CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 369

_id 215e
authors Bai, Rui-Yuan and Liu, Yu-Tung
year 1998
title Towards a Computerized Procedure for Visual Impact Analysis and Assessment - The Hsinchu Example
source CAADRIA ‘98 [Proceedings of The Third Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 4-907662-009] Osaka (Japan) 22-24 April 1998, pp. 67-76
summary This paper examines the procedure of visual impact analysis and assessment proposed by Rahman and reviews the use of CAD applications in urban projects in the real world. A preliminary computerized procedure for visual impact analysis and assessment is proposed. An experiments was conducted in our laboratory to verify the preliminary procedure. In order to further study the revised procedure in real urban projects, it was also applied into the renew project of The Eastern Gate Plaza located in the center of city Hsinchu, Taiwan from 1996 to 1998. According to several face-to-face discussions with Hsinchu habitants, government officials, and professional designers, a final computerized procedure for visual impact analysis and assessment is concluded.
keywords Environmental Simulation, Visual Impact Analysis and Assessment, Virtual Reality
series CAADRIA
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id e2c4
authors Comair, C., Kaga, A. and Sasada, T.
year 1996
title Collaborative Design System with Network Technologies in Design Projects
source CAADRIA ‘96 [Proceedings of The First Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 9627-75-703-9] Hong Kong (Hong Kong) 25-27 April 1996, pp. 269-286
summary This paper depicts the work of the team of researchers at the Sasada Laboratory in the area of collaborative design and the integration of global area network such as the Internet in order to extend the architectural studio into cyber-space. The Sasada Laboratory is located at the University of Osaka, Faculty of Engineering, Department of Environmental engineering, Japan. The portfolio of the Laboratory is extensive and impressive. The projects which were produced by the men and women of the Laboratory range from the production of databases and computer simulation of several segments of different cities throughout the world to specific studies of architectural monuments. The work performed on the databases was varied and included simulation of past, present, and future events. These databases were often huge and very complex to build. They presented challenges that sometimes seemed impossible to overcome. Often, specialised software, and in some cases hardware, had to be designed on the "fly” for the task. In this paper, we describe the advances of our research and how our work led us to the development of hardware and software. Most importantly, it depicts the methodology of work which our lab undertook. This research led to the birth of what we call the "Open Development Environment” (ODE) and later to the networked version of ODE (NODE). The main purpose of NODE is to allow various people, usually separated by great distances, to work together on a given project and to introduce computer simulation into the working environment. Today, our laboratory is no longer limited to the physical location of our lab. Thanks to global area networks, such as the Internet, our office has been extended into the virtual space of the web. Today, we exchange ideas and collaborate on projects using the network with people that are spread over the five continents.
series CAADRIA
email ccomair@digipen.edu
last changed 2003/05/17 07:54

_id a115
authors Hanna, R.
year 1996
title A Computer-based Approach for Teaching Daylighting at the Early Design Stage
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 181-190
summary This paper has reviewed the literature on the teaching of daylight systems design in architectural education, and found that traditionally such teaching has evolved around the prediction of the Daylight Factor (DF%), i.e. illuminance, via two methods one studio-based and another laboratory based. The former relies on graphical and/or mathematical techniques, e.g. the BRE Protractors, the BRE Tables, Waldram Diagrams, the Pepper-pot diagrams and the BRE formula. The latter tests scale models of buildings under artificial sky conditions (CIE sky). The paper lists the advantages and disadvantages of both methods in terms of compatibility with the design process, time required, accuracy, energy-consumption facts, and visual information.

This paper outlines a proposal for an alternative method for teaching daylight and artificial lighting design for both architectural students and practitioners. It is based on photorealistic images as well as numbers, and employs the Lumen Micro 6.0 programme. This software package is a complete indoor lighting design and analysis programme which generates perspective renderings and animated walk-throughs of the space lighted naturally and artificially.

The paper also presents the findings of an empirical case study to validate Lumen Micro 6.0 by comparing simulated output with field monitoring of horizontal and vertical illuminance and luminance inside the highly acclaimed GSA building in Glasgow. The monitoring station was masterminded by the author and uses the Megatron lighting sensors, Luscar dataloggers and the Easylog analysis software. In addition photographs of a selected design studio inside the GSA building were contrasted with computer generated perspective images of the same space.

series eCAADe
email gtca09@udcf.gla.ac.uk
last changed 1998/08/17 13:41

_id ddssar9615
id ddssar9615
authors Hill, S.M., Sinclair, B.S., Sandall, D., Butt, T.S., Sampson, N. and Blackie, N.
year 1996
title A Computer-Facilitated Approach for Development, Visualization and Testing of Functional Programming Information
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary Functional programming processes for complex architectural projects have traditionally been hampered by the static nature of available tools and technologies. Connection with user groups have likewise been disadvantaged through the employment of sender-oriented communications models that limit feedback and interaction. In addition, diminishing project budgets place increasing pressure on clients and consult-ants to develop more effective and efficient methods for the design and construction of buildings. This paper discusses a case-study involving the design of a highly complex medical laboratory wherein infoc mation technologies were used to facilitate the development, visualization and testing of functional pro-gramming information. The objectives for the project involved creating an environment where users and clients actively participate in consideration of programming directions and implications in a manner that would not only increase confidence that the program would meet user requirements now and in the future, but also would reduce redundant and or inefficient space within the overall building programme. In the approach used the distinction between programming and design is diminished to improve communication of desires and design responses. The findings of the study indicate that the computer-facilitated approach met the objectives of the project and that the methods developed hold promise for application across a broader range of project types.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 6006
authors Liu, Yu-Tung and Bai, Rui-Yuan
year 2001
title The Hsinchu experience: a computerized procedure for visual impact analysis and assessment
source Automation in Construction 10 (3) (2001) pp. 337-343
summary This paper examines the procedure of visual impact analysis and assessment (VIAA) proposed by Rahman and reviews the use of computer-aided design (CAD) applications in urban projects in the real world. A preliminary computerized procedure for VIAA is proposed. An experiment was conducted in our laboratory to verify the preliminary procedure. In order to further study the revised procedure in real urban projects, it was also applied into the renew project of The Eastern Gate Plaza located in the center of Hsinchu, Taiwan from 1996 to 1998. Based on the face-to-face discussions with Hsinchu habitants, government officials, and professional designers, a final computerized procedure for VIAA is concluded.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id ddss9837
id ddss9837
authors Liu, Yu-Tung and Bai, Rui-Yuan
year 1998
title The roles of virtual reality, image processing, and multimedia in thedesign of public spaces: 1997 Hsinchu Project
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary This paper examines the procedure of visual impact analysis and assessment proposed by Rahman and reviews the use of CAD applications in urban projects in the real world. A preliminary computerized procedure for visual impact analysis and assessment is proposed. An experiments wasconducted in our laboratory to verify the preliminary procedure. In order to further study the revised procedure in real urban projects, it was also applied into the renew project of The Eastern Gate Plaza located in the center of city Hsinchu, Taiwan from 1996 to 1998. According to several face-to-face discussions with Hsinchu habitants, government officials, and professional designers, a final computerized procedure for visual impact analysis and assessment is concluded.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 80fb
authors Woo, S.,Takenaka, Y. and Sasada, T.
year 1996
title Architectural Virtual Space in Design Education
source CAADRIA ‘96 [Proceedings of The First Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 9627-75-703-9] Hong Kong (Hong Kong) 25-27 April 1996, pp. 27-33
summary Our research in recent years has included the subject of providing collaborative work space in the field of architectural design. We propose to improve the quality of architectural design education by extending the physical space of the architectural laboratory into the virtual space of the network (i.e. Internet). In this paper, this extension is called the Architectural Virtual Space (AVS) system. The aim of this paper is to provide the AVS system with reality, interaction and real time, and to popularise architectural design education by providing the applications and power whenever needed for collaboration on the Internet in conjunction with the growth of various browsers of hypermedia.
series CAADRIA
last changed 2001/05/27 15:31

_id 8832
authors MacCallum, C. and Hanna, R.
year 1996
title DEFLECT: A Computer Aided Learning Package For Teaching Structural Design
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 253-262
summary The teaching of structures and its integration with design teaching has been seen as one of the major problems in design education in schools of architecture world-wide. A number of suggestions have been put forward to improve the quality of teaching in structures in architecture. These include the production of computer based learning materials, and the use of the computer as a ‘substitute’ tutor.

This paper reports on a SHEFC funded project jointly carried out by the Department of Civil Engineering, University of Paisley, the Mackintosh School of Architecture, and Lamp Software. The project aims to build a computer-assisted learning package on the response of structures to load. The software will be used as an interactive teaching tool for both architectural and engineering students.

The package has three levels: Beginners (Level 1), Intermediate (Level 2) and Advanced (Level 3). The first two levels have been completed after continuous feedback from both institutions. Level 1 is geared towards architectural and engineering students to help them understand structural behaviour of building components, such as deflection. Level 2 is a graphical editor that enables students to draw precisely the structure of their designs, investigate the deflection of structural members and identify areas of tension and compression. Level 3 is a design tool aimed at architectural and civil engineering students where they can design and analyse realistic structures by choosing structural members from a library, and specify materials and multiple loads.

Prior to its final release, the software package was appraised by students from both institutions. Analysis of results from questionnaires revealed that students expressed a great deal of 'satisfaction' with many of its teaching and learning attributes. The outcome of this project will promote and enhance students’ understanding of the response of structures to load; it will also help students grasp the impact of varying building materials and cross sectional properties on the structural form.

series eCAADe
email gtca09@udcf.gla.ac.uk
last changed 1998/08/17 13:48

_id e29d
authors Arvesen, Liv
year 1996
title LIGHT AS LANGUAGE
source Full-Scale Modeling in the Age of Virtual Reality [6th EFA-Conference Proceedings]
summary With the unlimited supply of electric light our surroundings very easily may be illuminated too strongly. Too much light is unpleasant for our eyes, and a high level of light in many cases disturbs the conception of form. Just as in a forest, we need shadows, contrasts and variation when we compose with light. If we focus on the term compose, it is natural to conceive our environment as a wholeness. In fact, this is not only aesthetically important, it is true in a physical context. Inspired by old windows several similar examples have been built in the Trondheim Full-scale Laboratory where depth is obtained by constructing shelves on each side of the opening. When daylight is fading, indirect artificial light from above gradually lightens the window. The opening is perceived as a space of light both during the day and when it is dark outside.

Another of the built examples at Trondheim University which will be presented, is a doctor's waitingroom. It is a case study of special interest because it often appears to be a neglected area. Let us start asking: What do we have in common when we are waiting to come in to a doctor? We are nervous and we feel sometimes miserable. Analysing the situation we understand the need for an interior that cares for our state of mind. The level of light is important in this situation. Light has to speak softly. Instead of the ordinary strong light in the middle of the ceiling, several spots are selected to lighten the small tables separating the seats. The separation is supposed to give a feeling of privacy. By the low row of reflected planes we experience an intimate and warming atmosphere in the room. A special place for children contributes to the total impression of calm. In this corner the inside of some shelves are lit by indirect light, an effect which puts emphasis on the small scale suitable for a child. And it also demonstrates the good results of variation. The light setting in this room shows how light is “caught” two different ways.

keywords Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa/
last changed 2004/05/04 12:34

_id 8c51
authors Schmitt, G., Wenz, F., Kurmann, D., Van der Mark, E.
year 1996
title Toward Virtual Reality in Architecture: Concepts and Scenarios from Architectural Space Laboratory
source Presence, Vol. 4, No. 3, July, pages pp. 267-285
summary Contributed by Bharat Dave (b.dave@architecture.unimelb.edu.au)
keywords 3D City modeling
series other
last changed 2001/06/04 18:23

_id a9ca
authors Abadi Abbo, Isaac
year 1996
title EFFECTIVENESS OF MODELS
source Full-Scale Modeling in the Age of Virtual Reality [6th EFA-Conference Proceedings]
summary Architects use many types of models to simulate space either in their design process or as final specifications for building them. These models have been proved useful or effective for specific purposes. This paper evaluates architectural models in terms of five effectiveness components: time of development, cost, complexity, variables simulated and ecological validity. This series of models, used regularly in architecture, are analysed to finally produce a matrix that shows the effectiveness of the different models for specific purposes in architectural design, research and education. Special emphasis is given to three specific models: 1/10 scale, full-scale and computer generated.
keywords Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa/
last changed 2016/02/17 12:47

_id ascaad2004_paper11
id ascaad2004_paper11
authors Abdelfattah, Hesham Khairy and Ali A. Raouf
year 2004
title No More Fear or Doubt: Electronic Architecture in Architectural Education
source eDesign in Architecture: ASCAAD's First International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design, 7-9 December 2004, KFUPM, Saudi Arabia
summary Operating electronic and Internet worked tools for Architectural education is an important, and merely a prerequisite step toward creating powerful tele-collabortion and tele-research in our Architectural studios. The design studio, as physical place and pedagogical method, is the core of architectural education. The Carnegie Endowment report on architectural education, published in 1996, identified a comparably central role for studios in schools today. Advances in CAD and visualization, combined with technologies to communicate images, data, and “live” action, now enable virtual dimensions of studio experience. Students no longer need to gather at the same time and place to tackle the same design problem. Critics can comment over the network or by e-mail, and distinguished jurors can make virtual visits without being in the same room as the pin-up—if there is a pin-up (or a room). Virtual design studios (VDS) have the potential to support collaboration over competition, diversify student experiences, and redistribute the intellectual resources of architectural education across geographic and socioeconomic divisions. The challenge is to predict whether VDS will isolate students from a sense of place and materiality, or if it will provide future architects the tools to reconcile communication environments and physical space.
series ASCAAD
email hkhairy@archcairo.org
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ddssar9601
id ddssar9601
authors Achten, H.H., Bax, M.F.Th. and Oxman, R.M.
year 1996
title Generic Representations and the Generic Grid: Knowledge Interface, Organisation and Support of the (early) Design Process
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary Computer Aided Design requires the implementation of architectural issues in order to support the architectural design process. These issues consist of elements, knowledge structures, and design processes that are typical for architectural design. The paper introduces two concepts that aim to define and model some of such architectural issues: building types and design processes. The first concept, the Generic grid, will be shown to structure the description of designs, provide a form-based hierarchical decomposition of design elements, and to provide conditions to accommodate concurrent design processes. The second concept, the Generic representation, models generic and typological knowledge of building types through the use of graphic representations with specific knowledge contents. The paper discusses both concepts and will show the potential of implementing Generic representations on the basis of the Generic grid in CAAD systems.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 846c
authors Achten, Henri
year 1996
title Generic Representations: Intermediate Structures in Computer Aided Architectural Composition.
source Approaches to Computer Aided Architectural Composition [ISBN 83-905377-1-0] 1996, pp. 9-24
summary The paper discusses research work on typological and generic knowledge in architectural design. Architectural composition occurs predominantly through drawings as a medium. Throughout the process, architects apply knowledge. The paper discusses the question how to accommodate this process in computers bearing in mind the medium of drawings and the application of knowledge. It introduces generic representations as one particular approach and discusses its implications by the concept of intermediate structures. The paper concludes with an evaluation of the presented ideas.
keywords
series other
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
last changed 1999/04/08 15:16

_id 2dbc
authors Achten, Henri
year 1996
title Teaching Advanced Architectural Issues Through Principles of CAAD
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 7-16
summary The paper discusses the differences between teaching CAAD by using standard software ("off-the-shelf"-software) and teaching the principles of CAAD ("principles-teaching"). The paper distinguishes four kinds of application for design systems in education: social systems, professional systems, educational systems, and innovative systems. The paper furthermore proposes to distinguish between computational issues and architectural issues relative to design systems. It appears that there is not a principled distinction between software-teaching and principles-teaching when it comes to computational issues of design systems. However, when the architectural content of CAAD systems is concerned, then principles of CAAD systems seem to be more appropriate for teaching. The paper presents work on generic representations as a specific case. Generic representations can be used to teach one particular kind of architectural content of design systems. The paper ends with conclusions.
series eCAADe
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
more http://www.ds.arch.tue.nl/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 63e6
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 1996
title Visualisation for Clients - One Example of Educating CAAD for Practice
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 17-24
summary During the spring term 1996, 13 students of the 3rd and 4th year at the School of Architecture at Lund University had the opportunity to make a one semester CAAD project. 11 students chose the individual exercise to use computer media for developing a small architectural design in interaction with a client. The focus was set more on visualization and the process of communicating ideas, feelings and practical solutions between architect and client and visa versa rather than concentrated on the final product.

This paper describes the process of the project and the reflections of the participants. It will discuss problems from the teachers point of view.

series eCAADe
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
more http://www.caad.lth.se/ECAADE/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 1fb3
authors Akin, O., Cumming, M., Shealey, M. and Tuncer, B.
year 1997
title An electronic design assistance tool for case-based representation of designs
source Automation in Construction 6 (4) (1997) pp. 265-274
summary In precedent based design, solutions to problems are developed by drawing from an understanding of landmark designs. Many of the key design operations in this mode are similar to the functionalities present in case-based reasoning systems: case matching, case adapting, and case representation. It is clear that a rich case-base, encoding all major product types in a design domain would be the centerpiece of such an approach. EDAT (Electronic Design Assistance Tool) is intended to assist in precedent based design in the studio with the potential of expansion into the office setting. EDAT has been designed using object oriented system development methods. EDAT was used in a design studio at Carnegie Mellon University, during Spring 1996.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 4cda
authors Akin, O., Cumming, M. , Shealey, M. and Tuncer, B.
year 1996
title An Electronic Design Assistance Tool for Case Based Representation of Designs
source Design Computation: Collaboration, Reasoning, Pedagogy [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-05-5] Tucson (Arizona / USA) October 31 - November 2, 1996, pp. 123-132
summary In precedent based design, solutions to problems are developed by drawing from an understanding of landmark designs. Many of the key design operations in this mode are similar to the functionalities present in case based reasoning systems: case matching, case adapting, and case representation. It is clear that a rich case base, encoding all major product types in a design domain would be the centerpiece of such an approach. EDAT (Electronic Design Assistance Tool) is intended to assist in precedent based design in the studio with the potential of expansion into the office setting. EDAT has been designed using object oriented system development methods. EDAT was used in a design studio at Carnegie Mellon University, during Spring 1996, and will be used in future studios, as well.
series ACADIA
email oa04@andrew.cmu.edu
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id d35f
authors Akin, O.
year 1997
title Researching Descriptive Models of Design
source Automation in Construction 7 (2-3) (1998) pp. 97-100
summary This special double issue is a result of the international symposium and workshop on „Descriptive Models of Design“ wich was held during July 1-5, 1996, at Istanbul Technical University, Istanbul, Turkey. The primary goal of the symposium was to promote greater understanding and to develop recommendations for funding policy and practices in the area of descriptive models of design.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id c204
authors Aleksander Asanowicz
year 1996
title Teaching and Learning - Full Brainwash
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 51-54
summary We often speak of changes in design process due to an application of computers. But in my opinion we more often rather speak of lack of changes. Lets hope that some day we will be able to witness full integrity and compatibility of design process and tools applied in it. Quite possible such an integrity may occur in the cyberspace. Nevertheless before that could happen some changes within the teaching methods at faculties of architecture, where despite great numbers of computer equipment used, the students are still being taught as in the XIX century. In terms of achieved results it proves ineffective because application of chalk and blackboard only will always loose to new media, which allow visual perception of dinosaurs in Jurassic Park. Our civilisation is the iconographic one. And that is why teaching methods are about to change. An application of computer as simply a slide projector seems to be way too expensive. New media demands new process and new process demands new media. Lets hope that could be achieved in cyberspace as being a combination of: classic ways of teaching, hypertext, multimedia, virtual reality and a new teaching methodology (as used in Berlitz English School - full brainwash). At our faculty several years ago we experimentally undertook and applied an Integrated Design Teaching Method. A student during design process of an object simultaneously learnt all aspects and functions of the object being designing i.e.: its structure, piping and wiring, material cost and even historic evolution of its form and function. Unfortunately that concept was too extravagant as for the seventies in our reality. At present due to wide implementation of new media and tools in design process we come to consider reimplementation of IDTM again.
series eCAADe
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

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