary This paper describes a physically-based rendering system tailored to the demands of lighting design and architecture. The simulation uses a light-backwards ray-tracing method with extensions to efficiently solve the rendering equation under most conditions. This includes specular, diffuse and directional-diffuse reflection and transmission in any combination to any level in any environment, including complicated, curved geometries. The simulation blends deterministic and stochastic raytracing techniques to achieve the best balance between speed and accuracy in its local and global illumination methods. Some of the more interesting techniques are outlined, with references to more detailed descriptions elsewhere. Finally, examples are given of successful applications of this free software by others.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id ee8b
authors Yakeley, Megan and Coates, Paul
year 1994
title The Virtual Ching's Head
source The Virtual Studio [Proceedings of the 12th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design / ISBN 0-9523687-0-6] Glasgow (Scotland) 7-10 September 1994, p. 225
summary The bar in the Architectural Association, named after the bust that sat in one corner, had white formica topped tables. Each day around lunchtime these were cleaned with Vim by the bar staff, ready for the new day’s thought’s, ideas, and occasional inspirations. Students used the bar as an ideal place to discuss their work, the table tops providing an endless supply of virtual napkins waiting not to be used but to be drawn on. This atmosphere of providing a relaxed environment to discuss and debate architectural ideas proved immensly popular, with tea spills adding to the table top sketches. It is often forgotten in the ordered cleanliness of the CAD studio, where the protection of the computers overrides the comfort of their users, that ideas and their development do not always come when we most expect. Providing an atmosphere in which the designer feels comfortable enough to play is as vital now as at the time when the Architectural Association was seen as an ideal place to foster debate. As the architect feels more comfortable, so will the ideas flow more freely. This paper demonstrates how a CAD environment can become the virtual equivalent of a coffee bar as it relates to the design studio, where ideas are thrown around with abandon, and where the discussion of those ideas is more important than the material with which the ideas are depicted. In contrast, the use of computers in design is following along the same path as beautifully descriptive artwork or highly skillful technical drawings, that say much about the presentation abilities of their authors, yet often little about the actual designs. Designers often are so seduced by the medium that they do not properly see the message. A computer’s ability to present three dimesnional form instantly, and the ease with which those forms may be altered, stretched, shrunk, reversed and so on make the computer an ideal sketching tool. This paper shows the results of the combined RIBA Part II and MSc Computing and Design course. This two year, 96 week course is entirely computer based, and uses generative modelling to explore the fundamental nature of the design of form. This paper seeks to show how this approach may be successfully used with some students, and how the approach complements existing teaching methods and techniques. To accompany these notes a computer based presentation will illustrate a variety of past and present student work. This will show how rule based form, and the use of computers as a sketching tool, has influenced the students' working methods and their approach to the creation of form. Finally, we will show that the use of such a formal approach leads inevitably to a greater understanding of, and therefore a greater ability to articulate and illustrate, a student’s own design ideas and proposals. The use of the computer at every stage of the design process forces the student to be entirely explicit about every action as it occurs. Similarly the rule based approach requires them to be explicit about actions they propose to take in the future. This double combination has produced students who are highly articulate about their designs at every stage, and this paper aims to demonstrate that the more articulate the student, the greater is the possibility for success.
series eCAADe
last changed 1998/09/14 08:14

_id 20ab
authors Yakeley, Megan
year 2000
title Digitally Mediated Design: Using Computer Programming to Develop a Personal Design Process
source Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Department of Architecture
summary This thesis is based on the proposal that the current system of architectural design education confuses product and process. Students are assessed through, and therefore concentrate on, the former whilst the latter is left in many cases to chance. This thesis describes a new course taught by the author at MIT for the last three years whose aim is to teach the design process away from the complexities inherent in the studio system. This course draws a parallel between the design process and the Constructionist view of learning, and asserts that the design process is a constant learning activity. Therefore, learning about the design process necessarily involves learning the cognitive skills of this theoretical approach to education. These include concrete thinking and the creation of external artifacts to develop of ideas through iterative, experimental, incremental exploration. The course mimics the Constructionist model of using the computer programming environment LOGO to teach mathematics. It uses computer programming in a CAD environment, and specifically the development of a generative system, to teach the design process. The efficacy of such an approach to architectural design education has been studied using methodologies from educational research. The research design used an emergent qualitative model, employing Maykut and Morehouses interpretive descriptive approach (Maykut & Morehouse, 1994) and Glaser and Strausss Constant Comparative Method of data analysis (Glaser & Strauss, 1967). Six students joined the course in the Spring 1999 semester. The experience of these students, what and how they learned, and whether this understanding was transferred to other areas of their educational process, were studied. The findings demonstrated that computer programming in a particular pedagogical framework, can help transform the way in which students understand the process of designing. The following changes were observed in the students during the course of the year: Development of understanding of a personalized design process; move from using computer programming to solve quantifiable problems to using it to support qualitative design decisions; change in understanding of the paradigm for computers in the design process; awareness of the importance of intrapersonal and interpersonal communication skills; change in expectations of, their sense of control over, and appropriation of, the computer in the design process; evidence of transference of cognitive skills; change from a Behaviourist to a Constructionist model of learning Thesis Supervisor: William J. Mitchell Title: Professor of Architecture and Media Arts and Sciences, School of Architecture and Planning
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id dda4
authors Yezioro, Abraham
year 1994
title Form and Performance in Intelligent CAAD Systems for Early Stages in Solar Design Building
source Technion, Faculty of Architecture and Town Planing, Haifa
summary Great care should be taken at the initial design stages to determine the principles and solution schemes for climate and energy-conscious buildings. The present study deals with supporting the designer's efforts at the early stages to lay down the appropriate principles for a conceptual and geometric design of energy-preserving buildings, which are also thermally comfortable and adapted to local climatic conditions. For years, especially during the last decade, important data concerning climate-conscious construction has been compiled, but the information has not been utilized by designers, due to its inaccessibility. It is significant, though, that solutions based on this knowledge could be found and assessed at the preliminary design steps. A correct climate-conscious design conceived at the initial stages may guarantee that during later phases of the project's development no problems calling for essential and drastic changes in the basic design will crop up. The meaning of such changes at later stages may require sometimes a redesigning of the entire project. It is vital, therefore, to understand at the pre-conceptual phase, what are the correct climatic-solar design strategies which satisfy the requirements of the local conditions, and enable the attainment of thermal comfort conditions, while consuming the least possible energy. The present study proposes a computer-aided passive solar design system (PASYS) which enables the handling of entire designing process, and its general, conceptual aspects, as well as the preliminary designing steps and their particular, practical aspects. The system is based both on a knowledge base which stores the existing information concerning solar-climatic construction in the form of rules of thumb, and on precise procedural models which enable finding solutions suited to the local climatic conditions. The proposed system is an intelligent CAAD system which equips the designer who is aware of the constraints of climate and energy, with a tool to achieve a better design. PASYS was developed as a universal system to deal with the various activities involved in the initial – pre-conceptual and conceptual - design stages. The system supports the following design activities of each stage of this kind: analysis, synthesis, documentation, assessment and decision making. It is capable of analyzing given conditions, thus helping the designer understand which are the significant preliminary design stages that have a bearing on thermal comfort conditions in a given climate. The system is also capable of proposing solutions corresponding with the particular design phase, and assess their adequacy. These solutions take into account the constraints determined both by the designer and by the system itself, owing to the knowledge base it contains. The system can also document the various solutions that have been found and selected, so that may be further developed at later stages. This documentation is carried out by a graphic interface, developed as part of the system, as well as by an interface devised for existing CAD software. This study highlights the interaction between form and performance. The system is able to assess the performance of a proposed design by considering a given geometry (form), or viceversa, it is able to recommend a solution that can deliver desired and required performances. The study comprises three parts: (a.) Development of the conceptual model of a knowledge based design process. (b.) Further development of the initial stages of the afore mentioned process, including the pre-conceptual and conceptual stages. (c.) Demonstration of the mode of work with the PASYS system. // The first part of the study deals with the definition of the design process, the definition of the various design steps and their characteristics, and the definition of the activities involved in each design step. This part of the work also presents the kinds of knowledge bases affecting the design process, and shows how this knowledge is an inseparable part of the design process. The second part deals with the development of the initial design stages - the pre-conceptual and the conceptual - which are based on knowledge. This part also contains compiled knowledge that is relevant to the design stage, and a knowledge storage and retrieval method that was developed so as to make the knowledge available and accessible on demand. This part further presents precise procedural methods, developed to find solutions adapted to the specific given conditions, and to precisely assess the performance of the proposed solution. A case in point is the module of the SHADING system which enables a precise assessment of the mutual shading of buildings, and an examination of the exposure of the southern elevation to the sun, which is necessary in order to determine the effective solar absorption area in a proposed project in given environment conditions. The third part of the study demonstrates the solar-climatic design process put into action and supported by the system that was developed. This system enables the designer, even at the preliminary design stages, to determine which properties relating to local climatic conditions he will introduce into the building. This important, seemingly natural act, is usually performed during more advanced stages, when it might generate significant changes in the design, at a juncture when changes are hard to make. A PASYS-aided design environment ensures that from the beginning of the designing process, the project will be designed correctly and efficiently as far as energy is concerned.
keywords Knowledge Base; Design Process; Form; Performance; CAAD Systems
series thesis:PhD
email array01@techunix.technion.ac.il
last changed 2003/03/03 10:58

_id 130d
authors Hoinkes, R. and Mitchell, R.
year 1994
title Playing with Time - Continuous Temporal Mapping Strategies for Interactive Environments
source 6th Canadian GIS Conference, (Ottawa Natura Resources Canada), pp. 318-329
summary The growing acceptance of GIS technology has had far- reaching effects on many fields of research. The recent developments in the area of dynamic and temporal GIS open new possibilities within the realm of historical research where temporal relationship analysis is as important as spatial relationship analysis. While topological structures have had wide use in spatial GIS and have been the subject of most temporal GIS endeavours, the different demands of many of these temporally- oriented analytic processes questions the choice of the topological direction. In the fall of 1992 the Montreal Research Group (MRG) of the Canadian Centre for Architecture mounted an exhibition dealing with the development of the built environment in 18th- century Montreal. To aid in presenting the interpretive messages of their data, the MRG worked with the Centre for Landscape Research (CLR) to incorporate the interactive capabilities of the CLR's PolyTRIM research software with the MRG's data base to produce a research tool as well as a public- access interactive display. The interactive capabilities stemming from a real- time object- oriented structure provided an excellent environment for both researchers and the public to investigate the nature of temporal changes in such aspects as landuse, ethnicity, and fortifications of the 18th century city. This paper describes the need for interactive real- time GIS in such temporal analysis projects and the underlying need for object- oriented vs. topologically structured data access strategies to support them.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ga0231
id ga0231
authors Sparacino, Flavia
year 2002
title Narrative Spaces: bridging architecture and entertainment via interactive technology
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Our society’s modalities of communication are rapidly changing. Large panel displays and screens are be ing installed in many public spaces, ranging from open plazas, to shopping malls, to private houses, to theater stages, classrooms, and museums. In parallel, wearable computers are transforming our technological landscape by reshaping the heavy, bulkydesktop computer into a lightweight, portable device that is accessible to people at any time. Computation and sensing are moving from computers and devices into the environment itself. The space around us is instrumented with sensors and displays, and it tends to reflect adiffused need to combine together the information space with our physical space. This combination of large public and miniature personal digital displays together with distributed computing and sensing intelligence offers unprecedented opportunities to merge the virtual and the real, the information landscape of the Internet with the urban landscape of the city, to transform digital animated media in storytellers, in public installations and through personal wearable technology. This paper describes technological platforms built at the MIT Media Lab, through 1994-2002, that contribute to defining new trends in architecture that mergevirtual and real spaces, and are reshaping the way we live and experience the museum, the house, the theater, and the modern city.
series other
email flavia@media.mit.edu
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ddss9401
id ddss9401
authors Akin, Omer
year 1994
title Psychology of Early Design in Architecture
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary Lately there has been a good deal of emphasis on the early stages of the design process, particularly by developers of computer aids and quantitative design models for both evaluation and generation of designs in a variety of domains. Yet, there is little understanding of the early design-process. While the early design process as manifested by human designers need not be the sole basis of the description of this phase, it certainly represents and important kernel of knowledge, especially for those who are interested in developing models, systems or merely interfaces for such systems. This paper focuses on the characterization of the psychology of the early design phase in architecture. It is described in terms of the general design strategies and problem solving tactics used; and is contrasted against some of the process characteristics that
series DDSS
email oaO4+@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 0574
authors Alison Murison and James Gray
year 1994
title Spatial Analysis for Museum Design
source The Virtual Studio [Proceedings of the 12th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design / ISBN 0-9523687-0-6] Glasgow (Scotland) 7-10 September 1994, pp. 201-206
summary The paper describes how a specially written customisation of AutoCAD enables students of Architecture to use the method of spatial analysis called Space Syntax developed by Professor Bill Hillier of the Bartlett School of Architecture, London, to examine a number of existing museums, to compare the findings against other criteria, and to draw conclusions about the strategy adopted in museum design. Simple interactive graphics enable plans to be entered and compared, so that they may be evaluated during the design process, with decisions supported by objective tests. This improves both design decisions and the learning process.
series eCAADe
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 1262
authors Alshawi, M.
year 1994
title A run time exchange of component information between CAD and object models: A standard interface
source The Int. Journal of Construction IT 2(2), pp. 37-52
summary Integrated computer aided design could only occur in engineering once CAD systems could represent physical features and components rather than graphical primitives. In most dedicated CAD systems, the knowledge of a complete component exists only for the duration of each drawing command and the data stored in the database is simply a set of graphic primitives. This paper proposes an approach for real time information transfer from and to CAD systems based on a high level object representation of the design drawing. Drawing components are automatically identified and represented in an object hierarchy that reflects the 'part-of' relation between the various components including building spaces. Such hierarchies transfer an industry standard CAD system i.e. AutoCAD, into a high level object oriented system that can communicate with external applications with relative ease.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id e807
authors Anadol, Z., and Akin, O.
year 1994
title Determining the impact of cad drafting tools on the building delivery process
source The Int. Journal of Construction IT 2(1), pp.1-8
summary Computer aided design is intended to change the way design and construction are carried out. at a minimum, this implies savings realized in terms of time spent and improvement of the quality of designs produced. to test this idea, we hypothesized that computer aided drafting and design operations may be instrumental in reducing the number of change orders issued and help control cost overruns by improving the accuracy of construction documents. we compared change orders in projects designed in the conventional media against ones developed with computers. we found that there is evidence supporting our hypothesis. furthermore, in the process of investigating this question, we found that computer applications to improve the management of existing building information (as-built drawings, building system related information, and the like) represent even more critical needs than those that can reduce change orders through more accurate design drawings.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id 241b
authors Anderson, Lee
year 1994
title Film Theory and Architectural Design
source Reconnecting [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-03-9] Washington University (Saint Louis / USA) 1994, pp. 219-227
summary This paper describes a 10 week, 3rd year architectural design studio, taught by the author, that explored the use of film and video techniques in the design process. The exploration was of (1) the potential of recently available personal computer software and hardware for image and video capture, manipulation and recording, and (2) the potential for application of video, informed by film theory, in the early stages of architectural design.

series ACADIA
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id ddss9403
id ddss9403
authors Arentze, T., Borgers, A., Dellaert, B. and Timmermans, H.
year 1994
title A Multi-Purpose Multi-Stop Model Describing Consumers' Choices of Shopping Centres
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary Recently, a number of interesting extensions to traditional decompositional and discrete choice models has been introduced that allow one to combine parameters estimated in different phases ofcomplex choice processes. These extensions offer new possibilities to model combinations of choices consumers make if they select shopping centres to visit. This paper will introduce a modelling approach that describes consumer choices of shopping centres involving multiple shopping functions (multi purpose) as well as locations (multi stop). The approach extends traditional decompositional models of single choices to a model of combinations of choices. It uses a recursive scaling procedure that combines attributes related to different shopping functions and to shopping centres at different locations. The model will be tested on data collected on shopping behaviour in Maastricht, the Netherlands.
series DDSS
email t.a.arentze@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddss9404
id ddss9404
authors Arima, Takafumi and Sato, Seiji
year 1994
title Form Characteristics of Landscape Images: A Landscape Research by Computer Image Processing
source Second Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture & Urban Planning (Vaals, the Netherlands), August 15-19, 1994
summary Landscape evaluation research examines how individuals perceive the landscape. Because the amount of the data to describe landscapes is huge, landscape research needs the technology of the computer. This paper describes a method to catch the amount of physical characteristics which were extracted from landscape images by using the technology of the computer image processing and verifies its effectiveness. To do this analysis, we took photographic slides of a landscape sample. Pictures were taken for three regions (the city centre area, the outskirts area, and the farm village area). The number of slides was 6 for each place hence 18 in total were used for theanalysis. Next, we stored these slides on a computer disk. Form characteristics of the landscape elements were extracted by using computer image processing. Borderlines were extracted usingthe algorithm of Robert and were converted into coordinates data by minute line processing and the vector processing. Other elements were extracted by label processing and were converted into the coordinates data by vector processing. These data thus are the vector data for two-dimensions of the image and not the data for a three-dimension space. The processing of these images enables the analysis of the form characteristics in the landscape images. We calculated the data such as appearing length, angle numbers of appearance of the vector data, and analyzed the characteristic of shape and the complexities of landscape applying fractal theory. We compared three districts and were able to find landscape characteristics of various places as a result.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

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