CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

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Hits 1 to 20 of 487

_id ddss9837
id ddss9837
authors Liu, Yu-Tung and Bai, Rui-Yuan
year 1998
title The roles of virtual reality, image processing, and multimedia in thedesign of public spaces: 1997 Hsinchu Project
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Fourth Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning Maastricht, the Netherlands), ISBN 90-6814-081-7, July 26-29, 1998
summary This paper examines the procedure of visual impact analysis and assessment proposed by Rahman and reviews the use of CAD applications in urban projects in the real world. A preliminary computerized procedure for visual impact analysis and assessment is proposed. An experiments wasconducted in our laboratory to verify the preliminary procedure. In order to further study the revised procedure in real urban projects, it was also applied into the renew project of The Eastern Gate Plaza located in the center of city Hsinchu, Taiwan from 1996 to 1998. According to several face-to-face discussions with Hsinchu habitants, government officials, and professional designers, a final computerized procedure for visual impact analysis and assessment is concluded.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id maver_084
id maver_084
authors Maver, T.W., Frame, I. and Chen, Y.
year 1996
title The Development of a Virtual Studio Environment to Support Collaborative Building Design
source Design, Synergy, Collaboration - selected papers from DEcon Conference
summary This paper describes the development of a virtual studio environment to support collaborative working in the domain of building design. By applying and extending the real-world design studio model within the Internet-based distributed computing environments, the virtual studio concept has been refined as computerised settings, which integrate both the dispersed human designers and the distributed CAD applications. The hope is to achieve the similar effect as physical co-presence while providing extra advantages such as the support for automatic communication archiving and being less obtrusive than sharing a physical office. Like its real-world counterpart (which usually consists of the office, desks, file cabinets, instruments etc), such a virtual studio consists of the several major components, including a multi-user graphical user interface displaying the shared virtual workspace on each designer's workstation, distributed multimedia databases and CAD tools for processing the domain tasks, and rich human-human interaction facilities supporting a variety of communication modes. Advance distributed object computing technologies (0MG CORBA in particular) have been adopted for modelling and implementing the distributed systems, W3 (world-wide-web) technologies have also been exploited for constructing the distributed multi-media databases and an image communication kit. In contrast to the traditional CAD integration which is usually focused solely on the well-structured technical part of the product and process, the described research advocates a human-centred systems development strategy in which design is first of all taken as a process of social construction.
series other
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/09/03 13:01

_id 096e
authors Papamichael, K., Porta, J.L., Chauvet, H., Collins, D., Trzcinski, T. , Thorpe, J. and Selkowitz, S.
year 1996
title The Building Design Advisor
source Design Computation: Collaboration, Reasoning, Pedagogy [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-05-5] Tucson (Arizona / USA) October 31 - November 2, 1996, pp. 85-97
summary The Building Design Advisor (BDA) is a software environment that supports the integrated use of multiple analysis and visualization tools throughout the building design process, from the initial, schematic design phases to the detailed specification of building components and systems. Based on a comprehensive design theory, the BDA uses an object-oriented representation of the building and its context, and acts as a data manager and process controller to allow building designers to benefit from the capabilities of multiple tools.

The BDA provides a graphical user interface that consists of two main elements: the Building Browser and the Decision Desktop. The Browser allows building designers to quickly navigate through the multitude of descriptive and performance parameters addressed by the analysis and visualization tools linked to the BDA. Through the Browser the user can edit the values of input parameters and select any number of input and/or output parameters for display in the Decision Desktop. The Desktop allows building designers to compare multiple design alternatives with respect to any number of parameters addressed by the tools linked to the BDA.

The BDA is implemented as a Windows-based application for personal computers. Its initial version is linked to a Schematic Graphic Editor (SGE), which allows designers to quickly and easily specify the geometric characteristics of building components and systems. For every object created in the SGE, the BDA supplies “smart” default values from a Prototypical Values Database (PVD) for all non-geometric parameters required as input to the analysis and visualization tools linked to the BDA. In addition to the SGE and the PVD, the initial version of the BDA is linked to a daylight analysis tool, an energy analysis tool, and a multimedia Case Studies Database (CSD). The next version of the BDA will be linked to additional tools, such as a photo-accurate rendering program and a cost analysis program. Future versions will address the whole building life-cycle and will be linked to construction, commissioning and building monitoring tools.

series ACADIA
email K_Papamichael@lbl.gov
last changed 2003/05/16 17:23

_id ddssar9627
id ddssar9627
authors Sariyildiz, S., Schwenck, M. and Jander, E.
year 1996
title Multimedia Teachware in the Field of Architectural Design
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary Software systems for educational purposes have been developed and used in many application areas. In this paper we will describe a development in the field of building science. ClAD is a teachware system directed to be used in the education of students of architecture as well as a tool that gives a survey to architects and engineers in the practice. In the first place it provides information about the use of computer science technologies in the building design process. Furthermore, information about the architectural design process itself is included. Based on an analysis of general requirements and specific demands of the application field we describe our solution concept. Very important conclusions are that the system has to integrate the use of all media which are usually used by architects by offering a flexible and well-designed user interface and allowing a high degree of interactive work. After covering the development process as a combination of top down and bottom up strategies we describe the overall structure of ClAD as a modular system which can be extended and updated easily. Finally, we give an overview about some parts of the system to demonstrate the implementation of the concepts mentioned above.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id avocaad_2001_19
id avocaad_2001_19
authors Shen-Kai Tang, Yu-Tung Liu, Yu-Sheng Chung, Chi-Seng Chung
year 2001
title The visual harmony between new and old materials in the restoration of historical architecture: A study of computer simulation
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In the research of historical architecture restoration, scholars respectively focus on the field of architectural context and architectural archeology (Shi, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995; Fu, 1995, 1997; Chiu, 2000) or on architecture construction and the procedure of restoration (Shi, 1988, 1989; Chiu, 1990). How to choose materials and cope with their durability becomes an important issue in the restoration of historical architecture (Dasser, 1990; Wang, 1998).In the related research of the usage and durability of materials, some scholars deem that, instead of continuing the traditional ways that last for hundreds of years (that is to replace new materials with old ones), it might be better to keep the original materials (Dasser, 1990). However, unavoidably, some of the originals are much worn. Thus we have to first establish the standard of eliminating components, and secondly to replace identical or similar materials with the old components (Lee, 1990). After accomplishing the restoration, we often unexpectedly find out that the renewed historical building is too new that the sense of history is eliminated (Dasser, 1990; Fu, 1997). Actually this is the important factor that determines the accomplishment of restoration. In the past, some scholars find out that the contrast and conflict between new and old materials are contributed to the different time of manufacture and different coating, such as antiseptic, pattern, etc., which result in the discrepancy of the sense of visual perception (Lee, 1990; Fu, 1997; Dasser, 1990).In recent years, a number of researches and practice of computer technology have been done in the field of architectural design. We are able to proceed design communication more exactly by the application of some systematic softwares, such as image processing, computer graphic, computer modeling/rendering, animation, multimedia, virtual reality and so on (Lawson, 1995; Liu, 1996). The application of computer technology to the research of the preservation of historical architecture is comparatively late. Continually some researchers explore the procedure of restoration by computer simulation technology (Potier, 2000), or establish digital database of the investigation of historical architecture (Sasada, 2000; Wang, 1998). How to choose materials by the technology of computer simulation influences the sense of visual perception. Liu (2000) has a more complete result on visual impact analysis and assessment (VIAA) about the research of urban design projection. The main subjects of this research paper focuses on whether the technology of computer simulation can extenuate the conflict between new and old materials that imposed on visual perception.The objective of this paper is to propose a standard method of visual harmony effects for materials in historical architecture (taking the Gigi Train Station destroyed by the earthquake in last September as the operating example).There are five steps in this research: 1.Categorize the materials of historical architecture and establish the information in digital database. 2.Get new materials of historical architecture and establish the information in digital database. 3.According to the mixing amount of new and old materials, determinate their proportion of the building; mixing new and old materials in a certain way. 4.Assign the mixed materials to the computer model and proceed the simulation of lighting. 5.Make experts and the citizens to evaluate the accomplished computer model in order to propose the expected standard method.According to the experiment mentioned above, we first address a procedure of material simulation of the historical architecture restoration and then offer some suggestions of how to mix new and old materials.By this procedure of simulation, we offer a better view to control the restoration of historical architecture. And, the discrepancy and discordance by new and old materials can be released. Moreover, we thus avoid to reconstructing ¡§too new¡¨ historical architecture.
series AVOCAAD
email tsk.aa88g@nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id avocaad_2001_20
id avocaad_2001_20
authors Shen-Kai Tang
year 2001
title Toward a procedure of computer simulation in the restoration of historical architecture
source AVOCAAD - ADDED VALUE OF COMPUTER AIDED ARCHITECTURAL DESIGN, Nys Koenraad, Provoost Tom, Verbeke Johan, Verleye Johan (Eds.), (2001) Hogeschool voor Wetenschap en Kunst - Departement Architectuur Sint-Lucas, Campus Brussel, ISBN 80-76101-05-1
summary In the field of architectural design, “visualization¨ generally refers to some media, communicating and representing the idea of designers, such as ordinary drafts, maps, perspectives, photos and physical models, etc. (Rahman, 1992; Susan, 2000). The main reason why we adopt visualization is that it enables us to understand clearly and to control complicated procedures (Gombrich, 1990). Secondly, the way we get design knowledge is more from the published visualized images and less from personal experiences (Evans, 1989). Thus the importance of the representation of visualization is manifested.Due to the developments of computer technology in recent years, various computer aided design system are invented and used in a great amount, such as image processing, computer graphic, computer modeling/rendering, animation, multimedia, virtual reality and collaboration, etc. (Lawson, 1995; Liu, 1996). The conventional media are greatly replaced by computer media, and the visualization is further brought into the computerized stage. The procedure of visual impact analysis and assessment (VIAA), addressed by Rahman (1992), is renewed and amended for the intervention of computer (Liu, 2000). Based on the procedures above, a great amount of applied researches are proceeded. Therefore it is evident that the computer visualization is helpful to the discussion and evaluation during the design process (Hall, 1988, 1990, 1992, 1995, 1996, 1997, 1998; Liu, 1997; Sasada, 1986, 1988, 1990, 1993, 1997, 1998). In addition to the process of architectural design, the computer visualization is also applied to the subject of construction, which is repeatedly amended and corrected by the images of computer simulation (Liu, 2000). Potier (2000) probes into the contextual research and restoration of historical architecture by the technology of computer simulation before the practical restoration is constructed. In this way he established a communicative mode among archeologists, architects via computer media.In the research of restoration and preservation of historical architecture in Taiwan, many scholars have been devoted into the studies of historical contextual criticism (Shi, 1988, 1990, 1991, 1992, 1995; Fu, 1995, 1997; Chiu, 2000). Clues that accompany the historical contextual criticism (such as oral information, writings, photographs, pictures, etc.) help to explore the construction and the procedure of restoration (Hung, 1995), and serve as an aid to the studies of the usage and durability of the materials in the restoration of historical architecture (Dasser, 1990; Wang, 1998). Many clues are lost, because historical architecture is often age-old (Hung, 1995). Under the circumstance, restoration of historical architecture can only be proceeded by restricted pictures, written data and oral information (Shi, 1989). Therefore, computer simulation is employed by scholars to simulate the condition of historical architecture with restricted information after restoration (Potier, 2000). Yet this is only the early stage of computer-aid restoration. The focus of the paper aims at exploring that whether visual simulation of computer can help to investigate the practice of restoration and the estimation and evaluation after restoration.By exploring the restoration of historical architecture (taking the Gigi Train Station destroyed by the earthquake in last September as the operating example), this study aims to establish a complete work on computer visualization, including the concept of restoration, the practice of restoration, and the estimation and evaluation of restoration.This research is to simulate the process of restoration by computer simulation based on visualized media (restricted pictures, restricted written data and restricted oral information) and the specialized experience of historical architects (Potier, 2000). During the process of practicing, communicates with craftsmen repeatedly with some simulated alternatives, and makes the result as the foundation of evaluating and adjusting the simulating process and outcome. In this way we address a suitable and complete process of computer visualization for historical architecture.The significance of this paper is that we are able to control every detail more exactly, and then prevent possible problems during the process of restoration of historical architecture.
series AVOCAAD
email tsk.aa88g@nctu.edu.tw
last changed 2005/09/09 08:48

_id 6598
authors Goldman, Glenn
year 1996
title Reconstructions, Remakes and Sequels: Architecture and Motion Pictures
source Design Computation: Collaboration, Reasoning, Pedagogy [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-05-5] Tucson (Arizona / USA) October 31 - November 2, 1996, pp. 11-21
summary Motion pictures can illustrate worlds that have never been. They may show fantastic depictions of the future or an interpretation of the past. In either case, they have the power to reach millions of people across cultures, generations, and educational backgrounds with visions of our environment that do not exist in our everyday world.

The study of imaginary worlds in this design studio case study is limited to motion pictures that postulate unique, or new environments rather than those films that faithfully attempt to document or reconstruct reality. In this sense, the movies used for study have a lineage traceable to Georges Melies "who came to film from illusionism and the "heater," rather than to the reality of the Lumiere brothers who came from photography which ultimately would lead to "cinema-verite."

Discussions, assignments and presentations in the studio are organized to provide students with an opportunity to gain a different awareness of architecture and use varying stimuli as source material for design. The study of architectural history, art, formal principles of design, visual perception, and media are required in order to complete the reconstructions and creations of proposed environments.

All student work throughout the entire semester is created with electronic media and the computer is used as an integral component of the studio enabling analysis and study, design, model creation, and animation. The available capabilities of computer graphics in the studio enables students to explore analytic and synthetic issues of design in motion pictures in a manner not readily available when restricted to traditional media. Through the use of digital media we have an opportunity to better understand the imaginary worlds for what they communicate and the ideas they contain, and therefore create an opportunity to modify our own concept of architecture.

series ACADIA
email goldman@njit.edu
last changed 2003/04/17 13:47

_id a115
authors Hanna, R.
year 1996
title A Computer-based Approach for Teaching Daylighting at the Early Design Stage
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 181-190
summary This paper has reviewed the literature on the teaching of daylight systems design in architectural education, and found that traditionally such teaching has evolved around the prediction of the Daylight Factor (DF%), i.e. illuminance, via two methods one studio-based and another laboratory based. The former relies on graphical and/or mathematical techniques, e.g. the BRE Protractors, the BRE Tables, Waldram Diagrams, the Pepper-pot diagrams and the BRE formula. The latter tests scale models of buildings under artificial sky conditions (CIE sky). The paper lists the advantages and disadvantages of both methods in terms of compatibility with the design process, time required, accuracy, energy-consumption facts, and visual information.

This paper outlines a proposal for an alternative method for teaching daylight and artificial lighting design for both architectural students and practitioners. It is based on photorealistic images as well as numbers, and employs the Lumen Micro 6.0 programme. This software package is a complete indoor lighting design and analysis programme which generates perspective renderings and animated walk-throughs of the space lighted naturally and artificially.

The paper also presents the findings of an empirical case study to validate Lumen Micro 6.0 by comparing simulated output with field monitoring of horizontal and vertical illuminance and luminance inside the highly acclaimed GSA building in Glasgow. The monitoring station was masterminded by the author and uses the Megatron lighting sensors, Luscar dataloggers and the Easylog analysis software. In addition photographs of a selected design studio inside the GSA building were contrasted with computer generated perspective images of the same space.

series eCAADe
email gtca09@udcf.gla.ac.uk
last changed 1998/08/17 13:41

_id maver_080
id maver_080
authors Maver, T.W. and Chen, Y.
year 1996
title The Design and Implementation of a Virtual Studio Environment
source Proceedings of 2nd East-West Conference on Information Technology in Design, 126-137
summary In this paper the authors describe the design and implementation of a virtual studio environment a distribute system for design collaboration across time and space. A virtual studio is defined as an electronic locale i the computer networks, containing distributed resources (both domain-specific design artifacts and generic Computer-Mediated Communication facilities) and inhabited by dispersed designers, whilst the virtual studj0 environment (VSE) refers to such a multi-user environment which supports the creation, operation and management of virtual studios. We'll particularly focus on reporting on the requirement analysis for a VS: the distributed system architecture, the design of the virtual studio model, and the implementation of the VSE server and VSE client programs. Conceptual buildingS design has been chosen as the application domain Advanced distributed computing technologies (CORBA, WWW) have been utilised for the prototyping.
series other
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/09/03 13:01

_id 2423
authors Morozumi, M., Takahasi, M., Naka, R., Kawasumi, N., Homma, R., Mitchell. W.J., Yamaguchi, S. and Iki, K.
year 1997
title The Levels of Communications Achieved Through Network in an International Collaborative Design Project: An Analysis of VDS ’96 Project Carried Out By Kumamoto University, MIT and Kyoto Institute of Technology
source CAADRIA ‘97 [Proceedings of the Second Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 957-575-057-8] Taiwan 17-19 April 1997, pp. 143-152
summary This paper reviewed the process and the achievements of a five-week-long virtual design studio project the authors carried out with three universities in Japan and the United States in the summer of 1996, in which there was no communication among team members other than network media. After analyzing the use of communication tools in different situations of design communication, and the level of communications achieved in this project, the authors concluded that the present network technology could provide sufficient levels of communication, if only participants could put forth some amount of extra effort for communication among team members.
series CAADRIA
email moro@arch.kumamoto-u.ac.jp
last changed 2003/05/17 07:54

_id 8804
authors QaQish, R. and Hanna, R.
year 1997
title A World-wide Questionnaire Survey on the Use of Computers in Architectural Education
source Challenges of the Future [15th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-3-0] Vienna (Austria) 17-20 September 1997
summary The paper reports on a study which examines the impact on architectural education needs arising from the changes brought about by the implications of CAD teaching/learning (CAI/CAL). The findings reflect the views of fifty-one (51) architecture schools through a world-wide questionnaire survey conducted in mid 1996. The survey was structured to cover four continents represented by seven countries, namely the USA, UK, Israel, Australia, Canada, Sweden and the Netherlands. Structurally the main findings of this study are summarised under five areas, namely: 1) General Information, 2) Program of Study (curriculum) and CAD course, 3) CAD Laboratories: Hardware, Software, 4) Departmental Current and Future Policies, 5) Multi-media and Virtual Reality. Principally, there were three main objectives for using the computers survey. Firstly, to accommodate a prevalent comprehension of CAD integration into the curriculum of architecture schools world wide. Secondly, to identify the main key factors that control the extent of association between CAD and architectural curriculum. Thirdly, to identify common trends of CAD teaching in Architecture schools world-wide and across the seven countries to establish whether there are any association between them. Several variables and factors that were found to have an impact on AE were examined, namely: the response rate, the conventional methods users and the CAD methods users amongst students, CAD course employment in the curriculum, age of CAD employment, the role of CAD in the curriculum, CAD training time in the Curriculum, CAD laboratories/Hardware & Software, computing staff and technicians, department policies, Multi-Media (MM) and Virtual-Reality (VR). The statistical analysis of the study revealed significant findings, one of which indicates that 35% of the total population of students at the surveyed architecture schools are reported as being CAD users. Out of the 51 architecture schools who participated in this survey, 47 have introduced CAD courses into the curriculum. The impact of CAD on the curriculum was noted to be significant in several areas, namely: architectural design, architectural presentation, structural engineering, facilities management, thesis project and urban design. The top five CAD packages found to be most highly used across universities were, namely, AutoCAD (46), 3DStudio (34), Microstation (23), Form Z (17), ArchiCAD (17). The findings of this study suggest some effective and efficient future directions in adopting some form of effective CAD strategies in the curriculum of architecture. The study also serves as an evaluation tool for computing teaching in the design studio and the curriculum.

 

keywords CAD Integration, Employment, Users and Effectiveness
series eCAADe
email r.qaqish@gsa.ac.uk
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/ecaade/proc/qaqish/qaqish.htm
last changed 2001/08/17 13:11

_id sigradi2006_c020a
id sigradi2006_c020a
authors Vasquez de Velasco de la Puente, Guillermo; Garcia Alvarado, Rodrigo and Bustos, Gabriela
year 2006
title Taller Virtual de Las Américas: Análisis, Síntesis y Propuesta de Desarrollo en Ambientes Multiusuarios Interactivos [America’s Virtual studio: Analysis, Synthesis and Proposal for develop an interactive multi-user environment]
source SIGraDi 2006 - [Proceedings of the 10th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Santiago de Chile - Chile 21-23 November 2006, pp. 105-109
summary As the title suggests, this paper makes an attempt to provide a factual analysis and synthesis of the activities that the Tex-Mex Virtual Design Studio, and later the Las Americas Virtual Design Studio, have been implementing since September of 1996, The objective of this attempt is to provide a framework for the formulation of a new conceptual and instrumental profile for future implementations of our virtual design studios. With such a purpose the paper outlines the importance of virtual design studios in the framework of opening design education to distance education methodologies and argues in favor of their further utilization for addressing issues of globalization in architecture and design education. This argument is followed by a quick description of current practices within the Las Americas Virtual Design Studio and sets the stage for a detailed description of how multi-user interactive environments may further support interaction within virtual design studios.
series SIGRADI
email vasquez@archone.tamu.edu
last changed 2016/03/10 09:02

_id c204
authors Aleksander Asanowicz
year 1996
title Teaching and Learning - Full Brainwash
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 51-54
summary We often speak of changes in design process due to an application of computers. But in my opinion we more often rather speak of lack of changes. Lets hope that some day we will be able to witness full integrity and compatibility of design process and tools applied in it. Quite possible such an integrity may occur in the cyberspace. Nevertheless before that could happen some changes within the teaching methods at faculties of architecture, where despite great numbers of computer equipment used, the students are still being taught as in the XIX century. In terms of achieved results it proves ineffective because application of chalk and blackboard only will always loose to new media, which allow visual perception of dinosaurs in Jurassic Park. Our civilisation is the iconographic one. And that is why teaching methods are about to change. An application of computer as simply a slide projector seems to be way too expensive. New media demands new process and new process demands new media. Lets hope that could be achieved in cyberspace as being a combination of: classic ways of teaching, hypertext, multimedia, virtual reality and a new teaching methodology (as used in Berlitz English School - full brainwash). At our faculty several years ago we experimentally undertook and applied an Integrated Design Teaching Method. A student during design process of an object simultaneously learnt all aspects and functions of the object being designing i.e.: its structure, piping and wiring, material cost and even historic evolution of its form and function. Unfortunately that concept was too extravagant as for the seventies in our reality. At present due to wide implementation of new media and tools in design process we come to consider reimplementation of IDTM again.
series eCAADe
email asan@cksr.ac.bialystok.pl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id a06c
authors Batie, David L.
year 1996
title The Incorporation of Construction History into Architectural History: The HISTCON Interactive Computer Program
source Design Computation: Collaboration, Reasoning, Pedagogy [ACADIA Conference Proceedings / ISBN 1-880250-05-5] Tucson (Arizona / USA) October 31 - November 2, 1996, pp. 235-243
summary Current teaching methods for architectural history seldom embrace building technology as an essential component of study. Accepting the premise that architectural history is a fundamental component to the overall architectural learning environment, it is argued that the study of construction history will further enhance student knowledge. This hypothesis created an opportunity to investigate how the study of construction history could be incorporated to strengthen present teaching methods. Strategies for teaching architectural history were analyzed with the determination that an incorporation of educational instructional design applications using object-oriented programming and hypermedia provided the optimal solution. This evaluation led to the development of the HISTCON interactive, multimedia educational computer program. Used initially to teach 19th Century iron and steel construction history, the composition of the program provides the mechanism to test the significance of construction history in the study of architectural history. Future development of the program will provide a method to illustrate construction history throughout the history of architecture. The study of architectural history, using a construction oriented methodology, is shown to be positively correlated to increased understanding of architectural components relevant to architectural history and building construction.
series ACADIA
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id 89ca
authors Garcia, Renato
year 1996
title Sound Structure: Using Data Sonification to Enhance Building Structures CAI
source CAADRIA ‘96 [Proceedings of The First Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 9627-75-703-9] Hong Kong (Hong Kong) 25-27 April 1996, pp. 109-117
summary Although sound is now extensively used to enrich multimedia applications in the form of simple audio signals, earcons, musical passages and speech, it has unfortunately been under-utilized as a means of data representation. Sound, having many characteristics which enable it to convey multi-dimensional information, provides a broad channel for dynamically presenting data in a learning environment. This paper looks into how teaching concepts of building structures to students of architecture and engineering through computers and multimedia can be enhanced by enlisting the use of appropriate sound parameters. Sound is useful in presenting redundant or supplementary information such as in portraying building structural response to static and dynamic external loading. This process of audiolization, which refers to the use of sounds to present data, can alleviate much of the cognitive load that usually burdens visual displays and has been used to some degree of success in various studies on scientific representation. Where appropriate, audiolization can be synchronized to more established visualization processes to provide more effective multi-modal multimedia systems for the study of building structures.
series CAADRIA
email rjgarcia@hkusua.hku.hk
last changed 2003/05/17 07:54

_id 6262
authors Glanville, Ranulph
year 1996
title Creativity and HyperMedia, MultiMedia, the InterNET an Virtuality
source CAD Creativeness [Conference Proceedings / ISBN 83-905377-0-2] Bialystock (Poland), 25-27 April 1996 pp. 99-115
summary Creativity is defined in an operational manner as being associated with the new, and hence with surprise and variety. Certain qualities of various computer media (HyperMedia, Multimedia, InterNET and Virtuality) are considered in the light of this definition in order to determine how they might be shaped and used to enhance (the likelihood of) creativity, particularly in architectural design. A more thorough examination of the qualities of computational media is suggested. together with a method for carrying this out. A major consideration of CAD has been excluded since the author has, elsewhere, recently covered this aspect of computing in some depth.
series plCAD
email ranulph@glanville.co.uk
last changed 2003/05/17 08:01

_id 7c47
authors Lee, Tsai-Sun and Hardin, Mary
year 1996
title Daylight Visual Effects: An Interactive Multimedia Courseware Prototype for Beginning Design Students
source Computer Graphics. August 1996
summary An interactive multimedia courseware prototype, Daylight Visual Effects (DVE), has been designed to provide a demonstration database and easy-to-use interface for beginning design students. Users gain or enhance knowledge about the visual effects of daylighting by reviewing relevant daylighting images, written information, animations and 3D computer models in the DVE's database. The presentation includes a live demonstration of the DVE prototype, a summary of the accomplishments and limitations of the courseware development, the effectiveness of the DVE interface, and the impact of DVE courseware on students and instructors.
series journal paper
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id c7e9
authors Maver, T.W.
year 2002
title Predicting the Past, Remembering the Future
source SIGraDi 2002 - [Proceedings of the 6th Iberoamerican Congress of Digital Graphics] Caracas (Venezuela) 27-29 november 2002, pp. 2-3
summary Charlas Magistrales 2There never has been such an exciting moment in time in the extraordinary 30 year history of our subject area, as NOW,when the philosophical theoretical and practical issues of virtuality are taking centre stage.The PastThere have, of course, been other defining moments during these exciting 30 years:• the first algorithms for generating building layouts (circa 1965).• the first use of Computer graphics for building appraisal (circa 1966).• the first integrated package for building performance appraisal (circa 1972).• the first computer generated perspective drawings (circa 1973).• the first robust drafting systems (circa 1975).• the first dynamic energy models (circa 1982).• the first photorealistic colour imaging (circa 1986).• the first animations (circa 1988)• the first multimedia systems (circa 1995), and• the first convincing demonstrations of virtual reality (circa 1996).Whereas the CAAD community has been hugely inventive in the development of ICT applications to building design, it hasbeen woefully remiss in its attempts to evaluate the contribution of those developments to the quality of the built environmentor to the efficiency of the design process. In the absence of any real evidence, one can only conjecture regarding the realbenefits which fall, it is suggested, under the following headings:• Verisimilitude: The extraordinary quality of still and animated images of the formal qualities of the interiors and exteriorsof individual buildings and of whole neighborhoods must surely give great comfort to practitioners and their clients thatwhat is intended, formally, is what will be delivered, i.e. WYSIWYG - what you see is what you get.• Sustainability: The power of «first-principle» models of the dynamic energetic behaviour of buildings in response tochanging diurnal and seasonal conditions has the potential to save millions of dollars and dramatically to reduce thedamaging environmental pollution created by badly designed and managed buildings.• Productivity: CAD is now a multi-billion dollar business which offers design decision support systems which operate,effectively, across continents, time-zones, professions and companies.• Communication: Multi-media technology - cheap to deliver but high in value - is changing the way in which we canexplain and understand the past and, envisage and anticipate the future; virtual past and virtual future!MacromyopiaThe late John Lansdown offered the view, in his wonderfully prophetic way, that ...”the future will be just like the past, onlymore so...”So what can we expect the extraordinary trajectory of our subject area to be?To have any chance of being accurate we have to have an understanding of the phenomenon of macromyopia: thephenomenon exhibitted by society of greatly exaggerating the immediate short-term impact of new technologies (particularlythe information technologies) but, more importantly, seriously underestimating their sustained long-term impacts - socially,economically and intellectually . Examples of flawed predictions regarding the the future application of information technologiesinclude:• The British Government in 1880 declined to support the idea of a national telephonic system, backed by the argumentthat there were sufficient small boys in the countryside to run with messages.• Alexander Bell was modest enough to say that: «I am not boasting or exaggerating but I believe, one day, there will bea telephone in every American city».• Tom Watson, in 1943 said: «I think there is a world market for about 5 computers».• In 1977, Ken Olssop of Digital said: «There is no reason for any individuals to have a computer in their home».The FutureJust as the ascent of woman/man-kind can be attributed to her/his capacity to discover amplifiers of the modest humancapability, so we shall discover how best to exploit our most important amplifier - that of the intellect. The more we know themore we can figure; the more we can figure the more we understand; the more we understand the more we can appraise;the more we can appraise the more we can decide; the more we can decide the more we can act; the more we can act themore we can shape; and the more we can shape, the better the chance that we can leave for future generations a trulysustainable built environment which is fit-for-purpose, cost-beneficial, environmentally friendly and culturally significactCentral to this aspiration will be our understanding of the relationship between real and virtual worlds and how to moveeffortlessly between them. We need to be able to design, from within the virtual world, environments which may be real ormay remain virtual or, perhaps, be part real and part virtual.What is certain is that the next 30 years will be every bit as exciting and challenging as the first 30 years.
series SIGRADI
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2016/03/10 08:55

_id maver_086
id maver_086
authors Maver, T.W.
year 1996
title A Tale of Three Cities
source VR News. Proceedings of Virtual Heritage Conference 1995 (Bath [UK], Nov 22)
summary The ABACUS Group has been active for some years in the use of computer graphics and multimedia to represent past, present and future buildings in both urban and rural settings. The three cities discussed during the presentation are Split, in former Yugoslavia - a graphical account of the development of Split from its origin in the Diocletian Palace of the Venetian Empire up to the present day; Edinburgh - a multimedia interface to a large-scale three dimensional computer model of Edinburgh Old Town; and Glasgow - Virtual City developments in the run up to the City of Architecture and Design celebrations in 1999. The presentation concludes with a report on the IMAGEA project - an international initiative to construct an Interactive Multimedia Archive of Great European Architecture.
series other
type normal paper
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2006/09/11 05:29

_id maver_078
id maver_078
authors Maver, T.W.
year 1996
title Information Technology and Building Performance
source 3rd International Symposium on the Application of the Performance Concept in Building. Tel Aviv, Israel
summary The quality of the built environment depends critically on the concept of sustainability and, in particular, on designs which are energy efficient and environmentally friendly. This paper gives an account of the successful application of computer-based simulations of the physical environment made available to architects through an Energy Design Advisory Service and used parametrically within a research project carried out jointly with a design and build company. It goes on to indicate how emerging multimedia technology can be used to provide an explanation, particularly to those who are technically unsophisticated, of the complexity of the way in which design decisions impact upon the energy efficiency and environmental friendliness of buildings.
series other
email t.w.maver@strath.ac.uk
last changed 2003/09/03 13:01

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