CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 41 to 60 of 486

_id aa7c
authors Amirante, M. Isabella and Burattini, Ernesto
year 1996
title Automatic Procedures for Bio-Climatic Control
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 29-40
summary The experiences illustrated here are related to the new regulation of teaching architecture in Italy and these ones in particular have been concentrated on the technological aspects of teaching architecture. We can consider the evolution of the architect from the individual operator to the manager multi- disciplinary aspects of the building process ( building process manager) as a reality today. Information technology, specifically applied to bio-climatic architecture and environmental control, can be of great importance for this professional role, and for this reason it is very useful to include these topics at the beginning the teaching design process. This paper describes a particular approach to bio-climatic problems of the architectural project. An experimental course has been performed by the second year students of the "Laboratorio di Construzione dell' Architettura", at the School of Architecture of the Second University of Naples, in Aversa. Analysing old and new buildings, they used some flow charts for the evaluation and representation of energetic behaviour of buildings regarding their climatic and geographical environment. In the flow charts the decisions are represented by boxes that allow to determine "rightness index" related to: morphological characters of the site and environment, typology and particular organisation of the inside spaces, shape of building, technological solution of the building "skin". The navigation through the decision boxes is made with simple options like; "winds: protected or exposed site", "shape of building; free, close or cross plane", "presence of trees on the south,; yes or not",; it shows the students the bio-climatic quality of the building and, through numeric value assigned to each option, determines the "weight" of its climatic comfort.

series eCAADe
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id d5c8
authors Angelo, C.V., Bueno, A.P., Ludvig, C., Reis, A.F. and Trezub, D.
year 1999
title Image and Shape: Two Distinct Approaches
source III Congreso Iberoamericano de Grafico Digital [SIGRADI Conference Proceedings] Montevideo (Uruguay) September 29th - October 1st 1999, pp. 410-415
summary This paper is the result of two researches done at the district of Campeche, Florianópolis, by the Grupo PET/ARQ/UFSC/CAPES. Different aspects and conceptual approaches were used to study the spatial attributes of this district located in the Southern part of Santa Catarina Island. The readings and analysis of two researches were based on graphic pistures builded with the use of Corel 7.0 e AutoCadR14. The first research – "Urban Development in the Island of Santa Catarina: Public Space Study"- examined the urban structures of Campeche based on the Spatial Syntax Theory developed by Hillier and Hanson (1984) that relates form and social appropriation of public spaces. The second research – "Topoceptive Characterisation of Campeche: The Image of a Locality in Expansion in the Island of Santa Catarina" -, based on the methodology developed by Kohlsdorf (1996) and also on the visual analysis proposed by Lynch (1960), identified characteristics of this locality with the specific goal of selecting attributes that contributed to the ideas of the place its population held. The paper consists of an initial exercise of linking these two methods in order to test the complementarity of their analytical tools. Exemplifying the analytical procedures undertaken in the two approaches, the readings done - global (of the locality as a whole) and partial (from parts of the settlement) - are presented and compared.
series SIGRADI
email caludvig@arq.ufsc.br
last changed 2016/03/10 08:47

_id ddssup9602
id ddssup9602
authors Arentze, T.A., Borgers, A.W.J. and Harry J.P.
year 1996
title A knowledge-based model for developing location strategies in a DSS for retail planning
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary Most DSS for retail planning are based on impact assessment models to support the evaluation of plan scenario's. This paper introduces a complementary knowledge-based model to support also the earlier stage of formulating plan scenario's. An analysis of the retail planning problem reveals the main lines of the strategies adopted by most Dutch planners and retailers to achieve their goals. A basic strategy that seems to be appropriate in most problem contexts is formulated in the form of a set of decision tables. Each decision table or system of decision tables specifies for a problem area decision rules to identify and analyse problems and to formulate possible actions. The model is implemented in a DSS where it is used in combination with quantitative impact assessment models. A case study in the area of daily good facilities demonstrates the approach. The major conclusion is that the knowledge-based approach and in particular the decision table technique provides interesting possibilities to implement planning task structures in a DSS environment.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 328d
authors Bassanino, May Nahab and Brown, Andre
year 1999
title Computer Generated Architectural Images: A Comparative Study
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 552-556
summary This work is part of a long term research programme (Brown and Horton, 1992; Brown and Nahab, 1996; Bassanino, 1999) in which tests and studies have been carried out on various groups of people to investigate their reaction to, and interpretation of different forms of architectural representation. In the work described here a range of architectural schemes were presented using particular representational techniques and media. An experiment was then undertaken on two different groups; architects and lay people. They were presented with a number of schemes displayed using the various techniques and media. The responses are summarised and some comments are made on the effect of computers on perceiving architecture and on communicating architectural ideas arising from an analysis of the responses.
keywords Subject, Image Type, Presentation Technique, Medium, SD Scales, Factors
series eCAADe
email andygbp@liv.ac.uk
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ddssup9604
id ddssup9604
authors Boelen, A.J.
year 1996
title Impact-Analysis of Urban Design Realtime impact-analysis models for urban designers
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary The past five years Prof Dr Jr T.M. de Jong, professor in environmental planning and sustainability at the Technical University of Delft, has developed a theoretical foundation for the analysis of urban design on the ecological, technical, economical, cultural and political impacts of morphologic interventions on different levels of scale. From september 1994 Jr AJ. Boelen (Urban Design Scientist and Knowledge Engineer) started a research project at the same university to further explore the possibilities of these theories and to develop impact evaluation models for urban design and development with the theoretical work of De Jong as a starting point. The paper discusses the development of a design and decision support system based on these theories. For the development of this system, techniques like object-orientation, genetic algorithms and knowledge engineering are used. The user interface, the relation between the real world, paper maps and virtual maps and the presentation of design-interventions and impacts caused by the interventions are important issues. The development-process is an interactive step by step process. It consists of the making of a prototype of the system, testing the theory and hypothe-sisses the system is based on, by applying tests end adjusting the theory and hypothesisses where needed. Eventually the system must be able to act as an integrator of many different models already developed or still to be developed. The structure of the system will allow easy future expansion and adjustment to changing insights. The logic used to develop the basic theory on which this system is founded makes it possible to even introduce and maintain rather subjective aspects like quality or appraisal as impacts that can be evaluated. In a previously developed system "Momentum" this was proved to work effectively for the national level. In this project we will - amongst other things - try to prove the effectiveness of impact-evaluation for other levels of scale.
series DDSS
email Aj.Boelen@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 0dfb
authors Bovill, C.
year 1996
title Fractal Geometry in Architecture and Design
source Design Science Collection, Harvard University, Boston
summary My intention in this book was to explain the essence of fractal geometry to the design community. Many of the fractals can be drawn by hand and fractal rhythms for use in design can be derived from musical scores. This approach was taken to make the material more approachable. Much of the literature on fractal geometry is hidden behind computer programs or complex mathematical notation systems.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 8e02
authors Brown, A.G.P. and Coenen, F.P.
year 2000
title Spatial reasoning: improving computational efficiency
source Automation in Construction 9 (4) (2000) pp. 361-367
summary When spatial data is analysed the result is often very computer intensive: even by the standards of contemporary technologies, the machine power needed is great and the processing times significant. This is particularly so in 3-D and 4-D scenarios. What we describe here is a technique, which tackles this and associated problems. The technique is founded in the idea of quad-tesseral addressing; a technique, which was originally applied to the analysis of atomic structures. It is based on ideas concerning Hierarchical clustering developed in the 1960s and 1970s to improve data access time [G.M. Morton, A computer oriented geodetic database and a new technique on file sequencing, IBM Canada, 1996.], and on atomic isohedral (same shape) tiling strategies developed in the 1970s and 1980s concerned with group theory [B. Grunbaum, G.C. Shephard, Tilings and Patterns, Freeman, New York, 1987.]. The technique was first suggested as a suitable representation for GIS in the early 1980s when the two strands were brought together and a tesseral arithmetic applied [F.C. Holdroyd, The Geometry of Tiling Hierarchies, Ars Combanitoria 16B (1983) 211–244.; S.B.M. Bell, B.M. Diaz, F.C. Holroyd, M.J.J. Jackson, Spatially referenced methods of processing raster and vector data, Image and Vision Computing 1 (4) (1983) 211–220.; Diaz, S.B.M. Bell, Spatial Data Processing Using Tesseral Methods, Natural Environment Research Council, Swindon, 1986.]. Here, we describe how that technique can equally be applied to the analysis of environmental interaction with built forms. The way in which the technique deals with the problems described is first to linearise the three-dimensional (3-D) space being investigated. Then, the reasoning applied to that space is applied within the same environment as the definition of the problem data. We show, with an illustrative example, how the technique can be applied. The problem then remains of how to visualise the results of the analysis so undertaken. We show how this has been accomplished so that the 3-D space and the results are represented in a way which facilitates rapid interpretation of the analysis, which has been carried out.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id 88f9
authors Carrara, G., Novembri, G., Zorgno, A.M., Brusasco, P.L.
year 1997
title Virtual Studio of Design and Technology on Internet (I) - Educator's approach
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary This paper presents a teaching experience involving students and professors from various universities, in Italy and abroad, which began in 1996 and is still on going. The Virtual Studios on the Internet (VSI) have some features in common with the Teaching Studios planned for the new programme of the faculties of Architecture in Italian universities. These are the definition of a common design theme, and the participation of disciplinary teachers. The greatest difference is in the modes of collaboration, which is achieved through information and communication technologies. The chief result of this is that the various work groups in different places can work and collaborate at the same time: the computer networks provide the means to express, communicate and share the design project.
keywords CAAD, Teaching of architectural design, Shared virtual reality, Virtualdesign studio, Collective intelligence.
series eCAADe
email guyver@arch.hku.hk
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/lvi_i&ii/zorgno.html
last changed 2001/08/17 13:11

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 18bc
authors Clay, Sharon and Wilhelms, Jane
year 1996
title Put: Language-Based Interactive Manipulation of Objects
source IEEE Computer Graphics and Applications
summary Describing a scene to a computer is an inherent task of computer graphics applications. Modeled scenes are typically built with direct placement techniques or specialized scripting languages. The scene description task could be greatly eased if natural language were an interactive control option. However, natural language understanding is notoriously difficult for computers. This difficulty is exacerbated in the case of computer graphics by the need for geometric output, not just "conceptual understanding" or high-level inferencing. General text-understanding techniques have not been successfully applied to scene generation. Typically, a few task-specific commands, such as "walk," are implemented as an ad-hoc collection of procedures. Our approach aims to separate the expressive power of fundamental natural concepts from the difficult task of text understanding. We are developing a 3D object placement system based on a combination of natural commands and interactive techniques. Guided by research in cognitive linguistics, we use basic spatial relationships--such as in, on, and at--and fundamental scene parameters--such as viewer location and object dimensionality--to identify regions of placement for objects in a scene. These natural commands can be used to quickly prototype a complex scene and constrain object placement.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id ddssar9613
id ddssar9613
authors de Groot, E.H. and Louwers, F.H.
year 1996
title The TIE-system, a KBS for the Evaluation of Thermal Indoor office Environments
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary A Knowledge-Based System [KBS] for the evaluation of Thermal Indoor office Environments [TIE] (in the Netherlands) was the product of a one-year project, undertaken by researchers of the Physical Aspects of the Built Environment group [FAGO] in cooperation with the Knowledge-Based System Section of the TNO-Building & Construction research Institute in Delft. The objective of the project was to develop a KBS capable of evaluating thermal indoor environments of existing or proposed office buildings designs. The approach used in this study was based on a traditional method of predicting thermal sensation by calculating Fanger's 'Predicted Mean Vote' [PMV]. PMV is influenced by four environmental parameters of a room: air temperature, radiant temperature, air velocity and relative humidity, and by two personal parameters of the employees: metabolic rate and clothing insulation. The knowledge required to determine these six parameters was placed in KBS-databases and tables using a KBS-building tool called Advanced Knowledge Transfer System [AKTS]. By questioning the user, the TIE-system is capable of determining the PMV for a particular office room. The system also provides conclusions and advice on improving the thermal comfort. The TIE-system was a pilot-study for the long-term Building Evaluation research project, being undertaken at FAGO, that examines in all aspects of office building performance, and in which KBS may play a major pole.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 5e49
authors Deering, Michael F.
year 1996
title HoloSketch: A Virtual Reality Sketching/Animation Tool Special Issue on Virtual Reality Software and Technology
source Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction 1995 v.2 n.3 pp. 220-238
summary This article describes HoloSketch, a virtual reality-based 3D geometry creation and manipulation tool. HoloSketch is aimed at providing nonprogrammers with an easy-to-use 3D "What-You-See-Is-What-You-Get" environment. Using head-tracked stereo shutter glasses and a desktop CRT display configuration, virtual objects can be created with a 3D wand manipulator directly in front of the user, at very high accuracy and much more rapidly than with traditional 3D drawing systems. HoloSketch also supports simple animation and audio control for virtual objects. This article describes the functions of the HoloSketch system, as well as our experience so far with more-general issues of head-tracked stereo 3D user interface design.
keywords Computer Graphics; Picture/Image Generation; Display Algorithms; Computer Graphics; Three-Dimensional Graphics and Realism; Human Factors; 3D Animation; 3D Graphics; Graphics Drawing Systems; Graphics Painting Systems; Man-Machine Interface; Virtual Reality
series other
last changed 2002/07/07 14:01

_id ddssar9604
id ddssar9604
authors Demir, Yueksel
year 1996
title CAD Systems for early design phases or CAD systems for designers' early phases
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary Most of the problems, related with the use of CAD systems are the results of some general principles; the philosophy that, those systems are based on. Therefore, mainly the relation between these principles and early design phase performance of CAD systems and designers are discussed in this paper. The circumstances of novice CAD user architects in Turkey is considered first. In formation of the research, the knowledge gained during my personal experience based on real cases from the university (education, research) and practice (design, consulting) is used. Beside this the results of a survey including a serious of interviews projecting the opinions of the architects is used. Vendors of commonly used CAD systems were interviewed. In this manner to answer the main question about the relation of "CAD" and "early design phase" the answers of some following questions and facts were investigated: What means CAD for architects? What are the main purposes of using CAD? Are CAD systems sufficient to be used in early design phases in terms of either hardware and / or software, or should we say thinkware?. The advantages and disadvantages of using CAD. The target user fact and its consequences (the difference between general purpose systems and the sophisticated architectural systems). Should we adapt to computerized way of thinking? Is 3D a basic feature? What are the education related problems of CAD? Is software integration problem solved? Modularity concept for CAD systems. What is the minimum time, and the budget required for a start? The illegal software use problem Complaints, demands, needs and thanks of architects? Simply, what do architects expect from CAD during design process and particularly in early phases (both of design and designer)? Do CAD systems match this?
keywords CAD, Information Technology, Office Automation
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id ddssup9605
id ddssup9605
authors Demir, Yuksel
year 1996
title A Design & Decision Support System Proposal for Housing
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary The subject of this study is to develop an information management system integrating all the related specialists and sources of information virtually from all related fields in building sector (housing) of Turkey; including design, production, construction, marketing, research. The application field has been chosen as housing for having a contribution to the existing housing problem. Although the subject of architecture is one : "the building", the specialists taking place during the lifetime of a building (from design, to destruction) are numerous. Moreover the links between practitioners, academicians, industry are missing Conventional methods, technology are expensive, time consuming. and insufficient to establish and maintain a healthy coordination between these contributors (mainly the design team and all the other related persons, institutions etc.). This has a strong negative effect on the concepts of "wholeness " and "integrity". The result is a built environment which is lacking significant qualities, while the money has been spent is even much more than required for a proper result. This means the loss of a considerable amount of resources. Especially in a country, which has to build thousands of houses each year, for low income groups, the efficient use of the limited sources becomes more essential. Though the potential user range of the system may include constructors, contractors, building element / material producers and retailers, surveyors, institutions, universities, the main user is aimed to be the architect. The system is aimed to support designers to deal with "complexity" without neglecting the concept of "wholeness". Within the study, the problems which became a stimulus for the development of this system will be investigated. The philosophical base, structure and the possible advantages of the proposal will be discussed.
keywords Design & Decision Support Systems, Information Technology, Information Management, Holistic View of Approach, Specialization
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 4dcb
authors Dourish, P., Holmes, J., MacLean, A., Marqvardsen, P. and Zbyslaw, A.
year 1996
title Freeflow: Mediating Between Representation and Action in Workflow Systems
source Proceedings of the ACM Conference on Computer Supported Cooperative Work CSCW’96, Boston, USA
summary In order to understand some problems associated with workflow, we set out an analysis of workflow systems, identifying a number of basic issues in the underlying technology. This points to the conflation of temporal and dependency information as the source of a number of these problems. We describe Freeflow, a prototype which addresses these problems using a variety of technical innovations, including a rich constraint-based process modelling formalism, and the use of declarative dependency relationships. Its focus is on mediation between process "and action, rather than the enactment of a process. We outline the system and its design principles, and illustrate the features of our approach with examples from ongoing work.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id 70b1
authors Emdanat, S.S., Vakalo, E.0. and Malkawi, A.M.
year 1996
title A Conceptual Framework for Integrating Morphological and Thermal Analysis in the Generation of Orthogonal Architectural Designs
source Proceedings of the 84th ACSA Meeting; Boston, pp. 117-131
summary Digital networks are gaining importance as environments for learning and creative collaboration. Technical achievements, software enhancements, and a growing number of applicable principles make it possible to compile complex environments that satisfy many aspects necessary for creative collaboration. This paper focuses on three issues: the architecture of collaborative environments, communication in these environments and the processes inherent to creative collaboration. The information architecture of digital environments looks different from physical architecture, mainly because the material that it is made out of is information and not stone, wood or metal and the goal is to provide appropriate paths and views to information. Nonetheless, many analogies can be drawn between information architecture and physical architecture, including the need for useability, aesthetics, and consistency. To communicate is important for creative collaboration. Digital networks request and enable new strategies for communicating. Regarding the collaborative creative process we have been able to detect principles and features that enhance this process, but there are still many unanswered questions. For example, the environment can enable and improve the frequency of surprise and coincidence, two factors that often play decisive roles in the creative processes but cannot be planned for in advance. Freedom and transparency within the environment are other important factors that foster creative collaboration. The following findings are based on numerous courses, which we have taught using networked environments and some associated, research projects that helped to verify their applicability for architectural practice.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id ec0e
authors Engeli, M. and Kurmann, D.
year 1996
title A Virtual Reality Design Environment with Intelligent Objects and Autonomous Agents
source H.J.P. Timmermans (ed.), Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Conference, Vol. 1: Architecture Proceedings, pp. 132-142
summary New technological achievements and research results allow for the creation of innovative design tools for architects, that do not originate from paper-based paradigms but instead make optimised use of the present technology and programming concepts. The core of our system is comprised of an intuitive interactive modelling tool. It runs in a virtual reality set-up, where the user can use 3D glasses to experience rooms and 3D input devices to model in three dimensions. The interface is free from widget-like buttons or menus, so that the user is undisturbed when moving into the virtual world of the design. The system can also run in a distributed fashion, so that a number of users can look at and modify the same design. The 3D model can be generated in a sketch-like fashion using solids and voids, void modelling turns out to be very valuable for architectural design. The objects in this system can contain forms of intelligence to produce such behaviour as: falling because of gravity, collision avoidance, and autonomous motion. Interactive behaviour can also be assigned to the objects. Autonomous Agents are added to the system to enhance the designer support. These are agents that enhance the virtual environment, agents that take over tasks, and agents that help to test the design. The system shows new interface and interaction approaches that support the architectural design process intelligently.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id ddssar9609
id ddssar9609
authors Engeli, Maia and Kurmann, David
year 1996
title A Virtual Reality Design Environment with Intelligent Objects and Autonomous Agents
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary New technological achievements and research results allow for the creation of innovative design tools for architects, that do not originate from paper-based paradigms but instead make optimised use of the present technology and programming concepts. The core of our system is comprised of an intuitive interactive modelling tool. It runs in a virtual reality set-up, where the user can use 3D glasses to expe-rience rooms and 31) input devices to model in three dimensions. The interface is free from widget-like buttons or menus, so that the user is undisturbed when moving into the virtual world of the design. The system can also run in a distributed fashion, so that a number of users can look at and modify the same design. The 31) model can be generated in a sketch-like fashion using solids and voids, void modelling turns out to be very valuable for architectural design. The objects in this system can contain forms of intelligence to produce such behaviour as: falling because of gravity, collision avoidance, and autonomous motion. Interactive behaviour can also be assigned to the objects. Autonomous Agents are added to the system to enhance the designer support. These are agents that enhance the virtual environment, agents that take over tasks, and agents that help to test the design. The system shows new interface and interaction approaches that support the architectural design process intelligently.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id f5ee
authors Erhorn, H., De Boer, J. and Dirksmueller, M.
year 1997
title ADELINE, an Integrated Approach to Lighting Simulation
source Proceedings of Right Light 4, 4th European Conference on Energy-Efficient Lighting, pp.99-103
summary The use of daylighting and artificial lighting simulation programs to calculate complex systems and models in the design practice often is impeded by the fact that the operation of these programs, especially the model input, is extremely complicated and time-consuming. Programs that are easier to use generally do not show the calculation capabilities required in practice. A second obstacle arises as the lighting calculations often do not allow any statements regarding the interactions with the energetic and thermal building performance. Both problems are mainly due to a lacking integration of the design tools of other building design practitioners as well as due to insufficient user interfaces. The program package ADELINE (Advanced Daylight and Electric Lighting Integrated New Environment) being available since May 1996 as completely revised version 2.0 presents a promising approach to solve these problems. This contribution describes the approaches and methods used within the international project IEA Task 21 for a further development of the ADELINE system. Aim of this work is a further improvement of user interfaces based on the inclusion of new dialogs and on a portation of the program system from MS-DOS to the Windows NT platform. Additional focus is laid on the use of recent developments in the field of information technology and experiences gained in other projects on integrated building design systems, like for example EU-COMBINE, in a pragmatical way. An integrated building design system with open standardized interfaces is to be achieved inter alia by using ISOSTEP formats, database technologies and a consequent, object-oriented design.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:50

_id c6dd
authors Fruchter, Renate
year 1996
title COMPUTER INTEGRATED ARCHITECTURE/ENGINEERING/CONSTRUCTION PROJECT-CENTERED LEARNING ENVIRONMENT
source Design Computation: Collaboration, Reasoning, Pedagogy [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-05-5] Tucson (Arizona / USA) October 31 - November 2, 1996, pp. 227-234
summary This paper describes an on-going effort, initiated at Stanford's Civil Engineering Department, to develop, implement, and test a new and innovative "Computer Integrated Architecture./Engineering/Construction" (A/E/C) course. The course takes a multi-site, cross- disciplinary, project-centered, team-oriented approach to teaching. The paper presents the motivation, methodology, computational infrastructure, and initial observations in the experimental A/E/C course. The course is sponsored by NSF Synthesis Coalition and is the result of the collaborative effort of faculty and researchers from Civil Engineering Department at Stanford University, and Architecture Department and Civil Engineering Department, at UC Berkeley. In this computer integrated A/EIC environment a new generation of architecture, engineering, construction students learns how to team up with other disciplines and the advantage of the emerging information technologies for collaborative work in order to design and build higher quality buildings faster.

series ACADIA
type normal paper
email fruchter@stanford.edu
last changed 2006/03/27 05:36

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