CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 61 to 80 of 388

_id 67cd
authors Clibbon, K., Candy, L. and Edmonds, E.
year 1995
title A Logic-Based Framework for Representing Architectural Design Knowledge
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 91-102
summary This paper proposes a logic-based framework for representing and manipulating knowledge during Computer-Aided Architectural Design. The framework incorporates a meta-level architecture to represent declarative design knowledge and strategic knowledge used by the designer. It consists of an object layer, a design requirements layer and strategies for navigating through the design space. An extended first-order logic is described which has been used to represent some examples of architectural knowledge. This computational model is being implemented in KAUS (Knowledge Acquisition and Utilisation System), a general purpose knowledge-based system, founded in Multi-Layered Logic.
keywords Design Knowledge, Strategic Knowledge, Multi-Layered Logic.
series CAAD Futures
email L.Candy@lboro.ac.uk
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id 30ec
authors Coates, Paul and Hall, Miles Robin
year 1995
title The Use of CAAD to Generate Urban Form
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 599-616
summary The paper describes a computer modelling process suitable for the generation of townscape elements using a statistical simulation based on aesthetic theory in mathematics. This approach is also used to analyse existing urban settings and thereby allow comparison with the generated output of the model indicating close agreement between the model and attractive historical townscape. This agreement depends closely upon the size of the unit chosen for measurement of the existing townscape thereby determining how the output from the model should be scaled for construction. An independent low-level designing ability appears inherent in the model and there is a discussion as to how this might be further developed.
keywords Emergent Form, Generative Model, Power Laws, Townscape, Vernacular Style
series CAAD Futures
email p.s.coates@btinternet.com
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id e420
authors Colajanni, B., Pellitteri, G. and Giacchino, V.
year 1995
title An Hypertext in Building Rehabilitation: A Case Study in Palermo
source Multimedia and Architectural Disciplines [Proceedings of the 13th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe / ISBN 0-9523687-1-4] Palermo (Italy) 16-18 November 1995, pp. 29-36
summary Hypertext is an ideal tool to teach building design inasmuch as it allows both teacher driven and student self driven learning. It allows to link every type of informations (texts, sounds, images, films) with associative mechanisms much like those utilized by our brain. Hypertextes buikt up for teaching purposen can be usefully employed in professional occurrencies. An example is shown dealing with the rehabilitation of the Fiumetorto Palace in the historical centre of Palermo. It manages in a simple but efficient way the many complex interconnections between analysis of the state of decay, history, town planning rules and technology focusing all the information on the rehabilitation task.
series eCAADe
email pellitt@unipa.it
more http://dpce.ing.unipa.it/Webshare/Wwwroot/ecaade95/Pag_4.htm
last changed 2003/04/01 16:52

_id 80df
authors Cook, Alan R.
year 1995
title Stereopsis in the Design and Presentation of Architectural Works
source Computing in Design - Enabling, Capturing and Sharing Ideas [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-04-7] University of Washington (Seattle, Washington / USA) October 19-22, 1995, pp. 113-137
summary This article presumes the primacy of spatial cognition in evaluating architectural designs and begins by describing key concepts involved in the perception of spatial form, focussing on parallax and stereoscopy. The ultimate emphasis is directed at presenting techniques which employ computers with modest hardware specifications and a basic three-dimensional modeling software application to produce sophisticated imaging tools. It is argued that these techniques are comparable to high end computer graphic products in their potentials for carrying information and in some ways are superior in their speed of generation and economies of dissemination. A camera analogy is considered in relation to controlling image variables. The ability to imply a temporal dimension is explored. An abbreviated summary of pertinent binocular techniques for viewing stereograms precedes a rationalization and initiation for using the cross-convergence technique. Ways to generate and view stereograms and other multiscopic views using 3-D computer models are described. Illustrations from sample projects show various levels of stereogram rendering including the theoretically 4-D wireframe stereogram. The translated perspective array autostereogram is presented as an economical and easily reproducible alternative to holography as well as being a substitute for stop action animation.

series ACADIA
email cookala@groupwise1.duc.auburn.edu
last changed 2003/05/15 19:17

_id eb51
authors Coyne, Richard
year 1996
title CAAD, Curriculum and Controversy
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 121-130
summary This paper brings some of the debate within educational theory to bear on CAAD teaching, outlining the contributions of conservatism, critical theory, radical hermeneutics and pragmatism. The paper concludes by recommending that CAAD teaching move away from conservative concepts of teaching, design and technology to integrate it into the studio. In a highly illuminating book on education theory, Shaun Gallagher (1991) outlines four current views on education that correspond to four major positions in contemporary social theory and philosophy. I will extend these categories to a consideration of attitudes to information technology, and the teaching of computing in architecture. These four positions are conservatism, critical theory, radical hermeneutics, and pragmatism. I will show how certain issues cluster around them, how each position provides the focus of various discursive practices, or intellectual conversations in contemporary thinking, and how information technology is caught up in those conversations. These four positions are not "cognitive styles," but vigorously argued domains of debate involving writers such as Gadamer, Habermas and Derrida about the theory of interpretation. The field of interpretation is known as hermeneutics, which is concerned less with epistemology and knowledge than with understanding. Interpretation theory applies to reading texts, interpreting the law, and appreciating art, but also to the application of any practical task, such as making art, drawing, defining and solving problems, and design (Coyne and Snodgrass, 1995). Hermeneutics provides a coherent focus for considering many contemporary issues and many domains of practice. I outline what these positions in education mean in terms of CAAD (computer-aided architectural design) in the curriculum.

series eCAADe
email richard@caad.ed.ac.uk
more http://www.caad.ac.uk/~richard
last changed 1998/08/17 13:35

_id 1ffd
authors Dave, Bharat
year 1995
title Towards Distributed Computer-Aided Design Environments
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 659-666
summary Computing in architectural design has followed a number of different visions, hopes and research agendas. One of the dominant themes in design Computing seeks to support various activities of 'individual' designers acting within a 'personal' design realm. Parallel to this is another theme which seeks to blend computing aids into normal working environments of groups of designers. The recent interest in and resurgence of collaborative design tools are steps towards what we view as an emerging theme in design computing, namely distributed design environments. This paper describes experiments in collaborative design using computers, and their observations are used to suggest future directions for integrating computing and design in distributed environments.
keywords Design Computing, Collaborative Work, Distributed Processing, Design Services, Design Products
series CAAD Futures
email b.dave@unimelb.edu.au
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id a84e
authors De Grassi, Mario and Giretti, Alberto
year 1995
title Applying Formal Methods to Multimedia Design Aid
source Multimedia and Architectural Disciplines [Proceedings of the 13th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe / ISBN 0-9523687-1-4] Palermo (Italy) 16-18 November 1995, pp. 283-296
summary In the last decade we assisted at an evolution of computer aided design systems from drafting, calculation and simulation utilities toward systems able to support the conceptual phase of the design process. Systems supporting conceptual design use knowledge about the design domain and assume a will defined model of the design activity. Their computational framework is usually built by means of a set of representational schemata which lack a formal semantics. This aspect causes a limitation on the applicability of their computational framework to different domains. In this paper we propose a formal knowledge representation language, that has been defined in order to represent the structural relationships of domain knowledge. On the basis of language structure we propose a number of inferences tailored to case-based conceptual design aiding. Finally we apply the representational framework to the implementation of a computational architecture for conceptual design aiding that integrates multimedia representation of design cases with symbolic information processing. The architecture combines a knowledge representation server and a multimedia server. The knowledge representation server processes both domain knowledge and design experiences according to the Case Based Reasoning paradigm. The multimedia server produces the required case representation.

series eCAADe
more http://dpce.ing.unipa.it/Webshare/Wwwroot/ecaade95/Pag_34.htm
last changed 2000/12/02 12:35

_id 27b5
authors Dießenbacher, Claus and Rank, Ernst
year 1995
title A Multimedia Archaeological Museum
source Multimedia and Architectural Disciplines [Proceedings of the 13th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe / ISBN 0-9523687-1-4] Palermo (Italy) 16-18 November 1995, pp. 13-20
summary This paper will present a project, which was first initiated in 1994 as a graduate students seminar and is now being continued as a research project in a cooperation of computer scientists, architects and archaeologists. An ancient roman city (Colonia Ulpia Traiana near todays Xanten in Germany) has been reconstructed, using various levels of abstraction. On the coarsest level, a 3D-model of the whole city was established, distinguishing between different historical periods of the city. The second level picks places of special interest (temples, the forum, the amphitheater, the townbaths etc.) and reconstructs these buildings or groups of buildings. On the finest level important interior parts or functional details like the Hypocaustae in the town-baths are modelled. All reconstructions are oriented as close as possible to results from excavations or other available documents. All levels of the 3D-model have been visualized using photorealistic images and sequences of video animations. The 3D model is integrated into a multimedia environment, augmenting the visualization elements with plans of the city and individual buildings and with text documents. It is intended, that parts of the outlined system will be available at the site of the ancient city, where today a large public archaeological park is located.
series eCAADe
more http://dpce.ing.unipa.it/Webshare/Wwwroot/ecaade95/Pag_2.htm
last changed 2000/12/02 12:36

_id a56e
authors Do, Ellen Yi-Luen
year 1995
title What's in a Diagram That a Computer Should Understand?
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 469-480
summary This paper reports on an experiment to test the feasibility of using a diagramming tool to access an architectural knowledge base. Our hypothesis is that designers only use a small set of conventional elements to make diagrams of architectural concepts. If this is true, then a scheme for retrieving information from computer knowledge bases using diagrams would work. Therefore we asked designers to make diagrams from texts, to interpret diagrams into texts, to pair diagrams and texts, and to comment on existing pairs from the case base. We found from the experiment that common features are shared between different designerís diagrams and texts.
keywords Architectural Diagrams, Graphic Interface, Knowledge Bases
series CAAD Futures
email ellendo@cmu.edu
last changed 2004/10/04 05:49

_id 4538
authors Dobson, A., Dokonal, W. and Kosco, I.
year 1995
title World Wide Web Presentation of Collaborative Student Design Work
source Multimedia and Architectural Disciplines [Proceedings of the 13th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe / ISBN 0-9523687-1-4] Palermo (Italy) 16-18 November 1995, pp. 105-110
summary Inspired by presentations made at the last eCAADe conference of collaborative work by students at a number of schools of architecture who were using the Internet as a form of virtual studio, a network for a collaborative design project was set up between the schools of architecture in Bratislava, Graz and Luton. This paper takes the form of a multi-media presentation of the results of this collaborative project, carried out on-line via the World Wide Web site at the University of Technology in Graz. In addition to presenting the design solutions produced during the project, the paper analyses the technical difficulties encountered with file transfers, assesses the participants' experience of using the Internet as a medium for collaboration, evaluates the educational validity of the project and outlines proposals for the future development of collaborative activities by the group.
series eCAADe
email Dokonal@stdb.tu-graz.ac.at, Kosco@dcaad.fa.stuba.sk
last changed 1998/09/17 15:41

_id 262e
authors Does, Jan van der
year 1995
title A Student’s Project: Choices in Media for Communication and Presentation
source The Future of Endoscopy [Proceedings of the 2nd European Architectural Endoscopy Association Conference / ISBN 3-85437-114-4]
summary The Delft Faculty of Architecture is currently working with a new educational method called “Problem Based Learning”. After teaching basic principles in free-hand drawing and theory of form in the new block system, the sector Media takes also part in the third and fourth year, mostly in the design disciplines. Communication and presentation techniques, so important for the future, that architects and townplanners were organized for further discussions in close cooperation between the three sections of the Media sector. It resulted in the creation of a media module.

Finally a short video production about the Faculty of Architecture resp. the sector Media at Delft University of Technology will be presented.

keywords Architectural Endoscopy, Real Environments
series EAEA
email j.l.h.breen@bk.tudelft.nl
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/eaea/
last changed 2005/09/09 08:43

_id 47c7
authors Fasse, Isabelle and Paul, Jean Claude
year 1995
title Realistic Rendering and Computer-Aided Lighting Design in Architecture
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 241-255
summary This paper presents an application of realistic rendering to computer aided design in architecture. The application concerns lighting design of buildings. We describe a library of algorithms which allows the simulation of the light sources emittance, surfaces reflectance/transmittance, and light propagation laws. Our general algorithm can compute a physically based simulation of illumination in complex geometric models and offers the capability to change the inputs without recalculating the entire global physical solution. Since the solution is view independent, hardware graphic accelerations are then used to generate the images. Two industrial experimentations have proved that our system can help designers to evaluate small iterations in the design, as well as compare global alternative solutions. Therefore, design quality improvement can be obtained while saving the costly full scale trials that are necessary when conventional methods are used.
keywords Computer-Aided Design, Computer Graphics, Synthesis Images, Architectural Design, Lighting Engineering
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/08/03 15:16

_id ga0024
id ga0024
authors Ferrara, Paolo and Foglia, Gabriele
year 2000
title TEAnO or the computer assisted generation of manufactured aesthetic goods seen as a constrained flux of technological unconsciousness
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary TEAnO (Telematica, Elettronica, Analisi nell'Opificio) was born in Florence, in 1991, at the age of 8, being the direct consequence of years of attempts by a group of computer science professionals to use the digital computers technology to find a sustainable match among creation, generation (or re-creation) and recreation, the three basic keywords underlying the concept of “Littérature potentielle” deployed by Oulipo in France and Oplepo in Italy (see “La Littérature potentielle (Créations Re-créations Récréations) published in France by Gallimard in 1973). During the last decade, TEAnO has been involving in the generation of “artistic goods” in aesthetic domains such as literature, music, theatre and painting. In all those artefacts in the computer plays a twofold role: it is often a tool to generate the good (e.g. an editor to compose palindrome sonnets of to generate antonymic music) and, sometimes it is the medium that makes the fruition of the good possible (e.g. the generator of passages of definition literature). In that sense such artefacts can actually be considered as “manufactured” goods. A great part of such creation and re-creation work has been based upon a rather small number of generation constraints borrowed from Oulipo, deeply stressed by the use of the digital computer massive combinatory power: S+n, edge extraction, phonetic manipulation, re-writing of well known masterpieces, random generation of plots, etc. Regardless this apparently simple underlying generation mechanisms, the systematic use of computer based tools, as weel the analysis of the produced results, has been the way to highlight two findings which can significantly affect the practice of computer based generation of aesthetic goods: ? the deep structure of an aesthetic work persists even through the more “desctructive” manipulations, (such as the antonymic transformation of the melody and lyrics of a music work) and become evident as a sort of profound, earliest and distinctive constraint; ? the intensive flux of computer generated “raw” material seems to confirm and to bring to our attention the existence of what Walter Benjamin indicated as the different way in which the nature talk to a camera and to our eye, and Franco Vaccari called “technological unconsciousness”. Essential references R. Campagnoli, Y. Hersant, “Oulipo La letteratura potenziale (Creazioni Ri-creazioni Ricreazioni)”, 1985 R. Campagnoli “Oupiliana”, 1995 TEAnO, “Quaderno n. 2 Antologia di letteratura potenziale”, 1996 W. Benjiamin, “Das Kunstwerk im Zeitalter seiner technischen Reprodizierbarkeit”, 1936 F. Vaccari, “Fotografia e inconscio tecnologico”, 1994
series other
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id 33f3
authors Fujii, Haruyuki
year 1995
title Incorporation of Natural Language Processing and a Generative System - An Interactive System that Constructs Topological Models from Spatial Descriptions in Natural Language
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 205-218
summary The natural language processing technique and the spatial reasoning technique are incorporated to create a computational model representing the process of updating and maintaining the knowledge about spatial relations. An algorithm for the spatial reasoning is proposed. An interactive system that understands sentences describing spatial relations is implemented. The system determines the reference of an anaphoric or deictic expression from the literal meaning of the input and the implicit meaning derived from the literal meaning. The consistency of the spatial relations is maintained. The correct topological representations of the spatial relations are generated from well-formed descriptions.
keywords Natural Language Processing, Discourse Analysis, Artificial Intelligence, Architecture, CAD
series CAAD Futures
email hfujii@arch.titech.ac.jp
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id 5580
id 5580
authors Gero, John S.
year 1995
title Computers and Creative Design
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 11-19
summary This paper introduces notions of creativity and creative design as a form of computational exploration. Exploration is used as a means of defining spaces which are then searched. It is shown that schemas provide an opportunity to describe exploration. Emergence as a process which modifies schemas is described, as a ìcreative processî. Visual emergence is elaborated and other forms of emergence are described. The role of emergence in creative design is presented.
keywords Creative Design, Design Theory, Emergence
series CAAD Futures
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/08/23 14:45

_id 858f
authors Glanville, Ranulph
year 1995
title Architecture and Computing: A medium approach
source Computing in Design - Enabling, Capturing and Sharing Ideas [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-04-7] University of Washington (Seattle, Washington / USA) October 19-22, 1995, pp. 5-20
summary In this paper, the argument is presented that the way in which computers are used in Architectural Design is based on and limited by our imaginings. Typically, computing is used as a tool to automate a process formerly carried out by a human rather than to expand our range of options. It is held that this is a very restricted way of using the computer and that architects and designers would be better served treating the computer as a medium, allowing it to act as a partner in design. Only then will the radical possibilities of computing become apparent, so that we may benefit from true interaction with them. Some specific limitations in our uses of computers are highlighted and ways that allow the computer to be more of an interacting partner are indicated, as are ways of exploring computing to extend the possibilities.
series ACADIA
last changed 1999/03/29 14:49

_id b04c
authors Goerger, S., Darken, R., Boyd, M., Gagnon, T., Liles, S., Sullivan, J. and Lawson, J.
year 1996
title Spatial Knowledge Acquisition from Maps and Virtual Environments in Complex Architectural Space
source Proc. 16 th Applied Behavioral Sciences Symposium, 22-23 April, U.S. Airforce Academy, Colorado Springs, CO., 1996, 6-10
summary It has often been suggested that due to its inherent spatial nature, a virtual environment (VE) might be a powerful tool for spatial knowledge acquisition of a real environment, as opposed to the use of maps or some other two-dimensional, symbolic medium. While interesting from a psychological point of view, a study of the use of a VE in lieu of a map seems nonsensical from a practical point of view. Why would the use of a VE preclude the use of a map? The more interesting investigation would be of the value added of the VE when used with a map. If the VE could be shown to substantially improve navigation performance, then there might be a case for its use as a training tool. If not, then we have to assume that maps continue to be the best spatial knowledge acquisition tool available. An experiment was conducted at the Naval Postgraduate School to determine if the use of an interactive, three-dimensional virtual environment would enhance spatial knowledge acquisition of a complex architectural space when used in conjunction with floor plan diagrams. There has been significant interest in this research area of late. Witmer, Bailey, and Knerr (1995) showed that a VE was useful in acquiring route knowledge of a complex building. Route knowledge is defined as the procedural knowledge required to successfully traverse paths between distant locations (Golledge, 1991). Configurational (or survey) knowledge is the highest level of spatial knowledge and represents a map-like internal encoding of the environment (Thorndyke, 1980). The Witmer study could not confirm if configurational knowledge was being acquired. Also, no comparison was made to a map-only condition, which we felt is the most obvious alternative. Comparisons were made only to a real world condition and a symbolic condition where the route is presented verbally.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id ddssup9609
id ddssup9609
authors Hall, A.C.
year 1996
title Assessing the Role of Computer Visualisation in Planning Control: a recent case study
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary In papers to previous DDSS Conferences, and elsewhere, the author has developed an argument concerning the use of computer visualisation in the planning process. In essence, it proposes that: • visualisation can enable lay persons to play a more effective role and this can result in different and more effective decisions; • the level of realism employed should result from the basic requirements necessary to resolve the issue minimising the cost of production of the images. These points have been tested in repeated examples. The latest one concerns a new site that Anglia Polytechnic University has established in the centre of Chelmsford, UK. A computer model of the new campus showing both the existing and proposed buildings was commissioned from the author by the University for a visit by HM the Queen in June 1995. This model was subsequently adapted for use in the process of obtaining planning consent and the marketing of floorspace for the next building to be constructed. For this purpose, a higher level of realism was requested. The experience of achieving it confirmed the results of the previous research indicating the strong link between realism and cost. It also contributed new insights into the varying expectations of different professionals concerning the role of such a visualisation. The requirement of the architect for demonstrating all aspects of the design required a high level of realism than that required for planning and marketing purposes and was considerably more expensive. The low cost of use for planning purposes should be stressed but surprisingly, the lower level of realism implied may be easier for the lay person than the professional to accept.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 51fd
authors Harrison, Steve and Minneman, Scott
year 1995
title Studying Collaborative Design to Build Design Tools
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 687-697
summary This paper outlines the way in which studying designers at work on real problems can inform the development of new computer aided architectural design systems. From a number of studies of designers in various domains, supporting the communications of designers is re-conceptualized into one of transmitting and storing process ephemera, rather than normalizing representations. After characterizing process ephemera, an example from one of the studies is described in detail. The paper concludes with implications for the design of collaborative CAAD systems.
keywords Collaboration, Design Communications, Telepresence, Media Space, Process Ephemera, Virtual Design Studio
series CAAD Futures
email steverharrison@yahoo.com
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id 4684
authors Herzog, Marcus and Kühn, Christian
year 1995
title Technological Issues in Multimedia Applications for Architectural Design Education
source Multimedia and Architectural Disciplines [Proceedings of the 13th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe / ISBN 0-9523687-1-4] Palermo (Italy) 16-18 November 1995, pp. 95-104
summary Teaching architecture is not primarily an instructional process but rather a process of interaction and experience. In this context multimedia material can be used to provide an active educational environment where students learn by doing. To yield an effective learning system expertise from various fields have to be combined. This paper emphasizes the technological challenges of multimedia applications in architectural design education. We discuss two research prototype systems and analyze the influence of the underpinning technology on the performance of the overall system design. Finally we give technical requirements that are demanded for next generation systems and propose a framework for concerted research action.
series eCAADe
email c.kuehn@tuwien.ac.at
more http://dpce.ing.unipa.it/Webshare/Wwwroot/ecaade95/Pag_13.htm
last changed 2000/12/02 12:44

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