CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 391

_id 5986
authors Gamma, E., Helm, R., Johnson, R. and Vlissides, J.
year 1995
title Design Patterns: Elements of Reusable Object-Oriented Software
source Reading, MA: Addison-Wesley
summary The book is an introduction to the idea of design patterns in software engineering, and a catalog of twenty-three common patterns. The nice thing is, most experienced OOP designers will find out they've known about patterns all along. It's just that they've never considered them as such, or tried to centralize the idea behind a given pattern so that it will be easily reusable.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 990b
authors Pree, W.
year 1995
title Design Patterns for Object-Oriented Software Development
source ACM Press, Addison-Wesley
summary Provides an overview of state-of-the-art approaches in object-oriented technology as well as practical guidance for their use in software design. Covers forming class hierarchies and interaction relationships between objects, software architectures that allow for reuse of code and design, and documenting object-oriented design on an adequate abstraction level. Includes examples and a case study.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 79fd
authors Jabi, Wassim and Hall, Theodore
year 1995
title The Role of Computers in Synchronous Collaborative Design
source Proceedings of the 14th International Congress on Cybernetics. Namur, Belgium: International Association for Cybernetics, 1995, pp. 71-76
summary In this paper we discuss the role of computers in supporting real-time synchronous design among geographically dispersed team members using the global network of computers known as the Internet. To enable efficient and functional synchronous design activity, we advocate a new generation of design-oriented software that combines collaboration technologies with a meaningful and parsimonious representation scheme. We are particularly interested in supporting the early design phases, wherein many of the most important decisions are made and collaboration is most important. These activities are crucial to the evolution and quality of the final design, and they are receptive to and can benefit from computer support. Furthermore, these are precisely the areas where current CAD systems are weakest. As a general theoretical direction, our emphasis is not on integrated databases, but rather on shared protocols of interaction that are independent of implementation and storage schemes. Our first experimental phase involved the simultaneous development and testing of prototypes for a Synchronous Collaborative Design Environment (SYCODE) on heterogeneous computer systems at two geographically dispersed sites. The applications were developed independently, based on a verbal description of protocols, with minimal sharing of actual source code. Though their user interfaces and implementation details are different, these prototypes allow multiple users to share a virtual design space - both within and between the remote sites - in which to create and manipulate architectural elements.
keywords Computer Supported Collaborative Design, Synchronous Design, Collaboration, Computers, CAD, Internet
series other
email jabi@njit.edu
last changed 2002/03/05 18:53

_id 0892
authors Mortola, E., Fortuzzi A., and Mirabelli, P.
year 1995
title Communications Project of Designing with Multimedia Interactive Tools
source Multimedia and Architectural Disciplines [Proceedings of the 13th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe / ISBN 0-9523687-1-4] Palermo (Italy) 16-18 November 1995, pp. 361-374
summary We at a new step of software where the development of applications is done not using instructions, but composing applications. The software object oriented which allows the integration between applications is the solution for the designer to produce the own software. It is possible to use integrated applications with a limited knowledge of algorithms and programming languages. That allows the not specialized users to use specialized multimedia tools. The consequences of this opportunity can result very important not only for the designer but above all the actors involved in the decision making process. It is hard to evaluate the social weight of hypertexts and hypermedia in the field of social participation to the decision making. However their efficiency in the communication problem it is clear. We can preview that in the next future the use of hypermedia will be more extensive in the field of decision making, which involve public interests. Some hypertext developed in the CAAD Laboratory of the Third University are briefly described.

series eCAADe
email a.fortuzzi@mail.uniroma3.it
more http://dpce.ing.unipa.it/Webshare/Wwwroot/ecaade95/Pag_44.htm
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id c642
authors Andersen, T. and Carlsen, N.V.
year 1995
title Software design of maintainable knowledge-based systems for building design
source Automation in Construction 4 (2) (1995) pp. 101-110
summary Identifying and establishing a basic structure for knowledge representation is one of the keys to successful design of knowledge-based computer systems. In Building Design and Construction, this initial knowledge structure can be achieved by utilizing a query driven approach to software engineering. As (user) queries reflect the user's demand for in/output, it is natural to link the overall user dialogue with key elements in the knowledge base direct connections between user screen and objects in the knowledge base support prototyping and testing the application during development. However, the price for pursuing this approach in its pure form can be high, as needs for later maintenance and augmentation of the system can be very hard to fulfill. To overcome these problems, a strict user interlace, software separation strategy must be. introduced at early stages of software design. and implemented as a global control module as independent of the knowledge processing as possible.
keywords Knowledge-based; Query driven: Software design; User interlace: Separation; Maintainable systems
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/06/02 07:35

_id 7555
authors Brown, F., Cooper, G., Ford, S., Aouad, G., Brandon, P., Child, T., Kirkham, J., Oxman, R. and Young, B.
year 1995
title An integrated approach to CAD: modelling concepts in building design and construction
source Design Studies 16 (3) (1995) pp. 327-347
summary The ICON project is concerned with the creation of a generic information structure for the construction industry. A central feature of the information model is the use of object-oriented modelling techniques to allow information to be viewed from different 'perspectives' and at different levels of abstraction, according to the requirements of the user. This paper discusses the object modelling of concepts and information in the design area. Drawing on knowledge elicited from protocol analysis of the design activity, a series of interrelated object models has been developed, reflecting different perspectives and abstraction levels within the design domain. Three of these models (spatial design, physical design and structural design) are presented and their implications for the communication and sharing of information discussed.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id 940c
authors Brown, F.E. (et. al.)
year 1995
title An integrated approach to CAD: modelling concepts in building design and construction
source Design Studies, vol. 16
summary The ICON project is concerned with the creation of a generic information structure for the construction industry. A central feature of the information model is the use of object-oriented modelling techniques to allow information to be viewed from different `perspectives' and at different levels of abstraction, according to the requirements of the user. This paper discusses the object modelling of concepts and information in the design area. Drawing on knowledge elicited from protocol analysis of the design activity, a series of interrelated object models has been developed, reflecting different perspectives and abstraction levels within the design domain. Three of these models (spatial design, physical design and structural design) are presented and their implications for the communication and sharing of information discussed.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 27b5
authors Dießenbacher, Claus and Rank, Ernst
year 1995
title A Multimedia Archaeological Museum
source Multimedia and Architectural Disciplines [Proceedings of the 13th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe / ISBN 0-9523687-1-4] Palermo (Italy) 16-18 November 1995, pp. 13-20
summary This paper will present a project, which was first initiated in 1994 as a graduate students seminar and is now being continued as a research project in a cooperation of computer scientists, architects and archaeologists. An ancient roman city (Colonia Ulpia Traiana near todays Xanten in Germany) has been reconstructed, using various levels of abstraction. On the coarsest level, a 3D-model of the whole city was established, distinguishing between different historical periods of the city. The second level picks places of special interest (temples, the forum, the amphitheater, the townbaths etc.) and reconstructs these buildings or groups of buildings. On the finest level important interior parts or functional details like the Hypocaustae in the town-baths are modelled. All reconstructions are oriented as close as possible to results from excavations or other available documents. All levels of the 3D-model have been visualized using photorealistic images and sequences of video animations. The 3D model is integrated into a multimedia environment, augmenting the visualization elements with plans of the city and individual buildings and with text documents. It is intended, that parts of the outlined system will be available at the site of the ancient city, where today a large public archaeological park is located.
series eCAADe
more http://dpce.ing.unipa.it/Webshare/Wwwroot/ecaade95/Pag_2.htm
last changed 2000/12/02 12:36

_id d6d8
authors Flemming, Ulrich and Woodbury, Robert
year 1995
title Software Environment to Support Early Phases in Building Design (SEED): Overview
source Journal of Architectural Engineering -- December 1995 -- Volume 1, Issue 4, pp. 147-152
summary This paper describes the overall goals of SEED, the approach taken by its developers to achieve these goals, and the subprojects that comprise the entire project. SEED aims at providing computational support forthe early design phase in all aspects that can benefit from such support. It addresses specifically architectural programming, schematic layout design, and the generation of a fully three-dimensional configuration ofphysical building components like structure and enclosure. These tasks are handled by three individual modules, SEED-Pro, SEED-Layout, and SEED-Config. A standards processor is under development tosupport standards and code checking in any module, as is an object database to store and retrieve different design versions, alternatives, and past designs that can be reused and adapted in different contexts(case-based design). Usability issues, especially the interfaces to the modules, receive special attention. Subsequent papers elaborate on these efforts in greater detail. The present paper provides an overview of theentire project and introduces shared concepts presumed known in subsequent papers.
series journal paper
email ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2003/05/15 19:45

_id b5d9
authors González, Guillermo and Gutiérrez, Liliana
year 1999
title El TDE-AC: tecnología digital y estrategia pedagógica (The Tde-ac: Digital Technology and Pedagogical Strategy)
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 269-271
summary In 1995 the programming of a specialized, expert graphic software CA-TSD, began. The TSD acronym designates a graphic language derived from the theory of spatial delimitation, it systematizes all possibilities of selection and combination of flat and volumetric figures. It establishes necessary and sufficient morphic and tactic dimensions to account for all possible relationships of selection and combination. TSD proposes a syntactic reading of those formal, pure design operations underlying traditional representations. Tracings and complex configurations described by tree-hierarchical structures of simple configurations allow for a coherent syntactic analysis of the design structure of any object this will allow the construction of a pure design formula for the conscious and unconscious prefiguration operations of an artist or style in this presentation, we will use our proprietary CA-TSD software that will allow for fast verification of what's stated, including architecture and graphic design examples.
series SIGRADI
email gnzlz@satlink.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:52

_id da78
authors Hajduk, Piotr
year 1995
title Spirit 5.6
source CAD Space [Proceedings of the III International Conference Computer in Architectural Design] Bialystock 27-29 April 1995, pp. 105-119
summary SPIRIT is an independent, technical program which aids an architecture design. It has been created for architects and specialists of related trades. This program is divided into three functional parts: threedimensional functions, two-dimensional functions and a module part. The communication between these parts is devoid of problems. Rich and light to develop data bases which include information about walls, windows, doors, furnitures and others elements are the integral part of this program. Elements are connected to libraries of symbols. A two-dimensional drawing does not stray to methods knowing from other CAD-programs. An interesting set of functions helping by drawing views is ARCH2D. It lets drawing walls with selected thickness and inserting openings like windows and doors. Three dimensional elements are made from simple masses like a plate, a sphere, a cylinder, a torus. Every object can be seen from whichever perspective you like. Most helpful is there a shader function which creates coloured view including light and shadow. Every three-dimensional object can be converted to vectorial, two-dimensional drawing which can be plotted or enlarged.
series plCAD
last changed 2000/01/24 09:08

_id maver_077
id maver_077
authors Kim, I., Liebich, T. and Maver T.
year 1995
title Representation and Management of Design Information
source Yugoslav Journal of Operations Research, vol 5, No 2, 233-257
summary A design problem cannot be comprehensively stated because the design problem has a multidisciplinary nature and the design problem itself evolves as solutions are attempted by the designer. This paper proposes a prototype architectural design environment, which aaims to integrate various aapplication for designing a building. Within an object-oriented design environment, a unified data model and a data management system have been implemented to seamlessly connect all application.
series journal paper
type normal paper
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2008/06/12 14:22

_id a0e2
authors Kim, Inhan and Liebich, Thomas
year 1995
title Representations and Control of Design Information in an Integrated CAAD Environment
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 125-138
summary This paper investigates the mechanisms by which effective data communication between the various design stages and design actors may be facilitated in an Integrated Design Environment. The design team would then be able to cooperate efficiently and easily predict the performance of buildings, thus improving the quality of the design. Within the proposed prototype design environment, a core data model and a data management system have been implemented to connect all applications seamlessly. The core data model supports semantically meaningful descriptions of buildings. The data management system supports consistent and straightforward mechanisms for controlling the data representation through interconnected modules. An existing building is used to test the integration capability of the implemented system.###Product Modelling,.Object-Oriented Database System
series CAAD Futures
email liebich@uumail.de
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id ab9c
authors Kvan, Thomas and Kvan, Erik
year 1999
title Is Design Really Social
source International Journal of Virtual Reality, 4:1
summary There are many who will readily agree with Mitchell's assertion that "the most interesting new directions (for computer-aided design) are suggested by the growing convergence of computation and telecommunication. This allows us to treat designing not just as a technical process... but also as a social process." [Mitchell 1995]. The assumption is that design was a social process until users of computer-aided design systems were distracted into treating it as a merely technical process. Most readers will assume that this convergence must and will lead to increased communication between design participants, that better social interaction leads to be better design. The unspoken assumption appears to be that putting the participants into an environment with maximal communication channels will result in design collaboration. The tools provided, therefore, must permit the best communication and the best social interaction. We see a danger here, a pattern being repeated which may lead us into less than useful activities. As with several (popular) architectural design or modelling systems already available, however, computer system implementations all too often are poor imitations manual systems. For example, few in the field will argue with the statement that the storage of data in layers in a computer-aided drafting system is an dispensable approach. Layers derive from manual overlay drafting technology [Stitt 1984] which was regarded as an advanced (manual) production concept at the time many software engineers were specifying CAD software designs. Early implementations of CAD systems (such as RUCAPS, GDS, Computervision) avoided such data organisation, the software engineers recognising that object-based structures are more flexible, permitting greater control of data editing and display. Layer-based systems, however, are easier to implement in software, more familiar to the user and hence easier to explain, initially easier to use but more limiting for an experienced and thoughtful user, leading in the end to a lesser quality in resultant drawings and significant problems in output control (see Richens [1990], pp. 31-40 for a detailed analysis of such features and constraints). Here then we see the design for architectural software faithfully but inappropriately following manual methods. So too is there a danger of assuming that the best social interaction is that done face-to-face, therefore all collaborative design communications environments must mimic face-to-face.
series journal paper
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
last changed 2003/05/15 08:29

_id 3f1d
authors Mahalingam, Ganapathy
year 1995
title The Application of Object-Oriented Computing In The Development of Design Systems for Auditoria
source University of Florida
summary This dissertation has a two-part theoretical basis. The first part is that architectural entities like spatial enclosures can be modeled as computational objects in object-oriented design systems. The second part is that spatial forms of auditoria can be generated from acoustical, functional and programmatic parameters. The method used to establish the theoretical basis is the application of the concepts of object-oriented computing in the development of design systems for auditoria. As a practical demonstration of the theoretical basis, two object-oriented design systems for the preliminary spatial design of fan-shaped and rectangular proscenium-type auditoria were developed. In the two systems, the concept of acoustic sculpting is used to convert acoustical, functional and programmatic parameters into architectural parameters used in the spatial design of the auditoria. Statistical, analytical and mathematical methods are used to generate the spatial forms of the auditoria based on the various parameters. The auditoria are modeled as parametric computational objects. The implementation of the systems is described in detail. The systems are true design systems because they involve the creation of spatial information from nonspatial information. The application of acoustic sculpting in the implemented systems is tested with case studies. The results are presented and discussed. These systems serve as indicators of the potential of object-oriented design systems in architecture. The dissertation concludes with a projection of how the object-oriented computing paradigm can benefit the creation of design systems in architecture. Future directions for research and development are outlined.
series thesis:PhD
email ganapathy.mahalingam@ndsu.nodak.edu
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 9577
authors Matalasov, Michail E.
year 1995
title About Videocomputer Technologies at the Moscow Architectural Institute
source CAD Space [Proceedings of the III International Conference Computer in Architectural Design] Bialystock 27-29 April 1995, pp. 303-308
summary Historically mock-up projecting turned out to be one of the bases of architectural education in the Moscow Architectural Institute. In spite of the fact, that technical progress did not pass over this Institute, introducing elements of computer techniques into the process of education, traditional methods do still prevail. In some sense it is a positive phenomenon, which does not allow this Institute to become ,one of the many typical ones", though in the epoch of global scientific and technical progress here this situation is forced. Under the economic conditions, established in this country, it is impossible to ensure such computer equipment, which would make the process of teaching students up-to-date methods of computer-aided design possible and really general, and make frontal employment of computers for solving complex design problems quite real. Now we can speak only about selective - optional teaching students mastering computer methods on the modern level. At the same time it was noted repeatedly, that essential defects are common to the traditional designing, especially when it concerns education; these defects are connected with a great degree of abstracting the model of the projected object (by the way this concerns also computer models), realized in the form of a small-scale mock-up. This is due to the representation of the projected object separated from the real environment as well as difference in the scales of the observer and the observed object. Mistakes in perception and appreciation caused in this way affect the efficiency of training disastrously. Luckily the available variety of sufficiently simple and cheap technical devices allows to overcome the mentioned defects to a considerable degree and combining these devices with personal computers makes it possible to enlarge their possibilities considerably. And at the same time due to the specific character of the employment it becomes unnecessary to have a lot of computers and the employed technologies turn out to be more "friendly" to the architect practically not demanding him to have complicated special knowledge. We mean special videocomputer technologies ("multimedia"), including the employment of periscope devices (environmental simulator or "telemaketoscope").
series plCAD
last changed 2000/01/24 09:08

_id dc94
authors Mullens, M.A., Armacost, R.L. and Swart, W.W.
year 1995
title The role of object oriented CAD in a generic simulator for the industrialized housing industry
source Automation in Construction 4 (1) (1995) pp. 29-43
summary This paper describes a simulator-based decision support tool for manufacturers of prefabricated homebuilding components. The Generic Industrialized Housing Manufacturing Simulator (GIHMS) serves as an experimental factory, capable of simulating factory performance under various product design, factory design, and operations management scenarios. GIHMS strength lies in its user-friendly, icon-based, point-and-click user interface. The interface allows the user to configure a factory and specify home designs for production without simulation language programming. The heart of the user interface is a specialized object oriented CAD system. This paper describes the GIHMS structure, focusing on the specialized CAD system, and demonstrates its functionality by describing the development of a structural foam panel factory model.
keywords Generic simulators; Object oriented CAD; Prefabrication; Housing
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/06/02 07:38

_id 87f9
authors Ronchi, Alfredo M.
year 1995
title An Hypermedial Object Oriented Approach to Computer Aided Architectural Design
source Multimedia and Architectural Disciplines [Proceedings of the 13th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe / ISBN 0-9523687-1-4] Palermo (Italy) 16-18 November 1995, pp. 375-388
summary This paper presents a new approach to hypermedial computer aided architectural design environments. The concept is to create a whole CAAD hypermedia environment based on object oriented approach. This was probably a dream in the past but new technologies make this possible. To introduce the subject let us think to a system based on an object oriented environment, with hypermedia capabilities and dynamic creation of data structures, all these things may be managed by a single application using OLE (Object Linking and Embedding) technology provided by MS Windows. Some years ago we were waiting for a universal browser able to manage all kind of data and formats such as text, images, movies and sounds. Let us think to an object oriented file system, we can store all objects and save relations amongst them, then we can use a browsing or quering template to read and retrieve data. Three cases of study developed by Diset are discussed in this paper: HyperMedia Design Kit, De Architectura and On Line Architectural Sites Projects.
series eCAADe
more http://dpce.ing.unipa.it/Webshare/Wwwroot/ecaade95/Pag_45.htm
last changed 2000/12/02 12:58

_id 1886
authors Rychter, Zenon
year 1995
title Matematical Architectural Syntesis
source CAD Space [Proceedings of the III International Conference Computer in Architectural Design] Bialystock 27-29 April 1995, pp. 283-297
summary Extremes converge. Life blossoms on the boundary. All creative thinking, architectural or mathematical, is essentially the some. Today legions of dull computers take over the role of renaissance giants in integrating all ways of thinking. On the sensual level, computer art is often indistinguishable from computer simulations of physical processes, such as fractals representing chaos. On the logical level, all information boils down to the language of bits, sequences of O's and I's or X's and Y's if you like- there just has to be two of them, like Adam and Eve at the beginning of mankind. Creating means synthesizing, composing, constructing a whole from elements. But often the starting point, the finish, the middle stages and methods are fuzzy, vague, ill- defined-ore all yet to be discovered or conceived. It is like groping in a dark labyrinth, searched and created at the same time. There are many branches to discover and explore, many dead ends forcing retreat, no guarantee of a solution, and even no clear idea of what a solution might be. It is a trial- and-error, generate-and-test, back-and-forth, top-down and bottom-up, global and local, inductive and deductive, rigorous at times and fuzzy most of the time, ameba-like process or bunch of processes. In this, creative, perspective both architecture and mathematics become experimental sciences: as such they require laboratories. Computer systems (hardware plus software) supply today the necessary environment, ways and means. To the happy user of a general-purpose platform, straddling the architecture-mathematics boundary-with one leg on a general-purpose computer-aided design system, like AutoCAD, and the other leg on a general-purpose mathematical system, like Mathematica, the essential unity of creatively doing both architecture and mathematics is hard to overlook.
series plCAD
last changed 2000/01/24 09:08

_id acadia16_424
id acadia16_424
authors Twose, Simon; du Chatenier, Rosa
year 2016
title Experimental Material Research - Digital Chocolate
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 424-431
summary This research investigates the aesthetics of a shared agency between humans, computation and physical material. ‘Chocolate’ is manipulated in physical and virtual space simultaneously to extract aesthetic conditions that are a sum of human and non-human relations. This is an attempt to further the knowledge of designing, giving physical and digital materials force in determining their own aesthetics. The research springs from work in speculative aesthetics, particularly N. Katherine Hayles’s OOI (object-oriented inquiry) and Graham Harman’s OOO (object-oriented ontology) and explores how these ideas impact contemporary computational architectural design. To study this, a simple material has been chosen, chocolate, and used as a vehicle to investigate the dynamics of physical and digital materials and their shared/differing ‘resistances to human manipulation’ (Pickering 1995). Digital chocolate is ‘melted’ through virtual heat, and the results printed and cast in real chocolate, to be further manipulated in real space. The resistances and feedback of physical and digital chocolate to human ‘prodding’ (Hayles 2014) are analyzed in terms of a material’s qualities and tendencies in digital space versus those in physical space. Observations from this process are used to speculate on an aesthetics where humans, computation and physical material are mutually agential. This research is a pilot for a larger study taking on more complex conditions, such as building and cities, with a view to broadening how aesthetics is understood in architectural design. The contribution of this research to the field of architectural computation is thus in areas of aesthetic speculation and human/non-human architectural authorship.
keywords object-oriented inquiry, speculative aesthetics, mutual agency, big data
series ACADIA
type paper
email rosaduchatenier@gmail.com
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

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