CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 41 to 60 of 483

_id 63e6
authors Af Klercker, Jonas
year 1996
title Visualisation for Clients - One Example of Educating CAAD for Practice
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 17-24
summary During the spring term 1996, 13 students of the 3rd and 4th year at the School of Architecture at Lund University had the opportunity to make a one semester CAAD project. 11 students chose the individual exercise to use computer media for developing a small architectural design in interaction with a client. The focus was set more on visualization and the process of communicating ideas, feelings and practical solutions between architect and client and visa versa rather than concentrated on the final product.

This paper describes the process of the project and the reflections of the participants. It will discuss problems from the teachers point of view.

series eCAADe
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se
more http://www.caad.lth.se/ECAADE/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id aa7c
authors Amirante, M. Isabella and Burattini, Ernesto
year 1996
title Automatic Procedures for Bio-Climatic Control
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 29-40
summary The experiences illustrated here are related to the new regulation of teaching architecture in Italy and these ones in particular have been concentrated on the technological aspects of teaching architecture. We can consider the evolution of the architect from the individual operator to the manager multi- disciplinary aspects of the building process ( building process manager) as a reality today. Information technology, specifically applied to bio-climatic architecture and environmental control, can be of great importance for this professional role, and for this reason it is very useful to include these topics at the beginning the teaching design process. This paper describes a particular approach to bio-climatic problems of the architectural project. An experimental course has been performed by the second year students of the "Laboratorio di Construzione dell' Architettura", at the School of Architecture of the Second University of Naples, in Aversa. Analysing old and new buildings, they used some flow charts for the evaluation and representation of energetic behaviour of buildings regarding their climatic and geographical environment. In the flow charts the decisions are represented by boxes that allow to determine "rightness index" related to: morphological characters of the site and environment, typology and particular organisation of the inside spaces, shape of building, technological solution of the building "skin". The navigation through the decision boxes is made with simple options like; "winds: protected or exposed site", "shape of building; free, close or cross plane", "presence of trees on the south,; yes or not",; it shows the students the bio-climatic quality of the building and, through numeric value assigned to each option, determines the "weight" of its climatic comfort.

series eCAADe
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 8ded
authors Anders, Peter
year 1996
title Envisioning Cyberspace: The Design of On-Line Communities
source Design Computation: Collaboration, Reasoning, Pedagogy [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-05-5] Tucson (Arizona / USA) October 31 - November 2, 1996, pp. 55-67
summary The development of the World Wide Web into an active, visual social environment poses unique opportunities for the design professions. Multi-user Domains, social meeting places in cyberspace, are mostly text-based virtual realities which use spatial references to set the stage for social interaction. Over the past year design students at the New Jersey Institute of Technology School of Architecture have investigated several text-based domains. In the course of their work, they envisioned and graphically portrayed these environments as immersive virtual realities through the use of computer animation. Their studies addressed issues ranging from the nature of symbolic motion to social/political structures of these domains.
series ACADIA
email ptr@mindspace.net
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 452d
authors Arlati, E., Bottelli, V. and Fogh, C.
year 1996
title Applying CBR to the Teaching of Architectural Design
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 41-50
summary This paper presents an approach to the analysis and description of the nature of process knowledge in architectural design, the development of a conceptual model for Galathea, a case-based navigation tool for its support, and the application of this theoretical foundation to the teaching of design to a group of about 100 second-year architecture students. Design is assumed as a globally coherent information, memory and experience-intensive process in which professional skill is the capability to govern a large number of continually evolving variables in the direction of desired change. This viewpoint on design has guided the development of Galathea, the model of a tool aimed at describing architectural design through the description, mapping and management of the complete decision-making path of projects by means of the dynamic representation of the relationship between goals, constraints and the decisions/actions adopted at specific nodes and through the creation of a case-base aimed at the storage, retrieval and adaptation of relevant design moves in similar project contexts. This conceptual model is applied to educational activity at the faculty of Architecture of Milan, with the aim of teaching how to govern a project from the outset considering it as an evolving but coherent map of design moves, which allow the adoption of the correct decisions involving the most disparate types of information, experience and memory, and which altogether conduct to the desired goal. The resolution paths of the students, all applied to the same architecture problem, result in a design move case-base, the further utilisation and interest of which is open to collegial discussion.
keywords knowledge-based design; case-based reasoning; design process control, design moves
series eCAADe
email arlati@cdc8g5.cdc.polimi.it
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ddssup9603
id ddssup9603
authors Bach, Boudewijn and MacGillivray, Trina
year 1996
title Semi-manual design support for increasing railwaystation catchment & sustainable traffic routing
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary The shape ('configuration'), location and direction of the pattern of potential trips by foot or bicycle can help decision makers and designers:- the shape of such a pattern informs about the potential size of a traffic calming area(such as 30Km-zoning),- the location of such a pattern refers to the user-groups and specific destinations that a urban network should bring in safe reach for dictated groups,- the direction of such a pattern, together with shape and location, points to the best routing to raise the Sustainable Traffic Modal Split or to improve the reach of destinations like a railway-station.The patters can be generated from zip-code's of user-groups with obvious and daily destinations (school-children, rail-passengers). The next step confronts the theoretical pattern with the layout of streets and the traffic flow, mapping or listing (potential) confrontations between cars and the non-motorised modes, a basis for economical investment in traffic-safety.A design can 'model' the analysed pattern(s) to a economic, direct and safe base (cycle or pedestrian) network. In co-operation, the Dutch the traffic consultant "Verkeersadviesbureau Diepens & Okkema" in Delft, The Netherlands and the Faculty of Architecture, Delft University of Technology, in Delft, The Netherlands, develloped the semi-manual design & decision support system "STAR-Analysis"
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 328d
authors Bassanino, May Nahab and Brown, Andre
year 1999
title Computer Generated Architectural Images: A Comparative Study
source Architectural Computing from Turing to 2000 [eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-5-7] Liverpool (UK) 15-17 September 1999, pp. 552-556
summary This work is part of a long term research programme (Brown and Horton, 1992; Brown and Nahab, 1996; Bassanino, 1999) in which tests and studies have been carried out on various groups of people to investigate their reaction to, and interpretation of different forms of architectural representation. In the work described here a range of architectural schemes were presented using particular representational techniques and media. An experiment was then undertaken on two different groups; architects and lay people. They were presented with a number of schemes displayed using the various techniques and media. The responses are summarised and some comments are made on the effect of computers on perceiving architecture and on communicating architectural ideas arising from an analysis of the responses.
keywords Subject, Image Type, Presentation Technique, Medium, SD Scales, Factors
series eCAADe
email andygbp@liv.ac.uk
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ddssar9638
id ddssar9638
authors Bax, M.F.Th. and Trum, H.M.G.J.
year 1996
title A Conceptual Model for Concurrent Engineering in Building Design according to Domain Theory
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary Concurrent engineering is a design strategy in which various designers participate in a co-ordinated parallel process. In this process series of functions are simultaneously integrated into a common form. Processes of this type ask for the identification, definition and specification of relatively independent design fields. They also ask for specific design knowledge designers should master in order to participate in these processes. The paper presents a conceptual model of co-ordinated parallel design processes in which architectural space is simultaneously defined in the intersection of three systems: a morphological or level-bound system, a functional or domain-bound system and a procedural or phase-bound system. Design strategies for concurrent engineering are concerned with process design, a design task which is comparable to the design of objects. For successfully accomplishing this task, knowledge is needed of the structural properties of objects and systems; more specifically of the morphological, functional and procedural levels which condition the design fields from which these objects emerge, of the series of generic forms which condition their appearance and of the typological knowledge which conditions their coherence in the overall process.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 4daf
authors Berdinsky, Dimitry V.
year 1996
title CAAD Creations in Moscow
source CAD Creativeness [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 83-905377-0-2] Bialystock (Poland), 25-27 April 1996 pp. 27-30
summary In the history of architecture we saw changing ideas, styles and methods of designing. From the charcoal in an ancient man's hand, architectural tools transformed into contemporary pens, papers and copying machines. They made the creative architectural work more productive and informative. Today, in the last quarter of our century, evolution of the architectural design is influenced by brandnew intellectual tools and instruments. Invasion of those tools make new problems appear. All the people can be divided into two groups- the first group can be defined as mechanically or mathematically oriented one while the second group can be defined as art oriented one.
series plCAD
last changed 1999/04/09 13:30

_id eb87
authors Bhavnani, S.K.
year 1996
title How Architects Draw with Computers: A Cognitive Analysis of Real-World CAD Interactions
source Carnegie Mellon University, School of Architecture and School of Computer Science
summary New media throughout history have passed through a period of transition during which users and technologists took many years to understand and exploit the medium's potential. CAD appears to be passing through a similar period of transition; despite huge investments by vendors and users, CAD productivity remains difficult to achieve. To investigate if history can provide any insights into this problem, this thesis begins with an examination of well-known examples from history. The analysis revealed that, over time, users had developed efficient strategies which were based on powers and limitations of tools; delegation strategies exploited powers provided by tools, and circumvention strategies attempted to overcome their limitations. These insights on efficient strategies were used to investigate the CAD productivity problem based on four research questions:

1. How do architects currently use CAD systems to produce drawings?

2. What are the effects of current CAD usage on product and performance?

3. What are the possible causes of current CAD usage?

4. What are the capabilities of the CAD medium and how can they be used efficiently?

The above four questions were addressed through the qualitative, quantitative, and cognitive analysis of data collected during an ethnographic study of architects working in their natural environment. The qualitative and quantitative analysis revealed that users missed many opportunities to use strategies that delegated iteration to the computer. The cognitive analysis revealed that missed opportunities to use such delegation strategies caused an increase in execution time, and an increase in errors many of which went undetected leading to the production of inaccurate drawings. These analyses pointed to plausible cognitive and contextual explanations for the inefficient use of CAD systems, and to a framework to identify and teach efficient CAD strategies. The above results were found to be neither unique to the CAD domain, nor to the office where the data were collected. The generality of these results motivated the identification of seven claims towards a general theory to explain and identify efficient strategies for a wide range of devices. This thesis contributes to the field of architecture by providing a detailed analysis of real-world CAD usage, and an approach to improve the performance of CAD users. The thesis also contributes to the field of human-computer interaction by demonstrating the generality of these results and by laying the framework for a general theory of efficient strategies which could be used to improve the performance of users of current and future computer applications.

series thesis:PhD
email bhavnani@umich.edu
last changed 2003/04/15 11:36

_id ddssup9604
id ddssup9604
authors Boelen, A.J.
year 1996
title Impact-Analysis of Urban Design Realtime impact-analysis models for urban designers
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary The past five years Prof Dr Jr T.M. de Jong, professor in environmental planning and sustainability at the Technical University of Delft, has developed a theoretical foundation for the analysis of urban design on the ecological, technical, economical, cultural and political impacts of morphologic interventions on different levels of scale. From september 1994 Jr AJ. Boelen (Urban Design Scientist and Knowledge Engineer) started a research project at the same university to further explore the possibilities of these theories and to develop impact evaluation models for urban design and development with the theoretical work of De Jong as a starting point. The paper discusses the development of a design and decision support system based on these theories. For the development of this system, techniques like object-orientation, genetic algorithms and knowledge engineering are used. The user interface, the relation between the real world, paper maps and virtual maps and the presentation of design-interventions and impacts caused by the interventions are important issues. The development-process is an interactive step by step process. It consists of the making of a prototype of the system, testing the theory and hypothe-sisses the system is based on, by applying tests end adjusting the theory and hypothesisses where needed. Eventually the system must be able to act as an integrator of many different models already developed or still to be developed. The structure of the system will allow easy future expansion and adjustment to changing insights. The logic used to develop the basic theory on which this system is founded makes it possible to even introduce and maintain rather subjective aspects like quality or appraisal as impacts that can be evaluated. In a previously developed system "Momentum" this was proved to work effectively for the national level. In this project we will - amongst other things - try to prove the effectiveness of impact-evaluation for other levels of scale.
series DDSS
email Aj.Boelen@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ecba
authors Bosco, Antonio
year 1996
title Hypertext for Building Rehabilitation. A didactic Use of an Innovative Methodology of Diagnosis of the Building Decay
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 59-64
summary In the paper presented in the last ECAADE conference in Palermo we described a first hypertext for the analysis of ancient buildings. One section of the hypertext was devoted to show diagnostic procedures and specific instrumental tests for building rehabilitation. We can consider that the hypertext represent the best answer to the request of an organised knowledge coming from students of the schools of architecture and public operators. So we describe how the proposed arrangement of the diagnostic tests can become a real operative tool technicians of public agencies and powerful means of building technology knowledge for students too. The diagnostic procedures are related to the specific needs of the architectural design; changing ways to archive the tests are showed. The goal is to allow the architects, operating in the rehabilitation field, to operate the right choice of diagnostic methods to avoid doing many unnecessary, expensive tests.
series eCAADe
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 0dfb
authors Bovill, C.
year 1996
title Fractal Geometry in Architecture and Design
source Design Science Collection, Harvard University, Boston
summary My intention in this book was to explain the essence of fractal geometry to the design community. Many of the fractals can be drawn by hand and fractal rhythms for use in design can be derived from musical scores. This approach was taken to make the material more approachable. Much of the literature on fractal geometry is hidden behind computer programs or complex mathematical notation systems.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id af53
authors Boyer, E. and Mitgang, L.
year 1996
title Building community: a new future for architecture education and practice
source Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching
summary Internships, before and after graduation, are the most essential link connecting students to the world of practice. Yet, by all accounts, internship is perhaps the most troubled phase of the continuing education of architects. During this century, as architectural knowledge grew more complex, the apprenticeship system withered away and schools assumed much of the responsibility for preparing architects for practice. However, schools cannot do the whole job. It is widely acknowledged that certain kinds of technical and practical knowledge are best learned in the workplace itself, under the guidance of experienced professionals. All state accrediting boards require a minimum period of internship-usually about three years-before a person is eligible to take the licensing exam. The National Council of Architectural Registration Boards (NCARB) allows students to earn up to two years of work credit prior to acquisition of an accredited degree. The Intern Development Program (IDP), launched by NCARB and the American Institute of Architects in 1979, provides the framework for internship in some forty states. The program was designed to assure that interns receive adequate mentoring, that experiences are well-documented, and that employers and interns allocate enough time to a range of educational and vocational experiences to prepare students for eventual licensure. As the IDP Guidelines state, "The shift from school to office is not a transition from theory to pragmatism. It is a period when theory merges with pragmatism.... It's a time when you: apply your formal education to the daily realities of architectural practice; acquire comprehensive experience in basic practice areas; explore specialized areas of practice; develop professional judgment; continue your formal education in architecture; and refine your career goals." Whatever its accomplishments, however, we found broad consensus that the Intern Development Program has not, by itself, solved the problems of internship. Though we found mutually satisfying internship programs at several of the firms we visited or heard about around the country, at many others interns told us they were not receiving the continuing education and experience they needed. The truth is that architecture has serious, unsolved problems compared with other fields when it comes to supplying on-the-job learning experiences to induct students into the profession on a massive scale. Medicine has teaching hospitals. Beginning teachers work in actual classrooms, supported by school taxes. Law offices are, for the most part, in a better financial position to support young lawyers and pay them living wages. The architecture profession, by contrast, must support a required system of internship prior to licensure in an industry that has neither the financial resources of law or medicine, the stability and public support of teaching, nor a network of locations like hospitals or schools where education and practice can be seamlessly connected. And many employers acknowledged those problems. "The profession has all but undermined the traditional relationship between the profession and the academy," said Neil Frankel, FAIA, executive vice president of Perkins & Will, a multinational firm with offices in New York, Chicago, Washington, and London. "Historically, until the advent of the computer, the profession said, 'Okay, go to school, then we in the profession will teach you what the real world is like.' With the coming of the computer, the profession needed a skill that students had, and has left behind the other responsibilities." One intern told us she had been stuck for months doing relatively menial tasks such as toilet elevations. Another intern at a medium-sized firm told us he had been working sixty to seventy hours per week for a year and a half. "Then my wife had a baby and I 'slacked off' to fifty hours. The partner called me in and I got called on the carpet for not working hard enough." "The whole process of internship is being outmoded by economics," one frustrated intern told us. "There's not the time or the money. There's no conception of people being groomed for careers. The younger staff are chosen for their value as productive workers." "We just don't have the best structure here to use an intern's abilities to their best," said a Mississippi architect. "The people who come out of school are really problems. I lost patience with one intern who was demanding that I switch him to another section so that he could learn what he needed for his IDP. I told him, 'It's not my job to teach you. You are here to produce.'" What steps might help students gain more satisfying work opportunities, both during and after graduation?
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 88f9
authors Carrara, G., Novembri, G., Zorgno, A.M., Brusasco, P.L.
year 1997
title Virtual Studio of Design and Technology on Internet (I) - Educator's approach
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary This paper presents a teaching experience involving students and professors from various universities, in Italy and abroad, which began in 1996 and is still on going. The Virtual Studios on the Internet (VSI) have some features in common with the Teaching Studios planned for the new programme of the faculties of Architecture in Italian universities. These are the definition of a common design theme, and the participation of disciplinary teachers. The greatest difference is in the modes of collaboration, which is achieved through information and communication technologies. The chief result of this is that the various work groups in different places can work and collaborate at the same time: the computer networks provide the means to express, communicate and share the design project.
keywords CAAD, Teaching of architectural design, Shared virtual reality, Virtualdesign studio, Collective intelligence.
series eCAADe
email guyver@arch.hku.hk
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/lvi_i&ii/zorgno.html
last changed 2001/08/17 13:11

_id avocaad_2001_02
id avocaad_2001_02
authors Cheng-Yuan Lin, Yu-Tung Liu
year 2001
title A digital Procedure of Building Construction: A practical project
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In earlier times in which computers have not yet been developed well, there has been some researches regarding representation using conventional media (Gombrich, 1960; Arnheim, 1970). For ancient architects, the design process was described abstractly by text (Hewitt, 1985; Cable, 1983); the process evolved from unselfconscious to conscious ways (Alexander, 1964). Till the appearance of 2D drawings, these drawings could only express abstract visual thinking and visually conceptualized vocabulary (Goldschmidt, 1999). Then with the massive use of physical models in the Renaissance, the form and space of architecture was given better precision (Millon, 1994). Researches continued their attempts to identify the nature of different design tools (Eastman and Fereshe, 1994). Simon (1981) figured out that human increasingly relies on other specialists, computational agents, and materials referred to augment their cognitive abilities. This discourse was verified by recent research on conception of design and the expression using digital technologies (McCullough, 1996; Perez-Gomez and Pelletier, 1997). While other design tools did not change as much as representation (Panofsky, 1991; Koch, 1997), the involvement of computers in conventional architecture design arouses a new design thinking of digital architecture (Liu, 1996; Krawczyk, 1997; Murray, 1997; Wertheim, 1999). The notion of the link between ideas and media is emphasized throughout various fields, such as architectural education (Radford, 2000), Internet, and restoration of historical architecture (Potier et al., 2000). Information technology is also an important tool for civil engineering projects (Choi and Ibbs, 1989). Compared with conventional design media, computers avoid some errors in the process (Zaera, 1997). However, most of the application of computers to construction is restricted to simulations in building process (Halpin, 1990). It is worth studying how to employ computer technology meaningfully to bring significant changes to concept stage during the process of building construction (Madazo, 2000; Dave, 2000) and communication (Haymaker, 2000).In architectural design, concept design was achieved through drawings and models (Mitchell, 1997), while the working drawings and even shop drawings were brewed and communicated through drawings only. However, the most effective method of shaping building elements is to build models by computer (Madrazo, 1999). With the trend of 3D visualization (Johnson and Clayton, 1998) and the difference of designing between the physical environment and virtual environment (Maher et al. 2000), we intend to study the possibilities of using digital models, in addition to drawings, as a critical media in the conceptual stage of building construction process in the near future (just as the critical role that physical models played in early design process in the Renaissance). This research is combined with two practical building projects, following the progress of construction by using digital models and animations to simulate the structural layouts of the projects. We also tried to solve the complicated and even conflicting problems in the detail and piping design process through an easily accessible and precise interface. An attempt was made to delineate the hierarchy of the elements in a single structural and constructional system, and the corresponding relations among the systems. Since building construction is often complicated and even conflicting, precision needed to complete the projects can not be based merely on 2D drawings with some imagination. The purpose of this paper is to describe all the related elements according to precision and correctness, to discuss every possibility of different thinking in design of electric-mechanical engineering, to receive feedback from the construction projects in the real world, and to compare the digital models with conventional drawings.Through the application of this research, the subtle relations between the conventional drawings and digital models can be used in the area of building construction. Moreover, a theoretical model and standard process is proposed by using conventional drawings, digital models and physical buildings. By introducing the intervention of digital media in design process of working drawings and shop drawings, there is an opportune chance to use the digital media as a prominent design tool. This study extends the use of digital model and animation from design process to construction process. However, the entire construction process involves various details and exceptions, which are not discussed in this paper. These limitations should be explored in future studies.
series AVOCAAD
email aleppo@cc.nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id e9e4
authors Chevrier, C.
year 1996
title Handling interactions between real and virtual worlds
source Proceedings of the International Conference Computer Graphics International’96, pp. 115-125
summary When compositing computer generated images and photographs or video images, interactions between real and virtual worlds must be taken into account in order to have a good visual result. These interactions are of three kinds: occluding object determination, specular inter-reflection and shadow computation. We first determine which real objects need to be geometrically and/or photometrically modelled for the three sets of interactions. Indeed, not all real surfaces need to be kept for the simulation and rendering steps. The unuseful real surfaces would just increase the rendering time. A rough photometric model can be sufficient for the surface properties, but colour computation has to be made in a particular colour model. Then for each kind of interactions, we take the real surfaces into account in a view-independent illumination step or in the rendering step.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id eb51
authors Coyne, Richard
year 1996
title CAAD, Curriculum and Controversy
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 121-130
summary This paper brings some of the debate within educational theory to bear on CAAD teaching, outlining the contributions of conservatism, critical theory, radical hermeneutics and pragmatism. The paper concludes by recommending that CAAD teaching move away from conservative concepts of teaching, design and technology to integrate it into the studio. In a highly illuminating book on education theory, Shaun Gallagher (1991) outlines four current views on education that correspond to four major positions in contemporary social theory and philosophy. I will extend these categories to a consideration of attitudes to information technology, and the teaching of computing in architecture. These four positions are conservatism, critical theory, radical hermeneutics, and pragmatism. I will show how certain issues cluster around them, how each position provides the focus of various discursive practices, or intellectual conversations in contemporary thinking, and how information technology is caught up in those conversations. These four positions are not "cognitive styles," but vigorously argued domains of debate involving writers such as Gadamer, Habermas and Derrida about the theory of interpretation. The field of interpretation is known as hermeneutics, which is concerned less with epistemology and knowledge than with understanding. Interpretation theory applies to reading texts, interpreting the law, and appreciating art, but also to the application of any practical task, such as making art, drawing, defining and solving problems, and design (Coyne and Snodgrass, 1995). Hermeneutics provides a coherent focus for considering many contemporary issues and many domains of practice. I outline what these positions in education mean in terms of CAAD (computer-aided architectural design) in the curriculum.

series eCAADe
email richard@caad.ed.ac.uk
more http://www.caad.ac.uk/~richard
last changed 1998/08/17 13:35

_id ddssar9603
id ddssar9603
authors Daru, R. and Snijder, H.P.S.
year 1996
title Morphogenetic Designing in Architecture resolving controversies in and between design, research and development
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary There is a dearth of software able to support the working styles of all types of designers and design scholars, spanning the whole spectrum of hermeneutical and empirical traditions. The development of morphogenetic designing in architecture opens new possibilities to bridge the gap between the different traditions. It can support the birth of forms evolving one from the other with the help of local and global rules in genetic algorithms and neural networks which translate the wishes of the designer. It can also support the communication about these forms and the testing of their adequacy. On the other hand the design process which is reflected in the sequence of form generating acts can be studied by design researchers better than by protocols alone.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id sigradi2018_1762
id sigradi2018_1762
authors de Albuquerque Montezi, Rafael; Tanoue Vizioli, Simone Helena
year 2018
title Digital morphogenesis and tectonics: an analysis of Peter Eisenman’s Aronoff Center
source SIGraDi 2018 [Proceedings of the 22nd Conference of the Iberoamerican Society of Digital Graphics - ISSN: 2318-6968] Brazil, São Carlos 7 - 9 November 2018, pp. 359-366
summary The concept of architectural tectonics relates simultaneously to pragmatic and poetic aspects of the materiality, aiming the expression of these concerns in the result of the Form. Far from only a theoretical concerning, these design decisions affect how our society employs its natural and human resources. This work takes the Aronoff Center for Design and Arts (1988-1996), by Peter Eisenman, as a case study for a graphical analysis, dealing with the consequences of a free-form morphogenesis to its construction and investigating the tectonics of the contemporary architecture.
keywords Contemporary Architecture; Digital Project; Tectonics
series SIGraDi
email montezi@usp.br
last changed 2019/05/20 09:14

_id ddssar9604
id ddssar9604
authors Demir, Yueksel
year 1996
title CAD Systems for early design phases or CAD systems for designers' early phases
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary Most of the problems, related with the use of CAD systems are the results of some general principles; the philosophy that, those systems are based on. Therefore, mainly the relation between these principles and early design phase performance of CAD systems and designers are discussed in this paper. The circumstances of novice CAD user architects in Turkey is considered first. In formation of the research, the knowledge gained during my personal experience based on real cases from the university (education, research) and practice (design, consulting) is used. Beside this the results of a survey including a serious of interviews projecting the opinions of the architects is used. Vendors of commonly used CAD systems were interviewed. In this manner to answer the main question about the relation of "CAD" and "early design phase" the answers of some following questions and facts were investigated: What means CAD for architects? What are the main purposes of using CAD? Are CAD systems sufficient to be used in early design phases in terms of either hardware and / or software, or should we say thinkware?. The advantages and disadvantages of using CAD. The target user fact and its consequences (the difference between general purpose systems and the sophisticated architectural systems). Should we adapt to computerized way of thinking? Is 3D a basic feature? What are the education related problems of CAD? Is software integration problem solved? Modularity concept for CAD systems. What is the minimum time, and the budget required for a start? The illegal software use problem Complaints, demands, needs and thanks of architects? Simply, what do architects expect from CAD during design process and particularly in early phases (both of design and designer)? Do CAD systems match this?
keywords CAD, Information Technology, Office Automation
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

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