CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 101 to 120 of 384

_id 4b78
authors Piccolotto, Moreno and Rio, Olga
year 1995
title Structural Design Education with Computers
source Computing in Design - Enabling, Capturing and Sharing Ideas [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-04-7] University of Washington (Seattle, Washington / USA) October 19-22, 1995, pp. 285-298
summary In this paper, we discuss the importance of computer based simulation tools for the education of architects and civil engineers. We present our efforts to develop a program for the simulation of structures (CASDET). CASDET forms a microworld for planar structures. The program enables students to compose structures and to experiment interactively the effects of different geometry and load configurations. It tries to identify the proposed structure and controls its stability. Upon request of the student, it also processes displacements, internal forces (moments, shear forces etc.) and reaction forces on supports. The students can then visualise the desired information by interacting directly with the structure or member(s) of interest (see fig.1). We present different methods, with which students can visualise the results of their actions and discuss their implications in the educational context.
keywords Structural Design Education, Microworlds, Learning Environment, CAI
series ACADIA
email moreno@arch.ethz.ch, olgario@cc.csic.es
last changed 1999/03/29 15:22

_id ebb2
authors Proctor, George
year 2000
title Reflections on the VDS, Pedagogy, Methods
source ACADIA Quarterly, vol. 19, no. 1, pp. 15-16
summary After having conducted a Digital Media based design studio at Cal Poly for six years, we have developed a body of experience I feel is worth sharing. When the idea of conducting a studio with the exclusive use of digital tools was implemented at our college, it was still somewhat novel, and only 2 short years after the first VDS- Virtual Design Studio (UBC, UHK et.al.-1993). When we began, most of what we explored required a suspension of disbelief on the part of both the students and faculty reviewers of studio work. In a few short years the notions we examined have become ubiquitous in academic architectural discourse and are expanding into common use in practice. (For background, the digital media component of our curriculum owes much to my time at Harvard GSD [MAUD 1989-91] and the texts of: McCullough/Mitchell 1990, 1994; McCullough 1998; Mitchell 1990,1992,1996; Tufte 1990; Turkel 1995; and Wojtowicz 1993; and others.)
series ACADIA
email georger@cybertects.com
last changed 2002/12/15 15:37

_id b731
authors Ramstein, Christophe
year 1995
title An Architecture Model for Multimodal Interfaces with Force Feedback I.14 Virtual Reality 2
source Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 1995 v.I. Human and Future Computing pp. 455-460
summary Multimodal interfaces with force feedback pose new problems both in terms of their design and for hardware and software implementation. The first problem is to design and build force-feedback pointing devices that permit users both to select and manipulate interface objects (windows, menus and icons) and at the same time feel these objects with force and precision through their tactile and kinesthetic senses. The next problem is to model the interface such that it can be returned to the user via force-feedback devices: the task is to define the fields of force corresponding to interface objects and events, and to design algorithms to synthesize these forces in such a way as to provide optimum real-time operation. The final problem concerns the hardware and software architecture to be used to facilitate the integration of this technology with contemporary graphic interfaces. An architecture model for a multimodal interface is presented: it is based on the notion of a multiagent model and breaks down inputs and outputs according to multiple modalities (visual, auditory and haptic). These modalities are represented by independent software components that communicate with one another via a higher-level control agent.
keywords Multimodal Interface; Software Architecture Model; Force Feedback; Haptic Device; Physical Model
series other
last changed 2002/07/07 14:01

_id 87f9
authors Ronchi, Alfredo M.
year 1995
title An Hypermedial Object Oriented Approach to Computer Aided Architectural Design
source Multimedia and Architectural Disciplines [Proceedings of the 13th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe / ISBN 0-9523687-1-4] Palermo (Italy) 16-18 November 1995, pp. 375-388
summary This paper presents a new approach to hypermedial computer aided architectural design environments. The concept is to create a whole CAAD hypermedia environment based on object oriented approach. This was probably a dream in the past but new technologies make this possible. To introduce the subject let us think to a system based on an object oriented environment, with hypermedia capabilities and dynamic creation of data structures, all these things may be managed by a single application using OLE (Object Linking and Embedding) technology provided by MS Windows. Some years ago we were waiting for a universal browser able to manage all kind of data and formats such as text, images, movies and sounds. Let us think to an object oriented file system, we can store all objects and save relations amongst them, then we can use a browsing or quering template to read and retrieve data. Three cases of study developed by Diset are discussed in this paper: HyperMedia Design Kit, De Architectura and On Line Architectural Sites Projects.
series eCAADe
more http://dpce.ing.unipa.it/Webshare/Wwwroot/ecaade95/Pag_45.htm
last changed 2000/12/02 12:58

_id avocaad_2001_20
id avocaad_2001_20
authors Shen-Kai Tang
year 2001
title Toward a procedure of computer simulation in the restoration of historical architecture
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In the field of architectural design, “visualization¨ generally refers to some media, communicating and representing the idea of designers, such as ordinary drafts, maps, perspectives, photos and physical models, etc. (Rahman, 1992; Susan, 2000). The main reason why we adopt visualization is that it enables us to understand clearly and to control complicated procedures (Gombrich, 1990). Secondly, the way we get design knowledge is more from the published visualized images and less from personal experiences (Evans, 1989). Thus the importance of the representation of visualization is manifested.Due to the developments of computer technology in recent years, various computer aided design system are invented and used in a great amount, such as image processing, computer graphic, computer modeling/rendering, animation, multimedia, virtual reality and collaboration, etc. (Lawson, 1995; Liu, 1996). The conventional media are greatly replaced by computer media, and the visualization is further brought into the computerized stage. The procedure of visual impact analysis and assessment (VIAA), addressed by Rahman (1992), is renewed and amended for the intervention of computer (Liu, 2000). Based on the procedures above, a great amount of applied researches are proceeded. Therefore it is evident that the computer visualization is helpful to the discussion and evaluation during the design process (Hall, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998; Liu, 1997; Sasada, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1993, 1997, 1998). In addition to the process of architectural design, the computer visualization is also applied to the subject of construction, which is repeatedly amended and corrected by the images of computer simulation (Liu, 2000). Potier (2000) probes into the contextual research and restoration of historical architecture by the technology of computer simulation before the practical restoration is constructed. In this way he established a communicative mode among archeologists, architects via computer media.In the research of restoration and preservation of historical architecture in Taiwan, many scholars have been devoted into the studies of historical contextual criticism (Shi, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995; Fu, 1995, 1997; Chiu, 2000). Clues that accompany the historical contextual criticism (such as oral information, writings, photographs, pictures, etc.) help to explore the construction and the procedure of restoration (Hung, 1995), and serve as an aid to the studies of the usage and durability of the materials in the restoration of historical architecture (Dasser, 1990; Wang, 1998). Many clues are lost, because historical architecture is often age-old (Hung, 1995). Under the circumstance, restoration of historical architecture can only be proceeded by restricted pictures, written data and oral information (Shi, 1989). Therefore, computer simulation is employed by scholars to simulate the condition of historical architecture with restricted information after restoration (Potier, 2000). Yet this is only the early stage of computer-aid restoration. The focus of the paper aims at exploring that whether visual simulation of computer can help to investigate the practice of restoration and the estimation and evaluation after restoration.By exploring the restoration of historical architecture (taking the Gigi Train Station destroyed by the earthquake in last September as the operating example), this study aims to establish a complete work on computer visualization, including the concept of restoration, the practice of restoration, and the estimation and evaluation of restoration.This research is to simulate the process of restoration by computer simulation based on visualized media (restricted pictures, restricted written data and restricted oral information) and the specialized experience of historical architects (Potier, 2000). During the process of practicing, communicates with craftsmen repeatedly with some simulated alternatives, and makes the result as the foundation of evaluating and adjusting the simulating process and outcome. In this way we address a suitable and complete process of computer visualization for historical architecture.The significance of this paper is that we are able to control every detail more exactly, and then prevent possible problems during the process of restoration of historical architecture.
series AVOCAAD
email tsk.aa88g@nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 65bb
authors Soufi, Bassel and Edmonds, Ernest
year 1995
title A Framework for the Description and Representation of Emergent Shapes
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 411-422
summary This paper is concerned with the computational modelling of emergent shapes in design. The categorisation of emergent shapes, and the development of a framework capable of modelling different types of emergent shapes are of particular interest. A scheme is propose for the description of emergent shapes. Four different types of emergent shapes are described. A framework based on multiple shape representations is then presented. The operation of the framework is illustrated using a worked example.
keywords Creative Design, Emergence, Categorisation Of Emergent Shapes, Multiple Shape Representations, Description-Representation Framework.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/08/03 15:16

_id e092
authors Streilein, André and Hirschberg, Urs
year 1995
title Integration of Digital Photogrammetry and CAAD: Constraint-Based Modelling and Semi-Automatic Measurement
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 35-47
summary The integration of state-of-the-art photogrammetric methods with the capabilities of CAAD has great potential for a variety of architectural applications. This paper describes the current status of an ongoing research project which aims to develop an easy to use tool for the photogrammetric generation of accurate, reliable and well structured 3D CAAD models of architectural objects. The system essentially consists of a standard CAAD package to which additional functionality was added and a Digital Photogrammetry Station (DIPS), providing semi-automatic computer measurement. The paper concentrates on two main issues in the design of the system: the data-integration and the CAAD-based 3D feature extraction. The data-integration is achieved using a knowledge-base. On top of an adequate data-transfer between the two systems this knowledge-base enables constraint-based modelling in CAAD and qualitatively controlled measurement in DIPS. In the section about Digital Photogrammetry we describe the 3D feature extraction procedure in detail and point out how the qualitative control can be achieved. A practical example is used to illustrate the performance of the system.
series CAAD Futures
email hirschberg@tugraz.at
last changed 2003/06/10 10:12

_id c56a
authors Sugishita, S., Kondo, K., Sato, Shimada, H. and Kimura, F.
year 1995
title Interactive Freehand Sketch Interpreter for Geometric Modelling I.16 Pen-Based Interface
source Proceedings of the Sixth International Conference on Human-Computer Interaction 1995 v.I. Human and Future Computing pp. 561-566
summary This paper presents a new method to deal with idea sketches for inputting geometric models at a workstation. The idea sketches are drawn on a CRT screen with a stylus pen and a tablet by designers at an initial stage of design procedures. They can keep their drawing styles at a workstation as the same manner as using a pen on paper. The system 'Sketch Interpreter' can create correct geometric models in a computer even though input idea sketches are incorrect perspectively. Data created are transferred to an advanced 3D-CAD system. The system is applied as a front-end processor for a design practice.
series other
last changed 2002/07/07 14:01

_id cf2011_p024
id cf2011_p024
authors Tidafi, Temy; Charbonneau Nathalie, Khalili-Araghi Salman
year 2011
title Backtracking Decisions within a Design Process: a Way of Enhancing the Designer's Thought Process and Creativity
source Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures 2011 [Proceedings of the 14th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures / ISBN 9782874561429] Liege (Belgium) 4-8 July 2011, pp. 573-587.
summary This paper proposes a way computer sciences could contribute to stimulate the designer’s reflexive thought. We explore the possibility of making use of backtracking devices in order to formalize the designer’s thought process. Design, as a process of creating an object, cannot be represented by means of a linear timeline. Accordingly, the backtracking processes we are discussing here are not based on a linear model but rather on a non-linear structure. Beyond the notion of undoing and redoing commands within CAD packages, the backtracking process is seen as a way to explore and record several alternate options. The branches of the non-linear model can be seen as pathways made of sequential decisions. The designer creates and explores these pathways while making tentative moves towards an architectural solution. Within the design process, backtracking enables the designer to establish and act on a network of interrelated decisions. This notion is fundamental. It is quite obvious that information, in order to be meaningful, must occupy a specific place within an informational network. A data, separated from its context, is devoid of interest. By the same token, a decision takes on significance solely in combination with other decisions. In this paper, we examine what kinds of decisions are involved within a design process, how they are connected, and what could be the best ways to formalize the relationships. Our goal is to experiment ways that could enable the designer and his/her collaborators to get a clearer mental picture of the network of decisions aforementioned. The non-linear model can be seen as a graph structure. The user moves wherever he/she wants through the branches of the structure to establish the network of decisions or to get reacquainted with a previous design process. As a matter of fact, it can act in both ways: to reassess or to confirm a decision. On the one hand, the designer can go back to previous states, reconsider past choices, and eventually modify them. On the other hand, he/she can move forward and revisit a given sequence of decisions, so as to recapture the essence of a previous design process. It goes without saying that knowledge regarding the design process is constructed by the designer from his/her own experiences. Since the designer’s perception evolves as time goes by, the network of decisions constitutes a model that is continuously questioned and restructured. The designer does not elaborate solely an architectural object, but also an evolving model formalizing the way he/she achieved his/her aim. As Le Moigne (1995) pointed out, the model itself produces knowledge; afterwards, the designer can examine it so as to get a clearer mental picture of his/her own cognitive processes. Furthermore, it can be used by his/her collaborators in order to understand which thread of ideas led the designer to a given visual result, and eventually resume or reorient the design process. In addition to reflecting on the ideological implications inherent to this questioning, we take into account the feasibility of such a research project. From a more technical point of view, in this paper we will describe how we plane to take up the challenge of elaborating a digital environment enabling backtracking processes within graph structures. Furthermore, we will explain how we plane to test the first trial version of the new environment with potential users so as to observe how they respond to it. These experiments will be conducted in order to verify to what extend the methods we are proposing are able to i) enhance the designer’s creativity and ii) increase our understanding of designer’s thought process.
keywords backtracking, design process, digital environments, problem space, network of decisions, graph structure.
series CAAD Futures
email temy.tidafi@umontreal.ca
last changed 2012/02/11 18:21

_id 2005_787
id 2005_787
authors Veikos, Cathrine
year 2005
title The Post-Medium Condition
source Digital Design: The Quest for New Paradigms [23nd eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9541183-3-2] Lisbon (Portugal) 21-24 September 2005, pp. 787-794
summary Theorists in art, architecture and visual media have described the digital world as a world of mediumlessness and proclaimed that the medium of a work, once the ontological determinant for the classification of the arts, is rendered meaningless by recent technological and cultural developments (Krauss, 2000; Negroponte, 1995; Manovich, 2001). Although indebted to specific media-based techniques and their attendant ideologies, software removes the material reality of techniques to an immaterial condition where the effects of material operations are reproduced abstractly. This paper asserts that a productive approach for digital design can be found in the acknowledgement that the importance of the digital format is not that it de-materializes media, but that it allows for the maximum intermingling of media. A re-conceptualization of media follows from this, defined now as, a set of conventions derived from the material conditions of a given technical support, conventions out of which to develop a form of expressiveness that can be both projective and mnemonic (Krauss, 2000). The paper will focus on the identification of these conventions towards the development of new forms of expressiveness in architecture. Further demonstration of the intermingling of materially-based conventions is carried out in the paper through a comparative analysis of contemporary works of art and architecture, taking installation art as a particular example. A new design approach based on the maximum intermingling of media takes account of integrative strategies towards the digital and the material and sees them as inextricably linked. In the digital “medium” different sets of conventions derived from different material conditions transfer their informational assets producing fully formed, material-digital ingenuity.
keywords Expanded Architecture, Art Practice, Material, Information, ParametricTechniques, Evolutionary Logics
series eCAADe
email veikos@design.upenn.edu
last changed 2012/11/23 18:17

_id 1c92
authors Verbeke, Johan
year 1995
title Trying to Stimulate Creativity in CAAD at Sint-Lucas Brussels-Gent
source CAD Space [Proceedings of the III International Conference Computer in Architectural Design] Bialystock 27-29 April 1995, pp. 239-245
summary The use of CAAD at our Institute, which is located at two different places (Brussels and Gent), is based on three important mainstays: theoretical lessons combined with practical exercises, design activity in the studio and scientific research. Our main ideas and experience (for the average student) will be explained in more detail in the sequel. Of course, the best students use the computer in a much more evolved way.
series plCAD
email Johan.Verbeke@village.uunet.be
last changed 2000/01/24 09:08

_id 34e1
authors Vernenne, D., Rogge, S., Van Laere, W.,and Vandamme, F.
year 1995
title Annot Agents: Knowledge-Based Tools for Supporting Participatory Design
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 699-706
summary In this paper, we consider participatory design as aiming for full cooperation of all actors involved in collaborative design processes. This type of co-design needs efficient tools to support the complex interactions on many levels. The paper describes our AnnotAgents which is a method and a library of tools which we are currently developing to support these complex cooperation processes.
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/08/03 15:16

_id f4b9
authors Watanabe, Shun
year 1995
title Representing Geometric Knowledge in Architectural Design
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 25-34
summary Geometric knowledge is essential to architectural design. A new method of geometric computing is proposed in this paper, in which geometric decision making in architectural design process can be represented naturally. I begin by discussing characteristics of geometry in the architectural design process and making clear the issues in the graphic libraries which have been used as a substitute in current CAD/CG systems. Then, I mention how to represent the spatial geometric primitives and operations from the view of knowledge in algebraic geometry. It is not sufficient for the architectural design process to represent geometric primitives and operations, and a model of geometric decision making is presented to manage the dynamism of the design process. I also explain the interaction between the presented geometric decision model and the architectural model which was proposed as the framework to develop our knowledge-based computer-aided architectural design system.
keywords Design Process, Geometry, Decision Making, CAD, AI
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/08/03 15:16

_id 6b82
authors Week, David
year 1995
title The Database Revisited: Beyond the Container Metaphor
source Computing in Design - Enabling, Capturing and Sharing Ideas [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-04-7] University of Washington (Seattle, Washington / USA) October 19-22, 1995, pp. 53-70
summary The growth of international networks, and of international trade in general, has increased the opportunities for architects to work together over distance. In our practice at Pacific Architecture, we’ve been using first modems, and now the Internet, to connect co-workers at sites in Australia, Oregon, Scotland, and Papua New Guinea. Design collaboration has been primarily through the e-mail exchange of text and drawings. We’ve also assessed other CMC tools. Products like Timbuktu and video-conferencing software allow for real-time collaboration, based on the metaphor of two (or more) people together at a table, able to see and hear each other, and to work together on the same document. Groupware make intragroup communication the basis for building a workgroup’s knowledgebase. On recent projects, we’ve begun using database software as the basis for collaborative design communication. We’ve taken as a model for data structure Christopher Alexander’s ‘pattern language’ schema. Conversations about the design take the form of a collaborative construction of the language. Inputs into the database are constrained by the ‘pattern’ format. The CAD drawings run in parallel, as an ‘expression’ or ‘instance’ of the language. So far, CAD and database do not have an integrated interface. This paper describes our experience in these projects. It also outlines a set of design criteria for an integrated CAD/database environment economically and incrementally achievable within the constraints of currently available software. Formulating such criteria requires the reconceptualisation of notions of ‘database’. This paper looks at these notions through philosophical and linguistic work on metaphor. In conclusion, the paper analyses the way in which we can use a reframed notion of database to create a useful collaborative communication environment, centred on the architectural drawing.

series ACADIA
last changed 1999/03/29 14:56

_id 6e87
id 6e87
authors Wognum, P.M. and Mars, N.J.I.
year 1995
title MODELING KNOWLEDGE FOR KNOWLEDGE-BASED DESIGN SUPPORT
source Oxman, R.M., Bax, M.F.Th., Achten, H.H. (eds.) Design research in the Netherlands, 97-109
series book
type normal paper
email H.H.Achten@tue.nl
more http://www.designresearch.nl/PDF/DRN1995_Wognum_Mars.pdf
last changed 2005/10/12 13:16

_id 22cd
authors Wojtowicz, Jerzy and Gilliard, Jeff
year 1995
title Purist Lessons: Constructing the Unrealized Villas of Le Corbusier
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 507-516
summary The villas of Le Corbusier from his Purist Corpus (1923-1929) are appropriate for reconstruction using computational tools for how their inherent logic is revealed by this process. Conceived but never built, the following seven design examples are inferred from incomplete and fragmentary original documentation and rebuilt as three-dimensional computer models. The analytic process of reconstruction depends upon available descriptive information, but more significant is the assumption of a design methodology based in geometry and elemental volumes. Understanding the basis of this method and its rules begins the systematic geometric reconstruction of the villas. The record of this process and the role of the machine in representing the object and its cognitive aspects is supported by the syntactic organization of images.
series CAAD Futures
email jerzy@post.harvard.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id caadria2006_621
id caadria2006_621
authors YU-LU LIU
year 2006
title THE MORE PHYSICAL NETWORK SPACE: A preliminary experiment in VR-Cave
source CAADRIA 2006 [Proceedings of the 11th International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia] Kumamoto (Japan) March 30th - April 2nd 2006, 621-623
summary For now, the written word is still the most efficient communication method in network space (Anders, 1998). When designing a network space, it is necessary to let users know the concept of the space. Some researchers imitated physical space and brought a similar spatial experience into network space. The design of network space may be based on existing space in the real world. The rules of construction in physical space and network space are the same (Donath, 1997; Dyson, 1998). Consequently, the best way to explore network space is to imitate physical space (Mitchell, 1995, 1999a).
series CAADRIA
email Lumeis@yahoo.com.tw
last changed 2006/04/17 16:48

_id avocaad_2001_16
id avocaad_2001_16
authors Yu-Ying Chang, Yu-Tung Liu, Chien-Hui Wong
year 2001
title Some Phenomena of Spatial Characteristics of Cyberspace
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary "Space," which has long been an important concept in architecture (Bloomer & Moore, 1977; Mitchell, 1995, 1999), has attracted interest of researchers from various academic disciplines in recent years (Agnew, 1993; Benko & Strohmayer, 1996; Chang, 1999; Foucault, 1982; Gould, 1998). Researchers from disciplines such as anthropology, geography, sociology, philosophy, and linguistics regard it as the basis of the discussion of various theories in social sciences and humanities (Chen, 1999). On the other hand, since the invention of Internet, Internet users have been experiencing a new and magic "world." According to the definitions in traditional architecture theories, "space" is generated whenever people define a finite void by some physical elements (Zevi, 1985). However, although Internet is a virtual, immense, invisible and intangible world, navigating in it, we can still sense the very presence of ourselves and others in a wonderland. This sense could be testified by our naming of Internet as Cyberspace -- an exotic kind of space. Therefore, as people nowadays rely more and more on the Internet in their daily life, and as more and more architectural scholars and designers begin to invest their efforts in the design of virtual places online (e.g., Maher, 1999; Li & Maher, 2000), we cannot help but ask whether there are indeed sensible spaces in Internet. And if yes, these spaces exist in terms of what forms and created by what ways?To join the current interdisciplinary discussion on the issue of space, and to obtain new definition as well as insightful understanding of "space", this study explores the spatial phenomena in Internet. We hope that our findings would ultimately be also useful for contemporary architectural designers and scholars in their designs in the real world.As a preliminary exploration, the main objective of this study is to discover the elements involved in the creation/construction of Internet spaces and to examine the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces. In addition, this study also attempts to investigate whether participants from different academic disciplines define or experience Internet spaces in different ways, and to find what spatial elements of Internet they emphasize the most.In order to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the spatial phenomena in Internet and to overcome the subjectivity of the members of the research team, the research design of this study was divided into two stages. At the first stage, we conducted literature review to study existing theories of space (which are based on observations and investigations of the physical world). At the second stage of this study, we recruited 8 Internet regular users to approach this topic from different point of views, and to see whether people with different academic training would define and experience Internet spaces differently.The results of this study reveal that the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces is different from that between human participants and physical spaces. In the physical world, physical elements of space must be established first; it then begins to be regarded as a place after interaction between/among human participants or interaction between human participants and the physical environment. In contrast, in Internet, a sense of place is first created through human interactions (or activities), Internet participants then begin to sense the existence of a space. Therefore, it seems that, among the many spatial elements of Internet we found, "interaction/reciprocity" Ñ either between/among human participants or between human participants and the computer interface Ð seems to be the most crucial element.In addition, another interesting result of this study is that verbal (linguistic) elements could provoke a sense of space in a degree higher than 2D visual representation and no less than 3D visual simulations. Nevertheless, verbal and 3D visual elements seem to work in different ways in terms of cognitive behaviors: Verbal elements provoke visual imagery and other sensory perceptions by "imagining" and then excite personal experiences of space; visual elements, on the other hand, provoke and excite visual experiences of space directly by "mapping".Finally, it was found that participants with different academic training did experience and define space differently. For example, when experiencing and analyzing Internet spaces, architecture designers, the creators of the physical world, emphasize the design of circulation and orientation, while participants with linguistics training focus more on subtle language usage. Visual designers tend to analyze the graphical elements of virtual spaces based on traditional painting theories; industrial designers, on the other hand, tend to treat these spaces as industrial products, emphasizing concept of user-center and the control of the computer interface.The findings of this study seem to add new information to our understanding of virtual space. It would be interesting for future studies to investigate how this information influences architectural designers in their real-world practices in this digital age. In addition, to obtain a fuller picture of Internet space, further research is needed to study the same issue by examining more Internet participants who have no formal linguistics and graphical training.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 8a1a
authors Burattini, Ernesto
year 1995
title Expert Systems and Hypertext: Can They Work Cooperatively?
source Multimedia and Architectural Disciplines [Proceedings of the 13th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe / ISBN 0-9523687-1-4] Palermo (Italy) 16-18 November 1995, pp. 315-322
summary In recent years two technologies, hypertext and expert systems, developed independently each other, drawn researcher´s attention since they seemed good tools to represent the knowledge and the reasoning process performed by human beings. These two technologies, until recently, had not too much intersection between them notwithstanding both were involved in representing the knowledge of experts of some domains and the domains itself. Also in the architecture field some expert systems and many hypertext products have been developed. Starting from some applications developed by our research team, in terms of expert systems and hypertext, we try here to give some suggestions about the possible interactions and the complementary use we may done of them.
series eCAADe
email ernb@sole.cib.na.cnr.it
more http://dpce.ing.unipa.it/Webshare/Wwwroot/ecaade95/Pag_38.htm
last changed 2000/12/02 12:21

_id 33f3
authors Fujii, Haruyuki
year 1995
title Incorporation of Natural Language Processing and a Generative System - An Interactive System that Constructs Topological Models from Spatial Descriptions in Natural Language
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 205-218
summary The natural language processing technique and the spatial reasoning technique are incorporated to create a computational model representing the process of updating and maintaining the knowledge about spatial relations. An algorithm for the spatial reasoning is proposed. An interactive system that understands sentences describing spatial relations is implemented. The system determines the reference of an anaphoric or deictic expression from the literal meaning of the input and the implicit meaning derived from the literal meaning. The consistency of the spatial relations is maintained. The correct topological representations of the spatial relations are generated from well-formed descriptions.
keywords Natural Language Processing, Discourse Analysis, Artificial Intelligence, Architecture, CAD
series CAAD Futures
email hfujii@arch.titech.ac.jp
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

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