CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 41 to 60 of 382

_id daa7
authors Hitchcock, R.J.
year 1995
title Advancing lighting and daylighting simulation: the transition from analysis to design aid tools
source Proceedings of Building Simulation '95, International Building Performance Simulation Association
summary This paper explores three significant software development requirements for making the transition from standalone lighting simulation/analysis tools to simulation-based design aid tools. These requirements include specialized lighting simulation engines, facilitated methods for creating detailed simulatable building descriptions, and automated techniques for providing lighting design guidance. Initial computer implementations meant to address each of these requirements are discussed to further elaborate these requirements and to illustrate workin- progress toward fulfilling them.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id e3db
authors Ismail, Ashraf Lotfy R.M.
year 1995
title Singularity and Pluralism in Multimedia: A Key Theoretical Approach to the Multimodel
source Multimedia and Architectural Disciplines [Proceedings of the 13th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe / ISBN 0-9523687-1-4] Palermo (Italy) 16-18 November 1995, pp. 331-340
summary Contemporary multimedia research address the possibilities and consequences of integrating various techniques to produce single user based applications (singularity). There is a need for utilising current multimedia techniques; to explore the potential of multi-models (theoretically) to generate modelling information that could be shared simultaneously. The problems are confined to understanding and managing the issues that influence the so-called ´target and product models´. This paper introduces and elaborates on such problems. It provides a theoretical and another practical framework, the 3D-CAD Modelling Paradigm, based upon completed results of modelling. There is a suggested evidence that there might be advantages in standardising the process of modelling and knowledge representation. The paper stresses that the composition of a model should differ from another to reflect its unique characteristics (singularity). Though, it is essential that such models should conform and respond to the well defined and shared criteria (pluralism).
series eCAADe
more http://dpce.ing.unipa.it/Webshare/Wwwroot/ecaade95/Pag_40.htm
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

_id d7f7
authors Jeng, Hoang-Ell
year 1995
title A Dialogical Model for Participatory Design; A Computational Approach to Group Planning
source Delft University of Technology
summary In participatory design, design concepts are generated collectively through discussion, dialogical interactions, in which the interchange of normative and supporting factual descriptions builds a collective design discourse. The goal of this research is to develop a method for participatory design to support this collective, face-to-face design problem-solving, in order to increase the acceptability of the design product. Since the mid-1960s, there has been an important movement towards increasing the participation of citizens in determining their built environment. At first, the movement was associated with social-political ideologies and rhetoric. By the end of the 1970s, participatory design had become an accepted component of professional practice. The objectives of the movement became more pragmatically and more modestly focused on exchanging practical information, resolving conflicts, and supplementing design. Today, participatory design is in a new phase. Traditional participatory design methods are seen as insufficient to fulfill an increasing demand for dialogue. The point of departure of the study is the assumption that new information technologies can satisfy this demand. The method includes: (1) a group-reasoning model, (2) a dialogical system and (3) a framework for participation-based design guidelines. The group-reasoning model formulates the process of knowledge acquisition, the learning and sharing of belief systems, the generation of design alternatives and design evaluations--by which reasoning takes place dialogically. The dialogical system provides a clear description of how the information should be processed, what aspects should be paid attention to, what results can be anticipated, and when and how to control the process. The framework for participation-based design guidelines guides and structures the design process. It facilitates a reconstruction of the implicit cognitive structure which underlines dialogue and is generated through the discussion of a group.
series thesis:PhD
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 1778
authors Jo, Jun H. and Gero, John S.
year 1995
title Representation and Use of Design Knowledge in Evolutionary Design
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 189-203
summary This paper describes an approach to knowledge representation for an evolutionary design process. The concept of design schemas is introduced to provide the representational framework for design knowledge. Two kinds of design schemas, the design rule schema and the design gene schema, are proposed to formulate design knowledge and interpret the knowledge into genetic codes. A design problem which is used to exemplify this approach is that of a large office layout planning problem.
keywords Representation, Design Knowledge, Genetic Codes
series CAAD Futures
email john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/05/16 18:58

_id 802c
authors Kalisperis, Loukas N. and Kolarevic, Branko (Eds.)
year 1995
title Computing in Design - Enabling, Capturing and Sharing Ideas [Conference Proceedings]
source ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-04-7 / University of Washington (Seattle, Washington / USA) October 19-22, 1995, 423 p.
summary The papers collected in this volume reflect not only the conference theme of enabling, capturing, and sharing design ideas, but also the ACADIA’s fifteen-year-old spirit of sharing new ideas about the application and integration of computing technology in architectural education and practice. In the fifteen years of its existence, ACADIA has not only encouraged new research, but has also motivated classroom use of new approaches that incorporate digital media directly into the design process. This educational mission is particularly important as architectural computing spreads from school's design studios into architectural offices, as students whom we train move into the work place and share their knowledge of the new design technologies. The papers in this volume clearly show that the capturing, enabling, and sharing of ideas are enhanced by the use of computers in design, not just in documentation and production, but more importantly from the very origination of the idea. The long sought synergy between the "digital" and the "traditional" is slowly, but increasingly happening in design studios and offices. Thousands of students and architects are exploring design ideas using digital technology, i.e., CAD is more or less in everyone's hands.

series ACADIA
email lnk@psu.edu, branko@hku.hk
last changed 1999/03/29 14:48

_id 3d4a
authors Kasprisin, Ronald J.
year 1995
title Visual Thinking For Architects And Designers: Visualizing Context In Design
source Van Nostrand Reinhold
summary Here at last is a book that will help architects and designers avoid the pitfall of creating buildings that battle aesthetically with everything within a three-block radius. In Visual Thinking for Architects and Designers, Ron Kasprisin and James Pettinari unveil a solution to designing for the complex urban landscape: visual thinking. A concept twenty-five years in the making, this integrative approach will help harried professionals prevent environmental disasters. The authors present three-dimensional drawing (visual thinking) as a communication and decision-making tool to be used during the design and planning process. Because architects, landscape architects, and urban designers often work independently, on different scales, and at different interludes, no one can truly envision the completed project. Visual thinking is a way of getting input from every member of the team. Here, you'll learn how to use graphics, whether hand-drawn or computer-generated, as a language to express complex systems, interrelationships, and environments. Using over 300 high quality drawings that are connected at many different scales; from aerial perspectives of entire regions to individual rooms and buildings-this groundbreaking book lays out an urban design process and methodology in a sequential and easily understood manner. The book is illustrated by the authors; own work, which has been recognized in national design competitions, and by the AIA, APA, and NEA. The authors masterfully cover the use of drawing to analyze and create spaces, drawing technique, and communicating complex information to the public. Case studies convincingly illustrate the authors; approach.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id d460
authors Khedro, Taha
year 1995
title AgentCAD for Cooperative Design
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 667-672
summary AgentCAD is a network infrastructure of distributed CAD applications that facilitates the concurrent an cooperative interaction of several designers working together, possibly over several physical locations, on a design project. It provides a set of services and protocols that support the communications of distributed design information captured by CAD drawings, multiple design views, and design changes. It coordinates access to a common and multiple design models as well as the activities of designers based on captured knowledge of designers' tasks, capabilities, and interests, which characterize their behaviors. The idea of AgentCAD represents a departure from the usual way in which CAD applications are used as single-user tools, applied to one view of specific design problems. In describing the AgentCAD environment, we discuss the organization of AgentCAD, its communication model, and the cooperative interaction protocols for designers in the context of a design scenario.
keywords Cooperative Design; Collaborative Design; Distributed Problem Solving; Communications; Coordination
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/08/03 15:16

_id c675
authors Kim, Inham
year 1995
title Design Tools Integration in an Integrated Design Environment
source Computing in Design - Enabling, Capturing and Sharing Ideas [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-04-7] University of Washington (Seattle, Washington / USA) October 19-22, 1995, pp. 75-95
summary The design problem has a multi-disciplinary nature and the design itself evolves as solutions are attempted by the designer. To support inter-disciplinary communication of design concepts and decisions, the integration of relevant CAAD tools is essential. Based upon a large set of design criteria and all corresponding knowledge, with the help of computer aided design tools, the result could be highly effective and novel. The integration of CAAD tools should be performed on the basis of generating better solutions by enabling designers to manipulate and appraise various solutions quickly and with a minimum of effort. The proposed system provides the foundations for a seamless and continuous working environment for architects and building engineers through a data modelling module, an integrated data management framework and various design tools. In the environment, stand-alone design tools can be plugged-in in order to access information stored in central databases. The suggested data modelling module helps integrated CAAD systems represent and exchange domain dependent design information at a semantic level, such as exchanging components and features of a building rather than graphical primitives. The suggested data management framework supports the straight-forward mechanisms for controlling the data representation through the inter-connected modules and design tools.
series ACADIA
last changed 1999/03/29 14:59

_id ab3c
authors Kramer, G.
year 1996
title Mapping a Single Data Stream to Multiple Auditory Variables: A Subjective Approach to Creating a Compelling Design
source Proceedings of the Third International Conferenceon Auditory Display, Santa FO Institute
summary Representing a single data variable changing in time via sonification, or using that data to control a sound in some way appears to be a simple problem but actually involves a significant degree of subjectivity. This paper is a response to my own focus on specific sonification tasks (Kramer 1990, 1993) (Fitch & Kramer, 1994), on broad theoretical concerns in auditory display (Kramer 1994a, 1994b, 1995), and on the representation of high-dimensional data sets (Kramer 1991a & Kramer & Ellison, 1991b). The design focus of this paper is partly a response to the others who, like myself, have primarily employed single fundamental acoustic variables such as pitch or loudness to represent single data streams. These simple representations have framed three challenges: Behavioral and Cognitive Science-Can sonifications created with complex sounds changing simultaneously in several dimensions facilitate the formation of a stronger internal auditory image, or audiation, than would be produced by simpler sonifications? Human Factors and Applications-Would such a stronger internal image of the data prove to be more useful from the standpoint of conveying information? Technology and Design-How might these richer displays be constructed? This final question serves as a starting point for this paper. After years of cautious sonification research I wanted to explore the creation of more interesting and compelling representations.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 4a1a
authors Laird, J.E.
year 2001
title Using Computer Game to Develop Advanced AI
source Computer, 34 (7), July pp. 70-75
summary Although computer and video games have existed for fewer than 40 years, they are already serious business. Entertainment software, the entertainment industry's fastest growing segment, currently generates sales surpassing the film industry's gross revenues. Computer games have significantly affected personal computer sales, providing the initial application for CD-ROMs, driving advancements in graphics technology, and motivating the purchase of ever faster machines. Next-generation computer game consoles are extending this trend, with Sony and Toshiba spending $2 billion to develop the Playstation 2 and Microsoft planning to spend more than $500 million just to market its Xbox console [1]. These investments have paid off. In the past five years, the quality and complexity of computer games have advanced significantly. Computer graphics have shown the most noticeable improvement, with the number of polygons rendered in a scene increasing almost exponentially each year, significantly enhancing the games' realism. For example, the original Playstation, released in 1995, renders 300,000 polygons per second, while Sega's Dreamcast, released in 1999, renders 3 million polygons per second. The Playstation 2 sets the current standard, rendering 66 million polygons per second, while projections indicate the Xbox will render more than lOO million polygons per second. Thus, the images on today's $300 game consoles rival or surpass those available on the previous decade's $50,000 computers. The impact of these improvements is evident in the complexity and realism of the environments underlying today's games, from detailed indoor rooms and corridors to vast outdoor landscapes. These games populate the environments with both human and computer controlled characters, making them a rich laboratory for artificial intelligence research into developing intelligent and social autonomous agents. Indeed, computer games offer a fitting subject for serious academic study, undergraduate education, and graduate student and faculty research. Creating and efficiently rendering these environments touches on every topic in a computer science curriculum. The "Teaching Game Design " sidebar describes the benefits and challenges of developing computer game design courses, an increasingly popular field of study
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id cf40
authors Leyh, W.
year 1995
title Automatic assembly of a commercial cavity block system
source Automation in Construction 4 (2) (1995) pp. 147-167
summary In an earlier publication (Leyh, 1993) the "Experiences with the Construction of a Building Assembly Robot" have been dealt with. The application of that robot system for the automatic assembly of commercial cavity blocks is the subject of a subsequent report which consists of two parts: in the first, this paper, we primarily deal with the assembly methods, in the second we deal with their realization. What is characteristic of cavity blocks is the fact that they are at first assembled dry, without cementing material, and the masonry is later filled with mortar. As to their weight and dimension, the cavity blocks used by the company GISOTON are adjusted to the ergonomics of a mason. The entirely different characteristics and abilities of assembly robots are not taken into consideration. However, their dimensional tolerance is relatively small (0.5 mm). Furthermore as cavity bricks, they have conic and oval recesses. Both features are strongly favourable for automation. This paper will highlight specific problems during automized construction assembly with commercial standard assembly elements, and help to solve them.
keywords Robotics; Assembly methods; Jointing technique; Reference system; Gripper construction
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/06/02 07:36

_id 8573
authors Lucardie, L., De Gelder, J. and Huijsing, A.
year 1995
title The Advanced Knowledge Transfer System
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 163-171
summary The joint application of decision tables and Prolog seems to meet all the necessary requirements to be met by a language or modelling knowledge. Despite the high complementarity of decision tables and Prolog, it appears that they still yield a language with certain drawbacks. The Advanced Knowledge Transfer System (AKTS) has been developed to take advantage of this complementarity and simultaneously eliminate these drawbacks. To show the capabilities of AKT three knowledge-based systems in the building and construction sector are described which recently have been developed using AKTS.
keywords Knowledge-Based Systems, Modelling Language, Decision Tables, Prolog
series CAAD Futures
last changed 1999/08/03 15:16

_id f4d7
authors Madrazo, L.
year 1995
title The Concept of Type in Architecture: An Inquiry into the Nature of Architectural Form
source Swiss Federal Institute of Technology, ETH Zurich
summary The purpose of this dissertation is to investigate the meaning of the concept of Type in the field of architectural theory. Even though the use of the term type by architectural theorists is a relatively recent phenomenon, which can be traced back to Quatremère de Quincy in the early nineteenth century, the idea of Type, as opposed to the explicit use of this term by theorists, has pervaded much of architectural theory ever since Vitruvius. In fact, many theorists have been concerned with issues which convey a notion of Type, like the origins of architectural form, the systematization of architectural knowledge and the understanding of the process of creativity. A basic premise of this work is that to understand the true significance of the idea of Type in architecture, it is necessary to overcome certain traditional views that have associated Type with the work of specific authors at a given time like, for example, Quatremère de Quincy and Semper in the nineteenth century, or Rossi in the twentieth. Only a comprehensive study of the most relevant ideas formulated in the field of architectural theory -beginning with Vitruvius and finishing with contemporary design methodologists- can reveal the essential meaning, or meanings, of Type. This work attempts to provide such a comprehensive study. To derive the fundamental meanings of the concept of Type from the body of the architectural tradition, it has been necessary to proceed, simultaneously, along two different lines: one diachronic, the other synchronic. From a diachronic point of view, the aim has been to trace the evolution of the theories of Type from one author to another, for example from Laugier to Quatremère de Quincy. From a synchronic point of view, the goal has been to disclose the common ideas that lie behind theories formulated at different times, for instance, between Vitruvius' theory of the origins of architectural form and the artistic theory developed after the advent of Gestalt psychology. In recent times, the term type has been used by architectural writers as synonymous with typology. Unfortunately, establishing this identity between type and typology has served to undermine some of the essential meanings conveyed by Type. In the overall context of the architectural tradition, the idea of Type has much deeper implications than those that are confined to the classification and study of building forms. Type embraces transcendental issues of aesthetic, epistemological and metaphysical character; issues that have to do with the most generic problem of Form. Certainly, the essential meaning of Type is intimately related with the more transcendental problem of Form. To explore the relation between the idea of Type and the historical evolution of architectural form, has also been the purpose of this research. As this work attempts to show, the variety of meanings that Type has adopted through history are inseparably connected to the evolution undergone by architectural form. For that reason, this work, although primarily a study of the concept of Type, it is, at the same time, an investigation on the nature of architectural form.
series thesis:PhD
email madrazo@salleURL.edu
last changed 2003/05/10 03:42

_id 2caa
authors Marinelli, Anna Maria and Graziano, Laura
year 1995
title Urban Analysis and Hypermedia
source Multimedia and Architectural Disciplines [Proceedings of the 13th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe / ISBN 0-9523687-1-4] Palermo (Italy) 16-18 November 1995, pp. 149-154
summary The structure of major European cities was formed in recent years more by stratification of different patterns, as it seems, than by urban planning. Moreover traditional analytical tools - such as cartography, which defines and symbolizes static data and their spatial connections - are not able to decode any more the image of cities. Modern city means not only static form, as public space is not a simple function. city includes movement, temporary objects, changing perceptions, fluxes. Therefore hypertexts could he a chance of building up and propagate a real knowledge about modern city. an effective action to reach qualification and management of urban spaces through citizens direct involvement in the city construction. A hypertext on the Rome quarter "Esquilino" has been carried out as an open structure, to probe the new representation method trough the construction of the real "image" of the quarter, gathering different information as historical, geographic and socioeconomical data, urban projects, citizens proposals.
series eCAADe
more http://dpce.ing.unipa.it/Webshare/Wwwroot/ecaade95/Pag_19.htm
last changed 2000/12/02 12:52

_id 9577
authors Matalasov, Michail E.
year 1995
title About Videocomputer Technologies at the Moscow Architectural Institute
source CAD Space [Proceedings of the III International Conference Computer in Architectural Design] Bialystock 27-29 April 1995, pp. 303-308
summary Historically mock-up projecting turned out to be one of the bases of architectural education in the Moscow Architectural Institute. In spite of the fact, that technical progress did not pass over this Institute, introducing elements of computer techniques into the process of education, traditional methods do still prevail. In some sense it is a positive phenomenon, which does not allow this Institute to become ,one of the many typical ones", though in the epoch of global scientific and technical progress here this situation is forced. Under the economic conditions, established in this country, it is impossible to ensure such computer equipment, which would make the process of teaching students up-to-date methods of computer-aided design possible and really general, and make frontal employment of computers for solving complex design problems quite real. Now we can speak only about selective - optional teaching students mastering computer methods on the modern level. At the same time it was noted repeatedly, that essential defects are common to the traditional designing, especially when it concerns education; these defects are connected with a great degree of abstracting the model of the projected object (by the way this concerns also computer models), realized in the form of a small-scale mock-up. This is due to the representation of the projected object separated from the real environment as well as difference in the scales of the observer and the observed object. Mistakes in perception and appreciation caused in this way affect the efficiency of training disastrously. Luckily the available variety of sufficiently simple and cheap technical devices allows to overcome the mentioned defects to a considerable degree and combining these devices with personal computers makes it possible to enlarge their possibilities considerably. And at the same time due to the specific character of the employment it becomes unnecessary to have a lot of computers and the employed technologies turn out to be more "friendly" to the architect practically not demanding him to have complicated special knowledge. We mean special videocomputer technologies ("multimedia"), including the employment of periscope devices (environmental simulator or "telemaketoscope").
series plCAD
last changed 2000/01/24 09:08

_id a900
authors Maver, Thomas W. and Petric, Jelena
year 1995
title Information Technology in the Service of Sustainable Architecture and Urban Design
source Sixth International Conference on Computer-Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 9971-62-423-0] Singapore, 24-26 September 1995, pp. 181-185
summary The quality of the built environment depends critically on the concept of sustainability and, in particular, on designs which are energy efficient and environmentally friendly. This paper gives an account of the successful application of computer-based simulations of the physical environment made available to architects through an Energy Design Advisory Service and used parametrically within a research project carried out jointly with a design and build company. It goes on to indicate how emerging multi-media technology can be used to provide an explanation, particularly to those who are technically unsophisticated, of the complexity of the way in which design decisions impact upon the energy efficiency and environmental friendliness of buildings.
keywords Energy Efficiency, Computer Simulation, Multi-Media, Design Decisions
series CAAD Futures
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/04/16 09:51

_id c449
authors Millard, Lesley
year 1995
title A Strategic Approach to Climate Responsive Design Using Computer Based Learning
source Multimedia and Architectural Disciplines [Proceedings of the 13th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe / ISBN 0-9523687-1-4] Palermo (Italy) 16-18 November 1995, pp. 177-182
summary Existing computer software to support the teaching of environmental issues to architecture students is mainly based on energy calculation methods or packages of information split into subject areas. Neither approach seems to adequately support the early stages of the design process. The paper explores the construction of a model for a computer based learning system to teach the development of environmental strategies. Different strands of educational theory were used to develop teaching principles based around consideration of the subjective quality of knowledge influenced by ideas and theories from different sources, the importance of learning a "language" consisting of methods and theories of a subject and their application in context and the suggestion that "deep" learning requires conceptual changes. A suitable framework for the development of environmental strategies is suggested and its implementation using multi-media software as a method of integrating different types of information and learning materials is proposed. The paper concludes that the process of analysis is a key part of the system and should be made the focus of the structure and contents.

series eCAADe
more http://dpce.ing.unipa.it/Webshare/Wwwroot/ecaade95/Pag_23.htm
last changed 2000/12/02 12:53

_id 4c7e
authors Mitchell, W.
year 1995
title City of Bits: space, place, and the infobahn
source The MIT Press
summary Entertaining, concise, and relentlessly probing, City of Bits is a comprehensive introduction to a new type of city, a largely invisible but increasingly important system of virtual spaces interconnected by the emerging information superhighway. William Mitchell makes extensive use of concrete, practical examples and illustrations in a technically well-grounded yet accessible examination of architecture and urbanism in the context of the digital telecommunications revolution, the ongoing miniaturization of electronics, the commodification of bits, and the growing domination of software over materialized form. In seven chapters - Pulling Glass, Electronic Agoras, Cyborg Citizens, Recombinant Architecture, Soft Cities, Bit Biz, and Getting to the Good Bits - Mitchell argues that the crucial issue before us is not one of putting in place the digital plumbing of telecommunications links and associated electronic appliances, nor even of producing content for electronic delivery, but rather one of creating electronically mediated environments for the kinds of lives that we want to lead.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 6dc4
authors Moeck, Martin and Selkowitz, Steven
year 1995
title A Computer-Based Daylight Systems Design Tool
source Computing in Design - Enabling, Capturing and Sharing Ideas [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-04-7] University of Washington (Seattle, Washington / USA) October 19-22, 1995, pp. 261-279
summary Currently numbers like illuminance or glare index are used for the evaluation of daylight system designs. We propose to use photorealistic pictures in addition to numbers as a way to assess the quality of a design solution. This is necessary since numbers-based performance criteria, that are currently in use, are either not sufficient to evaluate performance, or they require expert knowledge for interpretation. The paper discusses the implications and ramifications of this approach.
keywords interactive Simulation, Non-numerical Performance Criteria, Photorealism, Visual Comfort, Performance Based Visualization, Indirect Evaluation of Performance
series ACADIA
last changed 1999/03/29 15:20

_id 0892
authors Mortola, E., Fortuzzi A., and Mirabelli, P.
year 1995
title Communications Project of Designing with Multimedia Interactive Tools
source Multimedia and Architectural Disciplines [Proceedings of the 13th European Conference on Education in Computer Aided Architectural Design in Europe / ISBN 0-9523687-1-4] Palermo (Italy) 16-18 November 1995, pp. 361-374
summary We at a new step of software where the development of applications is done not using instructions, but composing applications. The software object oriented which allows the integration between applications is the solution for the designer to produce the own software. It is possible to use integrated applications with a limited knowledge of algorithms and programming languages. That allows the not specialized users to use specialized multimedia tools. The consequences of this opportunity can result very important not only for the designer but above all the actors involved in the decision making process. It is hard to evaluate the social weight of hypertexts and hypermedia in the field of social participation to the decision making. However their efficiency in the communication problem it is clear. We can preview that in the next future the use of hypermedia will be more extensive in the field of decision making, which involve public interests. Some hypertext developed in the CAAD Laboratory of the Third University are briefly described.

series eCAADe
email a.fortuzzi@mail.uniroma3.it
more http://dpce.ing.unipa.it/Webshare/Wwwroot/ecaade95/Pag_44.htm
last changed 2003/05/16 19:27

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