CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 41 to 60 of 479

_id 3386
authors Gavin, L., Keuppers, S., Mottram, C. and Penn, A.
year 2001
title Awareness Space in Distributed Social Networks
source Proceedings of the Ninth International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Futures [ISBN 0-7923-7023-6] Eindhoven, 8-11 July 2001, pp. 615-628
summary In the real work environment we are constantly aware of the presence and activity of others. We know when people are away from their desks, whether they are doing concentrated work, or whether they are available for interaction. We use this peripheral awareness of others to guide our interactions and social behaviour. However, when teams of workers are spatially separated we lose 'awareness' information and this severely inhibits interaction and information flow. The Theatre of Work (TOWER) aims to develop a virtual space to help create a sense of social awareness and presence to support distributed working. Presence, status and activity of other people are made visible in the theatre of work and allow one to build peripheral awareness of the current activity patterns of those who we do not share space with in reality. TOWER is developing a construction set to augment the workplace with synchronous as well as asynchronous awareness. Current, synchronous activity patterns and statuses are played out in a 3D virtual space through the use of symbolic acting. The environment itself however is automatically constructed on the basis of the organisation's information resources and is in effect an information space. Location of the symbolic actor in the environment can therefore represent the focus of that person's current activity. The environment itself evolves to reflect historic patterns of information use and exchange, and becomes an asynchronous representation of the past history of the organisation. A module that records specific episodes from the synchronous event cycle as a Docudrama forms an asynchronous information resource to give a history of team work and decision taking. The TOWER environment is displayed using a number of screen based and ambient display devices. Current status and activity events are supplied to the system using a range of sensors both in the real environment and in the information systems. The methodology has been established as a two-stage process. The 3D spatial environment will be automatically constructed or generated from some aspect of the pre-existing organisational structure or its information resources or usage patterns. The methodology must be extended to provide means for that structure to grow and evolve in the light of patterns of actual user behaviour in the TOWER space. We have developed a generative algorithm that uses a cell aggregation process to transcribe the information space into a 3d space. In stage 2 that space was analysed using space syntax methods (Hillier & Hanson, 1984; Hillier 1996) to allow the properties of permeability and intelligibility to be measured, and then these fed back into the generative algorithm. Finally, these same measures have been used to evaluate the spatialised behaviour that users of the TOWER space show, and will used to feed this back into the evolution of the space. The stage of transcription from information structure to 3d space through a generative algorithm is critical since it is this stage that allows neighbourhood relations to be created that are not present in the original information structure. It is these relations that could be expected to help increase social density.
keywords Algorithmic Form Generation, Distributed Workgroups, Space Syntax
series CAAD Futures
email l.gavin@ucl.ac.uk
last changed 2006/11/07 06:22

_id ddss2008-02
id ddss2008-02
authors Gonçalves Barros, Ana Paula Borba; Valério Augusto Soares de Medeiros, Paulo Cesar Marques da Silva and Frederico de Holanda
year 2008
title Road hierarchy and speed limits in Brasília/Brazil
source H.J.P. Timmermans, B. de Vries (eds.) 2008, Design & Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning, ISBN 978-90-6814-173-3, University of Technology Eindhoven, published on CD
summary This paper aims at exploring the theory of the Social Logic of Space or Space Syntax as a strategy to define parameters of road hierarchy and, if this use is found possible, to establish maximum speeds allowed in the transportation system of Brasília, the capital city of Brazil. Space Syntax – a theory developed by Hillier and Hanson (1984) – incorporates the space topological relationships, considering the city shape and its influence in the distribution of movements within the space. The theory’s axiality method – used in this study – analyses the accessibility to the street network relationships, by means of the system’s integration, one of its explicative variables in terms of copresence, or potential co-existence between the through-passing movements of people and vehicles (Hillier, 1996). One of the most used concepts of Space Syntax in the integration, which represents the potential flow generation in the road axes and is the focus of this paper. It is believed there is a strong correlation between urban space-form configuration and the way flows and movements are distributed in the city, considering nodes articulations and the topological location of segments and streets in the grid (Holanda, 2002; Medeiros, 2006). For urban transportation studies, traffic-related problems are often investigated and simulated by assignment models – well-established in traffic studies. Space Syntax, on the other hand, is a tool with few applications in transport (Barros, 2006; Barros et al, 2007), an area where configurational models are considered to present inconsistencies when used in transportation (cf. Cybis et al, 1996). Although this is true in some cases, it should not be generalized. Therefore, in order to simulate and evaluate Space Syntax for the traffic approach, the city of Brasília was used as a case study. The reason for the choice was the fact the capital of Brazil is a masterpiece of modern urban design and presents a unique urban layout based on an axial grid system considering several express and arterial long roads, each one with 3 to 6 lanes,
keywords Space syntax, road hierarchy
series DDSS
last changed 2008/09/01 15:06

_id ddssup9609
id ddssup9609
authors Hall, A.C.
year 1996
title Assessing the Role of Computer Visualisation in Planning Control: a recent case study
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary In papers to previous DDSS Conferences, and elsewhere, the author has developed an argument concerning the use of computer visualisation in the planning process. In essence, it proposes that: • visualisation can enable lay persons to play a more effective role and this can result in different and more effective decisions; • the level of realism employed should result from the basic requirements necessary to resolve the issue minimising the cost of production of the images. These points have been tested in repeated examples. The latest one concerns a new site that Anglia Polytechnic University has established in the centre of Chelmsford, UK. A computer model of the new campus showing both the existing and proposed buildings was commissioned from the author by the University for a visit by HM the Queen in June 1995. This model was subsequently adapted for use in the process of obtaining planning consent and the marketing of floorspace for the next building to be constructed. For this purpose, a higher level of realism was requested. The experience of achieving it confirmed the results of the previous research indicating the strong link between realism and cost. It also contributed new insights into the varying expectations of different professionals concerning the role of such a visualisation. The requirement of the architect for demonstrating all aspects of the design required a high level of realism than that required for planning and marketing purposes and was considerably more expensive. The low cost of use for planning purposes should be stressed but surprisingly, the lower level of realism implied may be easier for the lay person than the professional to accept.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id a115
authors Hanna, R.
year 1996
title A Computer-based Approach for Teaching Daylighting at the Early Design Stage
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 181-190
summary This paper has reviewed the literature on the teaching of daylight systems design in architectural education, and found that traditionally such teaching has evolved around the prediction of the Daylight Factor (DF%), i.e. illuminance, via two methods one studio-based and another laboratory based. The former relies on graphical and/or mathematical techniques, e.g. the BRE Protractors, the BRE Tables, Waldram Diagrams, the Pepper-pot diagrams and the BRE formula. The latter tests scale models of buildings under artificial sky conditions (CIE sky). The paper lists the advantages and disadvantages of both methods in terms of compatibility with the design process, time required, accuracy, energy-consumption facts, and visual information.

This paper outlines a proposal for an alternative method for teaching daylight and artificial lighting design for both architectural students and practitioners. It is based on photorealistic images as well as numbers, and employs the Lumen Micro 6.0 programme. This software package is a complete indoor lighting design and analysis programme which generates perspective renderings and animated walk-throughs of the space lighted naturally and artificially.

The paper also presents the findings of an empirical case study to validate Lumen Micro 6.0 by comparing simulated output with field monitoring of horizontal and vertical illuminance and luminance inside the highly acclaimed GSA building in Glasgow. The monitoring station was masterminded by the author and uses the Megatron lighting sensors, Luscar dataloggers and the Easylog analysis software. In addition photographs of a selected design studio inside the GSA building were contrasted with computer generated perspective images of the same space.

series eCAADe
email gtca09@udcf.gla.ac.uk
last changed 1998/08/17 13:41

_id maver_088
id maver_088
authors Henriques, P., Maver, T. and Retik, A.
year 1996
title Integration of Cost Planning in the Architectural Design of Housing - "CP/CAD Model"
source Application of the Performance Concept in Building (Ed: R Becker), vol 1, 2: 105-114
summary Cost estimation in the initial phases of a project is of great interest to the construction industry. This paper proposes a new way of the integration of an architectural project and its cost estimate so as to optimise the design solutions, according to technical and economic criteria. This work explores the capacity of an elemental cost estimation method for residential buildings, when integrated with Computer Aided Design systems, to increase cost estimate precision during the early stages of design. A Cost Planning and CAD model (CP/CAD) is developed by the integration of a database and a CAD system which provides for the automatic exchange of information relative to the geometric layout of the building, the construction element build-up and the construction costs of the same. Finally the CP/CAD model is tested through the estimation of costs for some theoretical cases and also for a group of one-family houses with similar architectural characteristics. The results show the increased precision and the advantages of the model for cost estimation in the early design stages.
series other
type normal paper
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2015/02/20 10:37

_id ddssar9616
id ddssar9616
authors Hunt, John
year 1996
title Establishing design directions for complex architectural projects: a decision support strategy
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary The paper seeks to identify characteristics of the design decision-making strategy implicit in the first placed design submissions for three significant architectural competitions: the Sydney Opera House competition, and two recent design competitions for university buildings in New Zealand. Cohn Rowe's (1982) characterisation of the design process is adopted as a basis for the analysis of these case studies. Rowe's fertile analogy between design and (criminal) detection is first outlined, then brought to bear on the case studies. By means of a comparison between the successful and selected unsuccessful design submissions in each case, aspects of Rowe's characterisation of the design process are confirmed. On the basis of this analysis several common features of the competition-winning submissions, and their implicit decision-making processes, are identified. The first of these features relates to establishing project or programmatic requirements and the prioritizing of these. The second concerns the role of design parameters or requirements that appear as conflicting or contradictory, in the development of a design direction and in innovative design outcomes. The third concerns the process of simultaneous consideration given by the designer to both project parameters or requirements, and to design solution possibilities - a process described by Rowe as "dialectical interanimation".
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddssar9617
id ddssar9617
authors Jabi, Wassim M.
year 1996
title Domain-Specific Tools for Collaboration in Architectural Design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary By using a semantically significant and parsimonious representation of collaborative work in architecture an approach is demonstrated that allows the construction of a computer environment that can support collaborative design among geographically dispersed participants. A principal characteristic of this approach is a shift away from a focus on multi-user access to shared databases towards a shared protocol of interaction that is independent of implementation and storage schemes. To arrive at the components of this protocol an analysis of the nature of collaborative design was conducted in order to derive its syntactic and semantic structures. This paper will detail the argument put forth and demonstrate a possible solution through a discussion of the elements of a protocol of interaction and a brief description of a prototype Synchronous Collaborative Design Environment (SYCODE) that was implemented on two heterogeneous computer systems at distant sites.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id fabd
authors Jabi, Wassim
year 1996
title Domain-Specific Tools for Collaboration in Architectural Design
source Proceedings of the Third International Conference on Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning. Spa, Belgium: Technical University of Eindhoven, 1996, pp. 248-259
summary By using a semantically significant and parsimonious representation of collaborative work in architecture an approach is demonstrated that allows the construction of a computer environment that can support collaborative design among geographically dispersed participants. A principal characteristic of this approach is a shift away from a focus on multi-user access to shared databases towards a shared protocol of interaction that is independent of implementation and storage schemes. To arrive at the components of this protocol an analysis of the nature of collaborative design was conducted in order to derive its syntactic and semantic structures. This paper will detail the argument put forth and demonstrate a possible solution through a discussion of the elements of a protocol of interaction and a brief description of a prototype Synchronous Collaborative Design Environment (SYCODE) that was implemented on two heterogeneous computer systems at distant sites.
keywords Computer Supported Collaborative Design
series other
email jabi@njit.edu
last changed 2002/03/05 18:54

_id ddssar9619
id ddssar9619
authors Kanoglu, Aiaattin
year 1996
title A Site-Based Computerized Production Planning & Control Model for The Plants which Produce Prefabricated Building Components
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary The "open systems" in building prefabrication may be qualified more flexible to some extent compared to the closed ones and may use the tools and approaches used in industrial production areas for the estimation of demand and production. As for the closed systems in particular, it is not possible for these systems to apply this kind of approach. Their production must be based on absolutely assured demands and projects. Because of this, they need detailed projects and assembly schedules for produc-tion. As a result of this, their production modes can be qualified "custom-made" type and production planning functions must provide the demand values from the assembly schedules of contracted proj-ects. The problem can be solved by integrating the work schedules of the sites that are served by fac-tory. Integration of data on a computerized system will be preferable and it is possible to realize the model in two alternative ways. The first is developing a new conceptual model and convert it into a software and the second is developing an approach for customizing general purpose project planning and programming software for using them in production planning. The second solution is studied in the paper following this. The aim of this study is to develop the principals of a conceptual model for an Integrated Data Flow and Evaluation System for production planning in prefabrication and to con-vert this model into an applicable and objective computer-aided model.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 4dcf
authors Kostogarova, Eugenia P.
year 1996
title CAAD Education at the Moscow Architectural Institute
source CAD Creativeness [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 83-905377-0-2] Bialystock (Poland), 25-27 April 1996 pp. 159-162
summary Nowadays, teaching of computer aided design at Marchi seems to be subdivided into two relatively independent spheres- direct teaching.of the use of machine graphic systems and videotechniques as well as scientific and methodological work. Experimental work and the way of teaching of computer aided design determinate the specific character of architectural institute. This specific character consists in comprehensive designing (taking into consideration all related disciplines) as well as in a wide range of architectural topics with a special attention paid to the development of creative thinking and fantasy regarding the requirements of composition and laws of visual perception.
series plCAD
last changed 1999/04/09 13:30

_id ddssar9620
id ddssar9620
authors Koutamanis, Alexander
year 1996
title Elements and coordinating devices in architecture: An initial formulation
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary Design representations of the built environment are essentially atomistic. A design is represented by its atomic components which may vary according to abstraction level, their properties and, if possible, their relationships. The utility of such representations has been amply demonstrated in academic research. However, the transition to practice means a substantial growth of the size of these representations in order to cover the many abstraction levels and the multiple aspects involved in the design and the management of the built environment. In most cases the complexity of larger representations renders them unmanageable for both computers and humans. The paper outlines an approach which enriches the atomistic basis of the representation with connected but independent coordinating devices. This facilitates the transformation of the basic relational representations into multilevel structures where each level corresponds to different aspects and abstraction scales. Coordinating devices are instrumental for the representation of multilateral relationships and abstract spatial schemata which precede or supersede the placement and arrangement of elements.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 2b9a
authors Kvan, Thomas (Ed.)
year 1996
title The Introduction of Technology [CAADRIA ‘96 Conference Proceedings]
source Proceedings of The First Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 9627-75-703-9 / Hong Kong (Hong Kong) 25-27 April 1996, 316 p.
summary Computers have established themselves as indispensable tools in the practice of architecture; there are few practices today which do not have access to computers for some aspects of their work. Similarly, we have seen purchases of systems by almost every school of architecture in the region in the past few years. The pervasive application of the tools in practice and the ease of access to some form of computing in architectural schools poses a challenge to which architectural education has responded.
series CAADRIA
email tkvan@arch.hku.hk
more http://www.caadria.org
last changed 1999/01/31 13:47

_id 4a62
authors Leake, D.B. (ed.)
year 1996
title Case-Based Reasoning: Experiences, Lessons, and Future Directions
source The MIT Press
summary Case-based reasoning (CBR) is now a mature subfield of artificial intelligence. The fundamental principles of case-based reasoning have been established, and numerous applications have demonstrated its role as a useful technology. Recent progress has also revealed new opportunities and challenges for the field. This book presents experiences in CBR that illustrate the state of the art, the lessons learned from those experiences, and directions for the future. True to the spirit of CBR, this book examines the field in a primarily case-based way. Its chapters provide concrete examples of how key issues---including indexing and retrieval, case adaptation, evaluation, and application of CBR methods---are being addressed in the context of a range of tasks and domains. These issue-oriented case studies of experiences with particular projects provide a view of the principles of CBR, what CBR can do, how to attack problems with case-based reasoning, and how new challenges are being addressed. The case studies are supplemented with commentaries from leaders in the field providing individual perspectives on the state of CBR and its future impact. This book provides experienced CBR practitioners with a reference to recent progress in case-based reasoning research and applications. It also provides an introduction to CBR methods and the state of the art for students, AI researchers in other areas, and developers starting to build case-based reasoning systems. It presents experts and non-experts alike with visions of the most promising directions for new progress and for the roles of the next generation of CBR systems.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ddssup9614
id ddssup9614
authors Loughreit, Fouad
year 1996
title Methods to assist the design of road surfaces with a reservoir structure: To improve flood risk management
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary Reservoir road surfaces can be seen as equipment of the future, in that they have two functions in the same structure (circulation and hydraulic functions). They can thus be laid without immobilising land, which is very expensive and prized in urban areas. Furthermore, they enable the limitation of the flow or volumes of running water, and thus help control rainwater, resulting in better flood risk management. The questions asked by drainage designers are how can we design these structures in the best way? How are they going to work for different types of rain (rain from storms, prolonged winter rain ....)? As for the public administrators, they wonder how a series of areas equipped with this type of technique (total flow management) would work. By solving this latter problem, we could really arouse interest in flood risk management. Given the diversity of structures possible for reservoir road surfaces (regulated, non-regulated, draining surface, dispersion surface...), we suggest comparing design and simulation methods, taking into account the measurement and total flow management problems mentioned above. So as to validate these comparisons and to give some directions concerning the use of one or the other methods, we use flow-metre measures on two different sites in Lyons. One of these sites is a car- park on a tertiary activity zone on the La Doua campus in Villeurbanne, the other a refuse dump in the Greater Lyons area in the town of Craponne. They are both interesting as they have different features. The first is non-regulated downstream and is used on a car-park for light motor-vehicles. The other is regulated and the traffic on it is made up of lorries. These sites will be described in this article.
series DDSS
email loughreit@urgc.hu.insa-lyon.fr
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id f5a3
authors Maher, M.L. and Gomez de Silva Garza, A.
year 1996
title Developing case-based reasoning for structural design
source IEEE Expert
summary Case-based systems enable users to retrieve previously known designs from memory and adapt them to fit the current design problem. The four case-based design systems described here illustrate how various implementations achieve design assistance or design automation objectives. Case-based reasoning is a problem-solving technique that makes analogies between a problem and previously encountered situations (cases) relevant to solving the problem. Using CBR as a design process model involves the subtasks of recalling previously known designs from memory and adapting these design cases or subcases to fit the current design context. The detailed development of this process model for a particular design domain proceeds in parallel with the development of the case representation, the case memory organization, and the necessary design knowledge. The selection of an information representation paradigm and the details of its use for a problem-solving domain depend on the intended use of the information, the project information available, and the nature of the domain. CBR could be used to develop and implement a CBR system. Although that sounds circular, if CBR is a viable approach to problem solving, it can be applied to the development of the reasoning system itself. Toward that end, this article presents four "cases" of case-based building design systems that we've developed at the University of Sydney: CaseCAD, CADsyn, Win, and Demex. These systems exemplify alternative case memory contents and organizations and provide insight into different potential implementations of the recall and adaptation subprocesses.
series journal paper
email mary@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 6ab6
authors Maher, M.L., Rutherford, J. and Gero, J.
year 1996
title Graduate Design Computing Teaching at the University of Sydney
source CAADRIA ‘96 [Proceedings of The First Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 9627-75-703-9] Hong Kong (Hong Kong) 25-27 April 1996, pp. 233-244
summary Design Computing involves the effective application of computing technologies, digital media, formal methods and design theory to the study and practice of design. Computers are assuming a prominent role in design practice. This change has been partly brought about by economic pressures to improve the efficiency of design practice, but there has also been a desire to aid the design process in order to produce better designs. The introduction of new computer-based techniques and methods generally involves a re-structuring of practice and ways of designing. We are also seeing significant current developments that have far reaching implications for the future. These innovations are occuring at a rapid rate and are imposing increasing pressures on design professionals. A re-orientation of skills is required in order to acquire and manage computer resources. If designers are to lead rather than follow developments then they need to acquire specialist knowledge – a general Computing also demands technical competence, an awareness of advances in the field and an innovative spirit to harness the technology understanding of computers and their impact, expertise in the selection and management of computer-aided design systems, and skill in the design an implementation of computer programs and systems.
series CAADRIA
email mary@arch.usyd.edu.au, john@arch.usyd.edu.au
last changed 1999/01/31 14:20

_id 57c7
authors Mathew, Paul
year 1996
title Integrated Energy Modeling for Computational Building Design Assistance
source Carnegie Mellon University, Department of Architecture
summary Insights into the importance of energy modeling in building design have not yet resulted in the sufficient and systematic use of modeling tools in practice. In recent years, there has been considerable discussion on the limitations of simulation tools, and there is a noteworthy consensus as to the nature of the contributing factors (material and time implications, problematic user-interfaces, inefficient data communication structures, poor integration with CAD systems, absence of 'active' design support). This thesis deals with three research questions that are especially pertinent to the quest for active, multi-aspect design and simulation environments: (1) The appropriateness and feasibility of a methodologically consistent performance modeling approach through the entire design process. (2) Strategies for a structurally 'seamless' containment of performance simulation within a computational design environment. (3) Technologies to facilitate dynamic and interactive performance-to-design mapping. At a paradigmatic level, this thesis critically examines the existing responses to each of these questions, and proposes alternative computational frameworks and technologies to overcome some of the system-immanent ('endogenous') limitations of the existing approaches. At an operational level, this thesis demonstrates the proposed solutions by implementing an active thermal simulation module (NOD
series thesis:PhD
email ujf@cmu.edu
last changed 2003/04/15 00:37

_id maver_083
id maver_083
authors Maver, T.W., Frame, I. and Chen, Y.
year 1996
title A Human-Centred Approach Towards Design Integration
source Published in Information Representation and Delivery in Civil and Structural Engineering Design. (Ed B. Kumar ) CIVIL COMP Press, UK, 105-116
summary Many past efforts have addressed design integration in terms of inter-operation among design tools/applications. In this paper the authors attempt to stress the social dimension of design and the role of explicit support for human level interaction during design systems integration. A humancentred approach will be proposed by taking design integration as collaborative use of design artifacts. A virtual studio environment framework will be presented as an integration vehicle to link social and technical dimensions within a human-human interaction context. A prototype virtual studio environment will be outlined, and a demonstration of using the VSE prototype presented. This will he followed by some discussion on the related research and further work.
series other
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/09/03 13:01

_id maver_084
id maver_084
authors Maver, T.W., Frame, I. and Chen, Y.
year 1996
title The Development of a Virtual Studio Environment to Support Collaborative Building Design
source Design, Synergy, Collaboration - selected papers from DEcon Conference
summary This paper describes the development of a virtual studio environment to support collaborative working in the domain of building design. By applying and extending the real-world design studio model within the Internet-based distributed computing environments, the virtual studio concept has been refined as computerised settings, which integrate both the dispersed human designers and the distributed CAD applications. The hope is to achieve the similar effect as physical co-presence while providing extra advantages such as the support for automatic communication archiving and being less obtrusive than sharing a physical office. Like its real-world counterpart (which usually consists of the office, desks, file cabinets, instruments etc), such a virtual studio consists of the several major components, including a multi-user graphical user interface displaying the shared virtual workspace on each designer's workstation, distributed multimedia databases and CAD tools for processing the domain tasks, and rich human-human interaction facilities supporting a variety of communication modes. Advance distributed object computing technologies (0MG CORBA in particular) have been adopted for modelling and implementing the distributed systems, W3 (world-wide-web) technologies have also been exploited for constructing the distributed multi-media databases and an image communication kit. In contrast to the traditional CAD integration which is usually focused solely on the well-structured technical part of the product and process, the described research advocates a human-centred systems development strategy in which design is first of all taken as a process of social construction.
series other
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/09/03 13:01

_id ddssar9623
id ddssar9623
authors Mitossi, V. and Koutamanis, A.
year 1996
title Parametric design of stairs
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary Stairs represent one of the oldest and most intricate design problems in architecture. Aesthetics, pedestrian circulation, construction and safety combine to create a complex network of factors. Despite the essentially parametric nature of stairs, designers have been eager to adopt and apply simplistic standardization schemes, often unrelated to safety issues. Moreover, while there are several computerized systems for the automated design of stairs, there has been little if any interest in the computer-based analysis of stair designs. The objective of our research has been to develop a transparent and flexible computer system for the design and analysis of stairs. The system employs constraint propagation networks for the calculation of stair dimensions in generation and for the correlation of floor levels to stairs and their dimensions in analysis. Computerization also allows us to re-examine and refine the norms underlying stair design. We propose that our understanding of stair design can be improved by the analysis of proprioceptive sizes in ascent and descent. Simulation of these sizes with virtual robots combines accurate measurement with visual evaluation. This combination facilitates the effortless and direct integration of advanced technologies and new methods in architectural design.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

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