CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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_id e4a8
authors Winograd, Terry ed. (et al.)
year 1996
title Bringing Design to Software
source New York, NY:ACM Press and Reading, MA:Addison-Welsley
summary In this landmark book, Terry Winograd shows how to improve the practice of software design, by applying lessons from other areas of design to the creation of software. The goal is to create software that works---really works---in being appropriate and effective for people who live in the world that the software creates. The book contains essays contributed by prominent software and design professionals, interviews with experts, and profiles of successful projects and products. These elements are woven together to illuminate what design is, to identify the common core of practices in every design field, and to show how software builders can apply these common practices to produce software that is more effective, more appropriate, and more satisfying for users. The initial chapters view software from the user's perspective, featuring the insights of a experienced software designers and developers, including Mitch Kapor, David Liddle, John Rheinfrank, Peter Denning, and John Seely Brown. Subsequent chapters turn to the designer and the design process, with contributions from designers and design experts, including David Kelley, Donald Schön, and Donald Norman. Profiles discussing Mosaic, Quicken, Macintosh Interface Guidelines, Microsoft Bob, and other successful applications and projects are included to highlight key points in the chapters. This book is for the broad community of people who conceive, develop, market, evaluate, and use software. It is foremost, of course, for the software designer, and particularly for the reflective designer---someone who is driven by practical concerns, but who is also able to step back for a moment and reflect on what works, what doesn't work, and why. At the same time, it reveals new directions and new possibilities for programmers who build software, and for product managers who bring software to market. Software users will also find the book valuable in expanding their understanding of what good software design encompasses, which will help them in evaluating, integrating, and productively using computer applications.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 22fd
authors Chou, Wen Huey
year 1996
title An Empirical Study of 2d Static Computer Art: An Investigation of How Contemporary Computer Art is Affected by Media
source CAADRIA ‘96 [Proceedings of The First Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 9627-75-703-9] Hong Kong (Hong Kong) 25-27 April 1996, pp. 81-89
summary We are in the act of forming the Technology & Electronics society: a society which cultural, psychological, social and economical facets take shape according to the development of technology and electronics, specially in the fields of computer and information. The influence of these mighty functions, produced by the bit, is prevalent in all the science and social courses; in fact, it has already invaded the artistic world. It did not take long after the birth of the computer for it to become the new tool for artistic production; it revolutionized the traditional production habits, production procedures, methods of expression and the work place in artistic creativity, thus bringing the tides of change in the artistic context and attitude towards the study of the Arts.
series CAADRIA
last changed 1999/01/31 14:00

_id acadia16_140
id acadia16_140
authors Nejur, Andrei; Steinfeld, Kyle
year 2016
title Ivy: Bringing a Weighted-Mesh Representations to Bear on Generative Architectural Design Applications
source ACADIA // 2016: POSTHUMAN FRONTIERS: Data, Designers, and Cognitive Machines [Proceedings of the 36th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture (ACADIA) ISBN 978-0-692-77095-5] Ann Arbor 27-29 October, 2016, pp. 140-151
summary Mesh segmentation has become an important and well-researched topic in computational geometry in recent years (Agathos et al. 2008). As a result, a number of new approaches have been developed that have led to innovations in a diverse set of problems in computer graphics (CG) (Sharmir 2008). Specifically, a range of effective methods for the division of a mesh have recently been proposed, including by K-means (Shlafman et al. 2002), graph cuts (Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008; Katz and Tal 2003), hierarchical clustering (Garland et al. 2001; Gelfand and Guibas 2004; Golovinskiy and Funkhouser 2008), primitive fitting (Athene et al. 2004), random walks (Lai et al.), core extraction (Katz et al.) tubular multi-scale analysis (Mortara et al. 2004), spectral clustering (Liu and Zhang 2004), and critical point analysis (Lin et al. 20070, all of which depend upon a weighted graph representation, typically the dual of a given mesh (Sharmir 2008). While these approaches have been proven effective within the narrowly defined domains of application for which they have been developed (Chen 2009), they have not been brought to bear on wider classes of problems in fields outside of CG, specifically on problems relevant to generative architectural design. Given the widespread use of meshes and the utility of segmentation in GAD, by surveying the relevant and recently matured approaches to mesh segmentation in CG that share a common representation of the mesh dual, this paper identifies and takes steps to address a heretofore unrealized transfer of technology that would resolve a missed opportunity for both subject areas. Meshes are often employed by architectural designers for purposes that are distinct from and present a unique set of requirements in relation to similar applications that have enjoyed more focused study in computer science. This paper presents a survey of similar applications, including thin-sheet fabrication (Mitani and Suzuki 2004), rendering optimization (Garland et al. 2001), 3D mesh compression (Taubin et al. 1998), morphin (Shapira et al. 2008) and mesh simplification (Kalvin and Taylor 1996), and distinguish the requirements of these applications from those presented by GAD, including non-refinement in advance of the constraining of mesh geometry to planar-quad faces, and the ability to address a diversity of mesh features that may or may not be preserved. Following this survey of existing approaches and unmet needs, the authors assert that if a generalized framework for working with graph representations of meshes is developed, allowing for the interactive adjustment of edge weights, then the recent developments in mesh segmentation may be better brought to bear on GAD problems. This paper presents work toward the development of just such a framework, implemented as a plug-in for the visual programming environment Grasshopper.
keywords tool-building, design simulation, fabrication, computation, megalith
series ACADIA
type paper
email ksteinfe@berkeley.edu
last changed 2016/10/24 11:12

_id 0ef8
authors Völker, H., Sariyildiz, S., Schwenck, M. and Durmisevic, S.
year 1996
title THE NEXT GENERATION OF ARCHITECTURE WITHIN COMPUTER SCIENCES
source Full-Scale Modeling in the Age of Virtual Reality [6th EFA-Conference Proceedings]
summary Considering architecture as a mixture of exact sciences and the art, we can state that as in all other sciences, every technical invention and development has resulted in advantages and disadvantages for the well-being and prosperity of mankind. Think about the developments in the fields of nuclear energy or space travel. Besides bringing a lot of improvements in many fields, it also has danger for the well-being of a mankind. The development of the advanced computer techniques has also influence on architecture, which is inevitable. How did the computer science influence architecture till now, and what is going to be the future of the architecture with this ongoing of computer science developments? The future developments will be both in the field of conceptual design (form aspect) and also in the area of materialization of the design process.

These all are dealing with the material world, for which the tools of computer science are highly appropriate. But what will happen to the immaterial world? How can we put these immaterial values into a computers model? Or can the computer be creative as a human being? Early developments of computer science in the field of architecture involved two-dimensional applications, and subsequently the significance of the third dimension became manifest. Nowadays, however, people are already speaking of a fourth dimension, interpreting it as time or as dynamics. And what, for instance, would a fifth, sixth or X-dimension represent?

In the future we will perhaps speak of the fifth dimension, comprising the tangible qualities of the building materials around us. And one day a sixth dimension might be created, when it will be possible to establish direct communication with computers, because direct exchange between the computer and the human brain has been realised. The ideas of designers can then be processed by the computer directly, and we will no longer be hampered by obstacles such as screen and keyboard. There are scientist who are working to realize bio-chips. If it will work, perhaps we can realise all these speculations. It is nearly sure that the emergence of new technologies will also affect our subject area, architecture and this will create fresh challenges, fresh concepts, and new buildings in the 21st century. The responsibility of the architects must be, to bear in mind that we are dealing with the well-being and the prosperity of mankind.

keywords Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
email i.s.sariyildiz@dutkitm.bk.tudelft.nl
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa/
last changed 2004/05/04 12:43

_id 2dbc
authors Achten, Henri
year 1996
title Teaching Advanced Architectural Issues Through Principles of CAAD
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 7-16
summary The paper discusses the differences between teaching CAAD by using standard software ("off-the-shelf"-software) and teaching the principles of CAAD ("principles-teaching"). The paper distinguishes four kinds of application for design systems in education: social systems, professional systems, educational systems, and innovative systems. The paper furthermore proposes to distinguish between computational issues and architectural issues relative to design systems. It appears that there is not a principled distinction between software-teaching and principles-teaching when it comes to computational issues of design systems. However, when the architectural content of CAAD systems is concerned, then principles of CAAD systems seem to be more appropriate for teaching. The paper presents work on generic representations as a specific case. Generic representations can be used to teach one particular kind of architectural content of design systems. The paper ends with conclusions.
series eCAADe
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
more http://www.ds.arch.tue.nl/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 6ec6
authors Alsayyad, Nezar, Elliott, Ame and Kalay, Yehuda
year 1996
title Narrative Models: A Database Approach to Modeling Medieval Cairo
source Design Computation: Collaboration, Reasoning, Pedagogy [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-05-5] Tucson (Arizona / USA) October 31 - November 2, 1996, pp. 247-254
summary This paper explores the use of three-dimensional simulations to investigate transformations of urban form in medieval Cairo, and lessons about using computers to support historical visualization. Our first attempt to create a single extremely detailed model of Cairo proved unworkable. From this experience we developed a database approach to organizing modeling projects of complex urban environments. The database consists of several complete models at different levels of abstraction. This approach has three advantages over the earlier one: the model is never viewed as incomplete, the framework supports both additive and subtractive chronological studies, and finally, the database is viewed as infinitely expandable. Using modeling software as a tool for inquiry into architectural history becomes more feasible with this new approach.
series ACADIA
email kalay@socrates.berkeley.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id cf57
authors Anumba, C.J.
year 1996
title Functional Integration in CAD Systems
source Advances in Engineering Software, 25, 103-109
summary This paper examines the issue of integration in CAD systems and argues that for integration to be effective, it must address the functional aspects of a CAD system. It discusses the need for integrated systems and, within a structural engineering context, identifies several facets of integration that should be targeted. These include 2-D drafting and 3-D modelling, graphical and non-graphical design information, the CAD data structure and its user interface, as well as integration of the drafting function with other engineering applications. Means of achieving these levels of integration are briefly discussed and a prognosis for the future development of integrated systems explored. Particular attention is paid to the emergence (and potential role) of `product models' which seek to encapsulate the full range of data elements required to define completely an engineering artefact.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id af94
authors Anumba, C.J.
year 1996
title Data structures and DBMS for computer-aided design systems
source Advances in Engineering Software, 25(2/3), 123-129
summary The structures for the storage of data in CAD systems influence to a large extent the effectiveness of the system. This paper reviews the wide range of data structures and database management systems (DBMS) available for structuring CAD data. Examples of basic data types are drawn from the MODULA-2 language. The relationship between these basic data types, their composite structures and the classical data models (on which many DBMS are based) is discussed, and the limitations of existing DBMS in modelling CAD data highlighted. A set of requirements for CAD database management systems is drawn up and the emerging role of product models (which seek to encapsulate the totality of data elements required to define fully an engineering artefact) is explored.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id acfa
authors Brown, A., Knight, M. and Nahab, May
year 1996
title Computer Generated Architectural Images in Practice: what kind and when?
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 79-86
summary The production of near-photorealistic images of buildings is becoming increasingly common. The software to produce reasonably sophisticated images being available at affordable prices and the increasing power of generally affordable computers have contributed to this trend. It is also probably the case that the run-of-the-mill architectural practice sees the competition producing this kind of image with a superficially beguiling quality and follow suit. What we ask in this paper is whether we should be more thoughtful about the kind of image used? Should the kind of image chosen to suit the stage of the design that it applies to and the nature of the human agents viewing the image? Of course, in posing the question we imply our answer, that it should. What we do in this paper is to illustrate why we feel it should and what the consequences are for the education of architects who are about to join the world of practice.
series eCAADe
email andygpb@liv.ac.uk
last changed 1998/08/17 13:34

_id 73a3
authors Case, Michael P.
year 1996
title Discourse Model for collaborative design
source Computer-Aided Design, Vol. 28 (5) (1996) pp. 333-345
summary A Discourse Model, including a structure and a process, is developed that provides software support for collaborative engineering design. The model shares characteristics of other design systems in the literature,including frames, constraints, semantic networks, and libraries of sharable design objects. It contributes a new model for conflict-aware agents, dynamic identification and dissemination of agent interest sets, avirtual workspace language, automatic detection of conflict, and a unique protocol for negotiation that ensures that interested agents have an opportunity to participate. The model is implementation independent andapplicable to many research and commercial design environments currently available. An example scenario is provided in the architecture/engineering/construction domain that illustrates collaboration during theconceptual design of a fire station.
keywords Agent, Conflict, Discourse Design Collaboration, Concurrent Engineering, Blackboard Architecture, KQML
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:33

_id e2c4
authors Comair, C., Kaga, A. and Sasada, T.
year 1996
title Collaborative Design System with Network Technologies in Design Projects
source CAADRIA ‘96 [Proceedings of The First Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 9627-75-703-9] Hong Kong (Hong Kong) 25-27 April 1996, pp. 269-286
summary This paper depicts the work of the team of researchers at the Sasada Laboratory in the area of collaborative design and the integration of global area network such as the Internet in order to extend the architectural studio into cyber-space. The Sasada Laboratory is located at the University of Osaka, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Environmental engineering, Japan. The portfolio of the Laboratory is extensive and impressive. The projects which were produced by the men and women of the Laboratory range from the production of databases and computer simulation of several segments of different cities throughout the world to specific studies of architectural monuments. The work performed on the databases was varied and included simulation of past, present, and future events. These databases were often huge and very complex to build. They presented challenges that sometimes seemed impossible to overcome. Often, specialised software, and in some cases hardware, had to be designed on the "fly” for the task. In this paper, we describe the advances of our research and how our work led us to the development of hardware and software. Most importantly, it depicts the methodology of work which our lab undertook. This research led to the birth of what we call the "Open Development Environment” (ODE) and later to the networked version of ODE (NODE). The main purpose of NODE is to allow various people, usually separated by great distances, to work together on a given project and to introduce computer simulation into the working environment. Today, our laboratory is no longer limited to the physical location of our lab. Thanks to global area networks, such as the Internet, our office has been extended into the virtual space of the web. Today, we exchange ideas and collaborate on projects using the network with people that are spread over the five continents.
series CAADRIA
email ccomair@digipen.edu
last changed 2003/05/17 07:54

_id ddssar9603
id ddssar9603
authors Daru, R. and Snijder, H.P.S.
year 1996
title Morphogenetic Designing in Architecture resolving controversies in and between design, research and development
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary There is a dearth of software able to support the working styles of all types of designers and design scholars, spanning the whole spectrum of hermeneutical and empirical traditions. The development of morphogenetic designing in architecture opens new possibilities to bridge the gap between the different traditions. It can support the birth of forms evolving one from the other with the help of local and global rules in genetic algorithms and neural networks which translate the wishes of the designer. It can also support the communication about these forms and the testing of their adequacy. On the other hand the design process which is reflected in the sequence of form generating acts can be studied by design researchers better than by protocols alone.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 5e49
authors Deering, Michael F.
year 1996
title HoloSketch: A Virtual Reality Sketching/Animation Tool Special Issue on Virtual Reality Software and Technology
source Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction 1995 v.2 n.3 pp. 220-238
summary This article describes HoloSketch, a virtual reality-based 3D geometry creation and manipulation tool. HoloSketch is aimed at providing nonprogrammers with an easy-to-use 3D "What-You-See-Is-What-You-Get" environment. Using head-tracked stereo shutter glasses and a desktop CRT display configuration, virtual objects can be created with a 3D wand manipulator directly in front of the user, at very high accuracy and much more rapidly than with traditional 3D drawing systems. HoloSketch also supports simple animation and audio control for virtual objects. This article describes the functions of the HoloSketch system, as well as our experience so far with more-general issues of head-tracked stereo 3D user interface design.
keywords Computer Graphics; Picture/Image Generation; Display Algorithms; Computer Graphics; Three-Dimensional Graphics and Realism; Human Factors; 3D Animation; 3D Graphics; Graphics Drawing Systems; Graphics Painting Systems; Man-Machine Interface; Virtual Reality
series other
last changed 2002/07/07 14:01

_id ddssar9604
id ddssar9604
authors Demir, Yueksel
year 1996
title CAD Systems for early design phases or CAD systems for designers' early phases
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary Most of the problems, related with the use of CAD systems are the results of some general principles; the philosophy that, those systems are based on. Therefore, mainly the relation between these principles and early design phase performance of CAD systems and designers are discussed in this paper. The circumstances of novice CAD user architects in Turkey is considered first. In formation of the research, the knowledge gained during my personal experience based on real cases from the university (education, research) and practice (design, consulting) is used. Beside this the results of a survey including a serious of interviews projecting the opinions of the architects is used. Vendors of commonly used CAD systems were interviewed. In this manner to answer the main question about the relation of "CAD" and "early design phase" the answers of some following questions and facts were investigated: What means CAD for architects? What are the main purposes of using CAD? Are CAD systems sufficient to be used in early design phases in terms of either hardware and / or software, or should we say thinkware?. The advantages and disadvantages of using CAD. The target user fact and its consequences (the difference between general purpose systems and the sophisticated architectural systems). Should we adapt to computerized way of thinking? Is 3D a basic feature? What are the education related problems of CAD? Is software integration problem solved? Modularity concept for CAD systems. What is the minimum time, and the budget required for a start? The illegal software use problem Complaints, demands, needs and thanks of architects? Simply, what do architects expect from CAD during design process and particularly in early phases (both of design and designer)? Do CAD systems match this?
keywords CAD, Information Technology, Office Automation
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 656d
authors Donath , Dirk and Regenbrecht, Holger
year 1996
title Using Virtual Reality Aided Design Techniques for Three-dimensional Architectural Sketching
source Design Computation: Collaboration, Reasoning, Pedagogy [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-05-5] Tucson (Arizona / USA) October 31 - November 2, 1996, pp. 199-212
summary With this paper we would like to introduce a system which supports the early phases of the architectural design process. The system consists of two main components: the software solution "voxDesign" and the physical environment "platform". Our aims are: to formulate, develop, and evaluate an architectural design system through the use of VR (virtual reality) space. The exploration and development of design intentions is supplemented by a new method of three dimensional sketching. In the second part of this paper we will show how these components were used to train students in architecture and design at our university. Parts of this paper were published to the academic public at "Designing Digital Space". (Regenbrecht 1996)
keywords Virtual Reality, Architectural Design, Human-computer interfaces, Design Techniques
series ACADIA
email donath@archit.uni-weimar.de
last changed 2001/06/22 15:14

_id 011e
authors Engeli, M. and Kurmann, D.
year 1996
title Spatial objects and intelligent agents in a virtual environment
source Automation in Construction 5 (3) (1996) pp. 141-150
summary Many CAD software tools are available today for architectural design. They are useful for drafting, but tools that support design development in an early stage are still missing. In a conceptual phase of the design aspects other than precision and measurements become important. With today's knowledge and technological possibilities new ways of interaction, different data structures and intelligent support tools can be implemented. This article describes our research on new ways to support the design development in an early stage. The concept of modelling spaces, the virtual modelling tool and the integration of intelligent agents are described.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 5273
authors Gortib, Sreenivasa R. and Srirama, Ram D.
year 1996
title From symbol to form: a framework for conceptual design
source Computer-Aided Design, Vol. 28 (11) (1996) pp. 853-870
summary This paper presents the design of a software framework for conceptual design. It develops an approach to mapping an evolving symbolic description of design into a geometric description. The distinct elements ofthe symbol-form mapping are: (a) deriving spatial relationships between objects as a consequence of the functional relationship; (b) instantiating alternative feasible solutions subject to these relationships; and (c)presenting the evolving descriptions of geometry. Computational support for each of these elements is provided within a conceptual design framework. The paper presents components of the framework, explicitlyidentifies interactions between these components, and explains how these interactions are developed into an integrated framework. It presents the rationale for the design decisions made in the framework. Anexample is presented to clarify the approach adopted. The applicability of the approach is then discussed.
keywords Conceptual Design, Symbol-Form Mapping, Knowledge-Based Systems, Knowledge Representation, Constraint Satisfaction
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:33

_id ab45
authors Gu, Jingwen
year 1996
title Natural Results from Advances in Computer Techniques - CAAD Teaching in China Yesterday, Today and Tomorrow
source CAADRIA ‘96 [Proceedings of The First Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 9627-75-703-9] Hong Kong (Hong Kong) 25-27 April 1996, pp. 21-26
summary The computer science has been becoming one of the most rapidly developed science areas in the world since 1970s. Many new and powerful solutions to engineering and scientific problems are based on computers. Now the applications and teaching of computer techniques are quickly towards almost all of the fields including architecture and urban planning. Of course, the advances of application of computers in particular fields and teachings are very different for some reasons. CAAD is one of few fields in which the teaching states, teaching ways and level are obviously different from university to university and from one area or country to another. In this paper the history of CAD and CAAD applications in China is first briefly reviewed. Then the CAAD activities including teaching and research work at Tongji University are introduced, and the social, economical, functional, technical and physical factors that have effects on CAAD teaching are discussed. What is currently included in our CAAD program is also discussed. As the further advances in computer technology including both software and hardware, What CAAD will include and in what way CAAD will be taught and the CAAD collaborative research projects will be taken remotely are shown finally.
series CAADRIA
email uplab@mail.tongji.edu.cn
last changed 2003/05/17 07:54

_id a115
authors Hanna, R.
year 1996
title A Computer-based Approach for Teaching Daylighting at the Early Design Stage
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 181-190
summary This paper has reviewed the literature on the teaching of daylight systems design in architectural education, and found that traditionally such teaching has evolved around the prediction of the Daylight Factor (DF%), i.e. illuminance, via two methods one studio-based and another laboratory based. The former relies on graphical and/or mathematical techniques, e.g. the BRE Protractors, the BRE Tables, Waldram Diagrams, the Pepper-pot diagrams and the BRE formula. The latter tests scale models of buildings under artificial sky conditions (CIE sky). The paper lists the advantages and disadvantages of both methods in terms of compatibility with the design process, time required, accuracy, energy-consumption facts, and visual information.

This paper outlines a proposal for an alternative method for teaching daylight and artificial lighting design for both architectural students and practitioners. It is based on photorealistic images as well as numbers, and employs the Lumen Micro 6.0 programme. This software package is a complete indoor lighting design and analysis programme which generates perspective renderings and animated walk-throughs of the space lighted naturally and artificially.

The paper also presents the findings of an empirical case study to validate Lumen Micro 6.0 by comparing simulated output with field monitoring of horizontal and vertical illuminance and luminance inside the highly acclaimed GSA building in Glasgow. The monitoring station was masterminded by the author and uses the Megatron lighting sensors, Luscar dataloggers and the Easylog analysis software. In addition photographs of a selected design studio inside the GSA building were contrasted with computer generated perspective images of the same space.

series eCAADe
email gtca09@udcf.gla.ac.uk
last changed 1998/08/17 13:41

_id b6a7
authors Jensen, K.
year 1996
title Coloured Petri Nets: Basic Concepts
source 2nd ed., Springer Verlag, Berlin
summary This book presents a coherent description of the theoretical and practical aspects of Coloured Petri Nets (CP-nets or CPN). It shows how CP-nets have been developed - from being a promising theoretical model to being a full-fledged language for the design, specification, simulation, validation and implementation of large software systems (and other systems in which human beings and/or computers communicate by means of some more or less formal rules). The book contains the formal definition of CP-nets and the mathematical theory behind their analysis methods. However, it has been the intention to write the book in such a way that it also becomes attractive to readers who are more interested in applications than the underlying mathematics. This means that a large part of the book is written in a style which is closer to an engineering textbook (or a users' manual) than it is to a typical textbook in theoretical computer science. The book consists of three separate volumes. The first volume defines the net model (i.e., hierarchical CP-nets) and the basic concepts (e.g., the different behavioural properties such as deadlocks, fairness and home markings). It gives a detailed presentation of many small examples and a brief overview of some industrial applications. It introduces the formal analysis methods. Finally, it contains a description of a set of CPN tools which support the practical use of CP-nets. Most of the material in this volume is application oriented. The purpose of the volume is to teach the reader how to construct CPN models and how to analyse these by means of simulation. The second volume contains a detailed presentation of the theory behind the formal analysis methods - in particular occurrence graphs with equivalence classes and place/transition invariants. It also describes how these analysis methods are supported by computer tools. Parts of this volume are rather theoretical while other parts are application oriented. The purpose of the volume is to teach the reader how to use the formal analysis methods. This will not necessarily require a deep understanding of the underlying mathematical theory (although such knowledge will of course be a help). The third volume contains a detailed description of a selection of industrial applications. The purpose is to document the most important ideas and experiences from the projects - in a way which is useful for readers who do not yet have personal experience with the construction and analysis of large CPN diagrams. Another purpose is to demonstrate the feasibility of using CP-nets and the CPN tools for such projects. Together the three volumes present the theory behind CP-nets, the supporting CPN tools and some of the practical experiences with CP-nets and the tools. In our opinion it is extremely important that these three research areas have been developed simultaneously. The three areas influence each other and none of them could be adequately developed without the other two. As an example, we think it would have been totally impossible to develop the hierarchy concepts of CP-nets without simultaneously having a solid background in the theory of CP-nets, a good idea for a tool to support the hierarchy concepts, and a thorough knowledge of the typical application areas.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

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