CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 382

_id 4cb3
authors Kwartler, Michael
year 1995
title Beyond the Adversial: Conflict Resolution, Simulation and Community Design
source The Future of Endoscopy [Proceedings of the 2nd European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 3-85437-114-4]
summary Fundamentally, the design of communities in the United States is grounded in the Constitution’s evolving definition of property and the rights and obligations attendant to the ownership and use of real property. The rearticulation of Jefferson’s dictum in the Declaration of Independence; “that individuals have certain inalienable rights, among these are life, liberty, and the pursuit of happiness” to the Constitution’s “life, liberty and property” represents a pragmatic understanding of the relationship between property and the actualization of the individual in society. In terms of community design, this means extensive public involvement and participation in not only the formulation of rules and regulations but of individual projects as well.

Since the 1960’s as planning and community design decision making has become increasingly contentious, the American legal system’s adversial approach to conflict resolution has become the dominant model for public decision making. The legal system’s adversial approach to adjudication is essentially a zero-sum game of winners and losers, and as most land-use lawyers will agree, is not a good model for the design of cities. While the adversial approach does not resolve disputes it rarely creates a positive and constructive consensus for change. Because physical planning and community design issues are not only value based, community design through consensus building has emerged as a new paradigm for physical planning and design.

The Environmental Simulation Center employs a broad range of complementary simulation and visualization techniques including 3-D vector based computer models, endoscopy, and verifiable digital photomontages to provide objective and verifiable information for projects and regulations under study.

In this context, a number of recent projects will be discussed which have explored the use of various simulation and visualization techniques in community design. Among them are projects involved with changes in the City’s Zoning Regulations, the community design of a major public open space in one of the region’s mid-size cities, and the design of a new village center for a suburban community, with the last project employing the Center’s userfriendly and interactive 3-D computer kit of parts. The kit - a kind of computer “pattern book” is comprised of site planning, urban and landscape design and architectural conventions - is part of the Center’s continuing effort to support a consensus based, rather than adversial based, public planning and design process.

keywords Architectural Simulation, Real Environments
series EAEA
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 1586
authors Counsell, John A M
year 1995
title GIS Software and Coordinated Project Information Systems - A Mechanism for Increasing the Effectiveness of 3D CAAD Models
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 389-397
summary This paper reviews current 3D CAD building modelling by reference to a large ongoing case study, in which 3D building models and sites are used to generate coordinated drawing, schedule, and visualisation output. It focuses on barriers which current software interpose, preventing more complete use of 3D CAD to integrate building project information systems. Comparisons are made with tools and methodology developed in GIS, in which users make different selections as required from common databases, and it is argued that used in conjunction with 3D CAD building models, they could improve functionality and reduce barriers to effective deployment.
keywords Building Model, Coordinated Information Systems
series CAAD Futures
email John.Counsell@uwe.ac.uk
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id 5c5f
authors Jepson, W., Liggett, R. and Friedman, S.
year 1995
title An environment for real-time urban visualization
source Proceedings of the Symposium on Interactive 3D Gra hics, Monterey, CA
summary Drawing from technologies developed for military flight simulation and virtual reality, a system for efficiently modeling and simulating urban environments has been implemented at UCLA. This system combines relatively simple 3-dimensional models (from a traditional CAD standpoint) with aerial photographs and street level video to create a realistic (down to plants, street signs and the graffiti on the walls) model of an urban neighborhood which can then be used for interactive fly and walk-through demonstrations.The Urban Simulator project is more than just the simulation software. It is a methodology which integrates existing systems such as CAD and GIS with visual simulation to facilitate the modeling, display, and evaluation of alternative proposed environments. It can be used to visualize neighborhoods as they currently exist and how they might appear after built intervention occurs. Or, the system can be used to simulate entirely new development.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id e716
authors Nickerson, S., Thrale, B. and Whiting, D.
year 1995
title Automating the Drafting for As-Found Recording and Facility Management Surveys
source Computing in Design - Enabling, Capturing and Sharing Ideas [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-04-7] University of Washington (Seattle, Washington / USA) October 19-22, 1995, pp. 315-332
summary Much of the time of a facility planner, restoration architect or heritage recorder is spent, on site analysing thebuilding and collecting data and measurements. These will be used later to create the reports and drawings that will provide the basis for the subsequent design but these notes and measurements are just the beginning of the long process of drafting the as-found situation. Errors are inevitable in this type of work but, typically they only come to light, back in the office where confirming a measurement may entail an extra trip to the site, and there are times that they only turn up when a contractor encounters problems on the job A software tool, currently under development, addresses this problem by first helping to structure the note taking process so that more consistent data is collected, and then, automatically creating a 2D or 3D CAD model from the resulting database. This can be done on a laptop computer, before the recording team leaves the site so that the model can be compared with reality and faulty or missing measurements corrected. Furthermore, this combination of database and drawing is linked, allowing queries of the data from inside Autocad or the assembly of a specialized model based on a database query. Point collection techniques supported include traditional and not so traditional) hand measurement, total station surveying equipment and interfaces with other software such as rectification and photogrammetric packages. The applications envisioned include as found recording, facilities management data collection and the possibility of a totally data-driven GIS
series ACADIA
last changed 1999/03/29 15:24

_id 8378
authors Arlati, Ezio
year 1995
title Patriarch: A Hypermedia Environment for the Support of Architectural Design
source Multimedia and Architectural Disciplines [Proceedings of the 13th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe / ISBN 0-9523687-1-4] Palermo (Italy) 16-18 November 1995, pp. 187-198
summary This paper reports on current research in the field of architectural design and knowledge- based systems, through the conception and implementation of two software tools operating as a part of an integrated hypermedia environment denominated PatriArch. Main concern of this set of tools operating in PatriArch is the support of design since the very beginning, in that phase of not yet correctly explored or interpretated constraints and of scarcely specified goals, in which an initial solution model - provisionally composed of fragments of supposed fitting ideas - for the design theme has to take place. The creative activity of the designer is assumed as an 'intentional planning activity' that represents the acquired level of knowledge of the network of connections defining the nature, function, shape in the space etc. of the increasingly integrated solution-model: the final design will be an evolution of this - and other competitive and concurrent - models. PatriArch is meant to be the environment containing and allowing the representation of this evolution through its ability of linking the fragments of designers' knowledge, supported by an integrated relational data base: Sysinfo. These works were conceived inside an educational software development program for architecture students.

series eCAADe
more http://dpce.ing.unipa.it/Webshare/Wwwroot/ecaade95/Pag_25.htm
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id c6bb
authors Bottelli, Valeria and Fogh, Christian
year 1995
title Galathea: A Case-Based Planning Tool for Knowledge Navigation in the Architectural Design Process
source Multimedia and Architectural Disciplines [Proceedings of the 13th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe / ISBN 0-9523687-1-4] Palermo (Italy) 16-18 November 1995, pp. 427-436
summary We report on an on-going Ph.D. research aimed at the analysis of the nature of process knowledge in architectural design and the development of a conceptual model for a case-based navigation tool for its support. We describe architectural design from a process viewpoint and assume it as a form of intentional planning, leading from an initial state configuration toward a desired situation, by means of an incremental specification of goals, constraints and involved variables. We consider the very essence of design and of the specific professional skill characterising designers as the continual recursive transformation of the initial solution model, in order to map the desired state onto the enacted one and the capability to govern a number of continually changing variables in this direction. On the basis of this general concept of the design process, we describe the model of Galathea, a case-based planning tool, aimed at progressively representing the enlarging space of acquired knowledge, and at supporting the designer´s central role in the management of the design process.
series eCAADe
more http://dpce.ing.unipa.it/Webshare/Wwwroot/ecaade95/Pag_50.htm
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 4aae
authors Day, Alan K. and Radford, Antony D.
year 1995
title Imaging Change: The Computer City Model as a Laboratory for Urban Design Research
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 495-506
summary The use of an extensive and detailed computer model of the city of Bath, UK, as a laboratory for urban design research is discussed. Bath is a small predominantly Georgian historic city that has been designated a World Heritage Site. Examples are drawn from four kinds of work: the representation of Bathís historic growth (including unbuilt plans), the prediction of the urban design impact of individual development proposals, the study and development of explicit and implicit urban design Çrulesë for the form of existing and new development, and the impact on city form and appearance of policy proposals for urban sustainability.
keywords 3D City Modeling, Urban Modelling, Planning, Public Consultation
series CAAD Futures
email anthony.radford@adelaide.edu.au
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id 2036
authors Dzeng, R.J.
year 1995
title Caseplan: A Case-based Planer and Scheduler for Construction Using Product Modeling
source University of Michigan
summary Construction planning and scheduling are important to contractors for estimating the cost and duration of a project they are to bid on and construct. Many projects specify incentive and disincentive clauses for completing projects early and late. The timely completion and success of a project rely on good planning and scheduling. Contractors who repeatedly build the same kind of facilities acquire experience in scheduling the needed construction work. When parts of a facility's design are copied from one project to the next, the previously developed schedules could possibly be reused to schedule future work. This dissertation presents a construction planner and scheduler, named CasePlan, that automates the planning and scheduling process through the use of experience encoded in cases. CasePlan enables a contractor to specify a facility design using a product model, describe the relationships between product components and parts of a schedule (e.g., activity subnetworks, construction crews), and store this information as a case. As a decision support tool, CasePlan enables the contractor to search for cases whose facility designs are similar to that of a new project. The similarity assessment is based on the relative importance values that the contractor assigns to the components and their attributes in the product model. As an automation tool, CasePlan creates the schedule of a new project by reusing parts of the schedules whose associated designs are most similar to that project's design. The result is a schedule in which construction alternatives are chosen from those used in previous cases based on the new project scheduling constraints. The contractor / system-user can interact with CasePlan during its operation or modify the resulting schedule to add detail needed for executing the schedule in the field. Two types of construction projects have been studied for the development of CasePlan. One is the Kit-of-Parts post offices, in which designs are made by reusing design modules defined as Parts. The other is the boiler erection for fossil-fueled power plants, in which the design process is standardized and component configurations are similar across designs. These projects were chosen because their schedules are similar within each project type, which suggested that practitioners had a high incentive and were likely to reuse schedules. CasePlan's similarity assessment for boiler erection projects was validated using a survey. CasePlan's schedules and usability was subjectively evaluated also by the interviewed professionals.
series thesis:PhD
email rjdzeng@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id ddssup9609
id ddssup9609
authors Hall, A.C.
year 1996
title Assessing the Role of Computer Visualisation in Planning Control: a recent case study
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary In papers to previous DDSS Conferences, and elsewhere, the author has developed an argument concerning the use of computer visualisation in the planning process. In essence, it proposes that: • visualisation can enable lay persons to play a more effective role and this can result in different and more effective decisions; • the level of realism employed should result from the basic requirements necessary to resolve the issue minimising the cost of production of the images. These points have been tested in repeated examples. The latest one concerns a new site that Anglia Polytechnic University has established in the centre of Chelmsford, UK. A computer model of the new campus showing both the existing and proposed buildings was commissioned from the author by the University for a visit by HM the Queen in June 1995. This model was subsequently adapted for use in the process of obtaining planning consent and the marketing of floorspace for the next building to be constructed. For this purpose, a higher level of realism was requested. The experience of achieving it confirmed the results of the previous research indicating the strong link between realism and cost. It also contributed new insights into the varying expectations of different professionals concerning the role of such a visualisation. The requirement of the architect for demonstrating all aspects of the design required a high level of realism than that required for planning and marketing purposes and was considerably more expensive. The low cost of use for planning purposes should be stressed but surprisingly, the lower level of realism implied may be easier for the lay person than the professional to accept.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 88f3
authors Herman, H. and Singh, S.
year 1995
title First results in autonomous retrieval of buried objects
source Automation in Construction 4 (2) (1995) pp. 111-123
summary We have developed an autonomous system for the retrieval of buried objects. It is designed to detect, locate and retrieve buried objects. The system is equipped with a surface and a subsurface sensor. The surface sensor is a laser rangefinder used to build the surface model. The subsurface sensor is a ground penetrating radar (GPR) used to detect and locate buried objects. We use an industrial robot equipped with an excavator bucket for automated excavation. Our system uses a "sense and dig cycle" procedure to retrieve buried objects. First, subsurface sensing is used to detect and locate the buried objects. If the object can be reached with one dig, the excavator retrieves it directly. Otherwise a layer of soil above the object is removed and another subsurface scan is made to get a more accurate estimate of the object location. This loop is repeated until the object is retrieved. The paper presents some recent results in sensing and excavation from experiments conducted on our testbed and the specific methods that we use to achieve those results. Such a system has numerous potential applications. They include hazardous waste removal, maintenance of subsurface structure (e.g. gas pipes), construction, and removal of unexploded buried ordnance.
keywords GPR; Ground Penetrating Radar; Subsurface Sensing; Autonomous Excavation; Robot Planning
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 12:43

_id 4169
authors Iodo, Irina A.
year 1995
title The Search for the Logical Algorithm of the Town-planning Process
source CAD Space [Proceedings of the III International Conference Computer in Architectural Design] Bialystock 27-29 April 1995, pp. 275-282
summary The creation of such models of material and spatial environment that can guarantee the most efficient passing of the virtual processes is considered to be one of the main goals for the town planning. But sometimes this goal is not achieved because of the far-fetched space organization accepted in the model, that does not always coincide with the real processes of vital activity. This report does not focus particularly on the damage which is caused by the realization of such defective models. But it is very important to find out the way for complete elimination of the reasons mentioned above. We should also take into account that means of cognition available at the moment are among the basic determiners, which define that "shear" of reality and also that comprehension level of objective laws governing this stage of social development. That is why our conception of the town-planning processes is in constant development and improvement: it gradually approximates to the truth, but, certainly, does not entirely perceive it.
series plCAD
last changed 2000/01/24 09:08

_id d7f7
authors Jeng, Hoang-Ell
year 1995
title A Dialogical Model for Participatory Design; A Computational Approach to Group Planning
source Delft University of Technology
summary In participatory design, design concepts are generated collectively through discussion, dialogical interactions, in which the interchange of normative and supporting factual descriptions builds a collective design discourse. The goal of this research is to develop a method for participatory design to support this collective, face-to-face design problem-solving, in order to increase the acceptability of the design product. Since the mid-1960s, there has been an important movement towards increasing the participation of citizens in determining their built environment. At first, the movement was associated with social-political ideologies and rhetoric. By the end of the 1970s, participatory design had become an accepted component of professional practice. The objectives of the movement became more pragmatically and more modestly focused on exchanging practical information, resolving conflicts, and supplementing design. Today, participatory design is in a new phase. Traditional participatory design methods are seen as insufficient to fulfill an increasing demand for dialogue. The point of departure of the study is the assumption that new information technologies can satisfy this demand. The method includes: (1) a group-reasoning model, (2) a dialogical system and (3) a framework for participation-based design guidelines. The group-reasoning model formulates the process of knowledge acquisition, the learning and sharing of belief systems, the generation of design alternatives and design evaluations--by which reasoning takes place dialogically. The dialogical system provides a clear description of how the information should be processed, what aspects should be paid attention to, what results can be anticipated, and when and how to control the process. The framework for participation-based design guidelines guides and structures the design process. It facilitates a reconstruction of the implicit cognitive structure which underlines dialogue and is generated through the discussion of a group.
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 2a99
authors Keul, A. and Martens, B.
year 1996
title SIMULATION - HOW DOES IT SHAPE THE MESSAGE?
source The Future of Endoscopy [Proceedings of the 2nd European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 3-85437-114-4], pp. 47-54
summary Architectural simulation techniques - CAD, video montage, endoscopy, full-scale or smaller models, stereoscopy, holography etc. - are common visualizations in planning. A subjective theory of planners says "experts are able to distinguish between 'pure design' in their heads and visualized design details and contexts like color, texture, material, brightness, eye level or perspective." If this is right, simulation details should be compensated mentally by trained people, but act as distractors to the lay mind.

Environmental psychologists specializing in architectural psychology offer "user needs' assessments" and "post occupancy evaluations" to facilitate communication between users and experts. To compare the efficiency of building descriptions, building walkthroughs, regular plans, simulation, and direct, long-time exposition, evaluation has to be evaluated.

Computer visualizations and virtual realities grow more important, but studies on the effects of simulation techniques upon experts and users are rare. As a contribution to the field of architectural simulation, an expert - user comparison of CAD versus endoscopy/model simulations of a Vienna city project was realized in 1995. The Department for Spatial Simulation at the Vienna University of Technology provided diaslides of the planned city development at Aspern showing a) CAD and b) endoscopy photos of small-scale polystyrol models. In an experimental design, they were presented uncommented as images of "PROJECT A" versus "PROJECT B" to student groups of architects and non-architects at Vienna and Salzburg (n= 95) and assessed by semantic differentials. Two contradictory hypotheses were tested: 1. The "selective framing hypothesis" (SFH) as the subjective theory of planners, postulating different judgement effects (measured by item means of the semantic differential) through selective attention of the planners versus material- and context-bound perception of the untrained users. 2. The "general framing hypothesis" (GFH) postulates typical framing and distraction effects of all simulation techniques affecting experts as well as non-experts.

The experiment showed that -counter-intuitive to expert opinions- framing and distraction were prominent both for experts and lay people (= GFH). A position effect (assessment interaction of CAD and endoscopy) was present with experts and non-experts, too. With empirical evidence for "the medium is the message", a more cautious attitude has to be adopted towards simulation products as powerful framing (i.e. perception- and opinion-shaping) devices.

keywords Architectural Endoscopy, Real Environments
series EAEA
type normal paper
email alexander.keul@sbg.ac.at
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 06e1
authors Keul, Alexander
year 1996
title LOST IN SPACE? ARCHITECTURAL PSYCHOLOGY - PAST, PRESENT, FUTURE
source Full-Scale Modeling in the Age of Virtual Reality [6th EFA-Conference Proceedings]
summary A methodological review by Kaminski (1995) summed up five perspectives in environmental psychology - patterns of spatial distribution, everyday “jigsaw puzzles”, functional everyday action systems, sociocultural change and evolution of competence. Architectural psychology (named so at the Strathclyde conference 1969; Canter, 1973) as psychology of built environments is one leg of environmental psychology, the second one being psychology of environmental protection. Architectural psychology has come of age and passed its 25th birthday. Thus, a triangulation of its position, especially in Central Europe, seems interesting and necessary. A recent survey mainly on university projects in German-speaking countries (Kruse & Trimpin, 1995) found a marked decrease of studies in psychology of built environments. 1994, 25% of all projects were reported in this category, which in 1975 had made up 40% (Kruse, 1975). Guenther, in an unpublished survey of BDP (association of professional German psychologists) members, encountered only a handful active in architectural psychology - mostly part-time, not full-time. 1996, Austria has two full-time university specialists. The discrepancy between the general interest displayed by planners and a still low institutionalization is noticeable.

How is the research situation? Using several standard research data banks, the author collected articles and book(chapter)s on architectural psychology in German- and English-language countries from 1990 to 1996. Studies on main architecture-psychology interface problems such as user needs, housing quality evaluations, participatory planning and spatial simulation / virtual reality did not outline an “old, settled” discipline, but rather the sketchy, random surface of a field “always starting anew”. E.g., discussions at the 1995 EAEA-Conference showed that several architectural simulation studies since 1973 caused no major impact on planner's opinions (Keul&Martens, 1996). “Re-inventions of the wheel” are caused by a lack of meetings (except this one!) and of interdisciplinary infrastructure in German-language countries (contrary to Sweden or the United States). Social pressures building up on architecture nowadays by inter-European competition, budget cuts and citizen activities for informed consent in most urban projects are a new challenge for planners to cooperate efficiently with social scientists. At Salzburg, the author currently manages the Corporate Design-process for the Chamber of Architecture, Division for Upper Austria and Salzburg. A “working group for architectural psychology” (Keul-Martens-Maderthaner) has been active since 1994.

keywords Model Simulation, Real Environments
series EAEA
type normal paper
email alexander.keul@sbg.ac.at
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 0b16
authors Mortola, E., Giangrande, A., Mirabelli, P. and Fortuzzi, A.Fortuzzi
year 1997
title The Self-sustainable Community Laboratories of Rome
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary The experience of the Laboratories is not new for Rome. In 1993 the Historical Heritage Office of the Municipality came to an agreement with the Dioguardi Co. to found the Laboratory of Ghetto - the ancient Jewish quarter - with the following objectives: to offer space and tools to analyse public and private proposals for buildings restoration; to collect, elaborate and diffuse data and information about the neighbourhood; to involve inhabitants and train some of them in renewal and restoration activities through the creation of a "pilot yard". The data gathered in the Laboratory were elaborated and used to produce an hypertext which could be consulted by inhabitants. A section of this hypertext showed all the restoration projects, public and private ones (Sivo 1995).
keywords Design Methods, Hypertext, Interactive Design, Multimediacommunity laboratories, development, planning, projects; traffic calmin
series eCAADe
email mortola@arch.uniroma3.it
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/mortola/mortgfm.htm
last changed 2001/08/17 13:11

_id eff2
authors Sinclair, Brian
year 1995
title Architecture in the Environment: A Technology-Centered Model for Priomary, Secondary & Post-Secondary Educational Partnership
source Computing in Design - Enabling, Capturing and Sharing Ideas [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-04-7] University of Washington (Seattle, Washington / USA) October 19-22, 1995, pp. 357-370
summary Societal appreciation of architecture, the environment and the role of design & planning professionals should begin early in the educational stream. Working from this premise, a model was developed which relied on a combination of learning strategies: Cognitive, Psychomotor and Affective. The project’s primary goal was to build knowledge of architecture and the environment in K-12 children, with particular emphasis on primary levels. More specifically, the ARCH was selected thematically as a strong architectonic element through which to promote a better connection with and responsibility for the environment. The educational experience comprised three sequential forms: visual history of the ARCH, physical construction using foam blocks, and finally "construction” in the computer using a multi-media interactive three-dimensionally focused program. Pedagogically the sequencing provided explanation and context, built awareness through making, and finally reinforced the lessons of the previous steps while highlighting the potential of information technology. To deliver the curriculum an installation was built at a local museum, with primary grade children arriving on field trips. Architecture faculty and students designed the curriculum and installation, including the computer modules. Secondary school students were trained, with the intention that they would in turn educate primary school students at the installation. In disseminating knowledge downwards through the various educational levels, awareness was promoted concerning the architects role, architectural elements, and the broader built environment. Using the ARCH as the theme, realization of the inter-connectedness of the environment was advanced. Through linking and learning, participants came to better understand the value of their individual contributions and the critical need for collaboration.

series ACADIA
email BSINCLAIR@bsu.edu
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id b378
authors Ervin, S.M.
year 1995
title New GIS Resources for Landscape Architects
source Landscape Architecture
summary This article discusses and illustrates the convergence of 'GIS' and 'CAD' technologies, especially from the point of view of landscape architecture and planning.
series other
email servin@gsd.harvard.edu
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 4367
authors Liggett, R. and Jepson, W.
year 1995
title Implementing an Integrated Environment for Urban Simulation: CAD, Visualization and GIS
source Visual Data Bases in Architecture. A. Koutamanis, H. Timmermans, I. Vermeulen (Eds.), Avebury, Sydney, pp. 145-160
summary Contributed by Susan Pietsch (spietsch@arch.adelaide.edu.au)
keywords 3D City Modeling, Development Control, Design Control
series other
last changed 2001/06/04 18:41

_id 23bd
authors Oloufa, A.A. and Ikeda, M.
year 1995
title An automated environment for soils- and terrain-dependent applications
source Automation in Construction 4 (2) (1995) pp. 139-146
summary This paper explains the development of an integrated information environment that is designed specifically for applications dependent on information related to soil types and terrain of the project site. This covers a wide variety of applications such as shallow and deep foundations, trenching, earthmoving and tunneling. The design of this environment takes into consideration the typical requirements of the project team with an emphasis on integrating requirements for both design and construction. The environment reported here is comprised of three main modules, a relational database for the storage and display of soil borelog information, a geographic information system that displays the geographical locations of soil studies, and a module that is used to develop a three-dimensional profile of the soil layers between any number of borelogs. The user may also develop cross sections of soil layers in any direction. This paper reports on the hardware and software used and concludes with a discussion of future extensions to the system.
keywords Soil Database; GIS; Three-dimensional Soil Layers; Visualization; Integrated Environment; Terrain-Depen-dent Applications
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 12:42

_id 41e5
authors Abendroth, M., Decock, J. and Mestaoui, N.
year 2000
title O_1:// the hypertextu(r)al matrix
source SIGraDi’2000 - Construindo (n)o espacio digital (constructing the digital Space) [4th SIGRADI Conference Proceedings / ISBN 85-88027-02-X] Rio de Janeiro (Brazil) 25-28 september 2000, pp. 75-76
summary Founded in 1995 LAB[au], laboratory for architecture and urbanism, links theoretic research LAB[a+u] to concrete works of conception and realisations LA.BAU. LAB[au] elaborates a “hyperdesign” investigating the implications of new technologies of communication and computation in spatiotemporal and social processes and their forms of representation as architecture and urbanism. The transposition of the hypertext model to architectural and urban concepts question the mutation of the spatial and semantic construct of space. The definition of architecture as a code is based on “glocal” systems according to the processes of computation and communication.
series SIGRADI
email lab-au@lab-au.com
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

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