CumInCAD is a Cumulative Index about publications in Computer Aided Architectural Design
supported by the sibling associations ACADIA, CAADRIA, eCAADe, SIGraDi, ASCAAD and CAAD futures

PDF papers
References

Hits 1 to 20 of 481

_id ddssup9604
id ddssup9604
authors Boelen, A.J.
year 1996
title Impact-Analysis of Urban Design Realtime impact-analysis models for urban designers
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary The past five years Prof Dr Jr T.M. de Jong, professor in environmental planning and sustainability at the Technical University of Delft, has developed a theoretical foundation for the analysis of urban design on the ecological, technical, economical, cultural and political impacts of morphologic interventions on different levels of scale. From september 1994 Jr AJ. Boelen (Urban Design Scientist and Knowledge Engineer) started a research project at the same university to further explore the possibilities of these theories and to develop impact evaluation models for urban design and development with the theoretical work of De Jong as a starting point. The paper discusses the development of a design and decision support system based on these theories. For the development of this system, techniques like object-orientation, genetic algorithms and knowledge engineering are used. The user interface, the relation between the real world, paper maps and virtual maps and the presentation of design-interventions and impacts caused by the interventions are important issues. The development-process is an interactive step by step process. It consists of the making of a prototype of the system, testing the theory and hypothe-sisses the system is based on, by applying tests end adjusting the theory and hypothesisses where needed. Eventually the system must be able to act as an integrator of many different models already developed or still to be developed. The structure of the system will allow easy future expansion and adjustment to changing insights. The logic used to develop the basic theory on which this system is founded makes it possible to even introduce and maintain rather subjective aspects like quality or appraisal as impacts that can be evaluated. In a previously developed system "Momentum" this was proved to work effectively for the national level. In this project we will - amongst other things - try to prove the effectiveness of impact-evaluation for other levels of scale.
series DDSS
email Aj.Boelen@bk.tudelft.nl
last changed 2003/11/21 14:16

_id ga0026
id ga0026
authors Ransen, Owen F.
year 2000
title Possible Futures in Computer Art Generation
source International Conference on Generative Art
summary Years of trying to create an "Image Idea Generator" program have convinced me that the perfect solution would be to have an artificial artistic person, a design slave. This paper describes how I came to that conclusion, realistic alternatives, and briefly, how it could possibly happen. 1. The history of Repligator and Gliftic 1.1 Repligator In 1996 I had the idea of creating an “image idea generator”. I wanted something which would create images out of nothing, but guided by the user. The biggest conceptual problem I had was “out of nothing”. What does that mean? So I put aside that problem and forced the user to give the program a starting image. This program eventually turned into Repligator, commercially described as an “easy to use graphical effects program”, but actually, to my mind, an Image Idea Generator. The first release came out in October 1997. In December 1998 I described Repligator V4 [1] and how I thought it could be developed away from simply being an effects program. In July 1999 Repligator V4 won the Shareware Industry Awards Foundation prize for "Best Graphics Program of 1999". Prize winners are never told why they won, but I am sure that it was because of two things: 1) Easy of use 2) Ease of experimentation "Ease of experimentation" means that Repligator does in fact come up with new graphics ideas. Once you have input your original image you can generate new versions of that image simply by pushing a single key. Repligator is currently at version 6, but, apart from adding many new effects and a few new features, is basically the same program as version 4. Following on from the ideas in [1] I started to develop Gliftic, which is closer to my original thoughts of an image idea generator which "starts from nothing". The Gliftic model of images was that they are composed of three components: 1. Layout or form, for example the outline of a mandala is a form. 2. Color scheme, for example colors selected from autumn leaves from an oak tree. 3. Interpretation, for example Van Gogh would paint a mandala with oak tree colors in a different way to Andy Warhol. There is a Van Gogh interpretation and an Andy Warhol interpretation. Further I wanted to be able to genetically breed images, for example crossing two layouts to produce a child layout. And the same with interpretations and color schemes. If I could achieve this then the program would be very powerful. 1.2 Getting to Gliftic Programming has an amazing way of crystalising ideas. If you want to put an idea into practice via a computer program you really have to understand the idea not only globally, but just as importantly, in detail. You have to make hard design decisions, there can be no vagueness, and so implementing what I had decribed above turned out to be a considerable challenge. I soon found out that the hardest thing to do would be the breeding of forms. What are the "genes" of a form? What are the genes of a circle, say, and how do they compare to the genes of the outline of the UK? I wanted the genotype representation (inside the computer program's data) to be directly linked to the phenotype representation (on the computer screen). This seemed to be the best way of making sure that bred-forms would bare some visual relationship to their parents. I also wanted symmetry to be preserved. For example if two symmetrical objects were bred then their children should be symmetrical. I decided to represent shapes as simply closed polygonal shapes, and the "genes" of these shapes were simply the list of points defining the polygon. Thus a circle would have to be represented by a regular polygon of, say, 100 sides. The outline of the UK could easily be represented as a list of points every 10 Kilometers along the coast line. Now for the important question: what do you get when you cross a circle with the outline of the UK? I tried various ways of combining the "genes" (i.e. coordinates) of the shapes, but none of them really ended up producing interesting shapes. And of the methods I used, many of them, applied over several "generations" simply resulted in amorphous blobs, with no distinct family characteristics. Or rather maybe I should say that no single method of breeding shapes gave decent results for all types of images. Figure 1 shows an example of breeding a mandala with 6 regular polygons: Figure 1 Mandala bred with array of regular polygons I did not try out all my ideas, and maybe in the future I will return to the problem, but it was clear to me that it is a non-trivial problem. And if the breeding of shapes is a non-trivial problem, then what about the breeding of interpretations? I abandoned the genetic (breeding) model of generating designs but retained the idea of the three components (form, color scheme, interpretation). 1.3 Gliftic today Gliftic Version 1.0 was released in May 2000. It allows the user to change a form, a color scheme and an interpretation. The user can experiment with combining different components together and can thus home in on an personally pleasing image. Just as in Repligator, pushing the F7 key make the program choose all the options. Unlike Repligator however the user can also easily experiment with the form (only) by pushing F4, the color scheme (only) by pushing F5 and the interpretation (only) by pushing F6. Figures 2, 3 and 4 show some example images created by Gliftic. Figure 2 Mandala interpreted with arabesques   Figure 3 Trellis interpreted with "graphic ivy"   Figure 4 Regular dots interpreted as "sparks" 1.4 Forms in Gliftic V1 Forms are simply collections of graphics primitives (points, lines, ellipses and polygons). The program generates these collections according to the user's instructions. Currently the forms are: Mandala, Regular Polygon, Random Dots, Random Sticks, Random Shapes, Grid Of Polygons, Trellis, Flying Leap, Sticks And Waves, Spoked Wheel, Biological Growth, Chequer Squares, Regular Dots, Single Line, Paisley, Random Circles, Chevrons. 1.5 Color Schemes in Gliftic V1 When combining a form with an interpretation (described later) the program needs to know what colors it can use. The range of colors is called a color scheme. Gliftic has three color scheme types: 1. Random colors: Colors for the various parts of the image are chosen purely at random. 2. Hue Saturation Value (HSV) colors: The user can choose the main hue (e.g. red or yellow), the saturation (purity) of the color scheme and the value (brightness/darkness) . The user also has to choose how much variation is allowed in the color scheme. A wide variation allows the various colors of the final image to depart a long way from the HSV settings. A smaller variation results in the final image using almost a single color. 3. Colors chosen from an image: The user can choose an image (for example a JPG file of a famous painting, or a digital photograph he took while on holiday in Greece) and Gliftic will select colors from that image. Only colors from the selected image will appear in the output image. 1.6 Interpretations in Gliftic V1 Interpretation in Gliftic is best decribed with a few examples. A pure geometric line could be interpreted as: 1) the branch of a tree 2) a long thin arabesque 3) a sequence of disks 4) a chain, 5) a row of diamonds. An pure geometric ellipse could be interpreted as 1) a lake, 2) a planet, 3) an eye. Gliftic V1 has the following interpretations: Standard, Circles, Flying Leap, Graphic Ivy, Diamond Bar, Sparkz, Ess Disk, Ribbons, George Haite, Arabesque, ZigZag. 1.7 Applications of Gliftic Currently Gliftic is mostly used for creating WEB graphics, often backgrounds as it has an option to enable "tiling" of the generated images. There is also a possibility that it will be used in the custom textile business sometime within the next year or two. The real application of Gliftic is that of generating new graphics ideas, and I suspect that, like Repligator, many users will only understand this later. 2. The future of Gliftic, 3 possibilties Completing Gliftic V1 gave me the experience to understand what problems and opportunities there will be in future development of the program. Here I divide my many ideas into three oversimplified possibilities, and the real result may be a mix of two or all three of them. 2.1 Continue the current development "linearly" Gliftic could grow simply by the addition of more forms and interpretations. In fact I am sure that initially it will grow like this. However this limits the possibilities to what is inside the program itself. These limits can be mitigated by allowing the user to add forms (as vector files). The user can already add color schemes (as images). The biggest problem with leaving the program in its current state is that there is no easy way to add interpretations. 2.2 Allow the artist to program Gliftic It would be interesting to add a language to Gliftic which allows the user to program his own form generators and interpreters. In this way Gliftic becomes a "platform" for the development of dynamic graphics styles by the artist. The advantage of not having to deal with the complexities of Windows programming could attract the more adventurous artists and designers. The choice of programming language of course needs to take into account the fact that the "programmer" is probably not be an expert computer scientist. I have seen how LISP (an not exactly easy artificial intelligence language) has become very popular among non programming users of AutoCAD. If, to complete a job which you do manually and repeatedly, you can write a LISP macro of only 5 lines, then you may be tempted to learn enough LISP to write those 5 lines. Imagine also the ability to publish (and/or sell) "style generators". An artist could develop a particular interpretation function, it creates images of a given character which others find appealing. The interpretation (which runs inside Gliftic as a routine) could be offered to interior designers (for example) to unify carpets, wallpaper, furniture coverings for single projects. As Adrian Ward [3] says on his WEB site: "Programming is no less an artform than painting is a technical process." Learning a computer language to create a single image is overkill and impractical. Learning a computer language to create your own artistic style which generates an infinite series of images in that style may well be attractive. 2.3 Add an artificial conciousness to Gliftic This is a wild science fiction idea which comes into my head regularly. Gliftic manages to surprise the users with the images it makes, but, currently, is limited by what gets programmed into it or by pure chance. How about adding a real artifical conciousness to the program? Creating an intelligent artificial designer? According to Igor Aleksander [1] conciousness is required for programs (computers) to really become usefully intelligent. Aleksander thinks that "the line has been drawn under the philosophical discussion of conciousness, and the way is open to sound scientific investigation". Without going into the details, and with great over-simplification, there are roughly two sorts of artificial intelligence: 1) Programmed intelligence, where, to all intents and purposes, the programmer is the "intelligence". The program may perform well (but often, in practice, doesn't) and any learning which is done is simply statistical and pre-programmed. There is no way that this type of program could become concious. 2) Neural network intelligence, where the programs are based roughly on a simple model of the brain, and the network learns how to do specific tasks. It is this sort of program which, according to Aleksander, could, in the future, become concious, and thus usefully intelligent. What could the advantages of an artificial artist be? 1) There would be no need for programming. Presumbably the human artist would dialog with the artificial artist, directing its development. 2) The artificial artist could be used as an apprentice, doing the "drudge" work of art, which needs intelligence, but is, anyway, monotonous for the human artist. 3) The human artist imagines "concepts", the artificial artist makes them concrete. 4) An concious artificial artist may come up with ideas of its own. Is this science fiction? Arthur C. Clarke's 1st Law: "If a famous scientist says that something can be done, then he is in all probability correct. If a famous scientist says that something cannot be done, then he is in all probability wrong". Arthur C Clarke's 2nd Law: "Only by trying to go beyond the current limits can you find out what the real limits are." One of Bertrand Russell's 10 commandments: "Do not fear to be eccentric in opinion, for every opinion now accepted was once eccentric" 3. References 1. "From Ramon Llull to Image Idea Generation". Ransen, Owen. Proceedings of the 1998 Milan First International Conference on Generative Art. 2. "How To Build A Mind" Aleksander, Igor. Wiedenfeld and Nicolson, 1999 3. "How I Drew One of My Pictures: or, The Authorship of Generative Art" by Adrian Ward and Geof Cox. Proceedings of the 1999 Milan 2nd International Conference on Generative Art.
series other
email owen@ransen.com
more http://www.generativeart.com/
last changed 2003/08/07 15:25

_id ddssup9601
id ddssup9601
authors Aoke, Yoshitsugu and Muraoka, Naoto
year 1996
title An optimization method of the facility location by genetic algorithm
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part two: Urban Planning Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary In planning of community-facilities, it is important to decide the facility location to provide the effective service for residents. The behavior of residents using the facility and the evaluation methods of the location have been studied. But, finding the optimum location is very hard in actual planning because the volume of calculation depends on the number of feasible locating points of facilities. To conquer the difficulty of searching the optimum location, we propose an optimization method using Genetic Algorithm. An alternative of location is expressed by a chromosome. Each chromosome consists of genes, and each gene expresses a located zone of the facility. We gave definitions of genetic procedures; crossing-over, mutation and selection. Alternatives of the facility location are generated by these genetic procedures like as life evolution. For each alternative, the behaviors of users are estimated by a spatial-interaction model, and the facilities that residents in each place choose are determined. The effectiveness of the location is measured by a total sum of distances between the facility and the user. After the confirmation of the effectiveness of our method by applying on ideal example problems, we applied it on the actual problem in Japanese town. By this method we could find the optimum location in about one-third time and effort as compared with the ordinal method.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id c872
authors Beliveau, Y.J., Fithian, J.E. and Deisenroth, M.P.
year 1996
title Autonomous vehicle navigation with real-time 3D laser based positioning for construction
source Automation in Construction 5 (4) (1996) pp. 261-272
summary Autonomous Guided Vehicles (AGVs) are a way of life in manufacturing where navigation can be done in a structured environment. Construction is an unstructured environment and requires a different type of navigation system to deal with three dimensional control and rough terrain. This paper provides a review of navigation systems that utilize dead-reckoning in conjunction with absolute referencing systems such as beacon-based systems, and vision and mapping based system. The use of a real-time laser based technology is demonstrated as a new form of navigation. This, technology does not rely on dead reckoning. The paper outlines the issues and strategies in guiding an autonomous vehicle utilizing only the laser-based positioning system. Algorithms were developed to provide real-time control of the AGV. The laser based positioning system is unique in that it provides three dimensional position data with five updates per second. No other system can provide this level of performance. This allows for control of end effectors and autonomous vehicles in complex and unstructured three dimensional environments. The use of this new type of navigation makes possible the automation of large complex assemblies in rough terrain such as construction.
series journal paper
more http://www.elsevier.com/locate/autcon
last changed 2003/05/15 19:22

_id ddssar9603
id ddssar9603
authors Daru, R. and Snijder, H.P.S.
year 1996
title Morphogenetic Designing in Architecture resolving controversies in and between design, research and development
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary There is a dearth of software able to support the working styles of all types of designers and design scholars, spanning the whole spectrum of hermeneutical and empirical traditions. The development of morphogenetic designing in architecture opens new possibilities to bridge the gap between the different traditions. It can support the birth of forms evolving one from the other with the help of local and global rules in genetic algorithms and neural networks which translate the wishes of the designer. It can also support the communication about these forms and the testing of their adequacy. On the other hand the design process which is reflected in the sequence of form generating acts can be studied by design researchers better than by protocols alone.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/08/07 14:36

_id 5e49
authors Deering, Michael F.
year 1996
title HoloSketch: A Virtual Reality Sketching/Animation Tool Special Issue on Virtual Reality Software and Technology
source Transactions on Computer-Human Interaction 1995 v.2 n.3 pp. 220-238
summary This article describes HoloSketch, a virtual reality-based 3D geometry creation and manipulation tool. HoloSketch is aimed at providing nonprogrammers with an easy-to-use 3D "What-You-See-Is-What-You-Get" environment. Using head-tracked stereo shutter glasses and a desktop CRT display configuration, virtual objects can be created with a 3D wand manipulator directly in front of the user, at very high accuracy and much more rapidly than with traditional 3D drawing systems. HoloSketch also supports simple animation and audio control for virtual objects. This article describes the functions of the HoloSketch system, as well as our experience so far with more-general issues of head-tracked stereo 3D user interface design.
keywords Computer Graphics; Picture/Image Generation; Display Algorithms; Computer Graphics; Three-Dimensional Graphics and Realism; Human Factors; 3D Animation; 3D Graphics; Graphics Drawing Systems; Graphics Painting Systems; Man-Machine Interface; Virtual Reality
series other
last changed 2002/07/07 14:01

_id 88f4
authors Fu, S., Bao, H. and Peng, Q.
year 1996
title An Accelerated Rendering Algorithm for Stereoscopic Display
source CAADRIA ‘96 [Proceedings of The First Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design Research in Asia / ISBN 9627-75-703-9] Hong Kong (Hong Kong) 25-27 April 1996, pp. 53-61
summary With the development of the scientific visualization and the virtual environment techniques, stereo viewing systems have not been used extensively. In this paper, we present an accelerated rendering algorithm for stereoscopic display. As the difference between the left view and the right view is slight, we generate the right view by a transformation of the left view conforming to the stereo disparity. The problem of visibility change of a few polygons during the transformation is discussed and an efficient algorithm is developed for filling the holes that may arise in the right view after the transformation. This method makes fully use of the coherence between the left view and the right view. Experiments prove its efficiency.
series CAADRIA
last changed 1999/01/31 13:56

_id 1aa5
authors Huangb, X., Gub, P. and Zernickea, R.
year 1996
title Localization and comparison of two free-form surfaces
source Computer-Aided Design, Vol. 28 (12) (1996) pp. 1017-1022
summary Comparison of two free-form surfaces based on discrete data points is of paramount importance for reverse engineering. It can be used to assess the accuracy of the reconstructed surfaces and to quantify thedifference between two such surfaces. The entire process involves three main steps: data acquisition, 3D feature localization and quantitative comparison. This paper presents models and algorithms for 3D featurelocalization and quantitative comparison. Complex free-form surfaces are represented by bicubic parametric spline surfaces using discrete points. A simple yet effective pseudoinverse algorithm was developed andimplemented for localization. It consists of two iterative operations, namely, constructing a pseudo transformation matrix and point matching. A computing algorithm was developed to compare two such surfacesusing optimization techniques. Since this approach does not involve solving non-linear equations for the parameters of positions and orientations, it is fast and robust. The algorithm was implemented and testedwith several examples. It is effective and can be used in industry for sculptured surface comparison.
keywords Free-Form Sculptured Surface, Localization, Point Matching, Surface Comparison
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:33

_id fb63
id fb63
authors Jabi, Wassim
year 1996
title An Outline of the Requirements for a Computer-Supported Collaborative Design System
source Open House International, vol 21, no 1, March 1996
summary Computer-Aided Architectural Design (CAAD) systems have adequately satisfied several needs so far. They have dramatically improved the accuracy and consistency of working drawings, enabled designers to visualize their design ideas in three-dimensions, allowed the analysis of designs through data exchange and integrated databases, and even allowed the designers to evaluate (and in some cases generate) designs based on comparisons to previous cases and/or the formalization of grammars. Yet, there is a consensus that CAAD systems have not yet achieved their full potential. First, most systems employ a single-user approach to solving architectural problems which fails to grapple with the fact that most design work is done through teamwork. Second, current systems still can not support early design stages which involve client briefing, data collection, building program formulation, and schematic design generation. This paper seeks to study remedies to both of the afore-mentioned limitations through focusing on the fundamental dialectic and collaborative nature of what is called designing: a concerned social activity that proceeds by creating architectural elements to address a set of requirements and their re-thinking as a result of architectural conjecture. To investigate this relationship, it is proposed to build a computer-supported collaborative design environment using the tools of conceptual modeling, object-oriented algorithms, and distributed agents. Based on findings regarding the role of artifacts in collaborative design and a literature survey, this paper concludes with an outline of the requirements for the above system.
series journal paper
type normal paper
email jabi@njit.edu
last changed 2008/06/12 14:34

_id 2f3c
authors Jabi, Wassim
year 1996
title An Outline of the Requirements for a Computer-Supported Collaborative Design System
source Open House International, vol. 21 no 1, March 1996, pp. 22-30
summary Computer-Aided Architectural Design (CAAD) systems have adequately satisfied several needs so far. They have dramatically improved the accuracy and consistency of working drawings, enabled designers to visualize their design ideas in three-dimensions, allowed the analysis of designs through data exchange and integrated databases, and even allowed the designers to evaluate (and in some cases generate) designs based on comparisons to previous cases and/or the formalization of grammars. Yet, there is a consensus that CAAD systems have not yet achieved their full potential. First, most systems employ a single-user approach to solving architectural problems which fails to grapple with the fact that most design work is done through teamwork. Second, current systems still can not support early design stages which involve client briefing, data collection, building program formulation, and schematic design generation. This paper seeks to study remedies to both of the afore-mentioned limitations through focusing on the fundamental dialectic and collaborative nature of what is called designing: a concerned social activity that proceeds by creating architectural elements to address a set of requirements and their re-thinking as a result of architectural conjecture. To investigate this relationship, it is proposed to build a computer-supported collaborative design environment using the tools of conceptual modeling, object-oriented algorithms, and distributed agents. Based on findings regarding the role of artifacts in collaborative design and a literature survey, this paper concludes with an outline of the requirements for the above system.
keywords Computer Supported Collaborative Design
series other
email jabi@njit.edu
last changed 2002/03/05 18:54

_id 3a63
authors Kaynak, O.
year 1998
title Computational intelligence: soft computing and fuzzy-neuro integration with applications
source Springer, Berlin
summary Soft computing is a consortium of computing methodologies that provide a foundation for the conception, design, and deployment of intelligent systems and aims to formalize the human ability to make rational decisions in an environment of uncertainty and imprecision. This book is based on a NATO Advanced Study Institute held in 1996 on soft computing and its applications. The distinguished contributors consider the principal constituents of soft computing, namely fuzzy logic, neurocomputing, genetic computing, and probabilistic reasoning, the relations between them, and their fusion in industrial applications. Two areas emphasized in the book are how to achieve a synergistic combination of the main constituents of soft computing and how the combination can be used to achieve a high Machine Intelligence Quotient.
series other
last changed 2003/04/23 13:14

_id 6237
authors Kiechle, Horst
year 1996
title CONSTRUCTING THE AMORPHOUS
source Full-Scale Modeling in the Age of Virtual Reality [6th EFA-Conference Proceedings]
summary Constructing the Amorphous entails the ongoing research into a concept which aims to develop a new understanding for Art, Design and Architecture within society. Rigid, reductivist and confrontational methods based on static geometry, prejudice and competition are to be replaced by dynamic, interdisciplinary and integrative models. In his current art practice the author simulates existing architectural spaces whose interior are re-designed into sculpted environments, based on creative irregularity rather than idealised geometry. All the computer simulated “soft” environments can be realised on an architectural scale as temporary installations with the curved surfaces approximated through planar polygons cut from sheet materials. Within this framework the Darren Knight Gallery Project represents the most recently example.

The paper discusses furthermore various 3D modeling options, such as standard CAD representations, high quality rendered video walk-throughs, VRML models and physically produced, full-scale models, made of corrugated cardboard. The cost and equipment requirements necessary for full-scale modeling in cardboard are outlined.

keywords VRML, CAD, 3D Modeling, Model Simulation, Real Environments
series other
type normal paper
email horst@vislab.usyd.edu.au
more http://info.tuwien.ac.at/efa/
last changed 2004/05/04 12:40

_id 1162
authors Malkawi, Ali and Jabi, Wassim
year 1996
title Integrating Shadow Casting Methodology and Thermal Simulation
source Proceedings of the Solar ‘96 Conference. Asheville, North Carolina: American Solar Energy Society, 1996, pp. 271-276
summary This paper describes an experiment that integrates shadow casting methodology and thermal simulation algorithms developed by the authors. The 3D shadow procedures use a polyhedral representation of solids within a Cartesian space that allows for accurate casting of shadows. The algorithm is also capable of calculating surface areas of polygonal shadows of any arbitrary shape and size. The thermal simulation algorithms – using the Transfer Function Method (TFM) – incorporate the shaded area calculations to better predict solar heat gain from glazing based on transmitted, absorbed, and conducted cooling loads. The paper describes the use of a 3D computer model to illustrate the impact of the pattern and area of shading on the visual and thermal properties of building apertures. The paper discusses the objectives of this experiment, the algorithms used, and their integration. Conclusions and findings are drawn.
keywords Shadow Casting Algorithms Energey Thermal Simulation
series other
email jabi@njit.edu
last changed 2002/03/05 18:51

_id c363
authors Pieglb, Les and Tillera, Wayne
year 1996
title Algorithm for approximate NURBS skinning
source Computer-Aided Design, Vol. 28 (9) (1996) pp. 699-706
summary An algorithm for approximate skinning through cross-sectionalNURBS curves is presented. The method eliminates the problem of dealing with huge amounts of control points obtained during the curvecompatability process. It also allows the designer to specify large numbers of cross-sections and approximately fit a smooth surface to these curves to any given tolerance. Depending on the tolerances used, up to99% of the control points can be eliminated.
keywords NURBS, Surface Skinning, Curves and Surfaces, Algorithms
series journal paper
last changed 2003/05/15 19:33

_id acadia07_284
id acadia07_284
authors Robinson, Kirsten; Gorbet, Robert; Beesley, Philip
year 2007
title Evolving Cooperative Behaviour in a Reflexive Membrane
source Expanding Bodies: Art • Cities• Environment [Proceedings of the 27th Annual Conference of the Association for Computer Aided Design in Architecture / ISBN 978-0-9780978-6-8] Halifax (Nova Scotia) 1-7 October 2007, 284-293
summary This paper describes the integration of machine intelligence into an immersive architectural sculpture that interacts dynamically with users and the environment. The system is conceived to function as an architectural envelope that might transfer air using a distributed array of components. The sculpture includes a large array of interconnected miniature structural and kinetic elements, each with local sensing, actuation, and machine intelligence. We demonstrate a model in which these autonomous, interconnected agents develop cooperative behaviour to maximize airflow. Agents have access to sensory data about their local environment and ‘learn’ to move air through the working of a genetic algorithm. Introducing distributed and responsive machine intelligence builds on work done on evolving embodied intelligence (Floreano et al. 2004) and architectural ‘geotextile’ sculptures by Philip Beesley and collaborators (Beesley et al. 1996-2006). The paper contributes to the general field of interactive art by demonstrating an application of machine intelligence as a design method. The objective is the development of coherent distributed kinetic building envelopes with environmental control functions. A cultural context is included, discussing dynamic paradigms in responsive architecture.
series ACADIA
type normal paper
email k.w.robinson@gmail.com
last changed 2007/10/02 06:14

_id ascaad2004_paper11
id ascaad2004_paper11
authors Abdelfattah, Hesham Khairy and Ali A. Raouf
year 2004
title No More Fear or Doubt: Electronic Architecture in Architectural Education
source eDesign in Architecture: ASCAAD's First International Conference on Computer Aided Architectural Design, 7-9 December 2004, KFUPM, Saudi Arabia
summary Operating electronic and Internet worked tools for Architectural education is an important, and merely a prerequisite step toward creating powerful tele-collabortion and tele-research in our Architectural studios. The design studio, as physical place and pedagogical method, is the core of architectural education. The Carnegie Endowment report on architectural education, published in 1996, identified a comparably central role for studios in schools today. Advances in CAD and visualization, combined with technologies to communicate images, data, and “live” action, now enable virtual dimensions of studio experience. Students no longer need to gather at the same time and place to tackle the same design problem. Critics can comment over the network or by e-mail, and distinguished jurors can make virtual visits without being in the same room as the pin-up—if there is a pin-up (or a room). Virtual design studios (VDS) have the potential to support collaboration over competition, diversify student experiences, and redistribute the intellectual resources of architectural education across geographic and socioeconomic divisions. The challenge is to predict whether VDS will isolate students from a sense of place and materiality, or if it will provide future architects the tools to reconcile communication environments and physical space.
series ASCAAD
email hkhairy@archcairo.org
last changed 2007/04/08 17:47

_id ddssar9601
id ddssar9601
authors Achten, H.H., Bax, M.F.Th. and Oxman, R.M.
year 1996
title Generic Representations and the Generic Grid: Knowledge Interface, Organisation and Support of the (early) Design Process
source Timmermans, Harry (Ed.), Third Design and Decision Support Systems in Architecture and Urban Planning - Part one: Architecture Proceedings (Spa, Belgium), August 18-21, 1996
summary Computer Aided Design requires the implementation of architectural issues in order to support the architectural design process. These issues consist of elements, knowledge structures, and design processes that are typical for architectural design. The paper introduces two concepts that aim to define and model some of such architectural issues: building types and design processes. The first concept, the Generic grid, will be shown to structure the description of designs, provide a form-based hierarchical decomposition of design elements, and to provide conditions to accommodate concurrent design processes. The second concept, the Generic representation, models generic and typological knowledge of building types through the use of graphic representations with specific knowledge contents. The paper discusses both concepts and will show the potential of implementing Generic representations on the basis of the Generic grid in CAAD systems.
series DDSS
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 2dbc
authors Achten, Henri
year 1996
title Teaching Advanced Architectural Issues Through Principles of CAAD
source Education for Practice [14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2] Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, pp. 7-16
summary The paper discusses the differences between teaching CAAD by using standard software ("off-the-shelf"-software) and teaching the principles of CAAD ("principles-teaching"). The paper distinguishes four kinds of application for design systems in education: social systems, professional systems, educational systems, and innovative systems. The paper furthermore proposes to distinguish between computational issues and architectural issues relative to design systems. It appears that there is not a principled distinction between software-teaching and principles-teaching when it comes to computational issues of design systems. However, when the architectural content of CAAD systems is concerned, then principles of CAAD systems seem to be more appropriate for teaching. The paper presents work on generic representations as a specific case. Generic representations can be used to teach one particular kind of architectural content of design systems. The paper ends with conclusions.
series eCAADe
email h.h.achten@bwk.tue.nl
more http://www.ds.arch.tue.nl/
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 765f
authors Adam, Holger
year 2002
title Reinterpretation or replacement? The effects of the information and communication technologies on urban space
source CORP 2002, Vienna, pp. 345-349
summary The timid question “Virtual spaces or real places?” forms the core of many debates within the spatial sciences addressing theconsequences of the rapid development of information and communication technologies1 on existing spatial structures. So far several opinions rival each other for the interpretation of current and the prediction of future spatial developments. The spacelessness ofcomputer networks and the possibility to transmit data in real-time have lead visionaries to predict a far-reaching devaluation of timeand space, so questioning the future importance of traditional spatial structures: The “annihilation of distance and time constraints [incomputer networks] could undermine the very rationale for the existence of the city by dissolving the need for physical proximity”(Graham and Marvin 1996: 318). The disappearance of the city into the net, therefore, seems to become a distinct possibility.
series other
email h-adam@gmx.de
more www.corp.at
last changed 2003/11/21 14:15

_id 4b55
authors Af Klercker, J. , Ekholm, A. and Fridqvist, S. (Ed.)
year 1996
title Education for Practice [Conference Proceedings]
source 14th eCAADe Conference Proceedings / ISBN 0-9523687-2-2 / Lund (Sweden) 12-14 September 1996, 425 p.
summary There are many of us trying to make place for CAAD in a natural way in the Curriculum of the Architect school. We would like to make CAAD useful to the students already during their studies. Even if we have the support of our collegues for running courses there is very often no space in the timetable. And even if we have all the entusiasm of our students it is hard to practice your CAAD knowledge on projects where it is not asked for.

The education of architects in the use of computers has lead me to try to find "the roots of education of architects" in general. A collegue of mine in a bookshelf of course litterature in Informatics found and put into my hands "Educating the reflective practitioner" by Donald Schön. It lead to an interesting process of personal reflection and discussion within our CAAD team.

We think by the way that the theme of the conference points to the heart of the message in Donald Schöns book and we are inviting him as a key note speaker at the Conference.

series eCAADe
type normal paper
email jonas.af_klercker@caad.lth.se, anders.ekholm@caad.lth.se, sverker.fridqvist@caad.lth.se
more http://www.caad.lth.se/ECAADE/
last changed 2007/01/21 13:05

For more results click below:

this is page 0show page 1show page 2show page 3show page 4show page 5... show page 24HOMELOGIN (you are user _anon_132660 from group guest) CUMINCAD Papers Powered by SciX Open Publishing Services 1.002