CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 479

_id ddssup9601
id ddssup9601
authors Aoke, Yoshitsugu and Muraoka, Naoto
year 1996
title An optimization method of the facility location by genetic algorithm
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary In planning of community-facilities, it is important to decide the facility location to provide the effective service for residents. The behavior of residents using the facility and the evaluation methods of the location have been studied. But, finding the optimum location is very hard in actual planning because the volume of calculation depends on the number of feasible locating points of facilities. To conquer the difficulty of searching the optimum location, we propose an optimization method using Genetic Algorithm. An alternative of location is expressed by a chromosome. Each chromosome consists of genes, and each gene expresses a located zone of the facility. We gave definitions of genetic procedures; crossing-over, mutation and selection. Alternatives of the facility location are generated by these genetic procedures like as life evolution. For each alternative, the behaviors of users are estimated by a spatial-interaction model, and the facilities that residents in each place choose are determined. The effectiveness of the location is measured by a total sum of distances between the facility and the user. After the confirmation of the effectiveness of our method by applying on ideal example problems, we applied it on the actual problem in Japanese town. By this method we could find the optimum location in about one-third time and effort as compared with the ordinal method.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 7b57
authors Chase, Scott Curland
year 1996
title Modeling Designs with Shape Algebras and Formal Logic
source University of California
summary A formal, hierarchical model of shape, spatial relations and non-spatial properties is presented, constructed from first principles of geometry, topology and logic. The combination of the two major paradigms used here, shape algebras and logic, is one which has been largely unexplored. The underlying interest is the development of generalized design modeling systems in which the components may be used for a variety of synthesis and recognition problems. The algebras of shape described by Stiny have been shown to be useful in the generation and analysis of designs. The generality of their representations, their non-reliance upon predetermined structure, and their use in combination provide a richness of expression lacking in more traditional representations. The use of formal logic as a specification tool for modeling spatial relations is investigated here. Logic has proven itself useful as a programming and specification tool, providing advantages over traditional procedural programming methods. Among those is the ability to specify the knowledge to be encapsulated in a model without the need to specify data manipulation procedures. It is argued that specification in logic provides a natural method of development. The model is developed by extending the formalisms of shape algebras with the use of logic to make more precise, generalized, parametric definitions of shape and spatial relations than has been previously possible. The value of such a model is demonstrated by the use of these generalized spatial relations for solving typical problems in the fields of geographic information systems and architecture. The advantages of the representations used over more traditional 'kit-of-parts' models is also illustrated.
series thesis:PhD
email s.c.chase@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id 7b7e
id 7b7e
authors Stahl, Benedikt
year 1996
title EXPERIMENTAL SPATIAL STRUCTURES
source Full-Scale Modeling in the Age of Virtual Reality [6th EFA-Conference Proceedings]
summary To speak about Experimental Spatial Structures at first means to find the right definition. Therefore we have to find definitions for three different subjects experiment, space and structure. Experiment - that means to perform scientific experiments. The attempt, the test, the simulation, the model. To do experimental work, that means to take measurements, to count, to compare, to try analyzing, to find out differences between substances. In our case, the experimental character of our work is impressed on working by using different methods to show the basic idea of our theme. To act and to use the full-scale-models with your body. Space - that means architectural space which is defined through architectural spatial elements: wall, ceiling, floor, corner, staircase, way, opening, border, edge and so on. So to speak the substances we need to do our experiments. Structure - means order. The contemplation and the comparison of different spatial structures allows the division of different basic subjects like: euclidian structures or physical structures or the depth of space and so on. To analyze or to design architectural space by using spatial structures as one possibility to do architectural work. As a summary: the experiment or the attempt to show architectural, spatial structures. Space and spatial structures are not only impressed by forms but also and as a main thing by action and moving in space. The role of full-scale modeling, of experimental work related to “reality” in architecture is to simulate basic situations which are not dependent on ideas how they are developed in particular. We try to give some instructions or impressions of elementary architectural structures which can be used as instruments to design space of life.
keywords Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
last changed 2007/07/26 05:34

_id ddssar9621
id ddssar9621
authors van Leeuwen, J.P., Wagter, H. R. and Oxman, M.
year 1996
title Information Modelling for Design Support - a Feature-based approach
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary The research described in this paper addresses the problem of modelling design information with respect to the dynamic nature of design. This requires information models to be highly flexible and extensible with domain-specific information-definitions. The approach followed in this research is inspired by the concepts of Features-technology, mainly applied in Mechanical Engineering, and results in a framework for defining flexible and extensible information models for architectural application. This approach distinguishes Generic Feature Types for the domain of architecture and Specific Feature Types for particular sub-domains. It proposes a classification of Feature Types, as well as an infrastructure that accommodates the definition and particularization of Features Types. The research involves the development of a pilot-system for the computational support of this Dynamic Information-Modelling approach. At the end of this paper we discuss the possibilities of the Feature-based Modelling approach as a basis for design support systems.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id avocaad_2001_16
id avocaad_2001_16
authors Yu-Ying Chang, Yu-Tung Liu, Chien-Hui Wong
year 2001
title Some Phenomena of Spatial Characteristics of Cyberspace
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary "Space," which has long been an important concept in architecture (Bloomer & Moore, 1977; Mitchell, 1995, 1999), has attracted interest of researchers from various academic disciplines in recent years (Agnew, 1993; Benko & Strohmayer, 1996; Chang, 1999; Foucault, 1982; Gould, 1998). Researchers from disciplines such as anthropology, geography, sociology, philosophy, and linguistics regard it as the basis of the discussion of various theories in social sciences and humanities (Chen, 1999). On the other hand, since the invention of Internet, Internet users have been experiencing a new and magic "world." According to the definitions in traditional architecture theories, "space" is generated whenever people define a finite void by some physical elements (Zevi, 1985). However, although Internet is a virtual, immense, invisible and intangible world, navigating in it, we can still sense the very presence of ourselves and others in a wonderland. This sense could be testified by our naming of Internet as Cyberspace -- an exotic kind of space. Therefore, as people nowadays rely more and more on the Internet in their daily life, and as more and more architectural scholars and designers begin to invest their efforts in the design of virtual places online (e.g., Maher, 1999; Li & Maher, 2000), we cannot help but ask whether there are indeed sensible spaces in Internet. And if yes, these spaces exist in terms of what forms and created by what ways?To join the current interdisciplinary discussion on the issue of space, and to obtain new definition as well as insightful understanding of "space", this study explores the spatial phenomena in Internet. We hope that our findings would ultimately be also useful for contemporary architectural designers and scholars in their designs in the real world.As a preliminary exploration, the main objective of this study is to discover the elements involved in the creation/construction of Internet spaces and to examine the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces. In addition, this study also attempts to investigate whether participants from different academic disciplines define or experience Internet spaces in different ways, and to find what spatial elements of Internet they emphasize the most.In order to achieve a more comprehensive understanding of the spatial phenomena in Internet and to overcome the subjectivity of the members of the research team, the research design of this study was divided into two stages. At the first stage, we conducted literature review to study existing theories of space (which are based on observations and investigations of the physical world). At the second stage of this study, we recruited 8 Internet regular users to approach this topic from different point of views, and to see whether people with different academic training would define and experience Internet spaces differently.The results of this study reveal that the relationship between human participants and Internet spaces is different from that between human participants and physical spaces. In the physical world, physical elements of space must be established first; it then begins to be regarded as a place after interaction between/among human participants or interaction between human participants and the physical environment. In contrast, in Internet, a sense of place is first created through human interactions (or activities), Internet participants then begin to sense the existence of a space. Therefore, it seems that, among the many spatial elements of Internet we found, "interaction/reciprocity" Ñ either between/among human participants or between human participants and the computer interface Ð seems to be the most crucial element.In addition, another interesting result of this study is that verbal (linguistic) elements could provoke a sense of space in a degree higher than 2D visual representation and no less than 3D visual simulations. Nevertheless, verbal and 3D visual elements seem to work in different ways in terms of cognitive behaviors: Verbal elements provoke visual imagery and other sensory perceptions by "imagining" and then excite personal experiences of space; visual elements, on the other hand, provoke and excite visual experiences of space directly by "mapping".Finally, it was found that participants with different academic training did experience and define space differently. For example, when experiencing and analyzing Internet spaces, architecture designers, the creators of the physical world, emphasize the design of circulation and orientation, while participants with linguistics training focus more on subtle language usage. Visual designers tend to analyze the graphical elements of virtual spaces based on traditional painting theories; industrial designers, on the other hand, tend to treat these spaces as industrial products, emphasizing concept of user-center and the control of the computer interface.The findings of this study seem to add new information to our understanding of virtual space. It would be interesting for future studies to investigate how this information influences architectural designers in their real-world practices in this digital age. In addition, to obtain a fuller picture of Internet space, further research is needed to study the same issue by examining more Internet participants who have no formal linguistics and graphical training.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 911c
authors Darken, Rudolph P.
year 1996
title Wayfinding in Large-Scale Virtual Worlds
source George Washington University
summary As important as navigation is to human performance in virtual worlds, it is an often overlooked problem in the design process. This dissertation reports an experiment intended to show that real-world wayfinding and environmental design principles are effective in designing virtual worlds which support skilled wayfinding behavior. The design principles are adapted from both the cognitive psychology literature and urban and architectural design methodologies. There are two categories of design principles; those that guide the organizational structure of the environment, and those that guide the use and presentation of maps. The study measures subject performance on a complex searching task in a number of virtual worlds with differing environmental cues. The environments are extremely large and consist of open sea, land, and ships which are used as targets for search tasks. The worlds are augmented with either a radial grid, a map, both, or neither. For each trial, the subject's viewpoint position and orientation was sampled approximately once per second. A verbal protocol with accompanying video was used to elicit information about the search strategies employed. A map drawing exercise followed each trial in order to gain insight to the subject's spatial knowledge (i.e. cognitive map) of the environment. The results show that subjects in the treatment without any additional cues were often disoriented and had extreme difficulty completing the task. The grid was shown to provide superior directional information but both treatments using the map were superior overall due to the geocentric perspective provided. Behaviors associated with each treatment indicate that the cues had a strong effect on both search performance and search strategy. The results suggest that users of large-scale virtual worlds require structure in order to effectively navigate. Augmentations such as direction indicators, maps, and path restriction can all greatly improve both wayfinding performance and overall user satisfaction.
series thesis:PhD
email darken@enews.nrl.navy.mil
more http://www.seas.gwu.edu/~sibert/darken/publications/Dissertation_95/thesis.html
last changed 2003/02/12 21:37

_id diss_fox
id diss_fox
authors Fox, M.A.
year 1996
title Novel Affordances of Computation to the Design Process of Kinetic Structures
source Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, MA
summary This paper is a discourse into the relationship between the process, computational tools and the role which symbolic structure can play in both. I argue the relationship of the process and tools is dialectic, whereby the tools we utilize in design develop new heuristics, the methodologies in turn, if reflectively understood, can be more aptly facilitated through the development of novel tools. The tools and the process then evolve together. A theory is laid out exploring the human visual information processing systems pertinence to the limitations in mental three-dimensional imaging and transformation operations as relevant to the operations of drawing and mental visualization within the architectural design processes, substantiating the designers necessity to draw (by traditional means, but more importantly here, through the inclusive integration of CAD within the process). The necessity to draw is explored as a representational process to the visual system as predicated upon the existence of a structured internal library of diagram-like representations in our heads. I argue that the ways we utilize such idiosyncratic libraries is predicated upon the ways in which we go about structuring the perceived experienced world around us into symbol systems. And finally, the ways we utilize our reflective understanding of the heuristic transformations of these symbols within the design process in the context of a CAD environment are explored as a means to an enhanced understanding of that which is being designed and consequently as a vehicle for the development of future CAD systems to better facilitate such methodologies of designing. A personal design process of several kinetic structures is carried out in order to arrive at a localized process analysis within computer-aided design environment. Through an interactive, reflective process analysis, conclusions are drawn as to the affordances and limitations of such tools as suggestive of the operations a CAD environment might perform so as to better foster future methodologies of designing. The design experiments are utilized as a vehicle to understand the process. Specifically three kinetic projects are exploited for the prototypical operations they display. When difficulties or mental limitations are encountered with the operations, specific tools are developed to facilitate the limitation or to overcome the problem.
series thesis:MSc
more http://www.mafox.net/sm_thesis/Thesis11.pdf
last changed 2003/11/28 06:35

_id 3a63
authors Kaynak, O.
year 1998
title Computational intelligence: soft computing and fuzzy-neuro integration with applications
source Springer, Berlin
summary Soft computing is a consortium of computing methodologies that provide a foundation for the conception, design, and deployment of intelligent systems and aims to formalize the human ability to make rational decisions in an environment of uncertainty and imprecision. This book is based on a NATO Advanced Study Institute held in 1996 on soft computing and its applications. The distinguished contributors consider the principal constituents of soft computing, namely fuzzy logic, neurocomputing, genetic computing, and probabilistic reasoning, the relations between them, and their fusion in industrial applications. Two areas emphasized in the book are how to achieve a synergistic combination of the main constituents of soft computing and how the combination can be used to achieve a high Machine Intelligence Quotient.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ddssup9615
id ddssup9615
authors Lucardie, L., de Gelder, J. and Duursma, C.
year 1996
title Matching the Knowledge Needs of Trade and Industry: Advanced and Operational Knowledge Based Systems
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary Complex tasks that are being performed in trade and industry such as diagnosis, engineering and planning, increasingly require rapid and easy access to large amounts of complicated knowledge. To cope with these demands on trade and industry, advanced automated support for managing knowledge seems to be needed. Knowledge based systems are claimed to match these needs. However, to deal with the vast volume and complexity of knowledge through knowledge based systems, preconditions at three computer systems levels should be fulfilled. At the first level, called the knowledge level, the development of knowledge based systems requires a well-elaborated theory of the nature of knowledge that helps to get a clear and consistent definition of knowledge. By providing guidelines for selecting and developing methodologies and for organising the mathematical functions underlying knowledge representation formalisms, such a definition significantly advances the process of knowledge engineering. Here, we present the theory of functional object-types as a theory of the nature of knowledge. At the second level, called the symbol level, the representation formalisms used must be compatible with the chosen theory of the nature of knowledge. The representation formalisms also have to be interpretable as propositions representing knowledge, so that their knowledge level import can be assessed. Furthermore, knowledge representation formalisms have to play a causal role in the intelligent behaviour of the knowledge based system. At the third level, called the systems level, a knowledge based system should be equipped with facilities that enable an effective management of the representation formalisms used. Yet other system facilities are needed to allow the knowledge base to communicate with existing computer systems used in the daily practice of trade and industry, for instance Database Management Systems, Geographical Information Systems and Computer Aided Design Systems. It should be taken into account that these systems may run in different networks and on different operating systems. A real-world knowledge based system that operates in the field of soil contamination exemplifies the development of an advanced and operational knowledge-based system that complies with the preconditions at each computer systems level.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 4b22
authors Moorhouse, J.
year 1996
title Teach a Man to Catch a Fish
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 281-286
summary An international charity outlined the following principle recently in an advertisement. “Give a man a fish and he will feed himself for a day, teach a man how to catch a fish and he will feed himself for a lifetime.” In education, the same principle may be applied to learning.

To the student of architecture, skills in the use of commercial software may be advantageouus in the search for future employment and can prove for be a useful springboard for exploring the potential of CAAD in a broader sense. However, software (and hardware) is continually being upgraded and developed, and it is apparent that such software does not fully meet the need of the designer.

Exploring the possibilities of CAADesigning as an integral part of learning to design will equip the student with the CAAD literacy necessary for working in practice, but more importantly will provide the student with a rich and diverse understanding of design approaches.

Traditionally design tutors have taught (by example) how individual architects design. Providing a library of architects CAADesigning in different ways can be used to establish precedents and examples, demystify the activities to both students and tutors and provide a rich set of methodologies as a working context for students to draw inspiration from.

As part of an ongoing research study, a new direction has been taken gathering, comparing, contrasting and grouping live records of architects CAADesigning. This paper will outline the benefits of recording and creating such a library and will describe examples of recent findings.

series eCAADe
email j.moorhouse@livjm.ac.uk
last changed 1998/08/17 14:24

_id cd74
authors Rezgui, Y., Brown, A., Cooper, G., Yip, J., Brandon, P. and Kirkham, J.
year 1996
title An information management model for concurrent construction engineering
source Automation in Construction 5 (4) (1996) pp. 343-355
summary Projects in the construction industry are increasingly characterised by large numbers of actors working concurrently at different locations and using heterogeneous technologies. In order to support this kind of collaborative engineering, project information needs to be conceptually modelled throughout its lifecycle, along with the events that impact upon it by causing state changes. There exists, therefore, an urgent need to provide a flexible framework in which the highly interleaved and interactive events and transactions inherent in complex construction projects can be managed effectively. This paper addresses these issues by proposing such a conceptual framework consisting of four levels of abstraction and functionality governed by the COMMIT (Construction Modelling and Methodologies for Intelligent inTegration of information) Information Management Model (CIMM). A comprehensive presentation of the CIMM (which tackles issues such as versioning, notification, object rights and ownership) is given. The CIMM also facilitates the recording of the intent behind construction project decisions, thereby providing a complete project history. Finally, the model is illustrated through two proposed scenarios dealing with selected objects' lifecycles during design stages and actor transaction management.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:23

_id c2cf
authors Roberts, Andrew
year 1996
title CAAD - The Role of the Design Tutor
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 381-386
summary Whilst it is often argued that computers have an positive role to play in the educational process, design tutors frequently view computer based design work as being of inferior quality to that of designs produced by traditional means. This may be no fault of the technology, but more likely a consequence of a student’s inappropriate use of that technology. It could be argued that part of the role of the design tutor is to encourage students to use technology in a more appropriate way, rather than to totally discourage the use of computers in their designs. The introduction of computer technologies has led to new ways of designing, which may be very different to the methods of design that are traditionally taught. This paper proposes that the successful implementation of CAAD in Architectural design education, can only be achieved if design tutors fully appreciate and embrace these new design methodologies, in a way which extends beyond the need to simply accept the new technology.

series eCAADe
email robertsas@cf.ac.uk
more http://ctiweb.cf.ac.uk/
last changed 1998/08/17 14:01

_id sigradi2006_c020a
id sigradi2006_c020a
authors Vasquez de Velasco de la Puente, Guillermo; Garcia Alvarado, Rodrigo and Bustos, Gabriela
year 2006
title Taller Virtual de Las Américas: Análisis, Síntesis y Propuesta de Desarrollo en Ambientes Multiusuarios Interactivos [America’s Virtual studio: Analysis, Synthesis and Proposal for develop an interactive multi-user environment]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 105-109
summary As the title suggests, this paper makes an attempt to provide a factual analysis and synthesis of the activities that the Tex-Mex Virtual Design Studio, and later the Las Americas Virtual Design Studio, have been implementing since September of 1996, The objective of this attempt is to provide a framework for the formulation of a new conceptual and instrumental profile for future implementations of our virtual design studios. With such a purpose the paper outlines the importance of virtual design studios in the framework of opening design education to distance education methodologies and argues in favor of their further utilization for addressing issues of globalization in architecture and design education. This argument is followed by a quick description of current practices within the Las Americas Virtual Design Studio and sets the stage for a detailed description of how multi-user interactive environments may further support interaction within virtual design studios.
series SIGRADI
email vasquez@archone.tamu.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 09:02

_id acd7
authors Yueh, Shing
year 1996
title Architecture Design as Two Searches - Knowledge of Spatial Organization and Knowledge of Shape in Design Process
source CAADRIA ‘96 [Proceedings of The First Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 9627-75-703-9] Hong Kong (Hong Kong) 25-27 April 1996, pp. 217-221
summary In the theory of design research, design thinking has gradually become an important direction for the research. In early research of design thinking, due to the insufficiency of academic research in human thinking, we have been unable to make further research in the field of design thinking. However, with the remarkable development of a variety of subjects: such as management science, cognitive psychology as well as artificial intelligence and others, researchers engaged in design thinking have more clear methodologies and solid background to conduct research studies of design thinking process.
series CAADRIA
last changed 1999/01/31 14:13

_id a9ca
authors Abadi Abbo, Isaac
year 1996
title EFFECTIVENESS OF MODELS
source Full-Scale Modeling in the Age of Virtual Reality [6th EFA-Conference Proceedings]
summary Architects use many types of models to simulate space either in their design process or as final specifications for building them. These models have been proved useful or effective for specific purposes. This paper evaluates architectural models in terms of five effectiveness components: time of development, cost, complexity, variables simulated and ecological validity. This series of models, used regularly in architecture, are analysed to finally produce a matrix that shows the effectiveness of the different models for specific purposes in architectural design, research and education. Special emphasis is given to three specific models: 1/10 scale, full-scale and computer generated.
keywords Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa/
last changed 2016/02/17 12:47

_id ascaad2004_paper11
id ascaad2004_paper11
authors Abdelfattah, Hesham Khairy and Ali A. Raouf
year 2004
title No More Fear or Doubt: Electronic Architecture in Architectural Education
source eDesign in Architecture: ASCAAD's First International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design, 7-9 December 2004, KFUPM, Saudi Arabia
summary Operating electronic and Internet worked tools for Architectural education is an important, and merely a prerequisite step toward creating powerful tele-collabortion and tele-research in our Architectural studios. The design studio, as physical place and pedagogical method, is the core of architectural education. The Carnegie Endowment report on architectural education, published in 1996, identified a comparably central role for studios in schools today. Advances in CAD and visualization, combined with technologies to communicate images, data, and “live” action, now enable virtual dimensions of studio experience. Students no longer need to gather at the same time and place to tackle the same design problem. Critics can comment over the network or by e-mail, and distinguished jurors can make virtual visits without being in the same room as the pin-up—if there is a pin-up (or a room). Virtual design studios (VDS) have the potential to support collaboration over competition, diversify student experiences, and redistribute the intellectual resources of architectural education across geographic and socioeconomic divisions. The challenge is to predict whether VDS will isolate students from a sense of place and materiality, or if it will provide future architects the tools to reconcile communication environments and physical space.
series ASCAAD
email hkhairy@archcairo.org
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ddssar9601
id ddssar9601
authors Achten, H.H., Bax, M.F.Th. and Oxman, R.M.
year 1996
title Generic Representations and the Generic Grid: Knowledge Interface, Organisation and Support of the (early) Design Process
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary Computer Aided Design requires the implementation of architectural issues in order to support the architectural design process. These issues consist of elements, knowledge structures, and design processes that are typical for architectural design. The paper introduces two concepts that aim to define and model some of such architectural issues: building types and design processes. The first concept, the Generic grid, will be shown to structure the description of designs, provide a form-based hierarchical decomposition of design elements, and to provide conditions to accommodate concurrent design processes. The second concept, the Generic representation, models generic and typological knowledge of building types through the use of graphic representations with specific knowledge contents. The paper discusses both concepts and will show the potential of implementing Generic representations on the basis of the Generic grid in CAAD systems.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 2dbc
authors Achten, Henri
year 1996
title Teaching Advanced Architectural Issues Through Principles of CAAD
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 7-16
summary The paper discusses the differences between teaching CAAD by using standard software ("off-the-shelf"-software) and teaching the principles of CAAD ("principles-teaching"). The paper distinguishes four kinds of application for design systems in education: social systems, professional systems, educational systems, and innovative systems. The paper furthermore proposes to distinguish between computational issues and architectural issues relative to design systems. It appears that there is not a principled distinction between software-teaching and principles-teaching when it comes to computational issues of design systems. However, when the architectural content of CAAD systems is concerned, then principles of CAAD systems seem to be more appropriate for teaching. The paper presents work on generic representations as a specific case. Generic representations can be used to teach one particular kind of architectural content of design systems. The paper ends with conclusions.
series eCAADe
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
more http://www.ds.arch.tue.nl/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 846c
authors Achten, Henri
year 1996
title Generic Representations: Intermediate Structures in Computer Aided Architectural Composition.
source Approaches to Computer Aided Architectural Composition [ISBN 83-905377-1-0] 1996, pp. 9-24
summary The paper discusses research work on typological and generic knowledge in architectural design. Architectural composition occurs predominantly through drawings as a medium. Throughout the process, architects apply knowledge. The paper discusses the question how to accommodate this process in computers bearing in mind the medium of drawings and the application of knowledge. It introduces generic representations as one particular approach and discusses its implications by the concept of intermediate structures. The paper concludes with an evaluation of the presented ideas.
keywords
series other
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 1999/04/08 15:16

_id 765f
authors Adam, Holger
year 2002
title Reinterpretation or replacement? The effects of the information and communication technologies on urban space
source CORP 2002, Vienna, pp. 345-349
summary The timid question “Virtual spaces or real places?” forms the core of many debates within the spatial sciences addressing theconsequences of the rapid development of information and communication technologies1 on existing spatial structures. So far several opinions rival each other for the interpretation of current and the prediction of future spatial developments. The spacelessness ofcomputer networks and the possibility to transmit data in real-time have lead visionaries to predict a far-reaching devaluation of timeand space, so questioning the future importance of traditional spatial structures: The “annihilation of distance and time constraints [incomputer networks] could undermine the very rationale for the existence of the city by dissolving the need for physical proximity”(Graham and Marvin 1996: 318). The disappearance of the city into the net, therefore, seems to become a distinct possibility.
series other
email h-adam@gmx.de
more www.corp.at
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

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